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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 196)

Buttigieg calls for Dem unity following strong showing in New Hampshire primary

Westlake Legal Group image Buttigieg calls for Dem unity following strong showing in New Hampshire primary fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc b73e8096-6527-560e-8828-3d9a3231bad7 article Andrew O'Reilly

Pete Buttigieg celebrated on Tuesday night after emerging as a close second in New Hampshire’s Democratic primary – and pulling in the same number of delegates as the winner, Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont.

Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., continued his primary success streak Tuesday after narrowly pulling in the most delegates in last week’s controversial Iowa caucuses.

“Here in a state that goes by the motto ‘live free or die,’ you made up your own mind,” Buttigieg said to supporters Tuesday night inside the gymnasium of Nashua Community College. “You asserted your famous independent streak and, thanks to you, a campaign that some people said shouldn’t be here at all showed that we’re here to stay.”

WARREN CAMPAIGN MEMO OUTLINES PATH TO VICTORY IN DEMS’ ‘FRACTURED’ NOMINATING PROCESS

The New Hampshire vote made clear that the early days of the Democratic contest will be a battle largely between two men who are four decades apart in age and are ideological opposites.

Sanders is a leading progressive voice, calling for a substantial government intervention in health care and other sectors of the economy. Buttigieg has pressed for more incremental changes, giving Americans the option of retaining their private health insurance and making a point of appealing to Republicans and independents who may be dissatisfied with President Trump.

Echoing the remarks of one of his primary rivals, Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, from earlier in the evening, Buttigieg spent his time on stage pushing for unity among Democrats, while attacking Trump’s policies on issues ranging from Medicare to foreign policy.

“We are on the same team,” Buttigieg said after congratulating Sanders on his victory in the Granite State.

DAGEN MCDOWELL: WHY AREN’T 2020 DEMOCRATS GOING AFTER PETE BUTTIGIEG’S ‘BLATANT FAILURES’ AS MAYOR?

Buttigieg added: “This is our chance, our only chance, not just to end the era of Donald Trump, but to start the era that comes next…We cannot miss the mark.”

Buttigieg’s comments come following a week where he faced the harshest criticism he’s yet received from his Democratic rivals, with former Vice President Joe Biden releasing a scathing television ad slamming the former South Bend mayor’s lack of experience and in a later interview,  calling into question Buttigieg’s appeal among African American voters.

Sanders went after Buttigieg during last Friday’s debate for taking contributions from the very wealthy and suggesting he won’t stand up to “Wall Street tycoons” or “the corporate elite.” And despite her call for unity on Tuesday evening, Warren echoed Sanders’ comments during an interview on ABC’s “This Week” where she said that “the coalition of billionaires is not exactly what’s going to carry us over the top.”

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His strong showing in Iowa and New Hampshire – and the volley of criticism that comes with his rise – will now follow Buttigieg as he moves on his campaign to Nevada and South Carolina – the two early voting states with a dramatically more racially diverse population than Iowa and New Hampshire. Biden is hoping to draw in his support among black voters to pull off his first primary win in South Carolina, while Sanders hopes his appeal with Latino voters will help him carry Nevada’s caucuses.

Buttigieg, however, seemed to be already looking ahead to the next primary states, telling supporters Tuesday evening that his campaign is ready to “welcome new allies.”

“Our campaign moves on to Nevada, to South Carolina, to communities across our country,” he said. “And we will welcome new allies to our movement at every step.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group image Buttigieg calls for Dem unity following strong showing in New Hampshire primary fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc b73e8096-6527-560e-8828-3d9a3231bad7 article Andrew O'Reilly   Westlake Legal Group image Buttigieg calls for Dem unity following strong showing in New Hampshire primary fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc b73e8096-6527-560e-8828-3d9a3231bad7 article Andrew O'Reilly

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Bernie Sanders Is The Front-Runner For Democratic Nomination

Westlake Legal Group 5e435cab2100003100e8a2bc Bernie Sanders Is The Front-Runner For Democratic Nomination

MANCHESTER, N.H. ― Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) is the front-runner for the Democratic Party’s nomination to challenge Republican President Donald Trump in November.

Sanders, with a win Tuesday night in New Hampshire and a contested victory in Iowa under his belt, is in the strongest position to seize the nomination at the Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee in July, clearly separating himself from former Vice President Joe Biden, former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.). He is also the candidate in the field with the second-greatest resources ― in the form of money, staffers and volunteers ― to power his efforts as the campaign continues.

His strongest potential rivals ― Biden and Warren ― are struggling, and the moderate candidates elevated by the nearly universally white electorates in the first two primary states have demonstrated almost no ability to appeal to the more diverse electorates casting ballots in Nevada, South Carolina and in a host of states on Super Tuesday, on March 3. 

In a crowded field, Sanders ― a democratic socialist who long declined to officially join the Democratic Party and is running on a platform of Medicare For All, a massive infrastructure program to combat climate change and a $15 minimum wage ― is assembling a diverse coalition beyond his base of the youngest and most liberal Democratic primary voters, according to public polling.

“We are putting together an unprecedented multicultural, multigenerational political movement,” Sanders told a roaring crowd here at the Southern New Hampshire University Fieldhouse.

A Quinnipiac University poll found him leading the field among “somewhat liberal voters” and placing third among Democrats who considered themselves “moderate or conservative.” He is third among Black voters. Among white voters without a college degree, he has a large lead and is essentially tied for the lead among college-educated white voters. Though the poll does not break out Latino voters, other surveys show him as one of the top two candidates competing for their votes.

There are still ways the party’s moderate wing could attempt to stop Sanders, and there are weaknesses in his coalition. In the Quinnipiac poll, Sanders is the only candidate with a significant gender gap: He has the support of 32% of men and just 20% of women. And the oldest voters in the field remain resistant to him: His support among voters ages 18 to 34 is nearly seven times greater than his support among voters older than 65. Women make up the majority of the Democratic primary electorate, and the oldest voters turn out at the most reliable levels.

And though Sanders won the most votes in Iowa, Democratic Majority for Israel, a pro-Israel group whose affiliated super PAC ran ads attacking him, asserted that their ad, which questioned Sanders’s electability and health, provided a blueprint for stopping his momentum, noting he performed much worse among voters who decided late.

Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who has already spent more than $300 million of his own money on the election, obviously dwarfs the financial resources of Sanders. But no other candidate comes close. That will provide Sanders with a potentially key advantage as the race moves into more expensive states, including California, Texas, Massachusetts and Virginia, on Super Tuesday.

Sanders’s other rivals at the moment ― Klobuchar and Buttigieg ― are both poorly positioned to capitalize on Biden’s struggles. Buttigieg, despite months in the national spotlight, is still polling in the single digits among Black voters. Quinnipiac’s poll didn’t find a single Black supporter for Klobuchar. 

Klobuchar may present a more significant threat than Buttigieg. Unlike Buttigieg, she is only now fully entering the national spotlight, and primary voters who have been following the race only casually could discover her in the coming days. While her fundraising so far has paled in comparison to Buttigieg and Sanders, she has raised $4.5 million in the days since Friday night’s Democratic primary debate. Her campaign plans to deploy additional staffers to Nevada, South Carolina and key Super Tuesday states.

But if the race does turn into a showdown between Bloomberg and Sanders, there’s evidence most Democratic voters would lean in Sanders’s direction. He’s the top second choice of Warren supporters and is essentially tied with Bloomberg as the top second choice of Biden supporters, according to Quinnipiac’s poll. And Democrats’ views of Sanders ― 76% view him favorably, while just 18% have a negative opinion ― are more positive than those of Bloomberg. Just 58% have a positive opinion of the former mayor.

And on the key questions that Democratic primary voters are weighing, Sanders performs well. He’s the candidate most trusted on health care, the No. 1 issue for both primary and general election voters. Despite moderate Democrats’ worries about his ability to win over swing voters, most Democrats believe he is capable of beating Trump ― and public polling on a Sanders vs. Trump race backs them up. 

“This victory is the beginning of the end for Donald Trump,” Sanders told the crowd, who respond with a chant of “Bernie beats Trump! Bernie beats Trump!”

Front-runner status after two states does not guarantee a victory. Bloomberg’s money, or Klobuchar’s momentum or Biden’s deep ties to Black voters could all, in one way or another, prove too much for Sanders to overcome.

Even as Sanders was delivering his victory speech, another potential obstacle was appearing: A powerful union in Nevada, the next state to vote, was signaling opposition to his candidacy and his push for “Medicare for All.”

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Bernie Sanders Wins New Hampshire Democratic Primary

Westlake Legal Group 11nh-ledeall-sub-facebookJumbo Bernie Sanders Wins New Hampshire Democratic Primary Warren, Elizabeth United States Politics and Government Sanders, Bernard Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Klobuchar, Amy Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Bloomberg, Michael R Biden, Joseph R Jr Bennet, Michael Farrand

MANCHESTER, N.H. — Senator Bernie Sanders narrowly won the New Hampshire primary on Tuesday, consolidating support on the left and fending off a late charge by two moderate rivals to claim his second strong showing in two weeks and establish himself as a formidable contender for the Democratic nomination.

Mr. Sanders had about 26 percent of the vote with 80 percent of the ballots counted, while former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., was a close second. Mr. Buttigieg split the centrist vote with Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, who surged in New Hampshire to finish in third.

Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Mr. Sanders’s progressive rival finished a distant fourth in her neighboring state and, in a stinging blow to his candidacy, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. finished fifth.

The results raised immediate questions about how much longer Mr. Biden and Ms. Warren, onetime front-runners, could afford to continue their campaigns. Both had already cut back their advertising because of financial strain.

Mr. Sanders’s victory leveraged his own reliable strengths as the champion of a liberal agenda against a moment of turmoil in the party’s more moderate wing: With Mr. Biden tumbling and Mr. Buttigieg and Ms. Klobuchar striving to take his place, Mr. Sanders’s grip on progressives carried him to the top of the field in both Iowa and New Hampshire.

But in both states, he captured less than 30 percent of the vote and, coupled with the abrupt ascents of Mr. Buttigieg and Ms. Klobuchar, his modest success only underscored the churning uncertainty of the race and raised the prospect of a drawn-out nominating process that could last through the spring.

“This victory here is the beginning of the end for Donald Trump,” Mr. Sanders told jubilant supporter in Manchester, N.H., claiming “a great victory” even before the final results were in. And looking toward Nevada and South Carolina, the next two states to vote, he vowed he would “win those states, as well.”

The rise of Mr. Sanders, a democratic socialist from Vermont who remains a political independent, has distressed many centrists and traditional liberals at a time when Democratic voters are united by a ravenous desire to defeat President Trump. With Mr. Trump acting triumphant after his acquittal of impeachment charges, and with the chaotic vote-counting in Iowa and the fractured field making Democrats anxious, many in the party are worried that they are endangering their opportunity to win back the White House.

Yet for Mr. Sanders, 78, winning here and cementing his status as a front-runner represented a moment of redemption just four months after he had a heart attack that threatened his candidacy, and four years after he lost the Democratic nomination after a long and often bitter primary race.

While he has not demonstrated a capacity to expand his appeal to moderate Democrats, Mr. Sanders is benefiting from something he lacked in 2016: a field of opponents who are dividing moderate voters. The centrist candidates, so far, have been unable to consolidate support.

Mr. Buttigieg and Ms. Klobuchar asserted themselves on Tuesday, and their rivalry may only intensify; Mr. Biden is fading but staying in the race; and the self-funding Michael R. Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York City, is gaining strength in advance of the Super Tuesday contests next month.

As he did in Iowa, Mr. Buttigieg gave a triumphant speech that cast himself as a victor, though Mr. Sanders was still ahead by about 4,000 votes when Mr. Buttigieg took the stage. He used the moment to claim vindication from the most persistent attack leveled against him over the last week, chiefly by Mr. Biden and Ms. Klobuchar: that he lacked the résumé to be president.

New Hampshire voters, Mr. Buttigieg said, had concluded “a middle-class mayor and a veteran from the industrial Midwest was the right choice to take on this president, not in spite of that experience, but because of it.”

Without naming Mr. Sanders, he urged voters to reject a political approach that demanded revolution or nothing. Mr. Buttigieg also subtly underscored the generational gulf between him and Mr. Sanders, which could become a major theme of their rivalry. “I admired Mr. Sanders when I was a high school student,” Mr. Buttigieg said. “I respect him greatly to this day.”

Helping Mr. Sanders just as much is the decline of Ms. Warren, whose setback in New Hampshire may allow Mr. Sanders to further coalesce the party’s left-wing voters.

Taking the stage before even half the votes were counted, but with her dismal finish clear, Ms. Warren sought to cast herself as a candidate who could unify the party’s factions and warned against a “long bitter rehash” of the center-vs.-left tensions that plagued Democrats in 2016.

“Harsh tactics might work if you’re willing to burn down the party, in order to be the last man standing,” she said.

The night was even more damaging to Mr. Biden, who was already reeling from his fourth-place finish in Iowa. Anticipating a poor showing, Mr. Biden left New Hampshire on Tuesday and headed to South Carolina, a state he hopes can salvage his candidacy.

Trying to change the subject as Ms. Warren did, Mr. Biden appeared at a rally in Columbia, S.C., replete with a gospel choir, and sought to contrast the heavily white electorates in Iowa and New Hampshire with those of the more diverse Nevada and South Carolina, the next states to vote.

”We haven’t heard from the most committed constituency of the Democratic Party, the African-American community, and the fastest-growing segment of society, the Latino community,” he said.

But there are signs that some black voters are exploring other options, most of all Mr. Bloomberg and Tom Steyer, another self-funding billionaire who has focused much of his effort on South Carolina.

Propelled by overwhelming support from young voters, Mr. Sanders got a lift in New Hampshire from an electorate that, like Iowa’s, is fractured along ideological and generational lines. He is the overwhelming favorite of younger and more progressive Democrats, while his rivals are dividing older and more moderate voters.

But Mr. Buttigieg and Ms. Klobuchar still roared into contention on Tuesday, thanks to a late migration of voters who said they had just made up their minds.

Mr. Buttigieg, 38, benefited from his virtual tie with Mr. Sanders in Iowa last week and steadily gained support as Mr. Biden declined in the week leading up to the primary here.

Ms. Klobuchar’s surge was even more sudden. After a lackluster finish in Iowa, the third-term Minnesota senator harnessed a standout debate performance on Friday to gain momentum and emerge as the unexpected story of New Hampshire, a state famous for springing electoral surprises.

Addressing supporters in Concord, N.H., long before the race was called, Ms. Klobuchar opened with a salutation that nodded to her relatively unknown status with most voters: “Hello, America,” she said. “I’m Amy Klobuchar and I will beat Donald Trump.”

And she seized the moment to make the case for her own electability that doubled as a plea for political moderation. “Donald Trump’s worst nightmare,” Ms. Klobuchar said, “is that the people in the middle, the people that have had enough of the name-calling and the mudslinging, have someone to vote for in November.”

Another factor weighs heavily in Mr. Sanders’s favor: money. Besides Mr. Steyer, Mr. Sanders is the only candidate who has raised enough money to finance a robust advertising and get-out-the-vote effort in Nevada and South Carolina, which vote this month, as well as in the 15 states and territories that all vote on March 3.

His campaign announced it had raised $25 million in January, and even before polls closed on Tuesday said it had already received 600,000 contributions in the first nine days of February.

In a number of the important March primary states, including California, early and mail-in voting will have been underway for weeks by the time Super Tuesday arrives, potentially giving a head start to any candidate who is ahead of the pack in the middle of February and disadvantaging those Democrats counting on a late-breaking shift in their direction.

As promising as this moment may appear, Mr. Sanders still faces daunting obstacles. Most notably, he has not yet demonstrated an ability to build a broader coalition beyond his loyal faction of progressives.

His 26 percent of the vote in New Hampshire was less than half of what he drew here in 2016, and he received only slightly more than a quarter of the vote in Iowa. Even if his center-left opponents continue to split voters, they still may deny him the delegate majority he needs to claim the nomination because Democrats do not have winner-take-all contests.

Each of Mr. Sanders’s top New Hampshire rivals insisted on Tuesday that they were forging ahead.

But the Nevada caucuses, which take place a week from Saturday, could winnow Mr. Sanders’s opposition.

Mr. Biden had been his most formidable candidate in Nevada, at least according to polls taken before Iowa and New Hampshire. But with 10 days before Nevada votes, Mr. Buttigieg, and Ms. Klobuchar may prove stronger after their success in New Hampshire.

For both of them, Nevada represents the first test of their abilities to build support from racial minorities, something they did not have to do in the first two, heavily white states. Each of them scrambled to start airing television ads in the state this week. A more significant challenge for Mr. Sanders may await on Super Tuesday, which takes place just three days after South Carolina’s primary on Feb. 29: Mr. Bloomberg, who did not compete in the first nominating states, has used his wealth to saturate the states voting that day with more than $300 million on advertising and organizing. Polls show the former New York mayor rising nationally and also in some of the Super Tuesday contests, in part because no one besides him, Mr. Sanders and Mr. Steyer has been able to buy commercials in those states.

The New Hampshire results on Tuesday further thinned the field, as Senator Michael Bennet of Colorado, who never gained traction, and the entrepreneur Andrew Yang, who emerged from obscurity and qualified for a number of debates, dropped out after poor showings.

On the moderate side of the party, Mr. Biden’s apparent weakness has sent many of his voters scattering to other candidates.

In addition to Mr. Buttigieg, who has risen quickly in national polls, Ms. Klobuchar has appeared to pick up some of Mr. Biden’s supporters, and so has Mr. Bloomberg.

The central question for Democrats on the center-left is whether Mr. Biden can regain traction in the race or whether his support is likely to crumble after another poor showing in New Hampshire — and, after falling short again, whether any of the remaining moderates can sweep up the bulk of those votes.

Within the progressive wing of the party, the shape of the race seems clearer. Mr. Sanders is widely seen as having a good chance to win the Nevada caucuses, and the strength and enthusiasm of his national following may give him an upper hand on Super Tuesday over a diffuse field of rivals on the center-left.

Yet there are deep doubts across much of the party about his ability to win the general election. It is unclear whether he will be able to ease those concerns in time to take control of the race during the big-state primaries in March. For him to do that, Mr. Sanders would have to more fully sideline Ms. Warren, who still has a sizable bloc of support on the national level, and do more to chip away at moderate resistance to his candidacy.

So far, Mr. Sanders has mainly been focused on driving up turnout within his progressive base — a sufficient approach in the earliest primary states, but perhaps not enough to secure the nomination.

If Democratic voters remain in an indecisive mood, there may still be several more shifts in momentum before the end of the month.

Stephanie Saul contributed from Columbia, S.C.

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Media spotlight surging Klobuchar as Sanders leads in NH

Westlake Legal Group image Media spotlight surging Klobuchar as Sanders leads in NH Howard Kurtz fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc e74cb4fb-3e46-57fe-8d2e-3cca8658085c article

The biggest winner in the New Hampshire primary may not be the guy who actually wins it.

Bernie Sanders is projected to have captured the state, as he was expected to do, but in media terms, as expected isn’t an exciting story.

In terms of the punditocracy, Amy Klobuchar is the white-hot story of the moment. Pete Buttigieg remains a sizzling media narrative, but Klobuchar is the breakout star.

BIDEN BAILS: FORMER VP LEAVES NEW HAMPSHIRE EARLY, ABANDONING ELECTION NIGHT PARTY

The results, of course, are being viewed through the prism of expectations. A third-place finish that might be lackluster for someone else is a leap into the top tier for Amy Klobuchar, who has surged since an impressive performance in Friday’s ABC debate. A strong second-place showing for Buttigieg is equally remarkable, given that the 38-year-old started with no money or name recognition—but his expectations were rather high after earlier polls showed him neck and neck with Sanders.

Buttigieg told supporters that “a campaign that some said shouldn’t be here at all has shown that we are here to stay.”

Sanders, by contrast, was always on a glide path to victory in the state just east of Vermont, a state which he easily won in 2016. It would still be a highly significant accomplishment for a democratic socialist after essentially tying in Iowa, despite the party’s deep doubts that Bernie would be a strong nominee.

Some results are beyond spinning, and that’s the case for Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren.

For the former vice president, who has been the national front-runner for a year, to apparently sink to fifth place, after a fourth-place flop in Iowa, is a colossal failure. That’s especially true for a candidate who has been at the heart of the impeachment drama, who has been using electability as his main calling card.

New Hampshire is a place where a candidate who shows heart can mount a comeback. Gary Hart did it with a 1984 win, Bill Clinton did it with a second-place finish in 1992, and his wife did it after a tearful coffee-shop moment in 2008. But Biden didn’t find his voice and didn’t break through. Put another way, he’s badly lost two straight contests to a man whose biggest job was governing a town of 100,000. He leaves New Hampshire with no delegates.

BLOOMBERG DISCUSSES THROWING MINORITY KIDS UP AGAINST THE WALL IN RESURFACED AUDIO

Yes, two small, predominantly white states were never a great fit for Biden. Yes, he has had—at least until now—far more African-American support than his rivals. He talked about the importance of black support again and again during his speech in South Carolina, his supposed firewall.

But Biden has dug himself a very deep hole, with even some of those who like Joe concluding he is past his prime.

A few short months ago, Warren was vying for the national lead. But she has been steadily dropping, and to apparently finish a distant fourth in a state partially blanketed by the Boston media market is a major-league miss. Maybe her stumble over Medicare for All, and tendency to disappear at debates, allowed Sanders to consolidate his progressive support. Many reporters have expressed amazement that Warren stubbornly stuck to her script, wouldn’t attack her friend Bernie, instead promoting herself as the unity candidate. She too gets zero delegates.

AWKWARD: VOTER TELLS MSNBC THAT UNFAIR COVERAGE TO SANDERS IMPACTED HER VOTE

In my view, the media are making Klobuchar the unofficial New Hampshire winner. She has good relations with the press—funny and down-to-earth—and is an experienced senator. She’s from the Midwest and doesn’t make many enemies. Some conservative pundits like her because she may be the most moderate of the Democratic liberals. And since Klobuchar often seemed teetering on the edge of elimination, she’s the surprise of the week.

Buttigieg, of course, was the guy with momentum last week, even with the Iowa fiasco delaying his moment. So after days of showering Mayor Pete with positive headlines, the press is looking for a brand-new story. And it doesn’t hurt that with Warren struggling and Andrew Yang dropping out, the Minnesota senator is the only woman credibly challenging the white guys at the top.

In her New Hampshire speech she jabbed the media for predicting her early demise. “Everyone had counted us out, even a week ago—thank you, pundits,” the senator said. She’s one of those politicians who genuinely seems to enjoy campaigning.

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The downside for Klobuchar: her shoestring campaign has little organization in Nevada and South Carolina, and the Super Tuesday states are a whole different kind of challenge. She has yet to demonstrate significant black support. And, as has started to happen with Buttigieg, she’ll find tougher media scrutiny in the national spotlight.

The Biden slide has sparked new interest in Mike Bloomberg, who has skipped the first four contests while dropping more than $200 million on an ad-driven campaign. The main reason the former New York mayor got in the race was the perception that Biden was weak and Sanders needed to be stopped. The billionaire has baggage, of course, but his long-shot gamble is looking a little more plausible as he climbs in the national polls.

The other big winner, I suppose, is the country, since we actually got timely results, just like in a normal primary.

Westlake Legal Group image Media spotlight surging Klobuchar as Sanders leads in NH Howard Kurtz fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc e74cb4fb-3e46-57fe-8d2e-3cca8658085c article   Westlake Legal Group image Media spotlight surging Klobuchar as Sanders leads in NH Howard Kurtz fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc e74cb4fb-3e46-57fe-8d2e-3cca8658085c article

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Sean Hannity blasts Bloomberg ‘stop and frisk’ comments: ‘It’s alarming, it’s revealing’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096898958001_6096890350001-vs Sean Hannity blasts Bloomberg 'stop and frisk' comments: 'It's alarming, it's revealing' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc bf9e8814-43f2-5399-a05d-e95a33741772 article

Sean Hannity ripped Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg after audio of him defending “stop and frisk” and making other controversial comments about minorities resurfaced this week.

“It’s alarming. It’s revealing,” Hannity said Tuesday on his television program. “In fact, it is so bad some in his own party are now accusing him of actually being a racist.”

MICHAEL MOORE SLAMS ‘DISGUSTING’ DNC FOR CLEARING DEBATE PATH FOR BLOOMBERG: ‘BECAUSE HE HAS A BILLION F—ING DOLLARS!’

In an audio clip of the 2015 speech Bloomberg gave to the Aspen Institute, the billionaire acknowledged that “stop and frisk” targeted minority “kids” whom cops must throw “up against the wall” to disarm. The Aspen Times reported at the time that Bloomberg representatives asked the Institute not to distribute footage of his appearance.

“Ninety-five percent of murders- murderers and murder victims fit one M.O. You can just take a description, Xerox it, and pass it out to all the cops,” he said. “They are male, minorities, [aged] 16-25. That’s true in New York, that’s true in virtually every city … And that’s where the real crime is. You’ve got to get the guns out of the hands of people that are getting killed.”

Hannity blasted the billionaire for his comments.

“I can tell you that it is a fact that people of all races commit crimes in New York and New York City specifically, but apparently not, according to Bloomberg,” Hannity said. “Is this not the definitive definition of … racial profiling?”

The host then ripped Democrats for using identity politics as a tactic.

“As you can see, the Democratic Party, well, they really seem to only care about race, gender when they can use it to club their opponents,” Hannity said. “For them, it seems to be nothing more than a sad, divisive, predictable political tactic. Year after year after year.”

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Hannity commended President Trump for his unifying message and for his policies and their impact on minorities.

“That’s the kind of hope and change that Democrats constantly promised,” Hannity said. “But it was President Trump that actually delivered that.”

Fox News’ Joseph A. Wulfsohn contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096898958001_6096890350001-vs Sean Hannity blasts Bloomberg 'stop and frisk' comments: 'It's alarming, it's revealing' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc bf9e8814-43f2-5399-a05d-e95a33741772 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096898958001_6096890350001-vs Sean Hannity blasts Bloomberg 'stop and frisk' comments: 'It's alarming, it's revealing' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc bf9e8814-43f2-5399-a05d-e95a33741772 article

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Media spotlight surging Klobuchar as Sanders leads in NH

Westlake Legal Group image Media spotlight surging Klobuchar as Sanders leads in NH Howard Kurtz fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc e74cb4fb-3e46-57fe-8d2e-3cca8658085c article

The biggest winner in the New Hampshire primary may not be the guy who actually wins it.

Bernie Sanders is projected to have captured the state, as he was expected to do, but in media terms, as expected isn’t an exciting story.

In terms of the punditocracy, Amy Klobuchar is the white-hot story of the moment. Pete Buttigieg remains a sizzling media narrative, but Klobuchar is the breakout star.

BIDEN BAILS: FORMER VP LEAVES NEW HAMPSHIRE EARLY, ABANDONING ELECTION NIGHT PARTY

The results, of course, are being viewed through the prism of expectations. A third-place finish that might be lackluster for someone else is a leap into the top tier for Amy Klobuchar, who has surged since an impressive performance in Friday’s ABC debate. A strong second-place showing for Buttigieg is equally remarkable, given that the 38-year-old started with no money or name recognition—but his expectations were rather high after earlier polls showed him neck and neck with Sanders.

Buttigieg told supporters that “a campaign that some said shouldn’t be here at all has shown that we are here to stay.”

Sanders, by contrast, was always on a glide path to victory in the state just east of Vermont, a state which he easily won in 2016. It would still be a highly significant accomplishment for a democratic socialist after essentially tying in Iowa, despite the party’s deep doubts that Bernie would be a strong nominee.

Some results are beyond spinning, and that’s the case for Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren.

For the former vice president, who has been the national front-runner for a year, to apparently sink to fifth place, after a fourth-place flop in Iowa, is a colossal failure. That’s especially true for a candidate who has been at the heart of the impeachment drama, who has been using electability as his main calling card.

New Hampshire is a place where a candidate who shows heart can mount a comeback. Gary Hart did it with a 1984 win, Bill Clinton did it with a second-place finish in 1992, and his wife did it after a tearful coffee-shop moment in 2008. But Biden didn’t find his voice and didn’t break through. Put another way, he’s badly lost two straight contests to a man whose biggest job was governing a town of 100,000. He leaves New Hampshire with no delegates.

BLOOMBERG DISCUSSES THROWING MINORITY KIDS UP AGAINST THE WALL IN RESURFACED AUDIO

Yes, two small, predominantly white states were never a great fit for Biden. Yes, he has had—at least until now—far more African-American support than his rivals. He talked about the importance of black support again and again during his speech in South Carolina, his supposed firewall.

But Biden has dug himself a very deep hole, with even some of those who like Joe concluding he is past his prime.

A few short months ago, Warren was vying for the national lead. But she has been steadily dropping, and to apparently finish a distant fourth in a state partially blanketed by the Boston media market is a major-league miss. Maybe her stumble over Medicare for All, and tendency to disappear at debates, allowed Sanders to consolidate his progressive support. Many reporters have expressed amazement that Warren stubbornly stuck to her script, wouldn’t attack her friend Bernie, instead promoting herself as the unity candidate. She too gets zero delegates.

AWKWARD: VOTER TELLS MSNBC THAT UNFAIR COVERAGE TO SANDERS IMPACTED HER VOTE

In my view, the media are making Klobuchar the unofficial New Hampshire winner. She has good relations with the press—funny and down-to-earth—and is an experienced senator. She’s from the Midwest and doesn’t make many enemies. Some conservative pundits like her because she may be the most moderate of the Democratic liberals. And since Klobuchar often seemed teetering on the edge of elimination, she’s the surprise of the week.

Buttigieg, of course, was the guy with momentum last week, even with the Iowa fiasco delaying his moment. So after days of showering Mayor Pete with positive headlines, the press is looking for a brand-new story. And it doesn’t hurt that with Warren struggling and Andrew Yang dropping out, the Minnesota senator is the only woman credibly challenging the white guys at the top.

In her New Hampshire speech she jabbed the media for predicting her early demise. “Everyone had counted us out, even a week ago—thank you, pundits,” the senator said. She’s one of those politicians who genuinely seems to enjoy campaigning.

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The downside for Klobuchar: her shoestring campaign has little organization in Nevada and South Carolina, and the Super Tuesday states are a whole different kind of challenge. She has yet to demonstrate significant black support. And, as has started to happen with Buttigieg, she’ll find tougher media scrutiny in the national spotlight.

The Biden slide has sparked new interest in Mike Bloomberg, who has skipped the first four contests while dropping more than $200 million on an ad-driven campaign. The main reason the former New York mayor got in the race was the perception that Biden was weak and Sanders needed to be stopped. The billionaire has baggage, of course, but his long-shot gamble is looking a little more plausible as he climbs in the national polls.

The other big winner, I suppose, is the country, since we actually got timely results, just like in a normal primary.

Westlake Legal Group image Media spotlight surging Klobuchar as Sanders leads in NH Howard Kurtz fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc e74cb4fb-3e46-57fe-8d2e-3cca8658085c article   Westlake Legal Group image Media spotlight surging Klobuchar as Sanders leads in NH Howard Kurtz fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc e74cb4fb-3e46-57fe-8d2e-3cca8658085c article

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Bernie Sanders Is The Projected Winner Of The New Hampshire Democratic Primary

Westlake Legal Group 5e38b8ac270000130138b1df Bernie Sanders Is The Projected Winner Of The New Hampshire Democratic Primary

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) is the projected winner of New Hampshire’s Democratic primary, according to NBC News and ABC News.

His victory in the Granite State, combined with his strong showing in the chaotic Iowa caucuses, places him as the front-runner in the Democratic presidential race. 

“The reason that we won tonight in New Hampshire … is because of the hard work of so many volunteers, and let me say tonight that this victory here is the beginning of the end for Donald Trump,” Sanders told supporters in Manchester.

Former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg appeared headed for a second-place finish, with Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) in third and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and former Vice President Joe Biden trailing behind. 

This marks the first big win in the 2020 Democratic race after the Iowa caucuses devolved into chaos last week. Iowa residents are the first to cast votes for a nominee, but it took days for party leaders to declare a victor after discovering there were significant problems with the app they were using to report caucus results. 

Though the Iowa Democratic Party eventually declared former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg the winner, both he and Sanders requested a recanvass of the results Monday. The Associated Press did not declare a winner in that race.

The results of the first two states have thrown the race into a tailspin, with front-runners dropping and lower-tier candidates surging.

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Lara Trump: The New Hampshire primary has made the Democratic Party ‘very nervous’

Westlake Legal Group ac8f1ca1-Video-15 Lara Trump: The New Hampshire primary has made the Democratic Party 'very nervous' fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning/trump-2020-campaign fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 6cbb80a3-bd7d-5eab-a0af-b1f7c1fc18e4

Trump 2020 campaign adviser Lara Trump said the results from Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary should make the Democrats very nervous ahead of their November showdown with President Trump.

Ms. Trump told “Hannity” that former Vice President Joe Biden’s bid has taken a massive hit as he has now failed to reach the top three in both New Hampshire and Iowa.

Meanwhile, the campaign of Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., goes from strength to strength, drawing massive crowds and recording top-two finishes in the early-state contests.

She noted Sanders is a “self-declared socialist” and that fact alone frightens the party establishment who are looking for a candidate with more crossover appeal.

“This is who was at the top of the Democratic Party right now. And I think it is probably making the establishment folks in the Democratic Party very, very nervous,” she added.

“They know the only energy behind Bernie Sanders is on the very, very far radical end of their base there.”

Trump said Sanders’ campaign is a hard “sell” to moderates who do not want radical change to the American system — and contrasted that with the GOP unity around her father-in-law.

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She went on to cite figures from the president’s Monday rally in the Granite State, for which 52,000 people RSVP’d. She said one-quarter of those people were registered Democrats and just about one-sixth did not vote in 2016.

“So, I think the Democrats are probably getting really nervous seeing these results come in,” she told host Sean Hannity. “I think the Democrats are probably very, very worried about the base of their party and their future going forward. I sure would be.”

Westlake Legal Group ac8f1ca1-Video-15 Lara Trump: The New Hampshire primary has made the Democratic Party 'very nervous' fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning/trump-2020-campaign fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 6cbb80a3-bd7d-5eab-a0af-b1f7c1fc18e4   Westlake Legal Group ac8f1ca1-Video-15 Lara Trump: The New Hampshire primary has made the Democratic Party 'very nervous' fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning/trump-2020-campaign fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 6cbb80a3-bd7d-5eab-a0af-b1f7c1fc18e4

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Colbert Finds The Only Reason ‘Turd Man’ Trump’s America Isn’t A Banana Republic

Westlake Legal Group 5e43660e2100003000e8a2c4 Colbert Finds The Only Reason ‘Turd Man’ Trump’s America Isn’t A Banana Republic

“Late Show” host Stephen Colbert on Tuesday tore into the Justice Department’s decision to backtrack on sentencing recommendations for Roger Stone, the longtime confidant of President Donald Trump

Stone was convicted last year on charges that included witness tampering, lying to Congress and obstruction.

As Colbert noted, Stone was facing up to 50 years in prison. 

Prosecutors asked for seven to nine years, but Trump attacked the sentence request on Twitter as a “miscarriage of justice.”

In what Colbert mocked as an “impossible coincidence,” the Justice Department then said it would ask for a lighter sentence, prompting four prosecutors to withdraw from the case

“So, Donald Trump and his attorney general are using the Justice Department to go easy on his cronies,” Colbert said. “The only difference between this and a banana republic is that Trump does not eat fruit.” 

Then Colbert bestowed a savage new nickname on Trump:

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2020 New Hampshire Primary Discussion Live Thread – Part IV

I’ve been out of the loop apparently…Iowa dems are saying that even though there were errors on the count they can’t change them because that was the “legal” vote? Sanders has more voters on both 1st and 2nd vote but somehow gets less delegates from the state.

Cool. What the fuck are we doing…

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