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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 242)

1,200-year-old ‘gumdrop’ might have belonged to elite gamer at UK monastery

What looks like a tasty, blue gumdrop decorated with white frosting is actually a 1,200-year-old glass “king” piece that may have belonged to an elite gamer, according to Durham University, England, and DigVentures, a crowdsourced archaeological outfit, also in the U.K.

The royal-blue game piece was found in September 2019 during a community-based dig at a cemetery in Lindisfarne (also called Holy Island), a tiny island off the northeast coast of England. Lindisfarne was once home to monks who ran a medieval monastery that was infamously invaded by the Vikings in A.D. 793.

“This is a truly wonderful discovery, which gives us a very special insight into life in the monastery at the time,” David Petts, a senior lecturer in the archaeology of Northern Britain at Durham University who co-directed the excavation with DigVentures, said in a statement released Thursday (Feb. 6). “It’s similar to a number of other examples found at settlements and trading sites around the edge of the North Sea, and shows us not only that there were people on Lindisfarne who had leisure time, but that they were well connected.”

Related: 16 of the most interesting ancient board and dice games

Five white bobbles decorate the newfound artifact and indicate that it was a king piece, said Maiya Pina-Dacier, the head of community at DigVentures. It’s about 0.7 inches (2 centimeters) across, or “about the size of a chocolate sweet or Ferrero Rocher,” Pina-Dacier told Live Science in an email.

The king piece would have been “a high-status object” that likely belonged to a royal who was living at or visiting the Lindisfarne monastery before the Vikings invaded, she added. “Other gaming pieces are usually made of wood or bone. We’re hoping to get further analysis done to tell us more about how it was made and maybe even where the materials came from.”

The board game itself was a strategy-laden lark with Roman roots called “ludus latrunculorum”. As the Romans invaded new lands, ludus latrunculorum spread; the game evolved differently in each location but became known by the umbrella term “tafl.” Tafl games were played in Britain, Ireland, Iceland, Denmark and Sweden before chess arrived in the 11th and 12th centuries, Pina-Dacier said.

“Although each region had their own version of the rules, the basic principles were the same: Defend a central king against attackers,” she explained. “There was usually only one decorated piece — the king; the rest would be more like counters.”

This is the second tafl game piece discovered in the British Isles. The other one was found at a Pictish hillfort in Dundurn, Scotland.

DigVentures plans to return to Lindisfarne in September 2020 to continue the dig. If you’d like to join, visit digventures.com/projects to learn more.

Originally published on Live Science.

Westlake Legal Group gumdrop 1,200-year-old 'gumdrop' might have belonged to elite gamer at UK monastery LiveScience Laura Geggel fox-news/columns/digging-history fnc/science fnc fb390935-ee12-58be-926b-26d795c3e44d article   Westlake Legal Group gumdrop 1,200-year-old 'gumdrop' might have belonged to elite gamer at UK monastery LiveScience Laura Geggel fox-news/columns/digging-history fnc/science fnc fb390935-ee12-58be-926b-26d795c3e44d article

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#FireChuckTodd Trends After MSNBC Anchor Quotes Article Comparing Bernie Sanders Supporters to Brownshirts

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Waffle House on Valentine’s Day: How the chain established itself as a romantic roadside destination

Westlake Legal Group WaffleHouseSignHeartIstocks Waffle House on Valentine's Day: How the chain established itself as a romantic roadside destination Michael Bartiromo fox-news/food-drink/food/restaurants fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 3afd267c-0429-59e4-ac02-ee88d846ad58 /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday

Each year on Valentine’s Day, hundreds of Waffle House locations across the country bust out their crisp white tablecloths and heart-shaped decorations, ready to welcome the lucky lovebirds who reserved a table at the most romantic restaurants they could think of … or at least the most romantic restaurants that serve smothered, covered and chunked hash browns.

Sure, this may have seemed like an unusual date idea once upon a time, but celebrating Valentine’s Day at Waffle House has become something of a quirky tradition for couples seeking a unique night out. And now, more than a decade on, that tradition is still going strong.

5 VALENTINE’S DAY GIFT IDEAS THAT DON’T SEEM SO LAST-MINUTE

“It’s become very popular with a lot of the customers,” said Njeri Boss, the director of public relations for Waffle House. “And once you start something, the customers come to expect it. So we try to provide a special experience.”

The idea for Waffle House’s Valentine’s Day dinner service began in 2008, at a single location in John’s Creek, Ga. According to Boss, the manager of that restaurant noticed the same few customers were returning year after year on Feb. 14, and he took it upon himself to make the dining area “nice” for his most romantic regulars.

The first Valentine’s Day dinner service was such a success, Boss says, that the John’s Creek manager brought it up with the vice president of his region, and the idea spread like butter on a hot pecan waffle.

“And of course, with all traditions, they evolve,” Boss told Fox News.

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Now, as of 2020, over 200 Waffle House locations across the South and Southeast have chosen to opt-in. Each location is also given the freedom to decorate however they wish — as long as white tablecloths are in the mix.

Boss explained that managers, too, are allowed to offer their own Valentine’s Day specials for the evening, for an added touch.

“Some [restaurants] even coordinate their uniforms, or do something different. Go upscale,” she says. “Every one is different … but the tablecloths remain the same.”

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Walt Ehmer, the CEO of Waffle House, is also such a fan of the idea that he once called it a “bucket-list experience.”

“A perfect Valentine’s dinner consists of soft music, great food and a welcoming atmosphere,” said Ehmer in 2018. “And we have all three waiting for those who are ready.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

As of 2020, over 200 Waffle House locations were accepting reservations for Valentine’s Day dinner service. Visit WaffleHouse.com for a complete list of participating restaurants.

Westlake Legal Group WaffleHouseSignHeartIstocks Waffle House on Valentine's Day: How the chain established itself as a romantic roadside destination Michael Bartiromo fox-news/food-drink/food/restaurants fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 3afd267c-0429-59e4-ac02-ee88d846ad58 /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday   Westlake Legal Group WaffleHouseSignHeartIstocks Waffle House on Valentine's Day: How the chain established itself as a romantic roadside destination Michael Bartiromo fox-news/food-drink/food/restaurants fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 3afd267c-0429-59e4-ac02-ee88d846ad58 /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday

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Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Westlake Legal Group ap_20042054971078_wide-9411b1fe4fde0fa2b036d396af345a3c32680ade-s1100-c15 Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

People wait in line to enter an event for Democratic presidential candidate former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg Monday. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

People wait in line to enter an event for Democratic presidential candidate former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg Monday.

Matt Rourke/AP

Democrats are going to try again.

After the Iowa results meltdown, New Hampshire takes center stage Tuesday night. This election is run by the secretary of state’s office and not the state party. It’s also a more-straightforward primary (with a couple kinks we explain below) rather than a complicated, math-heavy caucus.

There is lots at stake, as New Hampshire has served to reinforce or reset the Democratic primary race over the last five decades. As always, be ready for surprises, especially because through the years, a third to half of voters have made up their minds in the last week.

Here are some key questions, things to watch and the stakes for the candidates:

Is New Hampshire a swing state?

First, let’s set the table. Yes, in a general election, New Hampshire is very competitive. It went Democratic in the 2016 election, but it was the closest of all states (by raw vote) — just 2,700 votes separated Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, and Trump’s team is closely watching and targeting it in 2020.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1205379729_wide-2789d743bf1aaac1e20806a61b5aa5168cac6da8-s1100-c15 Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Sen. Bernie Sanders before he speaks during a stop at the Coffee Coffee roasters Monday in Salem, N.H. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Sen. Bernie Sanders before he speaks during a stop at the Coffee Coffee roasters Monday in Salem, N.H.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Why is New Hampshire first?

This question comes up repeatedly, because, like Iowa, New Hampshire is not a diverse state. It, too, is more than 90% white. In 2016, 93% of New Hampshire Democratic primary voters were white. It has been first for a very long time — 100 years this year actually.

Then, about 50 years ago, New Hampshire passed a law requiring it be first and gave sole power to the secretary of state to set the primary date. Bill Gardner is that secretary of state. He has been in the job about as long as the law has been on the books and has fought against efforts — Democratic and Republican — to move it.

When is the New Hampshire primary?

Polls open at 8 a.m. ET and close, in most places, at 7 p.m. ET. But there are 221 towns in New Hampshire, and they all set their own times. Some scarcely populated towns famously begin voting at midnight to gain attention.

But all polls will be closed by 8 p.m. ET.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1205387513_wide-389b636523934422c3d71c4246fa5687a7ce577d-s1100-c15 Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Sen. Elizabeth Warren hosts a rally at the Rochester Opera House on Monday in Rochester, N.H. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Sen. Elizabeth Warren hosts a rally at the Rochester Opera House on Monday in Rochester, N.H.

Scott Olson/Getty Images

When will we see results?

We will start seeing results after 7 p.m. ET for most places, but there will be no calls from the news networks or the Associated Press (which NPR relies on for calls) until at least 8 p.m. ET. At that point, expect the Republican primary (yes, there is one) to be called for President Trump.

When will we know who wins?

This is always tricky, because, um, Iowa. The state predicts we might know around 9:30 p.m. ET, but stay loose on that one. Check NPR’s New Hampshire liveblog throughout the day for updates live results. Also, since this is a delegate race, check out our new delegate tracker to see how many delegates are allocated to each candidate and where the race stands now.

Speaking of delegates, how many are at stake?

Twenty-four pledged delegates. There are nine more automatic delegates, which used to be superdelegates, but they matter less this year because they can’t vote on first ballot at the Democratic National Convention unless there’s an overwhelming majority for one candidate.

Sixteen of the delegates are allocated proportionally by congressional district. (There are two of them). Another eight are allocated by statewide vote (5 at large, 3 pledged leaders and elected officials. Those odd numbers will be important going forward in states to come because the overall winner essentially gets the extra delegate.)

That represents just 1% of the total number of delegates available; after New Hampshire just 2% of total delegates will be allocated (including Iowa). A candidate needs 1,991 delegates to win the nomination, so there’s a long way to go.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1199945315_wide-42982ea5b37e234ff32751d43b3c7a463fac13f3-s1100-c15 Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Sen. Amy Klobuchar speaks at a town hall in Exeter, N.H. Monday Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Sen. Amy Klobuchar speaks at a town hall in Exeter, N.H. Monday

Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Are there thresholds for getting delegates like there were in Iowa?

Yes. Like Iowa, there’s a 15% to win any delegates. That’s true in every Democratic primary and caucus. The difference in New Hampshire is there is no resorting in a second round. You vote, it’s done. You get 15%, you get delegates. You don’t, well, you don’t.

How many people actually vote?

The record for turnout in the Democratic presidential primary in New Hampshire is about 288,000. That was set in 2008 in the race between Barack Obama and Clinton. The second-highest turnout was in 2016 between Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders about 251,000.

New Hampshire is known for high voter participation. In the 2016 general election, it was actually the second-highest turnout state behind Minnesota.

How does voting work?

It’s a primary, so voters head to the polls like they would in a general election. It’s “semi-open,” meaning independents can participate. About 40% of the state are independents, and given that there is no competitive GOP primary happening, one might expect to see a higher percentage of independents turn out on the Democratic side than in 2016.

In 2016, independents made up 40% of the electorate, according to the exit polls, but there were competitive primaries on both sides. In 2008, it was 44%, but in 2004 — the last time there was a competitive Democratic primary with an incumbent Republican president up for reelection — 48% of the electorate was independents.

Westlake Legal Group ap_20042044005440_wide-0e39dcc742afd1f75664be66c09f10164fb0c3f9-s1100-c15 Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Former Vice President Joe Biden, takes photos with supporters during a campaign event at St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral, Monday in Manchester, N.H. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Former Vice President Joe Biden, takes photos with supporters during a campaign event at St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral, Monday in Manchester, N.H.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Don’t confuse independents with moderates, though. Sanders, who won the 2016 primary by more than 20 points, won three-quarters of independents. He won a slightly lower percentage of self-described moderates, 59%.

Aside from independents, which other voters are important to watch?

The shape of the electorate is very important, and will get more important as the race winnows and support solidifies. The more liberal the electorate, the better it is for Sanders. And the Democratic electorate in New Hampshire has grown increasingly liberal.

In 2004, just 48% who turned out identified as liberal; in 2008, that jumped to 56%, as Obama turned out lots of young and new voters. But in 2016, more than two-thirds (68%) of the New Hampshire Democratic electorate was liberal. If that trend holds, that’s good for Sanders.

Young voters, under 30, made up about a fifth in 2016, and they broke overwhelmingly for Sanders. The percentage of young voters in 2016 (19%) was actually higher than in 2008 (18%) when Obama ran. Sanders needs that trend to continue, as he wins big margins with young voters.

The more white and and more people there are with college degrees voting, the better for former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg. He finished with the delegate lead over Sanders in Iowa, and he hopes to do well again in New Hampshire. With it being 93% white in 2016 and 60% with college degrees that lines up for Buttigieg.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1205404466_wide-67e596ca3606b3492e30b573dd86213725cb975a-s1100-c15 Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg arrives on stage at Hampshire Hills Athletic Club Monday in Milford, N.H. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg arrives on stage at Hampshire Hills Athletic Club Monday in Milford, N.H.

Win McNamee/Getty Images

Older voters were roughly a fifth. That number probably needs to be higher to help former Vice President Biden, who is declining in the state. And there’s no guarantee he even wins them now. He won the highest percentage of voters 65 and older in Iowa, but Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar and Buttigieg won significant shares, too.

Who’s ahead in the polls?

There have been four different poll leaders in New Hampshire during this race. But Sanders is now the favorite. He leads by 7 points in an average of the polls over Buttigieg, who has surged since Iowa.

But this is New Hampshire, where things can change quickly and a third or more tend to say they made up their mind in the last week. Remember, Obama had an 8-point lead in the polls over Clinton in 2008 and lost the primary by less than 3 points, so be prepared for anything to happen.

What’s at stake for the candidates?

Everything. Here are some things in particular to look for:

Can Sanders expand his base? Sanders was promising high turnout in Iowa, but it didn’t happen. Turnout was more on pace with 2016 than 2008. That’s not exactly a groundswell of support and an overwhelming movement. But New Hampshire is take two for Sanders and the rest. Can they show they have fired up Democrats enough to take on Trump this year?

Sanders did well in urban areas and college towns. He needs to show he can reach beyond that. The Democratic Party doesn’t need help winning in those places. Still, a win would be a win, and Sanders would be in the pole position for the nomination if he does, especially considering that moderates and establishment Democrats don’t appear to be coalescing around anyone any time soon.

For Buttigieg, New Hampshire is nice, but…: Again, New Hampshire is a very white state, and Buttigieg has struggled in polling with voters of color. He needs to perform well in New Hampshire, but then the real test comes when the race moves to Nevada and South Carolina, two states with much more diverse electorates.

Who finishes third? This might be the biggest and most important question of the night. Biden is fading fast. He’s been hoping that South Carolina and his support with African American voters would be his firewall, but South Carolina is weeks away, and there may be evidence he’s already declining with African Americans. A Quinnipiac poll out Monday showed former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who has now spent more than $350 million on ads, eating into Biden’s support with black voters. Can Biden really survive a fifth-place showing in New Hampshire?

Meanwhile, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who finished third in Iowa, needs to be able show she can beat Sanders and Buttigieg, the two candidates most eating into her support. She polls second with progressives to Sanders and second with college-educated whites to Buttigieg. New Hampshire is an opportunity for her to show she’s right in the mix with them and deserves another shot when the electorate gets more diverse. But if she doesn’t perform well….?

How far can Klobuchar go? She’s seen a sharp spike since coming close to Biden in Iowa and after her strong debate performance in New Hampshire Friday. She’s actually now polling third, slightly ahead of Warren and Biden. If she were to take third, wow. Moderates not thrilled how Biden has held up and think Buttigieg is too young and inexperienced are looking around.

And Klobuchar has a good case to make. She’s 59, been a productive senator and won reelection by a lot in a Midwestern state Trump came close in. But is it too little, too late? She needs the donations to pour in if she’s going to have a shot, and that starts with a surprising finish in New Hampshire — ahead of some of the field’s heavyweights.

How long do lower-performing candidates continue on?

Wealthy venture capitalist Tom Steyer has the personal resources to go as long as he wants, but he’s seen little payoff in the results. He’s making a serious push in South Carolina, but no polling so far indicates he can win the state. That effort might wind up wounding Biden more than any other candidate, as he’s making inroads with black leaders and voters.

Andrew Yang has a deep well of support, but it’s not very wide. He wound up with fewer than 2,000 votes in Iowa out of 170,000. Yang is a serious person with a serious message, but if he finishes in single digits again in New Hampshire, he and his supporters have to ask themselves why he’s running — is it to make a point or is it to win? And if it’s to make a point, for how long and will his supporters wholeheartedly get behind whoever winds up becoming the Democratic nominee?

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Why you never wash hot pans in cold water

If you invite me over for dinner and place your hot pans in the sink as you finish cooking, you’ll probably see me physically cringe. I’m not trying to judge; I’ve done it before, too. It’s tempting to use the sink as a way to make space on the stovetop, or maybe you have an especially disastrous pan that looks like it could benefit from a long soak.

But that sizzling sound is an indication that something nefarious going on. Putting a hot pan in cold water causes something called thermal shock. It can ruin your pans — even the expensive ones. Here’s how to best care for a nonstick skillet:

What Is Thermal Shock?

There’s a lot of science here, but basically, metal expands as it’s heated. Most pots and pans are made from multiple layers of metal, like stainless steel and aluminum. They may also have an enameled or nonstick coating. Each of these materials expands and contracts at different temperatures, which you never notice when the change happens gradually. For example, when you slowly warm a pan on the stovetop or let it come down to room temperature naturally, the layers of metal expand together.

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The problem arises when you introduce a sudden change in temperature, like putting a hot pan in cold water. The metals cool too quickly and the pan actually starts to pull against itself. The bigger the temperature difference, the greater the shock, but even a small amount of cold water in the bottom of your sink can cause a pan to warp, shatter, crack or chip.

Warped pans are a major problem because they won’t cook evenly. They allow oil to pool on one side or the other, and they certainly won’t sit flat against an induction or electric cooktop. Even if your pan doesn’t warp, the finish can come off, and that chipped enamel or nonstick coating may find its way into your food.

How to Cool a Hot Pan the Right Way

The best way to avoid this type of damage is to let your pans cool down gradually on the stovetop. If you need to make space, place the pan on a trivet or another heat-proof surface. If you’re using your granite countertops, be sure to wipe them clean first so the pan doesn’t accidentally sit in a puddle of water.

You should be especially careful when it comes to thin nonstick pans and cookware made with glass or stoneware, as these are the most susceptible to thermal shock. You’ll have better luck with thicker, well-constructed pans, but that doesn’t mean you should put your All-Clad stainless steel or cast-iron skillets straight into the sink. After letting these types of pans cool briefly, you can speed up the cooling process by adding small amounts of tepid water.

If you’ve accidentally warped your pan with cold water, you also might be in the market for a replacement: Here’s how to choose which type of cookware to get.

Westlake Legal Group WashingPanIstock Why you never wash hot pans in cold water Taste of Home Lindsay D. Mattison fox-news/food-drink/food/kitchen-tools-gadgets fox-news/food-drink/food/cooking-basics fnc/food-drink fnc article 5028d299-113f-5861-a03b-0c7aced306f7   Westlake Legal Group WashingPanIstock Why you never wash hot pans in cold water Taste of Home Lindsay D. Mattison fox-news/food-drink/food/kitchen-tools-gadgets fox-news/food-drink/food/cooking-basics fnc/food-drink fnc article 5028d299-113f-5861-a03b-0c7aced306f7

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Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Westlake Legal Group ap_20042054971078_wide-9411b1fe4fde0fa2b036d396af345a3c32680ade-s1100-c15 Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

People wait in line to enter an event for Democratic presidential candidate former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg Monday. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Matt Rourke/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

People wait in line to enter an event for Democratic presidential candidate former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg Monday.

Matt Rourke/AP

Democrats are going to try again.

After the Iowa results meltdown, New Hampshire takes center stage Tuesday night. This election is run by the secretary of state’s office and not the state party. It’s also a more-straightforward primary (with a couple kinks we explain below) rather than a complicated, math-heavy caucus.

There is lots at stake, as New Hampshire has served to reinforce or reset the Democratic primary race over the last five decades. As always, be ready for surprises, especially because through the years, a third to half of voters have made up their minds in the last week.

Here are some key questions, things to watch and the stakes for the candidates:

Is New Hampshire a swing state?

First, let’s set the table. Yes, in a general election, New Hampshire is very competitive. It went Democratic in the 2016 election, but it was the closest of all states (by raw vote) — just 2,700 votes separated Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, and Trump’s team is closely watching and targeting it in 2020.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1205379729_wide-2789d743bf1aaac1e20806a61b5aa5168cac6da8-s1100-c15 Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Sen. Bernie Sanders before he speaks during a stop at the Coffee Coffee roasters Monday in Salem, N.H. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Sen. Bernie Sanders before he speaks during a stop at the Coffee Coffee roasters Monday in Salem, N.H.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Why is New Hampshire first?

This question comes up repeatedly, because, like Iowa, New Hampshire is not a diverse state. It, too, is more than 90% white. In 2016, 93% of New Hampshire Democratic primary voters were white. It has been first for a very long time — 100 years this year actually.

Then, about 50 years ago, New Hampshire passed a law requiring it be first and gave sole power to the secretary of state to set the primary date. Bill Gardner is that secretary of state. He has been in the job about as long as the law has been on the books and has fought against efforts — Democratic and Republican — to move it.

When is the New Hampshire primary?

Polls open at 8 a.m. ET and close, in most places, at 7 p.m. ET. But there are 221 towns in New Hampshire, and they all set their own times. Some scarcely populated towns famously begin voting at midnight to gain attention.

But all polls will be closed by 8 p.m. ET.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1205387513_wide-389b636523934422c3d71c4246fa5687a7ce577d-s1100-c15 Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Sen. Elizabeth Warren hosts a rally at the Rochester Opera House on Monday in Rochester, N.H. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Sen. Elizabeth Warren hosts a rally at the Rochester Opera House on Monday in Rochester, N.H.

Scott Olson/Getty Images

When will we see results?

We will start seeing results after 7 p.m. ET for most places, but there will be no calls from the news networks or the Associated Press (which NPR relies on for calls) until at least 8 p.m. ET. At that point, expect the Republican primary (yes, there is one) to be called for President Trump.

When will we know who wins?

This is always tricky, because, um, Iowa. The state predicts we might know around 9:30 p.m. ET, but stay loose on that one. Check NPR’s New Hampshire liveblog throughout the day for updates live results. Also, since this is a delegate race, check out our new delegate tracker to see how many delegates are allocated to each candidate and where the race stands now.

Speaking of delegates, how many are at stake?

Twenty-four pledged delegates. There are nine more automatic delegates, which used to be superdelegates, but they matter less this year because they can’t vote on first ballot at the Democratic National Convention unless there’s an overwhelming majority for one candidate.

Sixteen of the delegates are allocated proportionally by congressional district. (There are two of them). Another eight are allocated by statewide vote (5 at large, 3 pledged leaders and elected officials. Those odd numbers will be important going forward in states to come because the overall winner essentially gets the extra delegate.)

That represents just 1% of the total number of delegates available; after New Hampshire just 2% of total delegates will be allocated (including Iowa). A candidate needs 1,991 delegates to win the nomination, so there’s a long way to go.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1199945315_wide-42982ea5b37e234ff32751d43b3c7a463fac13f3-s1100-c15 Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Sen. Amy Klobuchar speaks at a town hall in Exeter, N.H. Monday Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Sen. Amy Klobuchar speaks at a town hall in Exeter, N.H. Monday

Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Are there thresholds for getting delegates like there were in Iowa?

Yes. Like Iowa, there’s a 15% to win any delegates. That’s true in every Democratic primary and caucus. The difference in New Hampshire is there is no resorting in a second round. You vote, it’s done. You get 15%, you get delegates. You don’t, well, you don’t.

How many people actually vote?

The record for turnout in the Democratic presidential primary in New Hampshire is about 288,000. That was set in 2008 in the race between Barack Obama and Clinton. The second-highest turnout was in 2016 between Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders about 251,000.

New Hampshire is known for high voter participation. In the 2016 general election, it was actually the second-highest turnout state behind Minnesota.

How does voting work?

It’s a primary, so voters head to the polls like they would in a general election. It’s “semi-open,” meaning independents can participate. About 40% of the state are independents, and given that there is no competitive GOP primary happening, one might expect to see a higher percentage of independents turn out on the Democratic side than in 2016.

In 2016, independents made up 40% of the electorate, according to the exit polls, but there were competitive primaries on both sides. In 2008, it was 44%, but in 2004 — the last time there was a competitive Democratic primary with an incumbent Republican president up for reelection — 48% of the electorate was independents.

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Former Vice President Joe Biden, takes photos with supporters during a campaign event at St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral, Monday in Manchester, N.H. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Former Vice President Joe Biden, takes photos with supporters during a campaign event at St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral, Monday in Manchester, N.H.

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Don’t confuse independents with moderates, though. Sanders, who won the 2016 primary by more than 20 points, won three-quarters of independents. He won a slightly lower percentage of self-described moderates, 59%.

Aside from independents, which other voters are important to watch?

The shape of the electorate is very important, and will get more important as the race winnows and support solidifies. The more liberal the electorate, the better it is for Sanders. And the Democratic electorate in New Hampshire has grown increasingly liberal.

In 2004, just 48% who turned out identified as liberal; in 2008, that jumped to 56%, as Obama turned out lots of young and new voters. But in 2016, more than two-thirds (68%) of the New Hampshire Democratic electorate was liberal. If that trend holds, that’s good for Sanders.

Young voters, under 30, made up about a fifth in 2016, and they broke overwhelmingly for Sanders. The percentage of young voters in 2016 (19%) was actually higher than in 2008 (18%) when Obama ran. Sanders needs that trend to continue, as he wins big margins with young voters.

The more white and and more people there are with college degrees voting, the better for former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg. He finished with the delegate lead over Sanders in Iowa, and he hopes to do well again in New Hampshire. With it being 93% white in 2016 and 60% with college degrees that lines up for Buttigieg.

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Former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg arrives on stage at Hampshire Hills Athletic Club Monday in Milford, N.H. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg arrives on stage at Hampshire Hills Athletic Club Monday in Milford, N.H.

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Older voters were roughly a fifth. That number probably needs to be higher to help former Vice President Biden, who is declining in the state. And there’s no guarantee he even wins them now. He won the highest percentage of voters 65 and older in Iowa, but Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar and Buttigieg won significant shares, too.

Who’s ahead in the polls?

There have been four different poll leaders in New Hampshire during this race. But Sanders is now the favorite. He leads by 7 points in an average of the polls over Buttigieg, who has surged since Iowa.

But this is New Hampshire, where things can change quickly and a third or more tend to say they made up their mind in the last week. Remember, Obama had an 8-point lead in the polls over Clinton in 2008 and lost the primary by less than 3 points, so be prepared for anything to happen.

What’s at stake for the candidates?

Everything. Here are some things in particular to look for:

Can Sanders expand his base? Sanders was promising high turnout in Iowa, but it didn’t happen. Turnout was more on pace with 2016 than 2008. That’s not exactly a groundswell of support and an overwhelming movement. But New Hampshire is take two for Sanders and the rest. Can they show they have fired up Democrats enough to take on Trump this year?

Sanders did well in urban areas and college towns. He needs to show he can reach beyond that. The Democratic Party doesn’t need help winning in those places. Still, a win would be a win, and Sanders would be in the pole position for the nomination if he does, especially considering that moderates and establishment Democrats don’t appear to be coalescing around anyone any time soon.

For Buttigieg, New Hampshire is nice, but…: Again, New Hampshire is a very white state, and Buttigieg has struggled in polling with voters of color. He needs to perform well in New Hampshire, but then the real test comes when the race moves to Nevada and South Carolina, two states with much more diverse electorates.

Who finishes third? This might be the biggest and most important question of the night. Biden is fading fast. He’s been hoping that South Carolina and his support with African American voters would be his firewall, but South Carolina is weeks away, and there may be evidence he’s already declining with African Americans. A Quinnipiac poll out Monday showed former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who has now spent more than $350 million on ads, eating into Biden’s support with black voters. Can Biden really survive a fifth-place showing in New Hampshire?

Meanwhile, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who finished third in Iowa, needs to be able show she can beat Sanders and Buttigieg, the two candidates most eating into her support. She polls second with progressives to Sanders and second with college-educated whites to Buttigieg. New Hampshire is an opportunity for her to show she’s right in the mix with them and deserves another shot when the electorate gets more diverse. But if she doesn’t perform well….?

How far can Klobuchar go? She’s seen a sharp spike since coming close to Biden in Iowa and after her strong debate performance in New Hampshire Friday. She’s actually now polling third, slightly ahead of Warren and Biden. If she were to take third, wow. Moderates not thrilled how Biden has held up and think Buttigieg is too young and inexperienced are looking around.

And Klobuchar has a good case to make. She’s 59, been a productive senator and won reelection by a lot in a Midwestern state Trump came close in. But is it too little, too late? She needs the donations to pour in if she’s going to have a shot, and that starts with a surprising finish in New Hampshire — ahead of some of the field’s heavyweights.

How long do lower-performing candidates continue on?

Wealthy venture capitalist Tom Steyer has the personal resources to go as long as he wants, but he’s seen little payoff in the results. He’s making a serious push in South Carolina, but no polling so far indicates he can win the state. That effort might wind up wounding Biden more than any other candidate, as he’s making inroads with black leaders and voters.

Andrew Yang has a deep well of support, but it’s not very wide. He wound up with fewer than 2,000 votes in Iowa out of 170,000. Yang is a serious person with a serious message, but if he finishes in single digits again in New Hampshire, he and his supporters have to ask themselves why he’s running — is it to make a point or is it to win? And if it’s to make a point, for how long and will his supporters wholeheartedly get behind whoever winds up becoming the Democratic nominee?

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Dead birds seized in Washington from passenger arriving from China

U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents in Washington, D.C., seized a package of dead birds from the luggage of a passenger traveling from China, the agency announced on Monday.

The unidentified person arrived at Dulles International Airport on a flight from Beijing on January 27, where CBP agriculture specialists initiated a baggage inspection and discovered the prohibited birds — which the passenger said was cat food, officials said.

Due to fears over the highly contagious bird flu, the deceased animals were promptly incinerated with USDA approval.

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The passenger was reportedly heading to an address in Maryland. It’s not clear what type of small birds were inside the package and CBP said they were 2.5 to 3.5 inches in length.

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Agriculture specialists with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) seized a package of dead birds from the luggage of a passenger traveling from China. (U.S. Customs and Border Protection)

“These dead birds are prohibited from importation to the United States as unprocessed birds pose a potentially significant disease threat to our nation’s poultry industries and more alarmingly to our citizens as potential vectors of avian influenza,” said Casey Durst, Director of Field Operations for CBP’s Baltimore Field Office.

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Westlake Legal Group IAD-Birds7L-012720 Dead birds seized in Washington from passenger arriving from China fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/us fox-news/travel/general/airports fox news fnc/travel fnc e7d96e71-0cbf-55ed-9176-21b39ca71d59 David Aaro article

The package of pet food fromChina consisted of tiny dead birds. (U.S. Customs and Border Protection)

The regulation of animal imports into the U.S. are conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

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Those consigning and importing certain products should make sure they comply with licensing, certification and importation requirements, CBP said.

Westlake Legal Group IAD-Birds6L-012720 Dead birds seized in Washington from passenger arriving from China fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/us fox-news/travel/general/airports fox news fnc/travel fnc e7d96e71-0cbf-55ed-9176-21b39ca71d59 David Aaro article   Westlake Legal Group IAD-Birds6L-012720 Dead birds seized in Washington from passenger arriving from China fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/us fox-news/travel/general/airports fox news fnc/travel fnc e7d96e71-0cbf-55ed-9176-21b39ca71d59 David Aaro article

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Soccer legend Pele ‘embarrassed’ to leave home due to health: report

Pele, the Brazilian soccer legend, has turned reclusive due to his nagging health issues, which have led to depression, according to his son.

The soccer great has been hospitalized last year for various issues including a urinary infection that kept him hospitalized for weeks. Edinho, his son, told the Brazilian station TV Globo that his father now requires assistance to walk due to hip problems.

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Brazilian football great Edson Arantes do Nascimento, known as Pele, arrives at Guarulhos International Airport last April. (Getty)

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“Imagine, he’s the King, he was always such an imposing figure and today he can’t walk properly,” his son said, according to the BBC. “He’s pretty fragile. He had a hip replacement and didn’t have an adequate or ideal rehabilitation. So he has this problem with mobility and that has set off a kind of depression.”

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The three-time World Cup champion is 79. The BBC reported that he scored a record 1,281 goals in his 21-year career.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

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New Hampshire primary voting begins as Sanders and Buttigieg battle for top spot, Biden feels the heat

Good morning and welcome to Fox News First. Here’s what you need to know as you start your Tuesday …

New Hampshire primary voting kicks off, with Sanders and Buttigieg locked in fierce battle
New Hampshire’s presidential primary kicked off at midnight – as voters in three tiny townships in the state’s North Country and White Mountains cast the first ballots in the first primary in the White House race.

Dixville Notch – which has held the midnight voting tradition for 60 years – as well as nearby Millsfield and Hart’s Location – grab the national spotlight every four years as they report the first results in New Hampshire.

On the final day before the primary, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., emphasized to supporters that “what happens here in New Hampshire is enormously important…the whole country is not only looking at New Hampshire – in fact, the whole world is looking at New Hampshire.”

After getting out of Iowa’s caucuses with essentially a tie with 2020 nomination rival Pete Buttigieg, expectations are high for Sanders in a state where he shares home-field advantage with fellow progressive standard-bearer Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.

Though Sanders and Buttigieg have high expectations in New Hampshire, the same may not be said for former Vice President Joe Biden, who is coming off a disappointing showing in the Iowa caucuses. As early as last Friday, he sounded like he was lowering expectations.

“I took a hit in Iowa and I’m probably going to take a hit here,” Biden said in a striking moment at the top of Friday night’s prime-time Democratic presidential nomination debate.

Asked the next day by Fox News if he was writing off the Granite State, the former vice president fired back, saying, “I’m not writing off New Hampshire. I’m going to campaign like hell here in New Hampshire, as I’m going to do in Nevada, in South Carolina and beyond. Look, this is just getting going here. This is a marathon.” Click here for more on our top story.

Other developments in the 2020 presidential race
Trump hits ‘mumbling’ Pelosi in rally ahead of key NH primary
Democracy 2020: Full coverage

Barr announces sweeping new sanctions, ‘significant escalation’ against left-wing sanctuary cities
Charging that so-called “sanctuary” cities that protect illegal immigrants are jeopardizing domestic security, Attorney General Bill Barr announced a slew of additional sanctions that he called a “significant escalation” against left-wing local and state governments that obstruct the “lawful functioning of our nation’s immigration system.”

Speaking at the National Sheriff’s Association 2020 Winter Legislative and Technology Conference in Washington, D.C., Barr said the Justice Department would immediately file multiple lawsuits against sanctuary jurisdictions for unconstitutionally interfering with federal immigration enforcement, and implement unprecedented national reviews of left-wing sanctuary governments and prosecutors. Click here for more.

T. Mobile-Sprint’s $26 billion deal favored by judge expected to be approved by judge
T. Mobile’s $26 billion tie-up with Sprint is expected to win a blessing from a federal judge as early as Tuesday, Fox Business has confirmed.

Both stocks soared in extended trading on Monday, with Sprint rallying over 71 percent, after closing lower in the regular session after investors speculated the deal would face roadblocks from the state attorneys general suing to block the deal on the grounds it would lead to higher costs for consumers.

The judge has alerted parties of the ruling and will make it public, likely after the close of trading on Tuesday, according to sources familiar with the developments. Click here for more.
 
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TODAY’S MUST-READS
China’s daily coronavirus death toll tops 100 for 1st time; total deaths top 1,000 | US total reaches 13
Federal judge indefinitely postpones sentencing of Michael Flynn.
Hundreds of officers turn out for arraignment of alleged Bronx cop shooter.

THE LATEST FROM FOX BUSINESS
Trump to Trish Regan: China has coronavirus under control.
Fed chairman heads to Capitol Hill to face growth risk questions.
WNBA Commissioner Cathy Engelbert on the new CBA: From maternity leave to higher pay.

NEW FROM FOX NATION:

Democratic pollster: Why I don’t trust New Hampshire polling leading up to the primary.

#TheFlashback: CLICK HERE to find out what happened on “This Day in History.”
 
SOME PARTING WORDS

Tucker Carlson says not even cool sunglasses can save Joe Biden from himself.

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Fox News First is compiled by Fox News’ Bryan Robinson. Thank you for making us your first choice in the morning! Enjoy your day! We’ll see you in your inbox first thing Wednesday morning.

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North Korea enhanced nuke program despite Trump overtures: report

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6070407655001_6070405860001-vs North Korea enhanced nuke program despite Trump overtures: report fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox news fnc/politics fnc Edmund DeMarche article 09e36579-092e-57b9-880d-6666a86886b3

North Korea spent the last year defying United Nations sanctions and continued its effort to enhance its nuclear and ballistic programs, a report Monday said.

Reuters, citing a confidential U.N. paper, reported exclusively that Pyongyang disregarded Security Council resolutions and used “illicit external procurement” for some new technology. The report pointed out that North Korea has insisted that it no longer needs to abide by the resolution and blamed the U.S. for “brutal and inhumane” sanctions.

NK’S 5 MOST BIZARRE PROPAGANDA MOMENTS

President Trump has made overtures to dictator Kim Jong Un in hopes of scoring a historic foreign policy win that would lead to complete denuclearization. Their relationship has seen several setbacks after some glimpses of promise.

Last month, Trump wished Kim a happy birthday through South Korean intermediaries. The North Korean Foreign Ministry responded that any “good personal feelings” Kim has for Trump is truly “personal.”

Trump once took a hard line toward the country and dubbed Kim “rocket man.”

That stance brought North Korea to the negotiating table and led to a series of high-profile summits between the two leaders in 2018 and 2019. But relations cooled last year after a February summit in Vietnam when the U.S. rejected allowing sanctions relief in exchange for the dismantling of an aging nuclear site.

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The Reuters report also accused Chinese barges of helping Pyongyang with importing petroleum and exporting $370 million in coal. China denied the 67-page U.N. report, calling it “baseless.”

Fox News’ Adam Shaw contributed to this report

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