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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 21)

Discussion Thread: Fifth Democratic Presidential Debate | 11/20/19 | 9:00 PM – 11:00 PM EST | Part II

Westlake Legal Group iiZakGK3YkOMgE8mwl1pWMhjn4OsYDanM_iQgvPJ_LY Discussion Thread: Fifth Democratic Presidential Debate | 11/20/19 | 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM EST | Part II r/politics

Ten candidates will be on stage Wednesday for the fifth Democratic presidential debate. That’s two fewer than were onstage for last month’s debate: former Congressman Beto O’Rourke dropped out and another candidate, former HUD Secretary Julián Castro, failed to hit the required polling levels. In order to qualify for this debate, candidates needed to achieve at least 3 percent in four approved polls or at least 5 percent in two early-state polls plus bring in donations from at least 165,000 unique donors.

The fifth Democratic debate is scheduled for Wednesday, November 20 and will be co-hosted by The Washington Post and MSNBC with all female moderators, including MSNBC anchors Rachel Maddow and Andrea Mitchell, NBC News White House correspondent Kristen Welker, and Washington Post White House reporter Ashley Parker. The debate will run from 9:00 to 11:00 PM EST.

The debate will air on MSNBC. It can also be streamed live on www.washingtonpost.com.

Candidates:

  • Former vice president Joe Biden

  • Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.)

  • South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg

  • Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii)

  • Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.)

  • Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.)

  • Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)

  • Tom Steyer

  • Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.)

  • Andrew Yang

Part I of the debate discussion thread

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Kamala Harris rips into Tulsi Gabbard for being an Assad apologist and Fox News regular who criticizes her own party

Westlake Legal Group K7YR-_XY43WZ7MSXFFD-eH9oZ3noUnXJeKTJ3RDVMXc Kamala Harris rips into Tulsi Gabbard for being an Assad apologist and Fox News regular who criticizes her own party r/politics

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Detroit officer killed, another wounded in shootout with suspect, police say

Westlake Legal Group detroit-police2 Detroit officer killed, another wounded in shootout with suspect, police say Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc da06f63a-309a-5de5-969f-0fa9f7e9b69b article

A Detroit police officer was shot and killed and another was wounded on Detroit’s west side Wednesday while they were responding to a home invasion, investigators said.

The officer who was shot in the neck and died was an 18-year veteran of the Detroit Police. The other wounded officer, a three-year veteran on the force, was shot in the leg. He was serious condition but conscious and able to move around.

The shooting unfolded around 7:30 p.m. and the suspect ultimately was arrested.

The two officers were responding to a home invasion in progress. As they arrived, people living in the home ran out frantically, saying an armed suspect was inside. The officers called for backup and more police arrived at the scene, Fox 2 Detroit reported.

AT LEAST 14 OFFICERS SUFFER SMOKE INHALATION, 8 RESIDENTS INJURED IN NEW YORK APARTMENT FIRE 

One of the officers was able to return gunfire and strike the suspect, who was transported to the hospital.

Detroit police chief James Craig said the suspect had a “lengthy” criminal history and recently was released from parole. Craig said the suspect was looking for his girlfriend in the home.

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Craig said the officer who died was “loved,” and 275 officers had come out to show their support that night. “Unfortunately I’ve been to a number of these, but this is probably the one where I’ve seen this number of officers come out and support.”

The officers’ names were not yet released, but will be in due time, Craig said.

Westlake Legal Group detroit-police2 Detroit officer killed, another wounded in shootout with suspect, police say Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc da06f63a-309a-5de5-969f-0fa9f7e9b69b article   Westlake Legal Group detroit-police2 Detroit officer killed, another wounded in shootout with suspect, police say Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc da06f63a-309a-5de5-969f-0fa9f7e9b69b article

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Gabbard accuses Harris of ‘lies and smears’ in fiery debate clash

Westlake Legal Group Gabbard-Harris_AP Gabbard accuses Harris of ‘lies and smears’ in fiery debate clash fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tulsi-gabbard fox-news/person/kamala-harris fox news fnc/politics fnc Brooke Singman article 3977a4ab-6cc6-5f5f-ac48-96fff2793ab8

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard accused Sen. Kamala Harris of “lies and smears and innuendos” during a fiery exchange at Wednesday night’s Democratic presidential primary debate, saying a Harris presidency would be more of the “status quo.”

The tense moment began when Gabbard, D-Hawaii, was asked about her attack last month on Hillary Clinton — the former secretary of state had suggested in an interview that Gabbard was a “favorite of the Russians.”

DEMS CLASH AT DEBATE OVER ‘DIVISIVE’ MEDICARE-FOR-ALL, PUSHED BY WARREN, SANDERS

“Our Democratic Party is not of or by the people,” Gabbard said, blasting the Democratic establishment. “I’m running for president to be the Democratic nominee that rebuilds our Democratic Party, and takes it out of their hands and truly puts it in the hands of the people in this country.”

She added, “And puts it in the hands of veterans and fellow Americans who are calling for an end to the Bush-Clinton-Trump foreign policy doctrine.”

Harris, D-Calif., chiming in, blasted Gabbard for spending years during the Obama administration criticizing his presidency.

“You spent four years, full time, on Fox News criticizing President Obama,” Harris fired back, adding that she has spent “the course of this campaign criticizing the Democratic Party.”

“What we need in November is someone on this stage who has the ability to win, someone who has the ability to go toe to toe with Donald Trump, and someone who has the ability to rebuild the Obama coalition and bring the country back together,” Harris said.

But Gabbard hit back.

“What Senator Harris is doing, is, unfortunately, continuing to traffic in lies and smears and innuendos because she cannot challenge the substance of the argument that I’m making,” Gabbard said. “Which makes me guess that she will, as president, continue with the status quo.”

Harris had the last word in the intense exchange, saying she believes “that what our nation needs right now is a nominee who can speak to all people,” and “someone who has the ability to unify the country and win the election.”

Wednesday night was not the first time Gabbard and Harris have sparred on the campaign trail.

During the Democratic primary debate in July, Gabbard attacked Harris over her prosecutorial record while serving as attorney general in California, and over her health care plan.

Westlake Legal Group Gabbard-Harris_AP Gabbard accuses Harris of ‘lies and smears’ in fiery debate clash fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tulsi-gabbard fox-news/person/kamala-harris fox news fnc/politics fnc Brooke Singman article 3977a4ab-6cc6-5f5f-ac48-96fff2793ab8   Westlake Legal Group Gabbard-Harris_AP Gabbard accuses Harris of ‘lies and smears’ in fiery debate clash fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tulsi-gabbard fox-news/person/kamala-harris fox news fnc/politics fnc Brooke Singman article 3977a4ab-6cc6-5f5f-ac48-96fff2793ab8

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Graham: DOJ watchdog’s FISA report will be released Dec. 9

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6103186992001_6103190541001-vs Graham: DOJ watchdog's FISA report will be released Dec. 9 fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/person/lindsey-graham fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 412aeec5-6c72-552d-936e-53eb2d4fd808

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., told Fox News Wednesday that Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz’s report on allegations of Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrant abuse during the 2016 election will be released on Dec. 9.

During an appearance on “Hannity” Wednesday, host Sean Hannity noted Horowitz will be coming before Graham’s committee on Dec. 11 to testify on the matter and went on to ask Graham not to allow a Friday night document “dump” that could muffle the coverage of the news.

In response, Graham smiled and nodded.

“It’ll be December 9th — you’ll get the report,” the South Carolina lawmaker said.

MICHAEL HOROWITZ: FINALIZING OF FISA PROBE REPORT ‘NEARING COMPLETION’

“That’s locked.”

Horowitz told congressional lawmakers in an October letter that his investigation and ensuing report were nearing their conclusion.

The “lengthy” draft report “concerns sensitive national security and law enforcement matters,” Horowitz wrote in the letter, adding that he anticipated “the final report will be released publicly with few redactions.”

Horowitz noted that he did not anticipate a need to prepare or issue “separate classified and public versions of the report.”

“After we receive the final classification markings from the Department and the FBI, we will then proceed with our usual process for preparing a final report, including ensuring that appropriate reviews occur for accuracy and comment purposes,” Horowitz wrote in the letter. “Once begun, we do not anticipate the time for that review to be lengthy.”

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Graham further broke news on “Hannity” when he confirmed he is sending a letter to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo requesting the transcripts of three phone calls the senator said then-Vice President Joe Biden had with then-Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko.

More from Media

Graham said the phone calls coincided with the timeframe in which a Ukrainian prosecutor, once praised for going after the head of natural gas company Burisma Holdings — a person Graham said was known as the “dirtiest guy in Ukraine” by one top American official — was fired.

Burisma was the company on which Hunter Biden, the son of the 2020 Democratic candidate, sat on the board.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“I want to know are there any transcripts or readouts of the phone calls between the vice president and the president of Ukraine in February [2016] after the raid on the gas company president’s house,” said Graham. “After this raid, Hunter Biden kicks in. Hunter Biden’s business partner meets with [then-Secretary of State] John Kerry and Vice President Biden on three occasions, [Biden] makes a phone call to the president of Ukraine and goes over there in March and they fire the guy.”

Graham added he found it “odd” that instead of lauding the Ukrainian prosecutor, Viktor Shokin, for investigating the Burisma chairman, he was instead relieved of his duties.

He said that in 2015, President Barack Obama’s ambassador to Ukraine, Geoffrey Pyatt, said in a speech he wanted Shokin to be more forceful in his investigation of domestic corruption.

“The one person he named as being a sleazebag was the president of Burisma,” Graham remarked.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6103186992001_6103190541001-vs Graham: DOJ watchdog's FISA report will be released Dec. 9 fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/person/lindsey-graham fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 412aeec5-6c72-552d-936e-53eb2d4fd808   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6103186992001_6103190541001-vs Graham: DOJ watchdog's FISA report will be released Dec. 9 fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/person/lindsey-graham fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 412aeec5-6c72-552d-936e-53eb2d4fd808

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National Book Awards Handed To Susan Choi, Arthur Sze And More

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1043894050_wide-24295ff44e004d55780ef5319ddf2b5038a0a0df-s1100-c15 National Book Awards Handed To Susan Choi, Arthur Sze And More

Winners of this year’s National Book Awards each receive $10,000 along with their prize. Priscila Zambotto/Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  National Book Awards Handed To Susan Choi, Arthur Sze And More

Winners of this year’s National Book Awards each receive $10,000 along with their prize.

Priscila Zambotto/Getty Images

More than 1,700 books began the autumn with a chance at winning a National Book Award. Now, after a swanky ceremony Wednesday night in Manhattan, the folks behind just five of those books have each emerged with a trophy, a purse of $10,000 and the right to slap that precious gold medallion on the front cover of their work.

The winners of the 70th annual National Book Awards are:

  • Fiction: Susan Choi’s Trust Exercise
  • Nonfiction: Sarah M. Broom’s The Yellow House
  • Poetry: Arthur Sze’s Sight Lines
  • Translated literature: Baron Wenckheim’s Homecoming, by László Krasznahorkai and translator Ottilie Mulzet
  • Young people’s literature: Martin W. Sandler’s 1919: The Year That Changed America

Want to see the full list of finalists too? Jump here.

Tonight’s winners joined a couple of honorees whose names were released earlier by the National Book Foundation. Oren J. Teicher, chief executive at the American Booksellers Association, won this year’s Literarian Award — a prize handed out for service to the wider literary community. And Edmund White won the medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, the National Book Awards’ version of a lifetime achievement award.

The 79-year-old White, a trailblazing gay writer, has enjoyed a vast and varied life on the page, tackling biography, fiction, memoir and plenty that trod the unstable boundaries in between. It’s partly that versatility that attracted the National Book Foundation to his work, according to a statement from David Steinberger, the chairman of the foundation’s board of directors.

Director John Waters, who has enjoyed an attention-grabbing career in his own right, explained it a bit differently on stage before handing White his award.

“Edmund White helped start the Gay Men’s Health Crisis in 1982. He’s an AIDS activist, an AIDS survivor and he still loves sex,” Waters said. “He’s written so many top-notch memoirs that My Struggle seems stingy in the details department. He’s pissed off Susan Sontag and Gore Vidal, and the world is a better place for it.”

White himself explained that the path he forged was rarely easy.

“When I started submitting novels in the pre-Stonewall 1960s, my gay subject matter was offensive — especially since I didn’t didn’t write about hustlers or criminals or drag queens, but rather about the middle-class guy sharing an office with you. The familiar is more threatening than the exotic,” he recalled. “Years later, various editors would tell me that they’d been moved by my submissions but hadn’t dared accept them lest their colleagues think they themselves were gay.”

“To go from being the most maligned to a highly lauded writer in a mere half-century is a stunning is astonishing indeed,” he added.

Of course, it would not be a National Book Awards ceremony without a rousing defense of literature’s place in society and its possibilities. For that, let’s turn to LeVar Burton, former host of Reading Rainbow and the evening’s emcee.

“My mother graduated from college at the age of 17, the first person in her family to go to college. For me to be a well-known literary advocate in this nation, a place where only a scant few generations ago it would have been illegal for me to read — it’s no small thing,” Burton said in his opening monologue.

Because, as he added, “it is the stories that we tell each other that define who we are, why we’re here, what our mission is in life. It is storytelling that holds our civilization together.”

The Finalists

Fiction

Nonfiction

Poetry

  • Jericho Brown, The Tradition
  • Toi Derricotte, “I”: New and Selected Poems
  • Ilya Kaminsky, Deaf Republic
  • Carmen Giménez Smith, Be Recorder
  • Arthur Sze, Sight Lines

Translated literature

  • Khaled Khalifa, Death Is Hard Work 
    Translated from Arabic by Leri Price
  • László Krasznahorkai, Baron Wenckheim’s Homecoming 
    Translated from Hungarian by Ottilie Mulzet
  • Scholastique Mukasonga, The Barefoot Woman 
    Translated from French by Jordan Stump
  • Yoko Ogawa, The Memory Police 
    Translated from Japanese by Stephen Snyder
  • Pajtim Statovci, Crossing
    Translated from Finnish by David Hackston

Young people’s literature

  • Akwaeke Emezi, Pet
  • Jason Reynolds, Look Both Ways: A Tale Told in Ten Blocks
  • Randy Ribay, Patron Saints of Nothing
  • Laura RubyThirteen Doorways, Wolves Behind Them All
  • Martin W. Sandler, 1919: The Year That Changed America

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Robert Pattinson says he ‘wouldn’t be acting’ if it wasn’t for ‘Harry Potter’

Robert Pattinson may be the next Batman, but his big break came from his role in the “Harry Potter” franchise.

Pattinson, now 33, dished on his role as Cedric Diggory in a recent visit to the podcast HFPA in Conversation.

Pattinson played a pivotal role in “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” which was released in 2005, and has only fond memories.

RUPERT GRINT RECALLS SEEING ‘SPARKS’ BETWEEN EMMA WATSON AND TOM FELTON ON ‘HARRY POTTER’ SET

“It was a really nice environment on ‘Harry Potter,'” he said. “Even compared to movies I’ve done since, it was very protective.”

He called the set a “very family-friendly environment,” noting that the child actors were treated very well.

Westlake Legal Group RT_RobertPattinson Robert Pattinson says he 'wouldn't be acting' if it wasn't for 'Harry Potter' Nate Day fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3bab2fda-7e4d-54c8-9551-501b7c7c71c8

Robert Pattinson is seen at the 70th Cannes Film Festival screening of the film “Good Time” in Cannes, France. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard

What sticks out most to him about the experience, however, was promoting the film on a press tour.

HALLE BERRY SPEAKS OUT AFTER BEING INJURED ON SET OF ‘BRUISED’ MOVIE

“I remember going to Tokyo for the first time and sitting in my room, looking out over the city and being like ‘How has this happened?'” Pattinson recalled on the podcast. “I really like that movie… I wouldn’t be acting if it wasn’t for that.

Pattinson is best known for playing Edward Cullen in the “Twilight” franchise alongside Kristen Stewart. This year, he starred in “The Lighthouse” and “The King,” both possible awards contenders.

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The actor will appear in Christopher Nolan’s next film, “Tenet,” and will play the titular character in 2021’s “The Batman.” Pattinson will be joined by an all-star cast including Zoe Kravitz, Paul Dano, Colin Ferrell, Andy Serkis and Jeffrey Wright.

Westlake Legal Group RT_RobertPattinson Robert Pattinson says he 'wouldn't be acting' if it wasn't for 'Harry Potter' Nate Day fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3bab2fda-7e4d-54c8-9551-501b7c7c71c8   Westlake Legal Group RT_RobertPattinson Robert Pattinson says he 'wouldn't be acting' if it wasn't for 'Harry Potter' Nate Day fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3bab2fda-7e4d-54c8-9551-501b7c7c71c8

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Court filing alleges that DNA test shows Hunter Biden fathered Arkansas woman’s baby

DNA tests allegedly confirm “with scientific certainty” that Democratic frontrunner Joe Biden’s son Hunter is the biological father of a baby whose mother he denied having sex with, according to court documents filed in an Arkansas Wednesday.

In a motion to partially seal information about the child from the public as part of an ongoing child support suit, an attorney for Lunden Alexis Roberts, an Arkansas woman and the child’s mom, asked that the infant, referred to as Baby Doe in court documents, have Secret Service protection.

BIDEN CAMPAIGN ACCIDENTALLY SENDS FUNDRAISING EMAIL CELEBRATING DEBATE PERFORMANCE HOURS BEFORE EVENT BEGINS

The attorney, Clinton Lancaster, informed the court in Independence County that because onetime Vice President Joe Biden “is considered by some to be the person most likely to win his party’s nomination and challenge President Trump on the ballot in 2020,” the child and those close to it should be entitled to the same protections afforded to to Biden’s other kin.

Westlake Legal Group Joe-Hunter-GettyImages-520783510 Court filing alleges that DNA test shows Hunter Biden fathered Arkansas woman's baby Vandana Rambaran fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc cb260e50-29d2-5799-92ad-aa66b8dec6e4 article

Hunter Biden and his father, former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden in 2016. (Photo by Teresa Kroeger/Getty Images for World Food Program USA)

“Baby Doe’s paternity could put the child and those close to the child at risk of harm for the same reasons the Biden family is protected by the United States Secret Service,” the document said.

Roberts’ paternity suit was first filed on May 28 when she alleged that she and Hunter Biden “were in a relationship” and that “Baby Doe” was born in August 2018 “as a result of that relationship,” according to reports by The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette.

In July, Biden denied having sexual relations with Roberts, according to an article by The New Yorker. He agreed to submit to a paternity test in October.

REPUBLICANS SEEK TO SUBPOENA HUNTER BIDEN, UKRAINE WHISTLEBLOWER, DNC FILES

Wednesday’s court filings said Biden “is not expected to challenge the results of the DNA test or the testing process.”

A hearing was previously scheduled for Dec. 2 in Batesville before 16th Judicial Circuit Judge Don McSpadden to resolve the paternity matter but could be canceled if the matter is resolved ahead of time.

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Attorneys for Biden did not respond to Fox News’ request for comment on the matter.

Separate attacks by President Trump against Joe and Hunter Biden have become fodder for the ongoing impeachment inquiry spearheaded by three Democrat-led House committees.

The investigation probes whether Trump attempted to persuade Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to open an investigation into the Bidens and their business ties in Ukraine in exchange for a White House meeting and military aid.

Westlake Legal Group HunterBiden092319 Court filing alleges that DNA test shows Hunter Biden fathered Arkansas woman's baby Vandana Rambaran fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc cb260e50-29d2-5799-92ad-aa66b8dec6e4 article   Westlake Legal Group HunterBiden092319 Court filing alleges that DNA test shows Hunter Biden fathered Arkansas woman's baby Vandana Rambaran fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc cb260e50-29d2-5799-92ad-aa66b8dec6e4 article

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U.S. Bill Supporting Hong Kong Rights Heads to Trump’s Desk

Westlake Legal Group merlin_164755011_9f8a49f6-c42d-4b24-854b-03aff7c34856-facebookJumbo U.S. Bill Supporting Hong Kong Rights Heads to Trump’s Desk United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Senate Law and Legislation International Trade and World Market House of Representatives Hong Kong Embargoes and Sanctions

A bill compelling the United States to support pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong could arrive on President Trump’s desk as soon as Thursday morning, potentially complicating the administration’s talks with China to end the trade war.

The bill, passed by the Senate on Tuesday, would require the government to impose sanctions on Chinese officials responsible for human rights abuses in the territory. On Wednesday, the House passed the Senate version 417-1, sending it to the White House.

If signed into law by Mr. Trump, the bill will also require the State Department to annually review the special autonomous status it grants Hong Kong in trade considerations. That status is separate from the relationship with mainland China, and a revocation of the status would mean less favorable trade conditions between the United States and Hong Kong.

The Senate passed the bill, the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act, by unanimous consent. The House had previously passed its own version unanimously, but gave assent to the Senate version in order to expedite the legislation. On the House floor on Wednesday, Speaker Nancy Pelosi said, “If America does not speak out for human rights in China because of commercial interests, we lose all moral authority to speak out on human rights elsewhere.”

Because the bill, in theory, has the support of a veto-proof majority in Congress, it could be enacted even if Mr. Trump vetoes it. And its enactment would most likely strain relations with China at a delicate moment in the trade negotiations.

Eswar Prasad, the former head of the International Monetary Fund’s China division, said the injection of Hong Kong into the trade process could derail the talks with China, which is notoriously sensitive about outside political interference.

“The legislation will further fuel the narrative in Chinese domestic policy circles that the U.S. is attempting to infringe on the sovereignty of China in terms of its internal economic and political affairs,” Mr. Prasad said.

Although Mr. Trump announced last month that the United States and China had reached a “historic” so-called phase one trade agreement, signing a deal has proved elusive. The two sides continue to negotiate and could achieve a deal in the next few weeks. But Mr. Trump has given mixed signals about whether he wants a deal.

“I haven’t wanted to do it yet because I don’t think they’ve stepped up,” Mr. Trump said on Wednesday afternoon while touring an Apple manufacturing facility in Texas.

The United States and China have been grappling over the fate of tariffs that Mr. Trump imposed on $360 billion of Chinese imports and additional tariffs that are due to be imposed on Dec. 15. China wants all of the tariffs rolled back as part of an agreement in which it would buy as much as $50 billion of American agricultural products a year and begin to open its markets to American companies.

Mr. Trump, however, is reluctant to scale back all the tariffs, and his advisers remain skeptical that China will live up to its commitments.

Henrietta Treyz, director of economic policy at the investment firm Veda Partners, said that the Hong Kong legislation raised the odds that the December tariffs will be imposed. She pointed to a series of caustic posts on Twitter written by the editor of The Global Times, a Chinese state-controlled publication, warning American farmers that the deal Mr. Trump promised them was not yet complete.

“Tensions are rising between the two nations, not dissipating,” Ms. Treyz said. “The prospect of not reaching a deal and requiring escalation from here remains quite real.”

The possibility that the Hong Kong bill could be signed into law has shaken the confidence of Wall Street analysts who had become increasingly optimistic in recent weeks that tariffs could be rolled back as part of the first phase of a trade deal.

Economists at Goldman Sachs said in a note to clients this week that the Hong Kong legislation was a potential “complication,” warning that China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs had promised “strong countermeasures” if such a bill were enacted.

Still, the trade talks have continued over the last year despite several spikes in tension between the United States and China, including the arrest of the Huawei executive Meng Wangzhou in Canada and the sale of 66 F-16s to Taiwan this summer.

Mr. Trump, who rarely talks about human rights, has not spoken about the bill, nor has he made consistently strong statements in support of the Hong Kong activists. In June, he told China’s president, Xi Jinping, that he would not publicly back the protesters as long as trade talks were progressing.

While Mr. Trump’s advisers debate how much tariff relief to offer in the first phase of a trade deal, similar debates are playing out in China. The fact that the United States is weighing in so forcefully on Hong Kong is most likely exacerbating that internal tension.

“There’s an ongoing debate in Beijing between reformers who would like phase one and hard-liners who see themselves surrounded by hostile forces led by the United States, including in Hong Kong,” said Michael Pillsbury, a China scholar at the Hudson Institute who advises the Trump administration.

Ed Wong and Catie Edmondson contributed reporting.

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Key Moments From Sondland, Cooper and Hale Testimony

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transcript

Trump Impeachment Hearings: Sondland Testimony Highlights

Gordon D. Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, appeared before the House Intelligence Committee.

“Secretary Perry, Ambassador Volker and I worked with Mr. Rudy Giuliani on Ukraine matters at the express direction of the president of the United States. We did not want to work with Mr. Giuliani. We all understood that if we refused to work with Mr. Giuliani, we would lose a very important opportunity to cement relations between the United States and Ukraine. Mr. Giuliani’s requests were a quid pro quo. Mr. Giuliani demanded that Ukraine make a public statement announcing the investigations of the 2016 election D.N.C. server and Burisma. Mr. Giuliani was expressing the desires of the president of the United States, and we knew these investigations were important to the president. Members of this committee frequently frame these complicated issues in the form of a simple question: Was there a quid pro quo? As I testified previously, with regard to the requested White House call and the White House meeting, the answer is yes.” “One of the things that you now remember is the discussion that you had with President Trump on July 26 in that restaurant in Kyiv, right? You confirmed to President Trump that you were in Ukraine at the time and that President Zelensky quote, ‘loves your ass.’ Do you recall saying that?” “It sounds like something I would say.” “You said President Trump had directed you to talk — you and the others — to talk to Rudy Giuliani at the Oval Office on May 23.” “If we wanted to get anything done with Ukraine, it was apparent to us we needed to talk to Rudy.” “Right, you understood that Mr. Giuliani spoke for the president, correct?” “That’s correct.” “You testified that Mr. Giuliani was expressing the desires of the president, correct?” “That’s our understanding, yes.” “But how did you know that? Who told you?” “Well, when the president says talk to my personal attorney, and then Mr. Giuliani as his personal attorney makes certain requests or demands, we assume it’s coming from the president.” “You don’t have records, you don’t have your notes because you didn’t take notes. You don’t have a lot of recollections. I mean, this is like the trifecta of unreliability. Isn’t that true?” “What I’m trying to do today is to use the limited information I have to be as forthcoming as possible with you and the rest of the committee.” “Your testimony is just simply in a pre-meeting with a group of Americans before the bilateral meeting. You referenced the fact that Ukraine needed to do these investigations in order to lift the aid.” “I think I referenced — I didn’t say that Ukraine had to do the investigations. I think I said that we heard from Mr. Giuliani that that was the case.” “So it wasn’t really a presumption. You heard from Mr. Giuliani.” “No one told me directly that the aid was tied to anything. I was presuming it was.” “You testified that pretty much everyone could put two and two together and make four and understood that the military assistance was also conditioned on the public announcement of these two investigations, correct?” “That was my presumption.” “Now you’re capable of putting two and two together. And so are the Ukrainians. Because you told them in Warsaw they were going to need to make that public statement — likely to get that aid released as I said.” “I said I presumed that might have to be done in order to get the aid released.” “Because we’ve had a lot of argumentation here. Well, the Ukrainians didn’t know the aid was withheld. But the Ukrainians found out. And then it was made abundantly clear, if they hadn’t put two and two together themselves, that if they wanted that aid they were going to have to make these statements, correct?” “Correct.” “When did President Zelensky announce that the investigation was going to happen? On page 14 you said this: ‘Was there a quid pro quo’ — today’s, your opening statement? ‘As I testified previously with regard to requested White House call, White House meeting the answer is yes,’ that there needed to be a public statement from President Zelensky. When the chairman asked you about the security assistance dollars, you said there needed to be a public announcement from Zelensky. So I’m asking you a simple question: When did that happen?” “Never did.” “Never did.” “Who would benefit from an investigation of the Bidens?” “I assume President Trump would benefit.” “There, we have it!” “Mr. Maloney, excuse me. I’ve been very forthright and I really resent what you’re trying to do.” “Fair enough. You’ve been very forthright. This is your third try to do so, sir. Didn’t work so well the first time, did it? We had a little declaration coming after you, remember that? And now we’re here a third time. And we’ve got a doozy of a statement from you this morning. There’s a whole bunch of stuff you don’t recall. So all due respect, sir. We appreciate your candor, but let’s be really clear on what it took to get it out of you.” “The question is not what the president meant. The question is not whether he was responsible for holding up the aid — he was. The question is not whether everybody knew it — apparently they did. The question is, what are we prepared to do about it? Is there any accountability? Or are we forced to conclude that this is just now the world that we live in?”

Westlake Legal Group 20dc-impeach-hilightsvid-promo2-videoSixteenByNine3000-v3 Key Moments From Sondland, Cooper and Hale Testimony United States Politics and Government Ukraine Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry impeachment House of Representatives Democratic Party

Gordon D. Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, appeared before the House Intelligence Committee.CreditCredit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

Here’s what you need to know:

Ukraine officials may have been aware that security aid was cut off by July 25 — much earlier than previously known and the same day that President Trump talked on the phone with the president of Ukraine, a top Pentagon official said Wednesday.

Laura K. Cooper, the deputy assistant secretary of defense for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia, said that she was aware of multiple communications between Ukrainian Embassy officials and members of her staff in which the embassy officials asked questions about delivery of the security aid to their country.

Ms. Cooper said that a member of her staff received a question about the aid on July 25 from the Ukrainian Embassy, which asked “what was going on with Ukraine assistance.” She said that during the week of Aug. 6, other members of her staff saw officials from the embassy who raised the issue of the aid.

The timing of when Ukraine knew that the aid had been frozen is a critical question as Democrats build a case that Mr. Trump tried to leverage the aid for a public announcement of investigations into his political rivals. The security aid was frozen in early July, and Republicans have insisted that Ukraine did not know about the hold until it was reported by a news outlet on Aug. 28.

Mr. Trump’s allies have also said that Mr. Trump could not have coerced Volodymyr Zelensky, the president of Ukraine, during the July 25 call because Mr. Zelensky did not know at the time that the aid was held up. The new information from Ms. Cooper could undercut the Republican efforts to defend the president.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_164753199_f9915c49-5a4e-46e4-8ebc-1b0d70dc9ee8-articleLarge Key Moments From Sondland, Cooper and Hale Testimony United States Politics and Government Ukraine Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry impeachment House of Representatives Democratic Party

David Hale, left, and Laura Cooper were sworn in to testify Wednesday evening.Credit…Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times

Ms. Cooper said her staff recalled the issue of concerns about Ukraine’s security aid coming up with members of the Ukrainian Embassy in other meetings during the month of August, though they could not recall precisely when those meetings took place.

“They believe the question of the hold came up at some point,” Ms. Cooper said.

She also cited several emails dated July 25 between members of her staff and State Department officials in which the diplomats wrote that the Ukrainian Embassy knew about the hold on the security assistance. Ms. Cooper said she did not believe she was shown the emails at the time.

Ms. Cooper said she learned of the new information about the inquiries from Ukrainian officials after members of her staff saw the transcript of her earlier, closed-door testimony when it was released to the public on Nov. 11, and brought new details of the timeline to her attention.

David Hale, the State Department’s No. 3 official, also fielded questions about the hold on security aid to Ukraine and the attacks by Rudolph W. Giuliani, President Trump’s personal lawyer, on the reputation of Marie L. Yovanovitch, the United States ambassador to Ukraine. She was eventually recalled from her post.

Mr. Hale told lawmakers that what happened to Ms. Yovanovitch was “wrong” and that “I believe that she should have been able to stay at post and continued to do the outstanding work.”

Mr. Sondland told the committee that he and other advisers to Mr. Trump pressured Ukraine to investigate Democrats “because the president directed us to do so.”

Mr. Sondland said that he, Energy Secretary Rick Perry and Kurt D. Volker, the special envoy for Ukraine, were reluctant to work with Rudolph W. Giuliani, the president’s personal attorney, on the pressure campaign and agreed only at Mr. Trump’s insistence.

“Secretary Perry, Ambassador Volker and I worked with Mr. Rudy Giuliani on Ukraine matters at the express direction of the president of the United States,” Mr. Sondland told the committee. “We did not want to work with Mr. Giuliani. Simply put, we were playing the hand we were dealt.” With no alternative, he said, “we followed the president’s orders.”

Mr. Sondland confirmed what has already been known, that there was a clear “quid pro quo” linking a coveted White House meeting for Ukraine’s president to the investigations Mr. Trump wanted. And he said he was concerned about “a potential quid pro quo” linking $391 million in security aid that Mr. Trump suspended to the investigations he desired.

But under questioning, Mr. Sondland acknowledged that Mr. Trump never told him that. “I never heard from President Trump that aid was conditioned on an announcement of investigations,” he testified.

And he was asked by Republicans to repeat a conversation he had with Mr. Trump that he has previously described in which he asked the president what he wanted from Ukraine. “It was a very short, abrupt conversation,” Mr. Sondland said. “He was not in a good mood. And he just said, ‘I want nothing. I want nothing. I want no quid pro quo. Tell Zelensky to do the right thing.’”

The conversation took place after the White House had already learned a whistle-blower had come forward with a complaint alleging that the president was abusing his power to try to enlist Ukraine to interfere on his behalf in the 2020 election.

Mr. Giuliani challenged Mr. Sondland in a tweet, saying the ambassador was “speculating based on VERY little contact. I never met him and had very few calls with him, mostly with Volker. Volker testified I answered their questions and described them as my opinions, NOT demands. I.E. no quid pro quo.”

He later deleted the tweet.

Mr. Perry also took issue with Mr. Sondland, issuing a statement through his department saying that the testimony “misrepresented both Secretary Perry’s interaction with Rudy Giuliani and direction the secretary received from President Trump.”

The statement said Mr. Perry spoke with Mr. Giuliani only once. “At no point before, during or after that phone call did the words ‘Biden’ or ‘Burisma’ ever come up in the presence of Secretary Perry,” the statement said.

Westlake Legal Group GORDON-SONDLAND-OPENING-STATEMENT-UKRAINE-articleLarge Key Moments From Sondland, Cooper and Hale Testimony United States Politics and Government Ukraine Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry impeachment House of Representatives Democratic Party

Read Gordon Sondland’s Opening Statement

The United States ambassador to the European Union testified that he pressured Ukraine for investigations at President Trump’s “express direction.”

Mr. Sondland testified that he told Vice President Mike Pence in late August that he feared the military aid withheld from Ukraine was tied to the investigations Mr. Trump sought and that he kept Secretary of State Mike Pompeo apprised of his efforts to pressure Ukraine.

The revelations suggested that Mr. Sondland has decided to publicly implicate the senior-most members of Mr. Trump’s administration in the matter, including Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, and he provided a series of text messages and emails to buttress his account.

“Everyone was in the loop,” he said told the committee. “It was no secret.”

If other officials were concerned that he was doing something wrong, as testimony now indicates, Mr. Sondland said they did not tell him at the time. “Everyone’s hair was on fire,” he said, “but no one decided to talk to us.”

The striking account — a major departure from Mr. Sondland’s initial closed-door testimony in the impeachment inquiry last month — also indicated that the ambassador who played a central role in the pressure campaign was eager to demonstrate that he did so only reluctantly with the knowledge and approval of the president and top members of his team.

Mr. Sondland rejected the notion that he was part of an illicit shadow foreign policy that worked around the normal national security process. “The suggestion that we were engaged in some irregular or rogue diplomacy is absolutely false,” he said, pointing to messages and phone calls in which he kept the White House and State Department informed of his actions. He added: “Any claim that I somehow muscled my way into the Ukraine relationship is simply false.”

The ambassador said that he “mentioned to Vice President Pence before the meetings with the Ukrainians that I had concerns that the delay in aid had become tied to the issue of investigations.” He testified that the conversation occurred shortly before Mr. Pence met with President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine while they were in Warsaw.

At that meeting, Mr. Zelensky brought up the issue of the withheld aid and Mr. Pence said he would discuss the matter with Mr. Trump. Afterward, Mr. Sondland said he informed Andriy Yermak, a top Ukrainian official, that the money would probably not flow without Mr. Zelensky making a public commitment to the investigations.

Marc Short, Mr. Pence’s chief of staff, issued a statement after his testimony denying Mr. Sondland’s account.

“The vice president never had a conversation with Gordon Sondland about investigating the Bidens, Burisma, or the conditional release of financial aid to Ukraine based upon potential investigations,” Mr. Short said. “This alleged discussion recalled by Ambassador Sondland never happened.”

Mr. Sondland also said that “even as late as September,” after the pressure campaign emerged in the news media, “Secretary Pompeo was directing Kurt Volker to speak with Mr. Giuliani.”

In a statement issued from Mr. Pompeo’s plane as he returned to Washington from Brussels, his spokeswoman denied something that Mr. Sondland never testified to.

“Gordon Sondland never told Secretary Pompeo that he believed the president was linking aid to investigations of political opponents,” Morgan Ortagus, the State Department spokeswoman, said in the statement. “Any suggestion to the contrary is flat out false.”

President Trump distanced himself from Gordon D. Sondland, a top donor he appointed as ambassador to the European Union, after the diplomat told lawmakers that he and other advisers pressured Ukraine to investigate Democrats at the president’s “express direction.”

As he headed to Marine One to depart on a trip to Texas, Mr. Trump stopped to talk with reporters briefly and pointed out that Mr. Sondland had testified that the president had told him at one point that he wanted nothing from Ukraine and there was no quid pro quo.

“That means it’s all over,” Mr. Trump said, shouting over the roar of helicopter rotors and reading from handwritten notes scrawled out in large block letters. “This is the final word from the president of the United States: ‘I want nothing.’”

In a tweet later Wednesday afternoon, Mr. Trump declared the “impeachment witch hunt” to be over, quoting Mr. Sondland’s testimony in all caps.

The president’s press secretary, Stephanie Grisham, later issued a statement emphasizing those points. “Ambassador Sondland’s testimony made clear that in one of the few brief phone calls he had with President Trump, the president clearly stated that he ‘wanted nothing’ from Ukraine and repeated ‘no quid pro quo over and over again,’” she said.

Despite that, Mr. Sondland told the House Intelligence Committee on the fourth day of public impeachment hearings that it was clear to him that the president was intently interested in having the Ukrainians publicly commit to investigating Democrats, including former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., whose son served on the board of the Ukrainian energy company Burisma.

Mr. Trump often disavows knowing advisers once they become problematic for him. Just last month, Mr. Trump called Mr. Sondland, who gave the president’s inaugural fund $1 million, “a really good man and great American.”

But on Wednesday he said: “I don’t know him very well. I have not spoken to him much. This is not a man I know well. He seems like a nice guy though.” Ms. Grisham’s statement amplified that by referring to “the few brief phone calls” she said the two men have had.

Mr. Sondland portrayed their relationship differently, describing it as a chummy one that ranged even beyond the issues at hand. “I’ve had a lot of conversations with the president about completely unrelated matters that have nothing to do with Ukraine,” he said. Their conversations, he testified, featured, “a lot of four-letter words.”

After Mr. Sondland testified that everyone from Mr. Trump on down was aware of the pressure campaign on Ukraine, House Democrats quickly declared that he had bolstered their case for impeachment.

Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California and chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, called Mr. Sondland’s testimony “among the most significant evidence to date,” saying he described “a basic quid pro quo” that conditioned American security aid on Ukraine agreeing to investigate Mr. Trump’s political rivals.

Mr. Schiff mocked Republican attempts to undermine Mr. Sondland’s testimony, saying that his colleagues on the Intelligence Committee “seem to be under impression that unless the president spoke the words, ‘Ambassador Sondland, I am bribing the Ukrainian president,’ that there’s no evidence of bribery. If he didn’t say, ‘Ambassador Sondland, I’m telling you I’m not going to give the aid unless they do this,’ that there’s no evidence of a quid pro quo.”

“Nonetheless,” Mr. Schiff said, “you have given us a lot of evidence of precisely that conditionality.”

Republicans scoffed. Representative Mike Turner, Republican of Ohio, pressed Mr. Sondland to acknowledge that he was never explicitly told that Ukraine’s military aid was tied to the investigations that Mr. Trump wanted.

“No one told you? Not just the president — Giuliani didn’t tell you, Mulvaney didn’t tell you, nobody,” Mr. Turner said. “Pompeo didn’t tell you?

“No one on this planet told you that President Trump was tying aid to investigations,” Mr. Turner added. “Yes or no?”

“Yes,” Mr. Sondland answered.

Under questioning, Mr. Sondland put his finger on a distinction that often gets overlooked in the discussion of Mr. Trump’s interest in Ukraine: For the president, it seemed more important that Ukrainian officials announce that they were investigating Democrats than for them to actually follow through.

“I never heard, Mr. Goldman, anyone say that the investigations had to start or had to be completed,” Mr. Sondland told Daniel S. Goldman, the top Democratic counsel who questioned him. “The only thing I heard from Mr. Giuliani or otherwise was that they had to be announced in some form and that form kept changing.”

The distinction is important because Democrats are arguing that Mr. Trump was not trying to fight corruption, but instead trying to enlist a foreign power to discredit his rivals in a way that would benefit him in the 2020 election. In pressing Mr. Sondland on the matter, Mr. Goldman noted that, “there would be political benefits to a public announcement.”

Mr. Sondland responded, “The way it was expressed to me was that the Ukrainians had a long history of committing to things privately and then never following through, so President Trump, presumably, again communicated through Mr. Giuliani, wanted the Ukrainians on record publicly that they were going to do these investigations.”

“But you never heard anyone say that they really wanted them to do the investigations, just that they wanted to announce” them, Mr. Goldman said.

“I didn’t hear either way,” Mr. Sondland said. “I didn’t hear either way.”

Mr. Sondland in his prepared testimony confirmed a conversation with Mr. Trump at a key moment in the timeline that he did not volunteer during his original testimony. But he disputed descriptions by other witnesses of another key meeting.

Mr. Sondland did not challenge the account of a lunch meeting on the outdoor patio of a Kyiv restaurant on July 26, the day after Mr. Trump’s phone call with Mr. Zelensky. David Holmes, the political counselor at the American Embassy in Ukraine, told investigators that he overheard Mr. Trump and Mr. Sondland talking on the phone.

“So, he’s going to do the investigation?” Mr. Trump asked, according to Mr. Holmes. Mr. Sondland told him yes. Mr. Zelensky “loves your ass” and would do “anything you ask him to,” Mr. Sondland said, according to Mr. Holmes’s statement.

But in his testimony Wednesday, Mr. Sondland also denied that a July 10 meeting at the White House with Ukrainian officials turned sharply tense, as others have testified in recent days.

Fiona Hill, then the senior director for Europe and Russia at the National Security Council, and her deputy for Ukraine policy, Lt. Col. Alexander S. Vindman, previously told lawmakers that the meeting led to a confrontation over Mr. Sondland’s unconventional role in Ukraine policy.

Mr. Sondland said he did not remember that.

“Their recollections of those events simply don’t square with my own or with those of Ambassador Volker or Secretary Perry,” he said in his prepared testimony.

Emily Cochrane contributed reporting.

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