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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 223)

He Combs the Web for Russian Bots. That Makes Him a Target.

Westlake Legal Group 00disinfo-nimmo-facebookJumbo He Combs the Web for Russian Bots. That Makes Him a Target. YouTube.com twitter Social Media Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Rumors and Misinformation Presidential Election of 2016 Politics and Government Facebook Inc elections Cyberwarfare and Defense Computers and the Internet Ben Nimmo

HADDINGTON, Scotland — In August 2017, Ben Nimmo was declared dead by 13,000 Russian bots on Twitter.

“Our beloved friend and colleague Ben Nimmo passed away this morning,” read the epitaph, which was manipulated to look as if it were from a co-worker’s Twitter account. “Ben, we will never forget you.”

The message was immediately shared thousands of times by the network of automated accounts. Notes began pouring in from worried friends and colleagues — even though Mr. Nimmo was very much alive.

It didn’t take long for Mr. Nimmo, who helped pioneer investigations into online disinformation, to figure out what was going on: He had been targeted by a shadowy group after reporting, along with others, that American far-right groups had adopted pro-Kremlin messages on social media about Ukraine. His fake death notice was a sinister attempt at disinformation, which is the spreading of falsehoods with the deliberate intent to mislead.

“That made it personal,” said Mr. Nimmo, 47, whose home address in a town near Edinburgh and other personal data, like bank details, have also been posted online.

For the last five years, Mr. Nimmo, a founder of the Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensic Research Lab, has been a leader of a small but growing community of online sleuths. These researchers serve as an informal internet police force that combats malicious attempts to use false information to sway public opinion, sow political discord and foment distrust in traditional institutions like the news media and the government.

Mr. Nimmo’s work came to the fore after the 2016 American presidential election, when intelligence agencies concluded that Russia had used Facebook and other internet platforms to influence voters. His research has since caused Facebook and other companies to ban thousands of disinformation-related accounts; he has also been tapped as an expert by governments studying foreign interference.

Now his skills are needed more than ever, as the 2020 presidential election approaches and the tactics of internet trickery have been adopted by governments, activist groups and clickbait farms in at least 70 countries. In tandem, a disinformation-for-hire industry has emerged. And domestic disinformation efforts in the United States are also on the rise.

“It doesn’t matter how much money you throw at the problem, or how many technological advances you have,” said Jenni Sargent, managing director of First Draft, a London group that tracks disinformation and trains journalists. “Without the human layer of someone like Ben dissecting the way that people use the internet, then we wouldn’t be as far ahead as we are in terms of understanding the problem and the scale.”

Mr. Nimmo’s goal is to spot disinformation early — essentially, to stamp out the fire before it spreads.

His techniques have changed as his adversaries have become more cunning. Because Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are now policing their platforms more aggressively, he is less able to rely on obvious clues like masses of automated Twitter posts and fake Facebook accounts.

So Mr. Nimmo has started looking for clues in obscure areas of the internet, like German news sites that accept unverified user-generated content and Iranian video-sharing services. Websites like Reddit, Medium and Quora are becoming popular places to create fake accounts and plant disinformation and leaks.

“Every time we catch a threat actor, you can bet that the other ones will change their tactics to try and keep ahead,” he said.

More interference is coming in the 2020 campaigns, Mr. Nimmo said. He said he was particularly worried about a “hack-and-leak” operation like the one in 2016 when Russian operatives took information from the Democratic National Committee’s servers and got it published online. Loaded with juicy and accurate information, such leaks go viral on social media and can be irresistible to the news media.

Mr. Nimmo’s path to disinformation research was not an obvious one. An Englishman who studied literature at Cambridge University, he worked as a scuba diving instructor in Egypt, as well as a travel writer and journalist in Europe. In 2007, while reporting on violent demonstrations in Estonia for Deutsche Presse-Agentur, he was head-butted by a protester, breaking his nose and leaving it off center still today.

In 2011, he began working at the North Atlantic Treaty Organization as a press officer. While there in 2014, he saw how Russia had worked to muddy perceptions of its invasion of Crimea that year, including misrepresenting Russian soldiers as “local self-defense forces.”

“There was this constant drumbeat of Russian disinformation,” he said.

Inspired to dig deeper, he became an independent researcher that same year. He moved to Scotland to be closer to family and began doing contract work on Russia for pro-democracy think tanks like the Institute for Statecraft.

During the 2016 American election campaign, Mr. Nimmo helped found the Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensic Research Lab, a Washington-based group that studies online disinformation. Facebook made him and the lab among the first outsiders allowed to study disinformation networks on its site before the company shut the networks down.

Last year, Mr. Nimmo became the head of investigations for the social-media monitoring company Graphika.

“He was there well before this was a trendy thing to do,” said Alex Stamos, who is conducting similar disinformation research work at Stanford University and was previously Facebook’s chief security officer. Both Graphika and the Digital Forensic Research Lab have received funding from Facebook.

Mr. Nimmo works from his home atop a hill and next to a grain farm in the small Scottish town of Haddington. To ferret out disinformation networks, he relies on open-source digital tools: the Wayback Machine to find internet pages that have been deleted; Amnesty International’s Citizen Evidence Lab, which provides information about YouTube videos; and Sysomos for spotting social media trends.

What is hard, he said, is determining when material is coming from regular people expressing a point of view or from a coordinated system linked to a government. One giveaway is when the same material is posted at the same time, or when it can be traced to an original post — “patient zero,” he said — known to be a website or social media account used by a government.

“The magic of the internet is there is always another clue to find,” he said.

Mr. Nimmo speaks fluent Russian, French, German and Latvian — and is conversant in several other languages — teaching himself by buying books in the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy in languages he is trying to learn. That makes it easier for him to spot clues like mistakes a native Russian speaker makes when writing in English in disinformation posts.

The amount of disinformation has increased recently. In October, Mr. Nimmo’s team at Graphika explained how pro-China propaganda accounts targeted Hong Kong demonstrators. In November, he helped expose an operation that used fringe platforms to leak a sensitive British trade document before Britain’s general election. And in December, he analyzed Facebook’s first big takedown of fake accounts with profile pictures generated by artificial intelligence.

Most recently, he has investigated Iranian disinformation after the United States killed the head of Iran’s security machinery, Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, last month. Mr. Nimmo is also tracing Russia-linked campaigns, including an effort to blame the United States for the downing of Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752, which Iran said it mistakenly shot down last month, killing 176 people.

This past week, after technical problems delayed the reporting of results from the Iowa caucuses, Mr. Nimmo was on alert for disinformation. There was little, he said, and he mainly found gleeful trolling from Republican supporters and right-wing groups.

Mr. Nimmo has sometimes made mistakes in identifying culprits. In 2018, he pinpointed a number of Twitter accounts as “Russian trolls,” when one of them was a British citizen sympathetic to Russia.

One recent evening, he started work at 7, chasing leads on Iranian disinformation related to the killing of General Suleimani. One suspicious Twitter account provided clues that led to various YouTube videos. From there, Mr. Nimmo found links to Facebook and Instagram pages. After a few hours, he had traced how memes from a suspicious pro-government Iranian website had traveled elsewhere on the web.

By the time Mr. Nimmo went to bed after 2 a.m., he had more than 50 tabs open on his browser, but no definitive evidence of an Iranian government campaign.

“He’s very careful,” said Camille François, the chief innovation officer at Graphika, who hired Mr. Nimmo. “It’s important to detect them, and to study them, but it’s also important not to overreact to the threat.”

That’s especially true now that foundations, universities and companies have poured money into efforts to examine disinformation, luring new researchers eager to spot such activity. Mr. Nimmo said he was concerned that investigators could have an incentive to sensationalize material that cannot be accurately attributed and argued that new standards were needed.

“When we look back on 2020, I hope we’ll see it as the year when disinformation research passed the tipping point and really started becoming a mainstream discipline,” he said. “We need to make that happen, because the threat actors aren’t going away.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Coronavirus Live Updates: Deaths in China Surpass Toll of SARS

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168575025_b84fe21b-75b0-4339-a5a7-2af975042d50-articleLarge Coronavirus Live Updates: Deaths in China Surpass Toll of SARS Xi Jinping World Health Organization Hubei Province (China) Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

Lining up this weekend to get tickets for free masks and sanitizer outside a Beijing pharmacy.Credit…Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

The coronavirus death toll in China has risen to 811, surpassing the toll from the SARS epidemic of 2002-3, according to official data released on Sunday.

The number of confirmed infections rose to 37,198, according to China’s National Health Commission. Eighty-nine deaths and 2,656 new cases were recorded in the preceding 24 hours, most of them in Hubei Province, the heart of the outbreak. A United States citizen died from the coronavirus in Wuhan, the provincial capital, American officials said on Saturday.

The SARS epidemic, which also began in China, killed 774 people worldwide. There have been only two confirmed deaths from the new coronavirus outside mainland China: one in Hong Kong and one in the Philippines.

Many doctors believe that deaths and infections from the current epidemic are undercounted in China because testing facilities are under severe strain.

The number of new cases has stabilized in recent days, but World Health Organization officials cautioned against reading too much into those figures, saying that Wuhan and Hubei were in the midst of a “very intense outbreak.”

Westlake Legal Group china-wuhan-coronavirus-maps-promo-articleLarge-v18 Coronavirus Live Updates: Deaths in China Surpass Toll of SARS Xi Jinping World Health Organization Hubei Province (China) Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

Coronavirus Map: Tracking the Spread of the Outbreak

The virus has sickened more than 37,500 people in China and 24 other countries.

“It’s very, very early to make any predictions,” said Dr. Michael Ryan, executive director of the W.H.O.’s health emergencies program.

The measures put in place in Hubei appear to be “paying off,” said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the W.H.O.’s director general, but he warned that outbreaks like these are unpredictable. “We have to understand it with caution because it can show stability for a few days and then they can shoot up,” he said. “I’ve said it many times: It’s slow now, but it may accelerate.”

Britain confirmed a new coronavirus case on Sunday, bringing the total cases in the country to four. The infected person was a “known contact of a previously confirmed U.K. case,” the chief medical officer, Chris Whitty, said in a statement.

The announcement came just hours after a flight from Wuhan carrying 200 Britons and European citizens arrived in Britain. About 150 of the passengers were taken to a center in Milton Keynes, England, to be quarantined for 14 days.

The authorities in Spain said on Sunday that the country had confirmed its second coronavirus case: a British man who lives on the island of Majorca with his family.

The man had reported to the hospital on Friday where his wife and children later tested negative for the virus, according to Spain’s national center for microbiology.

The infected man, who has been quarantined, had been in contact with a person who tested positive for the virus in France, Spanish officials said. The authorities in Majorca are now investigating whether the infected man came into contact with other people on the island before going to the hospital.

All 3,600 people aboard a cruise ship that had been held for four days in Hong Kong disembarked on Sunday after its crew members tested negative for the coronavirus, health officials said.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 5, 2020

    • Where has the virus spread?
      You can track its movement with this map.
    • How is the United States being affected?
      There have been at least a dozen cases. American citizens and permanent residents who fly to the United States from China are now subject to a two-week quarantine.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      Several countries, including the United States, have discouraged travel to China, and several airlines have canceled flights. Many travelers have been left in limbo while looking to change or cancel bookings.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands is the most important thing you can do.

The ship, the World Dream, had been grounded since Wednesday because eight people from mainland China who were on a previous journey were found to be infected. Everyone was cleared to leave after no cases were found among the 1,800 crew members.

Most passengers had kept to their rooms during the holding period, watching movies or playing mahjong. Some ventured outside on balconies, waving to loved ones or shouting messages to reporters on the dock below.

“I felt really bored staying in my room, but we know that the quarantine is to keep everyone else in the city safe,” Charlotte Chan, a sales executive, said on Sunday after she disembarked wearing two layers of masks.

The coronavirus continues to ripple through China’s huge network of auto and parts factories.

The longer the China supply chain remains paralyzed, the greater the chance that production in Asia, Europe and the United States could grind to a halt because of shortages of components. A lot is at stake in getting the factories humming again: The auto industry employs eight million people worldwide.

Volkswagen said on Saturday that it would not resume production at most of its production facilities in China until Feb. 17, following the lead of BMW, PSA, Toyota and others.

“We are working hard on getting back to normal production processes, facing challenges due to the nationwide restarting of supply chains as well as limited travel options for our production employees,” Volkswagen said in a statement. The only plant that will reopen on Monday is in Shanghai, the company said.

Even a relatively brief interruption in the flow of parts and materials could have far-reaching effects.

The shutdowns at Chinese factories have hit automakers from several angles. The virus is already causing sales losses in China, by far the world’s largest car market. If they are forced to shut down factories outside of China because of parts shortages, as Hyundai has already done in South Korea, they could also lose sales in other regions.

Six more people on a cruise ship that has been quarantined for nearly a week in Yokohama, Japan, have tested positive for the coronavirus, passengers were told on Sunday. Five of them were crew members.

About 3,700 people on the ship, the Diamond Princess, have been quarantined since last Monday, after it was learned that a passenger who disembarked in Hong Kong on Jan. 25 had been infected.

The Japanese health authorities have tested hundreds of people on the ship. The six new cases, which were confirmed by the Health Ministry on Sunday, bring the total to 70.

The announcement to passengers, a recording of which was posted online, said that the six people were being taken off the ship and that eight other passengers had been taken to hospitals for reasons unrelated to the coronavirus.

For Doug Perez, the most dangerous part of each day in Wuhan is taking his dog for a walk.

Mr. Perez, 28, grew up around San Francisco, but he has taught math and science for the last two years in the Chinese city where the coronavirus emerged. When it began to spread, he chose to stay.

So when Chubby, a 1-year-old Labrador, needs to go out, Mr. Perez pulls on gloves, straps on a mask, and wriggles into the special jacket and pants that are sprayed down with alcohol after every trip outdoors. Then he slides a yellow jacket over Chubby, too.

The State Department has evacuated hundreds of Americans from Hubei Province, where the outbreak began. But some, like Mr. Perez, have decided not to leave. In his case, it is because he does not want to abandon his girlfriend, who is Chinese.

They have spent more than two weeks in his apartment, along with his girlfriend’s brother. They cook, they watch television (three seasons of “The Sopranos” so far), and they clean — a lot. They scrub down surfaces, furiously wash their hands and disinfect their clothes after going out.

“Sometimes I find I’m out of time, which is crazy,” Mr. Perez said. “You’d think I’d have all the time in the world, but with the coronavirus, a lot of time is spent cleaning.”

Other Americans have also stayed in China because of loved ones. Gabrielle Autry, 26, from Georgia, lives in the eastern city of Hangzhou. She has looked into flights that would take her to the United States — but her fiancé, a Chinese citizen, would not be able to join her, since all foreign citizens are barred from entering the United States if they have recently been in China. If the two were married, it would be a different story.

For now, they are mostly stuck at home, a little bored.

“Together it’s O.K., but alone it would be horrible,” she said. “I just couldn’t fathom it.”

Mr. Perez has tried to make the best of the isolation, working on his coding skills and reading news about the virus. He talks to his family nearly every day. His parents have sent him masks.

“They’ve been supportive of my decision to stay,” he said. “They regret it, but they know me, and I guess they know I’m stubborn about some things.”

His classes have been canceled, and he is not sure if he will be paid after February. The announcement of an American’s death in Wuhan was upsetting, as are the “rumors and mass hysteria” that he often sees on social media.

To treat themselves, the household orders takeout now and again, even though they consider it safer to cook.

“After a rough week, getting a pizza in is worth the risk,” Mr. Perez said.

Chinese academics, professionals and others have created digital petitions calling for freedom of speech amid a widespread outpouring of anger and grief online for Dr. Li Wenliang, who gave early warnings about the coronavirus in Wuhan, only to die of it last week himself.

“Change, and only change, is the best commemoration of Dr. Li Wenliang,” said a petition that had been signed by 28 academics, lawyers and business figures by Sunday morning.

“Otherwise, all our outrage and all our tears will end up as bubbles,” it said. “And we will continue suffering from man-made disasters and our offspring will continue to live in fear.”

Around the country, people have been mourning Dr. Li and engaging in soul-searching, both in private and online, as to whether they’ve been complicit under an authoritarian government that allows for little dissent.

The petitions reflect concerns that the online expressions of frustration will fade, as in several past instances, including a 2008 earthquake in Sichuan Province and a train accident in 2011.

By Sunday, a petition on the site Matters had been signed by nearly 1,000 people. It urges the government to apologize to Dr. Li and seven other medical workers who were reprimanded for sharing knowledge about the virus. It also calls for the punishment of officials who suppressed information about the outbreak.

“A healthy society should allow more than one voice,” one petition quoted Dr. Li as telling the Chinese magazine Caixin.

For China’s leader, Xi Jinping, the outbreak is not just a health crisis, but a political one: a test of the authoritarian system he has built around himself. As his government struggles to contain the virus amid rising public discontent with its performance, the changes that Mr. Xi has ushered in could make it difficult for him to escape blame.

“It’s a big shock to the legitimacy of the ruling party,” said Rong Jian, a writer about politics in Beijing. “I think it could be only second to the June 4 incident of 1989. It’s that big,” he said, referring to the armed crackdown on Tiananmen Square protesters that year.

“There’s no doubt about his control over power,” he added, “but the manner of control and its consequences have hurt his legitimacy and reputation.”

Mr. Xi has recognized what is at stake, calling the outbreak “a major test of China’s system and capacity for governance.”

As China’s battle with the coronavirus intensified, Mr. Xi put the country’s No. 2 leader, Li Keqiang, in charge of a leadership group handling the emergency, effectively turning him into the public face of the government’s response. It was Mr. Li who traveled to Wuhan to visit doctors.

Mr. Xi’s retreat from the spotlight, some analysts said, signaled an effort to insulate himself from a campaign that may draw public ire. Yet Mr. Xi has consolidated power, sidelining or eliminating rivals, so there are few people left to blame when something goes wrong.

In an unusual move, a county in Hubei Province, the epicenter of the outbreak, is offering cash rewards to people who report a fever — whether their own or someone else’s.

China has responded to the epidemic by sealing off large cities, quarantining people en masse and punishing people for failing to report flulike symptoms.

Now, the Fang County government is trying “incentives,” according to a statement posted Saturday on its website. People who report their own fevers will receive 1,000 renminbi, the equivalent of $143 — a few days’ salary for the average Hubei resident.

The statement also said that people who report the fevers of others would get 500 renminbi, which raised the prospect of neighbors turning one another in. Communist Party cadres who investigate and verify such reports would receive the same amount.

The measures are intended “to promote the early detection, early isolation, early reporting, and early treatment of fever patients,” the statement said.

The first confirmed death of an American citizen in the coronavirus outbreak, which the United States Embassy in Beijing reported on Saturday, is likely to raise questions about whether the State Department has done enough to ensure the safety of Americans in China.

Few details about the American, who died in Wuhan on Thursday, were immediately available. The embassy said the person was 60 years old. Two people familiar with the matter said the person was a woman and had underlying health conditions.

It was not clear whether the person had tried to leave Wuhan on any of the flights organized by the State Department, which have evacuated diplomats and other American citizens from the city and other parts of China.

In a statement, the State Department took a defensive tone, saying that since Jan. 29, it had evacuated around 850 people, most of them Americans, on five charter flights out of Wuhan.

The agency said it had “no higher priority than the welfare and safety of U.S. citizens abroad,” but there are no current plans to conduct additional flights, even as some Americans elsewhere in China have been asking to be evacuated.

The State Department said Americans should heed its Feb. 2 advisory not to travel to China. To show that its flights appeared to have met the immediate needs of Americans in Wuhan, the department said that its last charter flight, on Thursday, had extra seats after accommodating all Americans on the manifest, so officials were able to offer seats to more than 30 Canadians.

Reporting was contributed by Motoko Rich, Eimi Yamamitsu, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, Yonette Joseph, Raphael Minder, Rich Barbieri, Raymond Zhong, Tiffany May, Katherine Li, Li Yuan, Chris Buckley, Steven Lee Myers, Sui-Lee Wee, Austin Ramzy and Edward Wong. Yiwei Wang contributed research.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Gunman who targeted NYPD officers in 2 ‘premeditated’ attacks has violent past, previous shootout with cops

The gunman who targeted New York City police officers in back-to-back shootings over the weekend, wounding two, has a history of violence that includes a prior gun battle against cops and an attempted murder conviction from nearly two decades ago, investigators said.

The still-unnamed suspect, who police believe carried out two “assassination attempts” on officers in the Bronx less than 12 hours apart, had been paroled in 2017 after an attempted murder conviction in 2002, Police Commissioner Dermot Shea said Sunday at a news conference.

BRONX ATTACKS ON NYPD LIKELY TO FURTHER INFLAME TENSIONS BETWEEN COPS, DE BLASIO’S CITY HALL

In 2002, the suspected gunman had shot a man and then carjacked a woman as he fled, Shea said. His bid to escape came to an end when he crashed the car and traded gunfire with New York City police officers.

Westlake Legal Group NYPD-Saturday-evening-shooting-suspect-split Gunman who targeted NYPD officers in 2 'premeditated' attacks has violent past, previous shootout with cops Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc d99dc2a4-5ba5-52d7-823e-5460660c0ad9 article

Police believe the suspected gunman is the same man who carried out a similar attack Saturday evening against two uniformed police officers in their patrol van. (New York City Police Department)

Since his parole more than two years ago, he has one recorded arrest for which he was already scheduled to appear in court, the commissioner said.

The suspected gunman was quickly taken into custody inside the headquarters of the 41st Precinct in the Bronx on Sunday morning after unloading his 9mm handgun on officers, police said. Only after running out of bullets did the gunman lay down on the ground and surrender.

NYPD OFFICER SHOT, WOUNDED IN ‘ASSASSINATION ATTEMPT’

“This is not a crime gone bad,” Shea said. “This is not a liquor store robbery interrupted that a tragedy erupts from. This is a premeditated assassination attempt.”

A police lieutenant was wounded in his upper left arm. He returned fire but did not hit the suspect. The lieutenant was expected to be released from the hospital later Sunday.

Investigators were confident the man in custody had carried out a similar assault Saturday evening on two uniformed police officers sitting in a patrol van, Shea said. One officer was wounded when a bullet grazed his chin and neck. Neither officer returned fire. The wounded officer was released from the hospital Sunday afternoon.

Westlake Legal Group nypd-police-suspect-shooting Gunman who targeted NYPD officers in 2 'premeditated' attacks has violent past, previous shootout with cops Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc d99dc2a4-5ba5-52d7-823e-5460660c0ad9 article

The suspect had a lengthy and violent criminal record, including an attempted murder conviction. (New York City Police Department)

Police are conducting tests on the suspect’s weapon that was recovered at the precinct to determine whether it was used in both targeted attacks, police said.

The twin attacks have spurred responses from police officials and President Trump who called on New York’s Democratic leaders, Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio, to work with law enforcement to end the hatred and violence directed at cops.

POLICE OFFICERS KILLED IN LINE OF DUTY, 2020

“I grew up in New York City and, over many years, got to watch how GREAT NYC’s ‘Finest’ are,” Trump tweeted. “Now, because of weak leadership at Governor & Mayor, stand away (water thrown at them) regulations, and lack of support, our wonderful NYC police are under assault. Stop this now!”

“It is a double miracle that we are not preparing for two funerals right now,” New York City Police Benevolent Association President Patrick J. Lynch said in a statement.

Westlake Legal Group bronx-shooting1 Gunman who targeted NYPD officers in 2 'premeditated' attacks has violent past, previous shootout with cops Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc d99dc2a4-5ba5-52d7-823e-5460660c0ad9 article

New York City police officers work the scene of a police-involved shooting outside the 41st precinct Sunday in the Bronx. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Both Cuomo and de Blasio condemned the shootings. Cuomo said the attacks left him “horrified” while de Blasio told New Yorkers these were clear attempts “to assassinate” police officers.

“There is too much hatred out there, too much hatred in general and too much hatred directed at our officers,” de Blasio said at a news conference.

The attacks come amid rising tensions between the city’s 34,000-member force and the administration of de Blasio, who has implemented several measures that critics say are hostile to police.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

De Blasio oversaw a continued dramatic decrease of the stop and frisk policy, which gave beat cops wide latitude to detain and search people for weapons, made the Big Apple a sanctuary city and has slated the Rikers Island jail for closure. In addition, new criminal justice reforms passed by state lawmakers effectively end cash bail for a wide variety of criminal suspects.

Fox News’ Greg Wilson contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group NYPD-Saturday-evening-shooting-suspect-split Gunman who targeted NYPD officers in 2 'premeditated' attacks has violent past, previous shootout with cops Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc d99dc2a4-5ba5-52d7-823e-5460660c0ad9 article   Westlake Legal Group NYPD-Saturday-evening-shooting-suspect-split Gunman who targeted NYPD officers in 2 'premeditated' attacks has violent past, previous shootout with cops Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc d99dc2a4-5ba5-52d7-823e-5460660c0ad9 article

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Army soldiers killed in Afghanistan attack identified, were part of special forces group

Two U.S. Army Special Forces soldiers who were killed when American and Afghan troops were fired on during a mission in Afghanistan were identified by the Pentagon on Sunday.

The soldiers, both assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne) at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, were Sgt. 1st Class Javier Jaguar Gutierrez of San Antonio, Texas and Sgt. 1st Class Antonio Rey Rodriguez of Las Cruces, N.M.

Both soldiers, who were both posthumously promoted, were 28 years old, according to the Department of Defense. U.S. Special Forces soldiers are also called Green Berets.

AFGHANISTAN ‘INSIDER ATTACK’ LEAVES 2 US SOLDIERS DEAD, 6 WOUNDED

The two were killed Saturday after they wounded up in a firefight with a gunman that injured six others in the Nangarhar province in eastern Afghanistan.

“Sgt. 1st Class Gutierrez was a warrior that exemplified selfless service and a commitment to the mission, both values that we embody here in the 7th Special Forces Group,”  Col. John W. Sannes, 7th Special Forces Group Commander said in a statement.

Westlake Legal Group AfghanistanSplit_1 Army soldiers killed in Afghanistan attack identified, were part of special forces group Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/world/conflicts fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/world fnc b8798764-5511-5b73-b06a-435f7919539f article

Antonio R. Rodriguez and Javier J. Gutierrez, both 28, were killed in Afghanistan on Saturday. (Department of Defense)

Gutierrez enlisted in the Army in 2009 as an infantryman and stationed at Fort Bragg. In 2012, he attended the Special Forces Assessment and Selection at Fort Bragg and was selected to attend the Special Forces Qualification Course, graduating in 2015 as a Special Forces Communications Sergeant. He was previously deployed once to Iraq and Afghanistan.

“Our priority now is to take care of his family and teammates, we will provide the best possible care possible during these trying times,” Sannes said.

Rodriguez also enlisted with the Army in 2009 and completed training at Fort Benning in Georgia before it was assigned to the 3rd Ranger Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment. He deployed eight times with the 75th Ranger Regiment and twice with 3rd Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne) in support of Operation Freedom’s Sentinel.

“Sgt. 1st Class Rodriguez was selfless and served honorably; he was certainly among the best in our unit,” Sannes said. “Here at the Red Empire, we take care of our own, and Sgt. 1st Class Rodriguez’ family will forever be a part of us, we will assist them in any way we can to help them through these trying times.”

An Afghan defense ministry official, who was not identified because he was not authorized to speak to the media, told the Associated Press the shooter was an Afghan soldier who had argued with the U.S. forces before opening fire. He was not a Taliban infiltrator, the official said.

The U.S. military, however, has not officially called the incident an “insider attack,” because the motive remains unclear and the shooter “was not one of the soldiers on the patrol,” a U.S. defense official told Fox News. Defense officials said Sunday the attack remains under investigation.

Such attacks have been frequent occurrences in the nearly two decades U.S. troops have been deployed in the country. In 2012, for example, 25 percent of American military deaths in Afghanistan were caused by allied Afghan forces, military officials have said.

On Saturday, military spokesman Col. Sonny Leggett issued in a statement saying those involved in the most recent attack were “engaged by direct firing.”

JIM HANSON: GET OUT OF AFGHANISTAN — A CLEAR, SPECIFIC DECLARATION WOULD LET US LEAVE AND PUT OUR ENEMIES ON NOTICE

In addition to the Taliban, “we are not ruling out ISIS” being responsible for the attack, the defense official told Fox News. Nangarhar Province — where the attack took place — is home to roughly 200 fighters affiliated with the Islamic State.

U.S. special forces soldiers led the mission at the district center in eastern Afghanistan on Saturday afternoon. Typically, special forces will conduct these types of missions with conventional Army infantry soldiers for added security on the perimeter. They also partner with Afghan soldiers.

Since Jan.1, six U.S. service members have been killed in Afghanistan, including the two soldiers killed Saturday. Last year, 22 U.S. service members were killed in action there.

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The Trump administration is weighing a decision to remove up to 4,000 US troops from Afghanistan.

There are currently roughly 12,000 US troops deployed there.

At the height of US military involvement in 2010, there were over 100,000 Americans deployed to Afghanistan and nearly 500 killed that year.

Fox News’ Lucas Tomlinson, Nick Givas, and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AfghanistanSplit_1 Army soldiers killed in Afghanistan attack identified, were part of special forces group Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/world/conflicts fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/world fnc b8798764-5511-5b73-b06a-435f7919539f article   Westlake Legal Group AfghanistanSplit_1 Army soldiers killed in Afghanistan attack identified, were part of special forces group Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/world/conflicts fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/world fnc b8798764-5511-5b73-b06a-435f7919539f article

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Lew Olowski: Democrats fail the Truman test — debate highlights where each 2020 contender falls short

Westlake Legal Group HarryTruman Lew Olowski: Democrats fail the Truman test — debate highlights where each 2020 contender falls short Lew Olowski fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 8fb5f26b-a4f1-5773-8a41-0629260e0770

The Democratic party elected some of history’s greatest presidents, from Andrew Jackson to John F. Kennedy.

Unfortunately, not one of the party’s 2020 presidential candidates measures up. Least of all Michael Bloomberg. He was absent altogether from the Democratic presidential debate in New Hampshire yet by saying nothing he gave the best answers. The rest of the party failed under a key metric of presidential decision-making: the Truman test.

“He alone, in all the world, must say Yes or No to that awesome, ultimate question,” said President Harry S. Truman, a Democrat, referring to his decision to detonate nuclear weapons over Japan, ending World War II.

NOVAK & ROONEY: THERE HAS TO BE A BETTER WAY TO CONDUCT PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES

Nobody on the debate stage could even match President Donald Trump for decisiveness, let alone Truman.

Debate moderator David Muir invited the candidates to compare themselves to Trump. He asked whether they, too, would have authorized Trump’s two-birds-with-one-drone strike against the Iranian terrorists Qassem Soleimani and Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER

“If your national security team came to you with an opportunity to strike, would Soleimani have been dead, or would he still be alive?” asked Muir.

“It depends on the circumstances, it depends if there was an alternative, it depends on what the different effects would be,” said Pete Buttigieg. He promised to “read the intelligence, pay attention to the international security situation, consult our allies,” etc.

President Truman kept a sign on his desk in the Oval Office that said, “The buck stops here.”

President Pete’s desk would say, “It depends.”

More from Opinion

Muir then asked Vice President Joe Biden, “Would you have ordered the strike?”

“No, and the reason I wouldn’t have ordered the strike: there is no evidence yet of imminent threat that was going to come from him,” said Biden.

For evidence, Biden should look at the graves of the 600 American soldiers whom Soleimani killed in his years-long campaign against the United States.

The question of “imminent threat” is a red herring. But of course Biden would play such semantic games. He and President Barack Obama routinely spoke in euphemism.

The War On Terror was rebranded “overseas contingency operation.” The overseas contingency operation against radical Islamist terrorists now confronted “violent extremism.” Violent extremism inspired “man-caused disasters” rather than terrorist attacks. Perpetrators of man-caused disaster were named on a kill list known as “the disposition matrix.” A man-caused disaster that slipped past the disposition matrix was downplayed as “workplace violence.”

And ransom for hostages became “resolving a financial dispute” when Obama paid it to the violent extremists in Tehran, who employ man-caused disasters to commit workplace violence against the United States, notwithstanding our disposition matrix in the overseas contingency operation.

But wait! There’s more.

Unlike in business, the president cannot outsource America’s national security. A strategy that depends on “interaction with other countries” is doomed to fail.

Ignoring North Korea exemplified “strategic patience.” Fighting a war in Libya meant “leading from behind.” Leading from behind devolved into “kinetic military action.” Threatening kinetic military action was just “coercive diplomacy.” Coercive diplomacy translated into “a red line” against chemical weapons. Behind the red line was — nothing at all. Euphemism for leadership.

Biden passed the buck in national security. Now Sen. Bernie Sanders passed Biden in national polling.

Unfortunately, Sanders fails the Truman test, too.

In fact, Sanders would have directly opposed Truman. The Truman Doctrine committed the United States to fighting communism worldwide. It defined American foreign policy for the rest of the century.

Sanders, on the other hand, is a self-described socialist who undermined America’s anti-communist foreign policy for decades. He even honeymooned in the Soviet Union, yet refused to meet communism’s most famous dissident, Nobel laureate Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, even though they lived within driving distance from each other in Vermont.

Sure, Sanders calls himself a democratic socialist. Likewise, the Soviet Union was technically the “Union of Soviet Socialist Republics” and North Korea remains “The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.”

So of course Sanders cannot tell America’s allies from its enemies. At the debate, he lumped Saudi Arabia, a U.S. ally, into the same category as adversaries like Kim Jong Un, Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping.

Meanwhile, billionaire hedge fund banker Tom Steyer would apply the business strategies of marketing and outsourcing to America’s national security. “Barack Obama used diplomacy to get Iran to give up its nuclear ambitions in return for our releasing economic sanctions along with our partners around the world,” he said.

But the Iran deal was puffery, and a bait-and-switch marketing trick. Like day traders, the U.S. and its allies paid upfront, hoping Iran’s promises would earn dividends later. And the deal represented a failure of salesmanship: Obama never succeeded in ratifying it as an actual treaty.

For Iran, however, the deal was yellowcake: it let Iran keep its terror and have nukes, too.

In any case, Steyer believes nuclear weapons are not even as dangerous as global warming. “The biggest problem that we face internationally in the world is climate change,” he said.

And yet Steyer’s buck stops with everyone else. “It can only be solved with diplomacy and allies and interaction with other countries,” he said.

Unlike in business, the president cannot outsource America’s national security. A strategy that depends on “interaction with other countries” is doomed to fail. Though it might enhance Steyer’s fortune in the meantime.

So far in the Democratic primary race, only one moment is faithful to Truman.

On Feb. 3, Iowa Democrats bungled their nomination contest. Buttigieg declared himself the winner “before a single vote was officially reported.” Yet Sanders actually won the most votes by a large margin of victory.

Similarly, on Nov. 2, 1948, the Chicago Tribune falsely called the results of the national presidential election. “Dewey Defeats Truman” read the front-page headline. Two days later, Truman posed for a photograph with  it. To this day the headline remains an icon of fake news.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The difference is that in 1948 the actual winner was immediately clear. In Iowa, on the other hand, no candidate can be called the winner.

They’re all losers.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY LEW OLOWSKI

Westlake Legal Group HarryTruman Lew Olowski: Democrats fail the Truman test — debate highlights where each 2020 contender falls short Lew Olowski fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 8fb5f26b-a4f1-5773-8a41-0629260e0770   Westlake Legal Group HarryTruman Lew Olowski: Democrats fail the Truman test — debate highlights where each 2020 contender falls short Lew Olowski fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 8fb5f26b-a4f1-5773-8a41-0629260e0770

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Lew Olowski: Democrats fail the Truman test — debate highlights where each 2020 contender falls short

Westlake Legal Group HarryTruman Lew Olowski: Democrats fail the Truman test — debate highlights where each 2020 contender falls short Lew Olowski fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 8fb5f26b-a4f1-5773-8a41-0629260e0770

The Democratic party elected some of history’s greatest presidents, from Andrew Jackson to John F. Kennedy.

Unfortunately, not one of the party’s 2020 presidential candidates measures up. Least of all Michael Bloomberg. He was absent altogether from the Democratic presidential debate in New Hampshire yet by saying nothing he gave the best answers. The rest of the party failed under a key metric of presidential decision-making: the Truman test.

“He alone, in all the world, must say Yes or No to that awesome, ultimate question,” said President Harry S. Truman, a Democrat, referring to his decision to detonate nuclear weapons over Japan, ending World War II.

NOVAK & ROONEY: THERE HAS TO BE A BETTER WAY TO CONDUCT PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES

Nobody on the debate stage could even match President Donald Trump for decisiveness, let alone Truman.

Debate moderator David Muir invited the candidates to compare themselves to Trump. He asked whether they, too, would have authorized Trump’s two-birds-with-one-drone strike against the Iranian terrorists Qassem Soleimani and Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER

“If your national security team came to you with an opportunity to strike, would Soleimani have been dead, or would he still be alive?” asked Muir.

“It depends on the circumstances, it depends if there was an alternative, it depends on what the different effects would be,” said Pete Buttigieg. He promised to “read the intelligence, pay attention to the international security situation, consult our allies,” etc.

President Truman kept a sign on his desk in the Oval Office that said, “The buck stops here.”

President Pete’s desk would say, “It depends.”

More from Opinion

Muir then asked Vice President Joe Biden, “Would you have ordered the strike?”

“No, and the reason I wouldn’t have ordered the strike: there is no evidence yet of imminent threat that was going to come from him,” said Biden.

For evidence, Biden should look at the graves of the 600 American soldiers whom Soleimani killed in his years-long campaign against the United States.

The question of “imminent threat” is a red herring. But of course Biden would play such semantic games. He and President Barack Obama routinely spoke in euphemism.

The War On Terror was rebranded “overseas contingency operation.” The overseas contingency operation against radical Islamist terrorists now confronted “violent extremism.” Violent extremism inspired “man-caused disasters” rather than terrorist attacks. Perpetrators of man-caused disaster were named on a kill list known as “the disposition matrix.” A man-caused disaster that slipped past the disposition matrix was downplayed as “workplace violence.”

And ransom for hostages became “resolving a financial dispute” when Obama paid it to the violent extremists in Tehran, who employ man-caused disasters to commit workplace violence against the United States, notwithstanding our disposition matrix in the overseas contingency operation.

But wait! There’s more.

Unlike in business, the president cannot outsource America’s national security. A strategy that depends on “interaction with other countries” is doomed to fail.

Ignoring North Korea exemplified “strategic patience.” Fighting a war in Libya meant “leading from behind.” Leading from behind devolved into “kinetic military action.” Threatening kinetic military action was just “coercive diplomacy.” Coercive diplomacy translated into “a red line” against chemical weapons. Behind the red line was — nothing at all. Euphemism for leadership.

Biden passed the buck in national security. Now Sen. Bernie Sanders passed Biden in national polling.

Unfortunately, Sanders fails the Truman test, too.

In fact, Sanders would have directly opposed Truman. The Truman Doctrine committed the United States to fighting communism worldwide. It defined American foreign policy for the rest of the century.

Sanders, on the other hand, is a self-described socialist who undermined America’s anti-communist foreign policy for decades. He even honeymooned in the Soviet Union, yet refused to meet communism’s most famous dissident, Nobel laureate Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, even though they lived within driving distance from each other in Vermont.

Sure, Sanders calls himself a democratic socialist. Likewise, the Soviet Union was technically the “Union of Soviet Socialist Republics” and North Korea remains “The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.”

So of course Sanders cannot tell America’s allies from its enemies. At the debate, he lumped Saudi Arabia, a U.S. ally, into the same category as adversaries like Kim Jong Un, Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping.

Meanwhile, billionaire hedge fund banker Tom Steyer would apply the business strategies of marketing and outsourcing to America’s national security. “Barack Obama used diplomacy to get Iran to give up its nuclear ambitions in return for our releasing economic sanctions along with our partners around the world,” he said.

But the Iran deal was puffery, and a bait-and-switch marketing trick. Like day traders, the U.S. and its allies paid upfront, hoping Iran’s promises would earn dividends later. And the deal represented a failure of salesmanship: Obama never succeeded in ratifying it as an actual treaty.

For Iran, however, the deal was yellowcake: it let Iran keep its terror and have nukes, too.

In any case, Steyer believes nuclear weapons are not even as dangerous as global warming. “The biggest problem that we face internationally in the world is climate change,” he said.

And yet Steyer’s buck stops with everyone else. “It can only be solved with diplomacy and allies and interaction with other countries,” he said.

Unlike in business, the president cannot outsource America’s national security. A strategy that depends on “interaction with other countries” is doomed to fail. Though it might enhance Steyer’s fortune in the meantime.

So far in the Democratic primary race, only one moment is faithful to Truman.

On Feb. 3, Iowa Democrats bungled their nomination contest. Buttigieg declared himself the winner “before a single vote was officially reported.” Yet Sanders actually won the most votes by a large margin of victory.

Similarly, on Nov. 2, 1948, the Chicago Tribune falsely called the results of the national presidential election. “Dewey Defeats Truman” read the front-page headline. Two days later, Truman posed for a photograph with  it. To this day the headline remains an icon of fake news.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The difference is that in 1948 the actual winner was immediately clear. In Iowa, on the other hand, no candidate can be called the winner.

They’re all losers.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY LEW OLOWSKI

Westlake Legal Group HarryTruman Lew Olowski: Democrats fail the Truman test — debate highlights where each 2020 contender falls short Lew Olowski fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 8fb5f26b-a4f1-5773-8a41-0629260e0770   Westlake Legal Group HarryTruman Lew Olowski: Democrats fail the Truman test — debate highlights where each 2020 contender falls short Lew Olowski fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 8fb5f26b-a4f1-5773-8a41-0629260e0770

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Giuliani says John Bolton is ‘either a liar or a backstabber’ following book revelations

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6110992297001_6110990900001-vs Giuliani says John Bolton is 'either a liar or a backstabber' following book revelations fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc feb04166-9678-56a2-a768-64cadacf0d39 article Andrew O'Reilly

President Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani blasted former National Security Adviser John Bolton for claiming in his new book that the president tied aid to Ukraine to his request that the country announce investigations of the Bidens.

In an interview on Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures,” Giuliani – who Bolton claims was in the room when Trump made the request – said Bolton was “either a either a liar or a back-stabber.”

“He went around my back to the secretary of state and complained,” Giuliani said. “I don’t know what John’s up to. He’s either a liar or a backstabber.”

NADLER THREATENS BOLTON SUBPOENA AFTER IMPEACHMENT ENDS

The claim in Bolton’s upcoming book, which was first reported by the New York Times, led to renewed calls during Trump’s impeachment trial that he – along with acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney and other high ranking administration officials – should be called as witnesses. The Republican-controlled Senate eventually voted against calling any witnesses in Trump’s trial and ultimately acquitted the president on the two articles brought against him.

Giuliani said he felt betrayed by Bolton for his comments and said he considered him a “friend.”

“I’m very angry at John because John says I was a hand grenade,” Giuliani said. “At no time, during the entire period this was going on did John Bolton, who I’ve known for ten years and consider a friend, did he come up to me and say Rudy I’m concerned about what you’re doing, I’m worried about what you’re doing. Never.”

Following Trump’s acquittal, Democrats said they are mulling over whether to subpoena Bolton to testify about his time in Trump’s White House.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In early January, Bolton said in a statement he would be willing to testify before the Senate trial if subpoenaed to meet his “obligations both as a citizen and as former National Security Advisor.”

But last week, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., told MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow that after the Senate voted to not call witnesses, Democrats approached Bolton’s counsel to see if he would be willing to give a written statement “describing what he observed in terms of the president’s Ukraine misconduct.”

Schiff added: “For whatever reason, he was willing to testify before the Senate but apart from that seems intent on saving it for his book. He’ll have to answer for that.”

Fox News’ Brie Stimson contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6110992297001_6110990900001-vs Giuliani says John Bolton is 'either a liar or a backstabber' following book revelations fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc feb04166-9678-56a2-a768-64cadacf0d39 article Andrew O'Reilly   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6110992297001_6110990900001-vs Giuliani says John Bolton is 'either a liar or a backstabber' following book revelations fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc feb04166-9678-56a2-a768-64cadacf0d39 article Andrew O'Reilly

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Coronavirus Live Updates: Deaths in China Surpass Toll From SARS

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168575025_b84fe21b-75b0-4339-a5a7-2af975042d50-articleLarge Coronavirus Live Updates: Deaths in China Surpass Toll From SARS Xi Jinping World Health Organization Hubei Province (China) Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

Lining up this weekend to get tickets for free masks and sanitizer outside a Beijing pharmacy.Credit…Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

The coronavirus death toll in China has risen to 811, surpassing the toll from the SARS epidemic of 2002-3, according to official data released on Sunday.

The number of confirmed infections rose to 37,198, according to China’s National Health Commission. Eighty-nine deaths and 2,656 new cases were recorded in the preceding 24 hours, most of them in Hubei Province, the heart of the outbreak. A United States citizen died from the coronavirus in Wuhan, the provincial capital, American officials said on Saturday.

The SARS epidemic, which also began in China, killed 774 people worldwide. There have been only two confirmed deaths from the new coronavirus outside mainland China: one in Hong Kong and one in the Philippines.

Many doctors believe that deaths and infections from the current epidemic are undercounted in China because testing facilities are under severe strain.

The number of new cases has stabilized in recent days, but World Health Organization officials cautioned against reading too much into those figures, saying that Wuhan and Hubei were in the midst of a “very intense outbreak.”

Westlake Legal Group china-wuhan-coronavirus-maps-promo-articleLarge-v18 Coronavirus Live Updates: Deaths in China Surpass Toll From SARS Xi Jinping World Health Organization Hubei Province (China) Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

Coronavirus Map: Tracking the Spread of the Outbreak

The virus has sickened more than 37,500 people in China and 24 other countries.

“It’s very, very early to make any predictions,” said Dr. Michael Ryan, executive director of the W.H.O.’s health emergencies program.

The measures put in place in Hubei appear to be “paying off,” said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the W.H.O.’s director general, but he warned that outbreaks like these are unpredictable. “We have to understand it with caution because it can show stability for a few days and then they can shoot up,” he said. “I’ve said it many times: It’s slow now, but it may accelerate.”

Britain confirmed a new coronavirus case on Sunday, bringing the total cases in the country to four. The infected person was a “known contact of a previously confirmed U.K. case,” the chief medical officer, Chris Whitty, said in a statement.

The announcement came just hours after a flight from Wuhan carrying 200 Britons and European citizens arrived in Britain. About 150 of the passengers were taken to a center in Milton Keynes, England, to be quarantined for 14 days.

The authorities in Spain said on Sunday that the country had confirmed its second coronavirus case: a British man who lives on the island of Majorca with his family.

The man had reported to the hospital on Friday where his wife and children later tested negative for the virus, according to Spain’s national center for microbiology.

The infected man, who has been quarantined, had been in contact with a person who tested positive for the virus in France, Spanish officials said. The authorities in Majorca are now investigating whether the infected man came into contact with other people on the island before going to the hospital.

All 3,600 people aboard a cruise ship that had been held for four days in Hong Kong disembarked on Sunday after its crew members tested negative for the coronavirus, health officials said.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 5, 2020

    • Where has the virus spread?
      You can track its movement with this map.
    • How is the United States being affected?
      There have been at least a dozen cases. American citizens and permanent residents who fly to the United States from China are now subject to a two-week quarantine.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      Several countries, including the United States, have discouraged travel to China, and several airlines have canceled flights. Many travelers have been left in limbo while looking to change or cancel bookings.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands is the most important thing you can do.

The ship, the World Dream, had been grounded since Wednesday because eight people from mainland China who were on a previous journey were found to be infected. Everyone was cleared to leave after no cases were found among the 1,800 crew members.

Most passengers had kept to their rooms during the holding period, watching movies or playing mahjong. Some ventured outside on balconies, waving to loved ones or shouting messages to reporters on the dock below.

“I felt really bored staying in my room, but we know that the quarantine is to keep everyone else in the city safe,” Charlotte Chan, a sales executive, said on Sunday after she disembarked wearing two layers of masks.

The coronavirus continues to ripple through China’s huge network of auto and parts factories.

The longer the China supply chain remains paralyzed, the greater the chance that production in Asia, Europe and the United States could grind to a halt because of shortages of components. A lot is at stake in getting the factories humming again: The auto industry employs eight million people worldwide.

Volkswagen said on Saturday that it would not resume production at most of its production facilities in China until Feb. 17, following the lead of BMW, PSA, Toyota and others.

“We are working hard on getting back to normal production processes, facing challenges due to the nationwide restarting of supply chains as well as limited travel options for our production employees,” Volkswagen said in a statement. The only plant that will reopen on Monday is in Shanghai, the company said.

Even a relatively brief interruption in the flow of parts and materials could have far-reaching effects.

The shutdowns at Chinese factories have hit automakers from several angles. The virus is already causing sales losses in China, by far the world’s largest car market. If they are forced to shut down factories outside of China because of parts shortages, as Hyundai has already done in South Korea, they could also lose sales in other regions.

Six more people on a cruise ship that has been quarantined for nearly a week in Yokohama, Japan, have tested positive for the coronavirus, passengers were told on Sunday. Five of them were crew members.

About 3,700 people on the ship, the Diamond Princess, have been quarantined since last Monday, after it was learned that a passenger who disembarked in Hong Kong on Jan. 25 had been infected.

The Japanese health authorities have tested hundreds of people on the ship. The six new cases, which were confirmed by the Health Ministry on Sunday, bring the total to 70.

The announcement to passengers, a recording of which was posted online, said that the six people were being taken off the ship and that eight other passengers had been taken to hospitals for reasons unrelated to the coronavirus.

For Doug Perez, the most dangerous part of each day in Wuhan is taking his dog for a walk.

Mr. Perez, 28, grew up around San Francisco, but he has taught math and science for the last two years in the Chinese city where the coronavirus emerged. When it began to spread, he chose to stay.

So when Chubby, a 1-year-old Labrador, needs to go out, Mr. Perez pulls on gloves, straps on a mask, and wriggles into the special jacket and pants that are sprayed down with alcohol after every trip outdoors. Then he slides a yellow jacket over Chubby, too.

The State Department has evacuated hundreds of Americans from Hubei Province, where the outbreak began. But some, like Mr. Perez, have decided not to leave. In his case, it is because he does not want to abandon his girlfriend, who is Chinese.

They have spent more than two weeks in his apartment, along with his girlfriend’s brother. They cook, they watch television (three seasons of “The Sopranos” so far), and they clean — a lot. They scrub down surfaces, furiously wash their hands and disinfect their clothes after going out.

“Sometimes I find I’m out of time, which is crazy,” Mr. Perez said. “You’d think I’d have all the time in the world, but with the coronavirus, a lot of time is spent cleaning.”

Other Americans have also stayed in China because of loved ones. Gabrielle Autry, 26, from Georgia, lives in the eastern city of Hangzhou. She has looked into flights that would take her to the United States — but her fiancé, a Chinese citizen, would not be able to join her, since all foreign citizens are barred from entering the United States if they have recently been in China. If the two were married, it would be a different story.

For now, they are mostly stuck at home, a little bored.

“Together it’s O.K., but alone it would be horrible,” she said. “I just couldn’t fathom it.”

Mr. Perez has tried to make the best of the isolation, working on his coding skills and reading news about the virus. He talks to his family nearly every day. His parents have sent him masks.

“They’ve been supportive of my decision to stay,” he said. “They regret it, but they know me, and I guess they know I’m stubborn about some things.”

His classes have been canceled, and he is not sure if he will be paid after February. The announcement of an American’s death in Wuhan was upsetting, as are the “rumors and mass hysteria” that he often sees on social media.

To treat themselves, the household orders takeout now and again, even though they consider it safer to cook.

“After a rough week, getting a pizza in is worth the risk,” Mr. Perez said.

Chinese academics, professionals and others have created digital petitions calling for freedom of speech amid a widespread outpouring of anger and grief online for Dr. Li Wenliang, who gave early warnings about the coronavirus in Wuhan, only to die of it last week himself.

“Change, and only change, is the best commemoration of Dr. Li Wenliang,” said a petition that had been signed by 28 academics, lawyers and business figures by Sunday morning.

“Otherwise, all our outrage and all our tears will end up as bubbles,” it said. “And we will continue suffering from man-made disasters and our offspring will continue to live in fear.”

Around the country, people have been mourning Dr. Li and engaging in soul-searching, both in private and online, as to whether they’ve been complicit under an authoritarian government that allows for little dissent.

The petitions reflect concerns that the online expressions of frustration will fade, as in several past instances, including a 2008 earthquake in Sichuan Province and a train accident in 2011.

By Sunday, a petition on the site Matters had been signed by nearly 1,000 people. It urges the government to apologize to Dr. Li and seven other medical workers who were reprimanded for sharing knowledge about the virus. It also calls for the punishment of officials who suppressed information about the outbreak.

“A healthy society should allow more than one voice,” one petition quoted Dr. Li as telling the Chinese magazine Caixin.

For China’s leader, Xi Jinping, the outbreak is not just a health crisis, but a political one: a test of the authoritarian system he has built around himself. As his government struggles to contain the virus amid rising public discontent with its performance, the changes that Mr. Xi has ushered in could make it difficult for him to escape blame.

“It’s a big shock to the legitimacy of the ruling party,” said Rong Jian, a writer about politics in Beijing. “I think it could be only second to the June 4 incident of 1989. It’s that big,” he said, referring to the armed crackdown on Tiananmen Square protesters that year.

“There’s no doubt about his control over power,” he added, “but the manner of control and its consequences have hurt his legitimacy and reputation.”

Mr. Xi has recognized what is at stake, calling the outbreak “a major test of China’s system and capacity for governance.”

As China’s battle with the coronavirus intensified, Mr. Xi put the country’s No. 2 leader, Li Keqiang, in charge of a leadership group handling the emergency, effectively turning him into the public face of the government’s response. It was Mr. Li who traveled to Wuhan to visit doctors.

Mr. Xi’s retreat from the spotlight, some analysts said, signaled an effort to insulate himself from a campaign that may draw public ire. Yet Mr. Xi has consolidated power, sidelining or eliminating rivals, so there are few people left to blame when something goes wrong.

In an unusual move, a county in Hubei Province, the epicenter of the outbreak, is offering cash rewards to people who report a fever — whether their own or someone else’s.

China has responded to the epidemic by sealing off large cities, quarantining people en masse and punishing people for failing to report flulike symptoms.

Now, the Fang County government is trying “incentives,” according to a statement posted Saturday on its website. People who report their own fevers will receive 1,000 renminbi, the equivalent of $143 — a few days’ salary for the average Hubei resident.

The statement also said that people who report the fevers of others would get 500 renminbi, which raised the prospect of neighbors turning one another in. Communist Party cadres who investigate and verify such reports would receive the same amount.

The measures are intended “to promote the early detection, early isolation, early reporting, and early treatment of fever patients,” the statement said.

The first confirmed death of an American citizen in the coronavirus outbreak, which the United States Embassy in Beijing reported on Saturday, is likely to raise questions about whether the State Department has done enough to ensure the safety of Americans in China.

Few details about the American, who died in Wuhan on Thursday, were immediately available. The embassy said the person was 60 years old. Two people familiar with the matter said the person was a woman and had underlying health conditions.

It was not clear whether the person had tried to leave Wuhan on any of the flights organized by the State Department, which have evacuated diplomats and other American citizens from the city and other parts of China.

In a statement, the State Department took a defensive tone, saying that since Jan. 29, it had evacuated around 850 people, most of them Americans, on five charter flights out of Wuhan.

The agency said it had “no higher priority than the welfare and safety of U.S. citizens abroad,” but there are no current plans to conduct additional flights, even as some Americans elsewhere in China have been asking to be evacuated.

The State Department said Americans should heed its Feb. 2 advisory not to travel to China. To show that its flights appeared to have met the immediate needs of Americans in Wuhan, the department said that its last charter flight, on Thursday, had extra seats after accommodating all Americans on the manifest, so officials were able to offer seats to more than 30 Canadians.

Reporting was contributed by Motoko Rich, Eimi Yamamitsu, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, Yonette Joseph, Raphael Minder, Rich Barbieri, Raymond Zhong, Tiffany May, Katherine Li, Li Yuan, Chris Buckley, Steven Lee Myers, Sui-Lee Wee, Austin Ramzy and Edward Wong. Yiwei Wang contributed research.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Coronavirus Live Updates: Deaths in China Surpass Toll From SARS

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168575025_b84fe21b-75b0-4339-a5a7-2af975042d50-articleLarge Coronavirus Live Updates: Deaths in China Surpass Toll From SARS Xi Jinping World Health Organization Hubei Province (China) Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

Lining up this weekend to get tickets for free masks and sanitizer outside a Beijing pharmacy.Credit…Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

The coronavirus death toll in China has risen to 811, surpassing the toll from the SARS epidemic of 2002-3, according to official data released on Sunday.

The number of confirmed infections rose to 37,198, according to China’s National Health Commission. Eighty-nine deaths and 2,656 new cases were recorded in the preceding 24 hours, most of them in Hubei Province, the heart of the outbreak. A United States citizen died from the coronavirus in Wuhan, the provincial capital, American officials said on Saturday.

The SARS epidemic, which also began in China, killed 774 people worldwide. There have been only two confirmed deaths from the new coronavirus outside mainland China: one in Hong Kong and one in the Philippines.

Many doctors believe that deaths and infections from the current epidemic are undercounted in China because testing facilities are under severe strain.

The number of new cases has stabilized in recent days, but World Health Organization officials cautioned against reading too much into those figures, saying that Wuhan and Hubei were in the midst of a “very intense outbreak.”

Westlake Legal Group china-wuhan-coronavirus-maps-promo-articleLarge-v18 Coronavirus Live Updates: Deaths in China Surpass Toll From SARS Xi Jinping World Health Organization Hubei Province (China) Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

Coronavirus Map: Tracking the Spread of the Outbreak

The virus has sickened more than 37,500 people in China and 24 other countries.

“It’s very, very early to make any predictions,” said Dr. Michael Ryan, executive director of the W.H.O.’s health emergencies program.

The measures put in place in Hubei appear to be “paying off,” said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the W.H.O.’s director general, but he warned that outbreaks like these are unpredictable. “We have to understand it with caution because it can show stability for a few days and then they can shoot up,” he said. “I’ve said it many times: It’s slow now, but it may accelerate.”

Britain confirmed a new coronavirus case on Sunday, bringing the total cases in the country to four. The infected person was a “known contact of a previously confirmed U.K. case,” the chief medical officer, Chris Whitty, said in a statement.

The announcement came just hours after a flight from Wuhan carrying 200 Britons and European citizens arrived in Britain. About 150 of the passengers were taken to a center in Milton Keynes, England, to be quarantined for 14 days.

The authorities in Spain said on Sunday that the country had confirmed its second coronavirus case: a British man who lives on the island of Majorca with his family.

The man had reported to the hospital on Friday where his wife and children later tested negative for the virus, according to Spain’s national center for microbiology.

The infected man, who has been quarantined, had been in contact with a person who tested positive for the virus in France, Spanish officials said. The authorities in Majorca are now investigating whether the infected man came into contact with other people on the island before going to the hospital.

All 3,600 people aboard a cruise ship that had been held for four days in Hong Kong disembarked on Sunday after its crew members tested negative for the coronavirus, health officials said.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 5, 2020

    • Where has the virus spread?
      You can track its movement with this map.
    • How is the United States being affected?
      There have been at least a dozen cases. American citizens and permanent residents who fly to the United States from China are now subject to a two-week quarantine.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      Several countries, including the United States, have discouraged travel to China, and several airlines have canceled flights. Many travelers have been left in limbo while looking to change or cancel bookings.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands is the most important thing you can do.

The ship, the World Dream, had been grounded since Wednesday because eight people from mainland China who were on a previous journey were found to be infected. Everyone was cleared to leave after no cases were found among the 1,800 crew members.

Most passengers had kept to their rooms during the holding period, watching movies or playing mahjong. Some ventured outside on balconies, waving to loved ones or shouting messages to reporters on the dock below.

“I felt really bored staying in my room, but we know that the quarantine is to keep everyone else in the city safe,” Charlotte Chan, a sales executive, said on Sunday after she disembarked wearing two layers of masks.

The coronavirus continues to ripple through China’s huge network of auto and parts factories.

The longer the China supply chain remains paralyzed, the greater the chance that production in Asia, Europe and the United States could grind to a halt because of shortages of components. A lot is at stake in getting the factories humming again: The auto industry employs eight million people worldwide.

Volkswagen said on Saturday that it would not resume production at most of its production facilities in China until Feb. 17, following the lead of BMW, PSA, Toyota and others.

“We are working hard on getting back to normal production processes, facing challenges due to the nationwide restarting of supply chains as well as limited travel options for our production employees,” Volkswagen said in a statement. The only plant that will reopen on Monday is in Shanghai, the company said.

Even a relatively brief interruption in the flow of parts and materials could have far-reaching effects.

The shutdowns at Chinese factories have hit automakers from several angles. The virus is already causing sales losses in China, by far the world’s largest car market. If they are forced to shut down factories outside of China because of parts shortages, as Hyundai has already done in South Korea, they could also lose sales in other regions.

Six more people on a cruise ship that has been quarantined for nearly a week in Yokohama, Japan, have tested positive for the coronavirus, passengers were told on Sunday. Five of them were crew members.

About 3,700 people on the ship, the Diamond Princess, have been quarantined since last Monday, after it was learned that a passenger who disembarked in Hong Kong on Jan. 25 had been infected.

The Japanese health authorities have tested hundreds of people on the ship. The six new cases, which were confirmed by the Health Ministry on Sunday, bring the total to 70.

The announcement to passengers, a recording of which was posted online, said that the six people were being taken off the ship and that eight other passengers had been taken to hospitals for reasons unrelated to the coronavirus.

For Doug Perez, the most dangerous part of each day in Wuhan is taking his dog for a walk.

Mr. Perez, 28, grew up around San Francisco, but he has taught math and science for the last two years in the Chinese city where the coronavirus emerged. When it began to spread, he chose to stay.

So when Chubby, a 1-year-old Labrador, needs to go out, Mr. Perez pulls on gloves, straps on a mask, and wriggles into the special jacket and pants that are sprayed down with alcohol after every trip outdoors. Then he slides a yellow jacket over Chubby, too.

The State Department has evacuated hundreds of Americans from Hubei Province, where the outbreak began. But some, like Mr. Perez, have decided not to leave. In his case, it is because he does not want to abandon his girlfriend, who is Chinese.

They have spent more than two weeks in his apartment, along with his girlfriend’s brother. They cook, they watch television (three seasons of “The Sopranos” so far), and they clean — a lot. They scrub down surfaces, furiously wash their hands and disinfect their clothes after going out.

“Sometimes I find I’m out of time, which is crazy,” Mr. Perez said. “You’d think I’d have all the time in the world, but with the coronavirus, a lot of time is spent cleaning.”

Other Americans have also stayed in China because of loved ones. Gabrielle Autry, 26, from Georgia, lives in the eastern city of Hangzhou. She has looked into flights that would take her to the United States — but her fiancé, a Chinese citizen, would not be able to join her, since all foreign citizens are barred from entering the United States if they have recently been in China. If the two were married, it would be a different story.

For now, they are mostly stuck at home, a little bored.

“Together it’s O.K., but alone it would be horrible,” she said. “I just couldn’t fathom it.”

Mr. Perez has tried to make the best of the isolation, working on his coding skills and reading news about the virus. He talks to his family nearly every day. His parents have sent him masks.

“They’ve been supportive of my decision to stay,” he said. “They regret it, but they know me, and I guess they know I’m stubborn about some things.”

His classes have been canceled, and he is not sure if he will be paid after February. The announcement of an American’s death in Wuhan was upsetting, as are the “rumors and mass hysteria” that he often sees on social media.

To treat themselves, the household orders takeout now and again, even though they consider it safer to cook.

“After a rough week, getting a pizza in is worth the risk,” Mr. Perez said.

Chinese academics, professionals and others have created digital petitions calling for freedom of speech amid a widespread outpouring of anger and grief online for Dr. Li Wenliang, who gave early warnings about the coronavirus in Wuhan, only to die of it last week himself.

“Change, and only change, is the best commemoration of Dr. Li Wenliang,” said a petition that had been signed by 28 academics, lawyers and business figures by Sunday morning.

“Otherwise, all our outrage and all our tears will end up as bubbles,” it said. “And we will continue suffering from man-made disasters and our offspring will continue to live in fear.”

Around the country, people have been mourning Dr. Li and engaging in soul-searching, both in private and online, as to whether they’ve been complicit under an authoritarian government that allows for little dissent.

The petitions reflect concerns that the online expressions of frustration will fade, as in several past instances, including a 2008 earthquake in Sichuan Province and a train accident in 2011.

By Sunday, a petition on the site Matters had been signed by nearly 1,000 people. It urges the government to apologize to Dr. Li and seven other medical workers who were reprimanded for sharing knowledge about the virus. It also calls for the punishment of officials who suppressed information about the outbreak.

“A healthy society should allow more than one voice,” one petition quoted Dr. Li as telling the Chinese magazine Caixin.

For China’s leader, Xi Jinping, the outbreak is not just a health crisis, but a political one: a test of the authoritarian system he has built around himself. As his government struggles to contain the virus amid rising public discontent with its performance, the changes that Mr. Xi has ushered in could make it difficult for him to escape blame.

“It’s a big shock to the legitimacy of the ruling party,” said Rong Jian, a writer about politics in Beijing. “I think it could be only second to the June 4 incident of 1989. It’s that big,” he said, referring to the armed crackdown on Tiananmen Square protesters that year.

“There’s no doubt about his control over power,” he added, “but the manner of control and its consequences have hurt his legitimacy and reputation.”

Mr. Xi has recognized what is at stake, calling the outbreak “a major test of China’s system and capacity for governance.”

As China’s battle with the coronavirus intensified, Mr. Xi put the country’s No. 2 leader, Li Keqiang, in charge of a leadership group handling the emergency, effectively turning him into the public face of the government’s response. It was Mr. Li who traveled to Wuhan to visit doctors.

Mr. Xi’s retreat from the spotlight, some analysts said, signaled an effort to insulate himself from a campaign that may draw public ire. Yet Mr. Xi has consolidated power, sidelining or eliminating rivals, so there are few people left to blame when something goes wrong.

In an unusual move, a county in Hubei Province, the epicenter of the outbreak, is offering cash rewards to people who report a fever — whether their own or someone else’s.

China has responded to the epidemic by sealing off large cities, quarantining people en masse and punishing people for failing to report flulike symptoms.

Now, the Fang County government is trying “incentives,” according to a statement posted Saturday on its website. People who report their own fevers will receive 1,000 renminbi, the equivalent of $143 — a few days’ salary for the average Hubei resident.

The statement also said that people who report the fevers of others would get 500 renminbi, which raised the prospect of neighbors turning one another in. Communist Party cadres who investigate and verify such reports would receive the same amount.

The measures are intended “to promote the early detection, early isolation, early reporting, and early treatment of fever patients,” the statement said.

The first confirmed death of an American citizen in the coronavirus outbreak, which the United States Embassy in Beijing reported on Saturday, is likely to raise questions about whether the State Department has done enough to ensure the safety of Americans in China.

Few details about the American, who died in Wuhan on Thursday, were immediately available. The embassy said the person was 60 years old. Two people familiar with the matter said the person was a woman and had underlying health conditions.

It was not clear whether the person had tried to leave Wuhan on any of the flights organized by the State Department, which have evacuated diplomats and other American citizens from the city and other parts of China.

In a statement, the State Department took a defensive tone, saying that since Jan. 29, it had evacuated around 850 people, most of them Americans, on five charter flights out of Wuhan.

The agency said it had “no higher priority than the welfare and safety of U.S. citizens abroad,” but there are no current plans to conduct additional flights, even as some Americans elsewhere in China have been asking to be evacuated.

The State Department said Americans should heed its Feb. 2 advisory not to travel to China. To show that its flights appeared to have met the immediate needs of Americans in Wuhan, the department said that its last charter flight, on Thursday, had extra seats after accommodating all Americans on the manifest, so officials were able to offer seats to more than 30 Canadians.

Reporting was contributed by Motoko Rich, Eimi Yamamitsu, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, Yonette Joseph, Raphael Minder, Rich Barbieri, Raymond Zhong, Tiffany May, Katherine Li, Li Yuan, Chris Buckley, Steven Lee Myers, Sui-Lee Wee, Austin Ramzy and Edward Wong. Yiwei Wang contributed research.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Federal prosecutors seek to delay Michael Flynn’s sentencing date

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122730378001_6122737799001-vs Federal prosecutors seek to delay Michael Flynn's sentencing date fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc e31cf918-75c1-5776-8bad-3c405dd52d69 article Andrew O'Reilly

Federal prosecutors are looking to move back the sentencing date for Michael Flynn after President Trump’s former national security adviser withdrew his plea in December for lying to the FBI.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Washington did not specifically call for a postponement of Flynn’s Feb. 27 sentencing hearing in its most recent filing, but it did propose delaying a number of approaching deadlines that would ultimately make his sentencing unlikely.

Prosecutors argue in the new filing that Flynn’s former attorneys should testify after he claimed to have received ineffective assistance from them. Flynn had previously hired the premier D.C. law firm, Covington & Burling. Federal lawyers also want Judge Emmet Sullivan to order that Flynn has waived his attorney-client privileges in his communications with Covington & Burling.

DOJ CLASHES WITH FLYNN LAWYERS OVER BID TO OUST PROSECUTORS AND DISMISS CASE

“The government requests that the Court suspend the current briefing schedule concerning the defendant’s [motion] until such time as the government has been able to confer with Covington regarding the information it seeks,” prosecutors wrote. “While Covington has indicated a willingness to comply with this request, it has understandably declined to do so in the absence of a Court order confirming the waiver of attorney-client privilege.”

Flynn in January moved to withdraw his guilty plea for lying to the FBI in the Russia probe, citing “bad faith” by the government. That court filing came just days after the Justice Department reversed course to recommend up to six months of prison time in his case, alleging he was not fully cooperating or accepting responsibility for his actions.

“The prosecution has shown abject bad faith in pure retaliation against Mr. Flynn since he retained new counsel,” Flynn’s attorneys wrote in the filing. “This can only be because with new, unconflicted counsel, Mr. Flynn refused to lie for the prosecution.”

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The filing continued: “Justice is not a game, and there should be no room for such gamesmanship in the Department of Justice.”

Flynn’s case stemmed from a 2017 FBI interview, in which he was asked about his conversations with former Russian Ambassador to the U.S. Sergey Kislyak. Flynn ultimately pleaded guilty to making false statements regarding those conversations during his interview, as part of former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation.

Judge Sullivan in December rejected claims from Flynn’s lawyers that he was pressured to plead guilty to lying to federal investigators about his contacts with the Russian diplomat.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122730378001_6122737799001-vs Federal prosecutors seek to delay Michael Flynn's sentencing date fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc e31cf918-75c1-5776-8bad-3c405dd52d69 article Andrew O'Reilly   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122730378001_6122737799001-vs Federal prosecutors seek to delay Michael Flynn's sentencing date fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc e31cf918-75c1-5776-8bad-3c405dd52d69 article Andrew O'Reilly

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com