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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 244)

Wisconsin teacher allegedly calls Rush Limbaugh’s cancer diagnosis ‘awesome,’ gets placed on leave

Westlake Legal Group image Wisconsin teacher allegedly calls Rush Limbaugh's cancer diagnosis 'awesome,' gets placed on leave fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/wisconsin fox-news/us/education/teachers fox-news/us/education fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brie Stimson article 42e8a818-fa67-5b4b-b4a0-f7eb306b1a36

A Wisconsin public school teacher was reportedly placed on leave this week after he allegedly called Rush Limbaugh‘s advanced cancer diagnosis “awesome” and said he hopes the radio host’s death is painful.

“limbaugh absolutely should have to suffer from cancer. it’s awesome that he’s dying, and hopefully it is as quick as it is painful,” Travis Sarandos, who teaches in Milwaukee, allegedly tweeted Monday, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

RUSH LIMBAUGH ECHOES LOU GEHRIG IN RETURN TO RADIO, SAYS HE’S ‘ONE OF THE LUCKIEST PEOPLE ALIVE’

Sarandos was replying to another tweet whose author said they hoped Limbaugh recovered quickly and would advocate for affordable health care for everyone, the newspaper reported.

The teacher’s tweet sparked a backlash after local radio host Mark Belling posted it on his blog Tuesday.

Milwaukee Public Schools first said Sarandos did not speak for the district but later confirmed he had been placed on leave.

Limbaugh announced on his radio show Monday that he has been diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer.

On Tuesday night, President Trump awarded Limbaugh the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, during the State of the Union address at the U.S. Capitol.

Limbaugh returned to his show Friday after missing three shows for treatments. He said those supporting him since disclosing his diagnosis have made him feel like “one of the luckiest people alive.”

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Sarandos has since deleted his Twitter account, the Journal Sentinel reported.

Westlake Legal Group image Wisconsin teacher allegedly calls Rush Limbaugh's cancer diagnosis 'awesome,' gets placed on leave fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/wisconsin fox-news/us/education/teachers fox-news/us/education fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brie Stimson article 42e8a818-fa67-5b4b-b4a0-f7eb306b1a36   Westlake Legal Group image Wisconsin teacher allegedly calls Rush Limbaugh's cancer diagnosis 'awesome,' gets placed on leave fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/wisconsin fox-news/us/education/teachers fox-news/us/education fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brie Stimson article 42e8a818-fa67-5b4b-b4a0-f7eb306b1a36

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Buttigieg edges past Sanders in latest New Hampshire poll

Westlake Legal Group image Buttigieg edges past Sanders in latest New Hampshire poll Paul Steinhauser fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/politics/elections/polls fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc article 71509b62-00a4-5d02-9b2d-9fb5097afe68

MANCHESTER, N.H. —  Pete Buttigieg is surging – and has edged past Democratic presidential nomination rival Sen. Bernie Sanders in a new survey in New Hampshire, where voters will head to the polls Tuesday in the first primary election of the 2020 race for the White House.

The former mayor of South bend, Ind., is in a statistical tied with the populist senator from Vermont among likely voters in the Granite State, with former Vice President Joe Biden a distant fourth, a Suffolk University survey for the Boston Globe and WBZ-TV released Friday night indicates.

The survey shows Buttigieg at 25 percent and Sanders at 24 percent support among likely Democratic primary voters in New Hampshire, according to Suffolk’s latest daily tracking poll results from Thursday and Friday evenings. Buttigieg has surged 10 percentage points over three nights.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts registers at 14 percent, edging up three points this week. Biden dropped to 11 percent, down four points over the past three nights.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota was at 6 percent,  tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang at 3 percent, billionaire environmental and progressive advocate Tom Steyer and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii each at 2 percent, Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado at 1 percent and former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick at less than 1 percent, the Suffolk poll indicates.

New Hampshire voters are traditionally late deciders and the poll suggested this year is no different. Seven percent said they remained undecided as Tuesday’s primary election nears, and 45 percent of those backing a candidate said they could change their minds before casting their vote.

Earlier Friday, a new NBC News/Marist poll in New Hampshire showed Sanders at 25 percent support, with Buttigieg at 21 percent. Warren stood at 14 percent, with Biden at 13 percent and Klobuchar at 8 percent.

Steyer and Yang each registered at 4 percent, with Gabbard at 3 percent and Bennet and Patrick at 1 percent.

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The NBC News/Marist poll was conducted Tuesday-Thursday, with 709 likely Democratic presidential primary voters in New Hampshire questioned by live telephone operators. The survey’s sampling error was plus-or-minus 4.7 percentage points.

The Suffolk University poll interviewed 500 likely Democratic presidential primary voters in the Granite State on Thursday and Friday, using live telephone operators. The sampling error was plus-or-minus 4.4 percentage points

Westlake Legal Group image Buttigieg edges past Sanders in latest New Hampshire poll Paul Steinhauser fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/politics/elections/polls fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc article 71509b62-00a4-5d02-9b2d-9fb5097afe68   Westlake Legal Group image Buttigieg edges past Sanders in latest New Hampshire poll Paul Steinhauser fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/politics/elections/polls fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc article 71509b62-00a4-5d02-9b2d-9fb5097afe68

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AOC, Omar, Jayapal say DNC boss Tom Perez should be ‘held accountable’ for Iowa failure

The drumbeat for Democratic National Committee boss Tom Perez to be “held accountable” for recent party failures appears to be getting louder.

The latest Democrats to criticize Perez include U.S. Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.; Ilhan Omar, D-Minn.; and Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., all backers of 2020 presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.

Recent party setbacks have included the vote-count fiasco at Monday’s Iowa caucuses and Tuesday night’s disclosure that two officials on the host committee of the party’s upcoming national convention in Milwaukee had been fired over non-specified allegations that they oversaw a work environment where staff members were not being “respected.”

IOWA MESS HAS PEREZ FACING DEM PARTY STORM, RESIGNATION CALLS

Previously, Democrats such as former Congressional Black Caucus Chairwoman Rep. Marcia Fudge of Ohio, Washington state Democratic chairwoman Tina Podlodowski and party strategist Neil Sroka spoke out against Perez’s leadership.

“He doesn’t lead on anything,” Fudge told Politico.

On Friday, Ocasio-Cortez, Omar and Jayapal shared their views on the party chairman.

“What’s happened in Iowa is a complete disgrace and someone needs to be held responsible,” Ocasio-Cortez said outside the U.S. Capitol, according to the outlet. “I think there’s a conversation needed around taking responsibility for Iowa and ensuring that this bungled process never happens again.”

“What’s happened in Iowa is a complete disgrace and someone needs to be held responsible.”

— Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.

Westlake Legal Group AOC-1 AOC, Omar, Jayapal say DNC boss Tom Perez should be ‘held accountable’ for Iowa failure fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pramila-jayapal fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 984151bd-0ad4-5f9e-8478-114c4053fb80

U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., is seen in New York City, April 5, 2019. (Getty Images)

Omar mentioned Perez by name in her remarks.

“I would say Tom Perez should be held accountable for this failure,” Omar told The Hill. “I believe it all starts from the top. These are things that Tom should do and should have done. If this was happening in my home state, we would be having a very serious conversation about what accountability would look like for our own chair.”

“I believe it all starts from the top. These are things that Tom should do and should have done.”

— Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn.

Westlake Legal Group a432b0a3-ContentBroker_contentid-8773343eb1e34b9181200509f128ca87 AOC, Omar, Jayapal say DNC boss Tom Perez should be ‘held accountable’ for Iowa failure fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pramila-jayapal fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 984151bd-0ad4-5f9e-8478-114c4053fb80

​​​​​​​Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 6, 2019. (Associated Press)

Omar noted that the DNC had years to prepare for the Iowa caucuses and said it was “devastating” that more precautions weren’t in place to prevent this week’s vote-count situation.

Jayapal called the Iowa caucuses a “national embarrassment,” and said others deserved blame in addition to Perez.

“I’m sure there is shared blame to go around,” Jayapal told The Hill. “But Tom Perez is the head of the DNC, and I do think that there clearly was not the process in place to make sure all these [protocols] were going to be followed.”

“Tom Perez is the head of the DNC, and I do think that there clearly was not the process in place to make sure all these [protocols] were going to be followed.”

— Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash.

Westlake Legal Group Jayapal720 AOC, Omar, Jayapal say DNC boss Tom Perez should be ‘held accountable’ for Iowa failure fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pramila-jayapal fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 984151bd-0ad4-5f9e-8478-114c4053fb80

Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash, speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, Jan. 30, 2019. (Associated Press)​​

The criticism of Perez followed a Twitter message the DNC leader posted Thursday, in which he blamed Iowa’s state-level Democratic Party for the caucus problems.

“Enough is enough,” Perez wrote. “In light of the problems that have emerged in the implementation of the delegate selection plan and in order to assure public confidence in the results, I am calling on the Iowa Democratic Party to immediately begin a recanvass.”

Podlodowski accused Perez of throwing Iowa officials “under the bus” after a long silence from the national DNC amid the vote-counting problems.

Neither news organizations nor the Iowa Democratic Party have been able to call a winner in Monday’s Iowa caucuses while Pete Buttigieg and Sanders are both claiming victory in the state.

As of late Friday, Buttigieg held a narrow lead in state delegate equivalents (SDEs), which help decide how many delegates a candidate gets to bring to the Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee later this year

Sanders, on the other hand, led in the popular vote from both the “first alignment” and the “second alignment” phases of the caucuses.

Those numbers could change, however, as the IDP has noted many irregularities in its vote count and it is highly likely candidates will call for reexaminations of the numbers, as Perez already has.

Meanwhile, DNC convention host committee members Liz Gilbert and Adam Alonso were fired Tuesday evening after initially being placed on leave following allegations made in a Jan. 30 letter signed by committee staffers, Wisconsin Public Radio reported.

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“Every employee has a right to feel respected in their workplace,” the host committee said in a statement, the outlet reported. “Based on the information we have learned to date, we believe the work environment did not meet the ideals and expectations of the Milwaukee 2020 Host Committee Board of Directors. Accordingly, Liz Gilbert and Adam Alonso are no longer employed by the organization, effective immediately.”

The staffers alleged that Alonso “consistently bullied and intimidated staff members,” in particular the women, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported, and accused Gilbert of allowing “a culture that coddles male senior advisers and consultants.”

Fox News’ Brooke Singman and Tyler Olson contributed to this story.

Westlake Legal Group image AOC, Omar, Jayapal say DNC boss Tom Perez should be ‘held accountable’ for Iowa failure fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pramila-jayapal fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 984151bd-0ad4-5f9e-8478-114c4053fb80   Westlake Legal Group image AOC, Omar, Jayapal say DNC boss Tom Perez should be ‘held accountable’ for Iowa failure fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pramila-jayapal fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 984151bd-0ad4-5f9e-8478-114c4053fb80

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5 Debate Takeaways

MANCHESTER, N.H. ― Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) has never been good at hiding her dislike of former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg. And at the Democratic debate here Friday night, she went directly for his voters.

Klobuchar and Buttigieg, whose Iowa caucus showing has given him a major boost in the polls here ahead of Tuesday night’s New Hampshire primary, are competing for many of the same voters. (Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and former Vice President Joe Biden are often in the mix as well, though Klobuchar and Buttigieg seem to be almost directly going head-to-head.)

On Friday night, Klobuchar decided to win them over by aggressively attacking another candidate they like, a strategy that risks alienating them. 

“I’m not a political newcomer with no record,” she said in her closing statement, a not-so-subtle reference to a college town mayor who had never received more than 10,000 votes in an election.

“We have a newcomer in the White House, and look where it got us. I think having some experience is a good thing,” she said directly to Buttigieg earlier in the debate. (Buttigieg didn’t directly respond, since the moderator went to Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont instead of to the former mayor.)

Klobuchar’s aggression was clearly a planned strategy. When a reporter noted Klobuchar had managed to attack Warren, Sanders and Buttigieg in a single answer on health care, a Klobuchar communications staffer noted it was an example of “big Amy energy.” 

The Minnesotan was not alone in her attacks on Buttigieg. Sanders also got in some direct swipes during an exchange over campaign finance: “I don’t have 40 billionaires, Pete, contributing to my campaign, coming from the pharmaceutical industry, coming from Wall Street.”

Buttigieg, for the most part, was able to defend against the attacks. But he had a particularly grim moment. When a moderator pressed him on his oversight of the police in South Bend on issues of race, his answer came off as robotic and practiced rather than articulate and thoughtful.

The overall focus on Buttigieg and Klobuchar during the debate means if there is real movement in the New Hampshire polls in the three days before Tuesday’s vote, it’s likely to involve Buttigieg voters switching to Klobuchar ― or maybe vice versa.

Here are four other takeaways from the New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary debate:

Biden Wakes Up

Biden’s first answer of the night was a disaster. Asked about his recent criticisms of Sanders and Buttigieg, Biden instead chose to attack his own standing in the race.

“It’s a long race,” he said. “I took a hit in Iowa, and I’ll probably take a hit here. Traditionally, Bernie won by 20 points last time. And usually it’s the neighboring senators that do well.”

It makes sense for Biden’s campaign to downplay his chances in New Hampshire. It doesn’t make sense for Biden, who is still leading in national polling and in position to do well in Nevada and South Carolina, to open up the debate in New Hampshire by downplaying his chances there.

Biden then went on to only half-heartedly deliver the attacks on Buttigieg’s experience and Sanders’s socialism that he delivered with gusto at a campaign event earlier in the week. 

But his performance quickly got better. His praise of Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, who was ousted from the White House on Friday after he’d provided damaging testimony about President Donald Trump to the House Judiciary Committee, brought the crowd to its feet and is likely to earn plenty of replays on cable news. He also delivered a sharper attack on Sanders’s past opposition to gun control measures. 

It seems unlikely Biden’s performance was strong enough to turn around his performance in New Hampshire. But it might have been good enough to stanch the bleeding in other states. (Biden’s team said he raised more money on Friday than on any previous debate day.)

Westlake Legal Group 5e3e43eb210000d302e1cd39 5 Debate Takeaways

Elise Amendola/ASSOCIATED PRESS Former Vice President Joe Biden (left) embraces Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) at the Democratic presidential primary debate Friday in Manchester, New Hampshire.

Everybody Loves Bernie, Mostly

Sanders is a front-runner in New Hampshire and is still outperforming Buttigieg in most polling. But the other candidates in the race mostly let Sanders off the hook, reflecting both ongoing doubts about his ability to actually seize the nomination and the impossibility of wooing Sanders’s core supporters to their side.

Klobuchar declared she “likes Bernie just fine” and reminisced about working with him in the Senate on legislation regarding the importation of cheaper prescription drugs from Canada, while Biden even gave him a hug. Though Biden did criticize Sanders over guns and the cost of “Medicare for All,” that was the exception rather than the rule in a debate that was largely friendly to him.

Warren Has Her Story, And She’s Sticking To It

Warren’s core message is clear: The American government works better for the wealthy than it does for the middle class, and corruption is the reason why. It’s clear because it’s part of her stump speech, and she’s delivered a variant on the line in every single presidential debate so far.

Every answer Warren gave during the first hour of the debate on Friday night was part of her stump speech, part of a regular answer she gives to voters or a line she’s used on the debate stage before. As the debate went on, she began to mix it up with other candidates more. She quickly attacked Buttigieg over his record on race and policing in South Bend before moving on to an applause line about the importance of considering race when crafting policy. 

“We cannot just say criminal justice is the only time we want to talk about race specifically. We need to start having race-conscious laws,” she said, before outlining how her housing plan would help Black and Latino voters.

And she provided a subtle ― and questionable ― contrast with Sanders and other candidates by noting that “everyone on this stage except Amy and me is either a billionaire or is receiving help from a PAC.”

Part of this is that Warren simply had less speaking time than the other candidates: A New York Times analysis found she spoke for about 4 minutes less than Buttigieg and Sanders, and 3 minutes less than Biden. But Klobuchar ― who spoke for roughly the same amount of time as Warren ― was in the mix in a way Warren was not. 

But for the most part, Warren didn’t have the type of moment that will change her trajectory in the polling in either New Hampshire or nationally, and she needs one. The Progressive Campaign Change Committee, an outside group supporting her, called her race answer one that the more diverse states of Nevada and South Carolina “will remember.” But those voters might not even consider her unless she does well in New Hampshire.

Warren’s campaign hasn’t signaled any major change in strategy. It’s a curious approach, even if most Democrats do like Warren’s tried-and-true message about corruption.

Steyer Goes After South Carolina

Tom Steyer was in Manchester, but he had gone to (South) Carolina in his mind. The billionaire investor and businessman is polling in the low single digits in the Granite State, but his free-spending ways on television and radio in South Carolina have him competitive there, winning a significant portion of the Black vote in a state where Black voters dominate Democratic primaries. He’s also in a stronger position in the equally diverse state of Nevada.

Many of Steyer’s answers were clearly aimed more at any South Carolinians watching at home than the audience at St. Anselm College. He mentioned his support for reparations and shamed the other candidates for not discussing race more frequently. In his closing statement, he mentioned both Columbia, South Carolina, and Las Vegas ― and not any cities or towns in New Hampshire.

He also brought up a South Carolina political scandal that hadn’t received national attention, involving a state legislator who endorsed Steyer and is receiving payments from his campaign, comments from an oft-controversial Biden backer in the state and some backlash from Black state legislators there, challenging Biden to disavow his backer.

“One of the leaders of Joe Biden’s South Carolina campaign made racist remarks about our campaign,” Steyer said, challenging Biden to accompany him on a visit with the state’s Legislative Black Caucus. (Biden responded by noting that more Black state legislators in South Carolina had endorsed him than any other candidate.) That type of in-the-weeds story about an endorsement in South Carolina isn’t likely to matter to voters in a state more than 1,000 miles to the north.

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Leslie Marshall: New Hampshire Democratic debate winners and losers

Westlake Legal Group image Leslie Marshall: New Hampshire Democratic debate winners and losers Leslie Marshall fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/andrew-yang fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc d3d9ea23-73c8-5f5d-91af-0cb7255ca7b1 article

Friday was seventh and last Democratic debate before the New Hampshire primary on Tuesday. There were seven Democrats on stage at St. Anselm College in Manchester: Former Vice President Joe Biden, Senators Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar, former Mayor Pete Buttigieg and businessmen Andrew Yang and Tom Steyer.

So what was my take on this debate? Below you’ll find my winners and losers of the evening.

WINNERS

BIGGEST WINNER

Senator Amy Klobuchar

On Friday night Senator Klobuchar had a breakthrough moment; perhaps because the Minnesota senator knew this could be her last debate if she didn’t step it up and she did.

From her comments on systematic racism to what many, myself included, felt was the winning (and funniest) line of the night “We have a president that literally blames everyone…He blames the King of Denmark. Who does that? He blames the prime minister of Canada for, he claims, cutting him out of the Canadian version of ‘Home Alone 2.’ Who does that?!”

WINNER

Senator Elizabeth Warren

Senator Warren’s performance was strong and steady on Friday evening. She reminded many of us as to why she had risen (and so fast) in the polls in weeks past.

The Massachusetts senator is intelligent and had specific answers (and plans) for most of the questions posed.

She also came prepared. “Put real money into our schools,” she pleaded. “Put real money into housing. Put real money into health care. Put real money into the future of our children. That’s how we build the America of our best values.”

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Warren also told former South Bend, Ind. Mayor Buttigieg that his answer on race was not sufficient and then proceeded to give the best answer of the night on racial justice.

WINNER

Former Vice President Joe Biden

Joe Biden wasn’t the strongest performer on the stage on Friday night, and I know many may disagree with my choice here — especially after coming in fourth place in Iowa — but the former vice president had some breakout moments.

First, he directly criticized Sen. Bernie Sanders on an issue that is of immense importance to Democratic voters: guns and the Senator’s record on guns. This is something most of the other candidates forget or avoid pointing out.

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Second, Biden was at his best when he lashed out at President Trump for giving the Medal of Freedom to Rush Limbaugh at Tuesday night’s State of the Union rather than to impeachment witness Lt. Col. Vindman who was fired on Friday. Biden called him an American patriot and asked the audience to rise as a sign of support. It was passionate, powerful and quite genuine.

Winner

The final question posed to all the candidates about Child Poverty. That issue has not been referenced in a presidential debate since another prominent journalist, the late Cokie Roberts,  asked candidates about this issue in 1999.

Winner AND loser

By many measures, Bernie Sanders had a strong night on the stage especially when he took on Buttigieg regarding donations from billionaires. Still, this smacks of irony since Sanders himself is a millionaire.

He’s also in my loser column because at this point the senator has nothing new to say. We’ve heard it all by now. No matter what the question is, for Sanders, the answer always appears to be the same: blame the corporations.

LOSERS

Biggest Loser

Pete Buttigieg

The former mayor gave a lackluster, rather stale performance. His poor record on race in South Bend, Indiana caught up with him. And Sanders really hammered Buttigieg on his support from billionaires.

Loser

Tom Steyer. For some reason, Steyer tried to paint Joe Biden as a racist… again. It ultimately backfired for Sen. Kamala Harris and it might do the same for Steyer who was trying to put a dent in the armor Biden has with African-American voters before the South Carolina primary later this month.  There was one other puzzling moment from the candidate. For some reason, Steyer closed his remarks saying ‘Let’s rise together,’ a signature line that didn’t belong to him but rather to former Democratic presidential candidate Senator Cory Booker.

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Loser

Andrew Yang did not have a good night. I find Yang very likable but he did not stand out on the stage and didn’t really contribute anything that could move the needle for him.

Loser

Democrats — if we fail to put all our support behind whichever of these seven individuals become our nominee.

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Westlake Legal Group image Leslie Marshall: New Hampshire Democratic debate winners and losers Leslie Marshall fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/andrew-yang fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc d3d9ea23-73c8-5f5d-91af-0cb7255ca7b1 article   Westlake Legal Group image Leslie Marshall: New Hampshire Democratic debate winners and losers Leslie Marshall fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/andrew-yang fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc d3d9ea23-73c8-5f5d-91af-0cb7255ca7b1 article

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Biden Tells Voters to Look to the Past. (Just Not the Last Week.)

Westlake Legal Group 07debate-assess1-facebookJumbo Biden Tells Voters to Look to the Past. (Just Not the Last Week.) United States Politics and Government Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Debates (Political) Bloomberg, Michael R Biden, Joseph R Jr

MANCHESTER, N.H. — For months, he played the big-talking front-runner, swaggering if rarely steady, hoping voters would not linger long on the tautology of his premise: Joe Biden was the candidate who should win, he told fellow Democrats, because he was the candidate who could win.

So it was with some apparent humility — and then plenty of residual swagger — that Mr. Biden, days off a fourth-place debacle in Iowa, opened Friday night’s debate with an unusual prediction: He would probably do some more losing next week.

“I took a hit in Iowa,” the former vice president allowed. “I’ll probably take a hit here.”

Since joining the race last year, Mr. Biden has presented himself as the safe choice for risk-averse times, the O.K.-that’ll-do option for Democrats whose chief priority has been finding the candidate best positioned to defeat President Trump. But with Mr. Biden’s setback in Iowa and a slate of flawed competitors beside him onstage on Friday — their shortcomings laid bare in several punchy exchanges throughout the night — the party has been left to consider an unsettling truth.

There is no safe option. And that is starting to feel especially risky.

For a perpetually anxious party, the gathering on Friday supplied an untimely forum to air the weaknesses of several top contenders, aided by the man whose standing has fallen the fastest.

The cost of Senator Bernie Sanders’s progressive health care plans? “He’s unwilling to tell us what the damn thing is going to cost,” Mr. Biden said.

The meager poll numbers among nonwhite voters for Pete Buttigieg? “He’s the mayor of a small city who has done some good things,” Mr. Biden ruled, “but has not demonstrated his ability — and we’ll soon find out — to get a broad scope of support across the spectrum.”

Perhaps most significantly, in the running dialogue that could define the campaign’s coming weeks, the race’s generational fault lines — and the field’s conspicuous absences — came bluntly to the fore. A lengthy discussion of institutional racism proceeded without a black contender onstage, in a primary that once included several candidates of color who pledged to help rebuild the winning Obama coalition. (On Friday, Andrew Yang, the former technology executive, was the only nonwhite candidate who qualified for the debate.)

Mr. Sanders, the septuagenarian choice of the young, acknowledged that the runaway turnout he had hoped for in Iowa had not come to pass. Mr. Buttigieg, the millennial who does best with older voters, appeared to tweak capital veterans like Mr. Biden, Mr. Sanders and Senator Elizabeth Warren when he said that those hungering for the person “with the most years of Washington establishment experience” should look elsewhere.

And in a signal of Mr. Buttigieg’s growing stature in the race in these early states — after functionally tying Mr. Sanders in Iowa, he has inched within striking distance in New Hampshire polls — the former mayor provoked sharp defenses from some of those proud establishment figures.

“This going after every single thing that people do because it’s popular to say and makes you look like a cool newcomer — I don’t think that’s what people want right now,” Senator Amy Klobuchar fired, noting the senators’ work during the recent impeachment trial. “We have a newcomer in the White House now and look where it got us.”

Mr. Biden, in one of several forceful defenses of his long record in Washington, adopted the uncommon political strategy of trumpeting the old ways of doing business, after Mr. Buttigieg urged voters to “leave the politics of the past in the past.”

“The politics of the past, I think, were not all that bad,” Mr. Biden said, spending the night ticking off highlights of the Obama administration and his legislative career.

He was at least “part of the reason,” he said, for the following events in American history: the confirmation of Supreme Court Justices Elena Kagan, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor; the non-confirmation of Judge Robert H. Bork; and the Iran nuclear deal.

He noted his early support for same-sex marriage and his involvement with the withdrawal of troops in Iraq (“I did that”); the Paris climate accords; gun legislation (“I’m the only guy that beat the N.R.A. twice”); and “every major initiative we have had relative to diplomacy.”

Democrats, rarely a tranquil lot this election season, have endured a particularly distressing week. Mr. Trump’s long-anticipated Senate acquittal was dispiriting enough for his critics — punctuated by a series of angry public appearances from the president, news that his approval ratings have climbed and, on Friday, the firing of key witnesses who had testified in the House impeachment proceedings.

In one memorable flourish on Friday, Mr. Biden urged the crowd to its feet to honor one of them, Lt. Col. Alexander S. Vindman, a National Security Council official whom the White House had dismissed earlier in the day.

“Stand up and clap for Vindman. Get up there!” Mr. Biden said. “That’s who we are. We are not what Trump is.”

The fiasco of the Iowa results just four days earlier was a psychological blow the Democrats did not see coming, a self-inflicted mess that instantly shook confidence within the party and seemed to validate Republican taunts that their opponents cannot even be trusted to count their own votes.

This crisis of competence is now the candidates’ to bear, leaving to them the task of convincing voters that the party will be able to come together — and get out of its own way — in time to turn back Mr. Trump. The fallout from Iowa has only exacerbated the wide-scale disdain and distrust that many progressives, particularly Sanders supporters, have reserved for the party leadership.

Still, with success in Iowa and a strong showing in New Hampshire polls, Mr. Sanders has emerged as the unquestioned early choice of the left, outperforming Ms. Warren, who had threatened to eat into his liberal base, and watching with delight as the race’s moderate lane remains a candidate pileup.

Ms. Warren’s campaign has argued that she still has a path, preaching a stay-the-course message and telling reporters that she has the “widest, deepest coalition” in New Hampshire, a state that borders her own.

On Friday, she appeared to take aim at former Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg of New York and perhaps Mr. Buttigieg with a familiar theme: lashing the billionaire class. “I don’t think anyone ought to be able to buy their way into a nomination,” she said, before also knocking “people who suck up to billionaires in order to fund their campaigns.”

Mr. Biden’s post-Iowa adjustments have been more dramatic. In a significant leadership shake-up, Mr. Biden has given effective control of the campaign to Anita Dunn, a veteran party operative, an acknowledgment that major improvements must come quickly if he is to reverse his fortunes.

But no staff reordering can change the profile of the candidate. In person, Mr. Biden has often felt like a contender at odds with his reputation: He was a national-polling leader who teetered through nationally televised debates; a three-time presidential candidate whose experience could not protect him from damaging mistakes; a former vice president who spoke constantly of his closeness with a popular former boss who had not explicitly endorsed him.

For a candidate whose allies had allowed themselves to dream of an incident-free path to the nomination, muscling through Iowa and dominating by Super Tuesday, his early stumbles have been startling. Now, more than three decades after first seeking the presidency, Mr. Biden has staggered into New Hampshire having extended his track record of primary failure, asking voters to believe that he is the safest electoral choice.

And so, the goals of Mr. Biden’s Friday evening were perhaps loftier than they had been at past debates. In a series of uneven performances throughout the primary, he had appeared at times content to grade out with a gentleman’s “B” — good enough to get through the night, if not to put away the field. Now the moment has plainly demanded more.

On Friday, it was a fiery Mr. Biden, whose efforts at soaring oratory can sometimes veer closer to a shout.

He was at his most passionate and to-the-point when discussing matters within his comfort zone: Foreign policy. Legislative accomplishments. Experience. His time in the Obama administration.

When Mr. Buttigieg said at one point in the evening that he offers a perspective “of somebody whose life has been shaped by the decisions that are made in those big white buildings in Washington, D.C.,” Mr. Biden — perhaps inadvertently — appeared to strike at a crucial tension of this primary.

“I don’t know what about the past of Barack Obama and Joe Biden was so bad,” he said, his volume rising. “We were just beginning.”

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Pete Buttigieg Attacked From Start To Finish At New Hampshire Democratic Debate

MANCHESTER, N.H. ― Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) passed up an opportunity to echo one of his surrogate’s attacks on former Vice President Joe Biden at Friday’s Democratic presidential debate, saying he was “a friend of mine, and I’m not here to attack him.” 

They even gave each other a hug at one point. 

Westlake Legal Group 5e3e2dd8220000c20b23ebf3 Pete Buttigieg Attacked From Start To Finish At New Hampshire Democratic Debate

Elise Amendola/Associated Press Former Vice President Joe Biden, left, embraces Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) during the Democratic presidential primary debate Friday at St. Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire.

But Pete Buttigieg was not so lucky. And he did not get any hugs. 

Throughout the night, the former mayor of South Bend, Indiana, received a barrage of criticism over his lack of experience, his record on race and policing, his stance on single-payer health care, his views of President Donald Trump and the accomplishments of President Barack Obama.

It’s not hard to see why. Buttigieg finished in a virtual tie in the Iowa caucuses ― exceeding predictions ― and several polls have shown him surging in New Hampshire ahead of the state’s primary on Tuesday.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) unloaded on Buttigieg early in the night by suggesting the former mayor of a mid-size city in Indiana wasn’t experienced enough to take on Trump.

She criticized him for complaints he made last week about how the Senate impeachment proceedings had been tiring and made him want to watch other television programming. 

“You said it was exhausting to watch and that you wanted to turn the channel and watch cartoons,” Klobuchar said, telling Buttigieg that the remark may have made him look “like a cool newcomer” but that it wasn’t appropriate.

“I don’t think that’s what people want right now. We have a newcomer in the White House, and look what that got us,” she said.

Buttigieg responded by saying that he had more to offer than those who work in the “big white buildings in Washington, D.C.,” citing his military service overseas. 

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), meanwhile, got in on the action after Buttigieg was asked by the debate moderators about his record on race and policing in South Bend. Buttigieg faced criticism from the city’s black leaders last year over several policing-related controversies.

“The reality is, on my watch, drug arrests in South Bend were lower than the national average, and specifically to marijuana, lower than in Indiana,” Buttigieg said. “But there is no question that systemic racism has penetrated to every level of our system, and my city was not immune. I took a lot of heat for discussing systemic racism with my own police department, but we’ve got to confront the fact that there is no escaping how this is part of all of our policies.”

Asked by a moderator if she was satisfied by Buttigieg’s answer, Warren said, “No.”

She dismissed his answer as lacking in substance. 

“You have to own up to the facts. And it’s important to own up to the facts about how race has totally permeated our criminal justice system,” Warren said, noting studies that find Black Americans face systemically harsher treatment than whites.

“But we cannot say that criminal justice is the only time we want to talk about race specifically,” she said, calling for “race-conscious laws” on issues like housing. 

“You can’t just repeal that and say, ‘OK, now everything is even ― it’s not,’” she added. “We need race-conscious laws in education, in employment, in entrepreneurship to make this country a country of opportunity for everyone.

Buttigieg also took heat from Klobuchar over his stance on “Medicare for All,” the single-payer health care program. The Minnesota senator accused him of flip-flopping on the issue after once saying he supported the program. Buttigieg, however, maintained he has been “consistent throughout” on health care. 

That’s not to say that the other candidates sailed through unscathed. Biden went after Sanders on guns, saying, “He voted to give the gun manufacturers, the only major industry in America, a loophole that does not allow them to be sued for the carnage they are creating.”

And he criticized Sanders on Medicare for All legislation, saying, “He says he wrote the damn thing, but he’s unwilling to tell us what the damn thing is going to cost.”

But Buttigieg was the man to take down. Although both he and Sanders emerged as the winners of the Iowa caucuses, Buttigieg’s performance was much stronger than expected ― and it put a target on his back. 

Candidates began previewing their attacks this week on the campaign trail in New Hampshire, which will go to the polls Tuesday. 

Sanders used Buttigieg as an example of what’s wrong with the political system at an event in Manchester on Friday morning, reading off headlines portraying him as the favorite candidate of billionaires and Wall Street.

And Wednesday, Biden took issue with Buttigieg’s criticisms of the old system in Washington, accusing him of calling the Obama administration a failure at a rally in New Hampshire: “Is he really saying the Obama-Biden administration was a failure? Pete, just say it out loud.”

But surrogates for Buttigieg’s campaign maintained that Friday’s attacks on their candidate failed to blunt his momentum, calling his support a “movement.”

“I think Pete rose to the occasion tonight. He was presidential this evening,” said Maura Sullivan, the Buttigieg campaign’s New Hampshire co-chair.

Sullivan, a veteran who served in the Pentagon under Obama, added that Buttigieg’s campaign had an “Obama-like feeling.”

“It’s electric, it’s magical, you can just feel it,” she said.

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Biden Wants Voters to Look to the Past. (Just Not the Recent Past.)

Westlake Legal Group 07debate-assess1-facebookJumbo Biden Wants Voters to Look to the Past. (Just Not the Recent Past.) United States Politics and Government Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Debates (Political) Bloomberg, Michael R Biden, Joseph R Jr

MANCHESTER, N.H. — For months, he played the big-talking front-runner, swaggering if rarely steady, hoping voters would not linger long on the tautology of his premise: Joe Biden was the candidate who should win, he told fellow Democrats, because he was the candidate who could win.

So it was with some apparent humility — and then plenty of residual swagger — that Mr. Biden, days off a fourth-place debacle in Iowa, opened Friday night’s debate with an unusual prediction: He would probably do some more losing next week.

“I took a hit in Iowa,” the former vice president allowed. “I’ll probably take a hit here.”

Since joining the race last year, Mr. Biden has presented himself as the safe choice for risk-averse times, the O.K.-that’ll-do option for Democrats whose chief priority has been finding the candidate best positioned to defeat President Trump. But with Mr. Biden’s setback in Iowa and a slate of flawed competitors beside him onstage on Friday — their shortcomings laid bare in several punchy exchanges throughout the night — the party has been left to consider an unsettling truth.

There is no safe option. And that is starting to feel especially risky.

For a perpetually anxious party, the gathering on Friday supplied an untimely forum to air the weaknesses of several top contenders, aided by the man whose standing has fallen the fastest.

The cost of Senator Bernie Sanders’s progressive health care plans? “He’s unwilling to tell us what the damn thing is going to cost,” Mr. Biden said.

The meager poll numbers among nonwhite voters for Pete Buttigieg? “He’s the mayor of a small city who has done some good things,” Mr. Biden ruled, “but has not demonstrated his ability — and we’ll soon find out — to get a broad scope of support across the spectrum.”

Perhaps most significantly, in the running dialogue that could define the campaign’s coming weeks, the race’s generational fault lines — and the field’s conspicuous absences — came bluntly to the fore. A lengthy discussion of institutional racism proceeded without a black contender onstage, in a primary that once included several candidates of color who pledged to help rebuild the winning Obama coalition. (On Friday, Andrew Yang, the former technology executive, was the only nonwhite candidate who qualified for the debate.)

Mr. Sanders, the septuagenarian choice of the young, acknowledged that the runaway turnout he had hoped for in Iowa had not come to pass. Mr. Buttigieg, the millennial who does best with older voters, appeared to tweak capital veterans like Mr. Biden, Mr. Sanders and Senator Elizabeth Warren when he said that those hungering for the person “with the most years of Washington establishment experience” should look elsewhere.

And in a signal of Mr. Buttigieg’s growing stature in the race in these early states — after functionally tying Mr. Sanders in Iowa, he has inched within striking distance in New Hampshire polls — the former mayor provoked sharp defenses from some of those proud establishment figures.

“This going after every single thing that people do because it’s popular to say and makes you look like a cool newcomer — I don’t think that’s what people want right now,” Senator Amy Klobuchar fired, noting the senators’ work during the recent impeachment trial. “We have a newcomer in the White House now and look where it got us.”

Mr. Biden, in one of several forceful defenses of his long record in Washington, adopted the uncommon political strategy of trumpeting the old ways of doing business, after Mr. Buttigieg urged voters to “leave the politics of the past in the past.”

“The politics of the past, I think, were not all that bad,” Mr. Biden said, spending the night ticking off highlights of the Obama administration and his legislative career.

He was at least “part of the reason,” he said, for the following events in American history: the confirmation of Supreme Court Justices Elena Kagan, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor; the non-confirmation of Judge Robert H. Bork; and the Iran nuclear deal.

He noted his early support for same-sex marriage and his involvement with the withdrawal of troops in Iraq (“I did that”); the Paris climate accords; gun legislation (“I’m the only guy that beat the N.R.A. twice”); and “every major initiative we have had relative to diplomacy.”

Democrats, rarely a tranquil lot this election season, have endured a particularly distressing week. Mr. Trump’s long-anticipated Senate acquittal was dispiriting enough for his critics — punctuated by a series of angry public appearances from the president, news that his approval ratings have climbed and, on Friday, the firing of key witnesses who had testified in the House impeachment proceedings.

In one memorable flourish on Friday, Mr. Biden urged the crowd to its feet to honor one of them, Lt. Col. Alexander S. Vindman, a National Security Council official whom the White House had dismissed earlier in the day.

“Stand up and clap for Vindman. Get up there!” Mr. Biden said. “That’s who we are. We are not what Trump is.”

The fiasco of the Iowa results just four days earlier was a psychological blow the Democrats did not see coming, a self-inflicted mess that instantly shook confidence within the party and seemed to validate Republican taunts that their opponents cannot even be trusted to count their own votes.

This crisis of competence is now the candidates’ to bear, leaving to them the task of convincing voters that the party will be able to come together — and get out of its own way — in time to turn back Mr. Trump. The fallout from Iowa has only exacerbated the wide-scale disdain and distrust that many progressives, particularly Sanders supporters, have reserved for the party leadership.

Still, with success in Iowa and a strong showing in New Hampshire polls, Mr. Sanders has emerged as the unquestioned early choice of the left, outperforming Ms. Warren, who had threatened to eat into his liberal base, and watching with delight as the race’s moderate lane remains a candidate pileup.

Ms. Warren’s campaign has argued that she still has a path, preaching a stay-the-course message and telling reporters that she has the “widest, deepest coalition” in New Hampshire, a state that borders her own.

On Friday, she appeared to take aim at former Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg of New York and perhaps Mr. Buttigieg with a familiar theme: lashing the billionaire class. “I don’t think anyone ought to be able to buy their way into a nomination,” she said, before also knocking “people who suck up to billionaires in order to fund their campaigns.”

Mr. Biden’s post-Iowa adjustments have been more dramatic. In a significant leadership shake-up, Mr. Biden has given effective control of the campaign to Anita Dunn, a veteran party operative, an acknowledgment that major improvements must come quickly if he is to reverse his fortunes.

But no staff reordering can change the profile of the candidate. In person, Mr. Biden has often felt like a contender at odds with his reputation: He was a national-polling leader who teetered through nationally televised debates; a three-time presidential candidate whose experience could not protect him from damaging mistakes; a former vice president who spoke constantly of his closeness with a popular former boss who had not explicitly endorsed him.

For a candidate whose allies had allowed themselves to dream of an incident-free path to the nomination, muscling through Iowa and dominating by Super Tuesday, his early stumbles have been startling. Now, more than three decades after first seeking the presidency, Mr. Biden has staggered into New Hampshire having extended his track record of primary failure, asking voters to believe that he is the safest electoral choice.

And so, the goals of Mr. Biden’s Friday evening were perhaps loftier than they had been at past debates. In a series of uneven performances throughout the primary, he had appeared at times content to grade out with a gentleman’s “B” — good enough to get through the night, if not to put away the field. Now the moment has plainly demanded more.

On Friday, it was a fiery Mr. Biden, whose efforts at soaring oratory can sometimes veer closer to a shout.

He was at his most passionate and to-the-point when discussing matters within his comfort zone: Foreign policy. Legislative accomplishments. Experience. His time in the Obama administration.

When Mr. Buttigieg said at one point in the evening that he offers a perspective “of somebody whose life has been shaped by the decisions that are made in those big white buildings in Washington, D.C.,” Mr. Biden — perhaps inadvertently — appeared to strike at a crucial tension of this primary.

“I don’t know what about the past of Barack Obama and Joe Biden was so bad,” he said, his volume rising. “We were just beginning.”

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Warren appears to target Buttigieg as she slams people who ‘suck up to billionaires’

Westlake Legal Group 854081161001_6128449562001_6128455277001-vs Warren appears to target Buttigieg as she slams people who 'suck up to billionaires' Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc f7c14ebc-2bb5-5495-bfd5-38a85d843d32 article

MANCHESTER, NH – Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg came under attack at Friday night’s Democratic presidential nomination debate by two of his top-tier rivals over his acceptance of campaign donations from billionaires and his reliance on super PACs to help support his White House bid.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren – who’s contributions have almost entirely come from small dollar grassroots donors – slammed the former South Bend, Indiana mayor without naming him.

BIDEN PREDICTS HE’LL ‘TAKE A HIT’ IN TUESDAY’S NH PRIMARY

“I don’t think anyone should be able to buy their way into a nomination or to be president of the United States, she emphasized, before adding that, “I don’t think people who suck up to billionaires in order to fund their campaigns ought to do it.”

It was crystal clear she was training her fire on Buttigieg

The progressive senator from Massachusetts then added that “everyone on this stage is either a billionaire or is receiving help from PACs that can do unlimited spending. So if you really want to live where you say, then put your money where your mouth is and say no to the PACs.”

While Buttigieg’s waved off support from any super PACs formed specifically to back his campaign, he’s benefited from the efforts of Vote Vets, a pro-Democratic outside group that’s spent over $1 million in the first-in-the-nation primary state of New Hampshire to run ads supporting the Afghanistan War veteran.

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont,a fellow progressive standard bearer who like Warren has sworn off PACs and big donor contributions, also took aim at Buttigieg – and had no problem singling him out by name.

“Unlike some of the folks up here, I don’t have 40 billionaires, Pete, contributing to my campaign, coming from the pharmaceutical campaign, Wall Street and all the big money interests,” Sanders said.

“If we want to change America, you’re not going to do it by electing candidates who are going out to rich people’s homes begging for money,” Sanders stressed.

Buttigieg – responding to the criticism – fired back that “we are going into the fight of our lives. Donald Trump – according to news reports – and his allies raised $25 million today. We need to go into that fight with everything that we’ve got. Now I’ve been very clear on my record – where I sued pharmaceutical companies – and what I’ve campaigned for – which includes raising rages and raising taxes on the corporations and the wealthy.”

Buttigieg’s star has risen this week, after tying Sanders in Iowa’s caucuses. And he’s closing in on Sanders in the latest polls in New Hampshire, ahead of Tuesday’s primary.

Westlake Legal Group 854081161001_6128449562001_6128455277001-vs Warren appears to target Buttigieg as she slams people who 'suck up to billionaires' Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc f7c14ebc-2bb5-5495-bfd5-38a85d843d32 article   Westlake Legal Group 854081161001_6128449562001_6128455277001-vs Warren appears to target Buttigieg as she slams people who 'suck up to billionaires' Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc f7c14ebc-2bb5-5495-bfd5-38a85d843d32 article

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Pete Buttigieg Attacked From Start To Finish

MANCHESTER, N.H. ― Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) passed up an opportunity to echo one of his surrogate’s attacks on former Vice President Joe Biden at Friday’s Democratic presidential debate, saying he was “a friend of mine, and I’m not here to attack him.” 

They even gave each other a hug at one point. 

Westlake Legal Group 5e3e2dd8220000c20b23ebf3 Pete Buttigieg Attacked From Start To Finish

Elise Amendola/Associated Press Former Vice President Joe Biden, left, embraces Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) during the Democratic presidential primary debate Friday at St. Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire.

But Pete Buttigieg was not so lucky. And he did not get any hugs. 

Throughout the night, the former mayor of South Bend, Indiana, received a barrage of criticism over his lack of experience, his record on race and policing, his stance on single-payer health care, his views of President Donald Trump and the accomplishments of President Barack Obama.

It’s not hard to see why. Buttigieg finished in a virtual tie in the Iowa caucuses ― exceeding predictions ― and several polls have shown him surging in New Hampshire ahead of the state’s primary on Tuesday.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) unloaded on Buttigieg early in the night by suggesting the former mayor of a mid-size city in Indiana wasn’t experienced enough to take on Trump.

She criticized him for complaints he made last week about how the Senate impeachment proceedings had been tiring and made him want to watch other television programming. 

“You said it was exhausting to watch and that you wanted to turn the channel and watch cartoons,” Klobuchar said, telling Buttigieg that the remark may have made him look “like a cool newcomer” but that it wasn’t appropriate.

“I don’t think that’s what people want right now. We have a newcomer in the White House, and look what that got us,” she said.

Buttigieg responded by saying that he had more to offer than those who work in the “big white buildings in Washington, D.C.,” citing his military service overseas. 

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), meanwhile, got in on the action after Buttigieg was asked by the debate moderators about his record on race and policing in South Bend. Buttigieg faced criticism from the city’s black leaders last year over several policing-related controversies.

“The reality is, on my watch, drug arrests in South Bend were lower than the national average, and specifically to marijuana, lower than in Indiana,” Buttigieg said. “But there is no question that systemic racism has penetrated to every level of our system, and my city was not immune. I took a lot of heat for discussing systemic racism with my own police department, but we’ve got to confront the fact that there is no escaping how this is part of all of our policies.”

Asked by a moderator if she was satisfied by Buttigieg’s answer, Warren said, “No.”

She dismissed his answer as lacking in substance. 

“You have to own up to the facts. And it’s important to own up to the facts about how race has totally permeated our criminal justice system,” Warren said, noting studies that find Black Americans face systemically harsher treatment than whites.

“But we cannot say that criminal justice is the only time we want to talk about race specifically,” she said, calling for “race-conscious laws” on issues like housing. 

“You can’t just repeal that and say, ‘OK, now everything is even ― it’s not,’” she added. “We need race-conscious laws in education, in employment, in entrepreneurship to make this country a country of opportunity for everyone.

Buttigieg also took heat from Klobuchar over his stance on “Medicare for All,” the single-payer health care program. The Minnesota senator accused him of flip-flopping on the issue after once saying he supported the program. Buttigieg, however, maintained he has been “consistent throughout” on health care. 

That’s not to say that the other candidates sailed through unscathed. Biden went after Sanders on guns, saying, “He voted to give the gun manufacturers, the only major industry in America, a loophole that does not allow them to be sued for the carnage they are creating.”

And he criticized Sanders on Medicare for All legislation, saying, “He says he wrote the damn thing, but he’s unwilling to tell us what the damn thing is going to cost.”

But Buttigieg was the man to take down. Although both he and Sanders emerged as the winners of the Iowa caucuses, Buttigieg’s performance was much stronger than expected ― and it put a target on his back. 

Candidates began previewing their attacks this week on the campaign trail in New Hampshire, which will go to the polls Tuesday. 

Sanders used Buttigieg as an example of what’s wrong with the political system at an event in Manchester on Friday morning, reading off headlines portraying him as the favorite candidate of billionaires and Wall Street.

And Wednesday, Biden took issue with Buttigieg’s criticisms of the old system in Washington, accusing him of calling the Obama administration a failure at a rally in New Hampshire: “Is he really saying the Obama-Biden administration was a failure? Pete, just say it out loud.”

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