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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 245)

Nebraska woman with concealed-carry permit arrested on assault charge after shooting fleeing shoplifting suspect

A Nebraska woman was arrested and charged with first-degree assault Friday after police say she shot a fleeing shoplifting suspect in the arm earlier this month.

Investigators say Shelby Jones, 38, was shopping at a convenience store early on Aug. 1 when Tilian Tilian, 22, allegedly tried to shoplift two bottles of liquor.

Police Chief Jeff Bliemeister said the store’s clerk tried to restrain Tilian and the two got into an altercation.

MISSOURI’S GUN LAW SHOULD ALLOW CITIES TO REQUIRE PERMITS, ST. LOUIS MAYOR SAYS

Westlake Legal Group Shelby-Jones Nebraska woman with concealed-carry permit arrested on assault charge after shooting fleeing shoplifting suspect Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/nebraska fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 27a1efb7-bf75-5e43-b2e9-481efa3bfca1

Shelby Jones  (Lincoln Police Department)

Bliemeister added that Jones saw the altercation, drew her handgun and positioned herself between Tilian and the exit.

“During the physical altercation, Tilian broke free and ran past Jones, exiting the store,” Bliemeister said.

OHIO GRANDFATHER WITH GUN STOPS INTRUDER: ‘THEY PICKED THE WRONG HOUSE’

He said Jones then shot Tilian in the back of the arm, missing the store clerk who ran outside at the same time.

“After conducting interviews, reviewing video surveillance and collecting forensic evidence, investigators concluded Tilian was fleeing the property when he was shot by Jones,” Bliemeister said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP 

Tilian was treated at a hospital and released. KETV reported that police anticipate charging him.

Police said Tilian still had one bottle liquor in his hand when he was shot, The Omaha World-Herald reported.

Westlake Legal Group Shelby-Jones Nebraska woman with concealed-carry permit arrested on assault charge after shooting fleeing shoplifting suspect Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/nebraska fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 27a1efb7-bf75-5e43-b2e9-481efa3bfca1   Westlake Legal Group Shelby-Jones Nebraska woman with concealed-carry permit arrested on assault charge after shooting fleeing shoplifting suspect Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/nebraska fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 27a1efb7-bf75-5e43-b2e9-481efa3bfca1

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey’s own account was hacked, used to post vulgar messages

Westlake Legal Group jackdorsey-gettyimages-524251000 Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey's own account was hacked, used to post vulgar messages Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/person/jack-dorsey fox-news/media fox news fnc/tech fnc article 8a894b93-9529-5754-bd8e-d0b9a609991d

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey appears to have been hacked on his own platform, with several offensive tweets posted to his account.

The tweets, posted Friday and deleted within minutes, included the use of the N-word, other vulgar comments, and one message claiming there was a bomb at Twitter’s headquarters.

Other tweets gave shoutouts to people, and pushed the hashtag “#ChucklingSquad” — the name of an online chat, according to The Daily Beast.

TWITTER’S JACK DORSEY MAXES OUT DONATIONS TO 2020 HOPEFUL TULSI GABBARD

Another tweet read: “Hitler is innocent go follow @taytaylov3r if you want every Jew gassed.” The account also retweeted another Twitter user who wrote, “Nazi Germany did nothing wrong.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Twitter released a brief statement saying, “We’re aware that @jack was compromised and investigating what happened.”

Dorsey’s compromised account immediately caused panic among some on the platform, stirring worry that President Trump’s account could also be hacked.

Westlake Legal Group jackdorsey-gettyimages-524251000 Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey's own account was hacked, used to post vulgar messages Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/person/jack-dorsey fox-news/media fox news fnc/tech fnc article 8a894b93-9529-5754-bd8e-d0b9a609991d   Westlake Legal Group jackdorsey-gettyimages-524251000 Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey's own account was hacked, used to post vulgar messages Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/person/jack-dorsey fox-news/media fox news fnc/tech fnc article 8a894b93-9529-5754-bd8e-d0b9a609991d

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Hurricane Dorian: Delta capping flight prices, American offering reduced fares from Florida as hurricane nears

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Hurricane Dorian: Delta capping flight prices, American offering reduced fares from Florida as hurricane nears

Florida officials are working to get roads ready for additional traffic due to Hurricane Dorian. Fox – 35 Orlando

Major airlines are capping prices on fares out of Florida and adding additional capacity to flight routes as Hurricane Dorian approaches the U.S.

In anticipation of the increased demand spurred by residents trying to flee the area, Delta Air Lines added six additional flights (equaling 930 seats) to the normal flight schedule between Atlanta and Florida, including Miami, Fort Lauderdale, West Palm Beach and Orlando.

Delta also capped fares on one-way flights to and from these locations between $299 and $599 in the main cabin and $499 and $799 in first class, based on flight distance, according to Delta spokesperson Adrian Gee.

In years past, airlines have been accused of raising prices as people in the path of storms attempted to book travel out of the area.

Gee noted that fares may be slightly higher for flights that include a connection from those same cities through Sept. 4.

American Airlines has also added reduced, last-minute fares for impacted cities.   According to spokesperson Ross Feinstein, this includes one-way, non-stop fares from 13 cities in Florida: Daytona Beach (DAB), Fort Lauderdale (FLL), Fort Myers (RSW), Gainesville (GNV), Jacksonville (JAX), Key West (EYW), Melbourne (MLB), Miami (MIA), Orlando (MCO), Sarasota / Bradenton (SRQ), Tallahassee (TLH), Tampa (TPA) and West Palm Beach (PBI).

As of Friday at 1 p.m. ET, a search on American’s website showed available fares from Miami to Atlanta for $129 on Monday. 

Forecasters say Dorian is expected to make landfall Monday into Tuesday along Florida’s east coast.Heavy rainfall, dangerous winds and life-threatening storm surge are expected.

In 2017, airlines were criticized on social media for “fare gouging” as people tried to evacuate before Hurricane Irma.

USA TODAY has reached out to Southwest, United, Frontier, Spirit and JetBlue for comment. Their websites do not list information on capped prices.

As of Friday at 3 p.m. ET, a search on Southwest’s website shows one-way fares from Ft. Lauderdale to Atlanta ranging from $129 to $317. On United’s site, a one-way flight from Miami to Atlanta Monday ranges from $366 to $753. And one-way JetBlue flights from Ft. Lauderdale to Atlanta Monday range from $129 to $639. 

Contributing: Ryan W. Miller

Hurricane Dorian travel guide: What to know if you’re flying or cruising Labor Day weekend

When will Hurricane Dorian hit Florida?: What we know about the dangerous storm

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President Trump Tweets Sensitive Surveillance Image of Iran

Westlake Legal Group diptych2_custom-ca58b2f7321ffc8e8e6add317ac5dba39175f5b6-s1100-c15 President Trump Tweets Sensitive Surveillance Image of Iran

A commercial satellite image from the company Maxar (bottom) is around 46 cm in resolution. The image tweeted by the president (top) appears far better. Top; Satellite image ©2019 Maxar Technologies Bottom; @realDonaldTrump hide caption

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Top; Satellite image ©2019 Maxar Technologies Bottom; @realDonaldTrump

Westlake Legal Group  President Trump Tweets Sensitive Surveillance Image of Iran

A commercial satellite image from the company Maxar (bottom) is around 46 cm in resolution. The image tweeted by the president (top) appears far better.

Top; Satellite image ©2019 Maxar Technologies Bottom; @realDonaldTrump

President Trump has tweeted what experts say is almost certainly an image from a classified satellite or drone, showing the aftermath of an accident at an Iranian space facility.

“The United States of America was not involved in the catastrophic accident during final launch preparations for the Safir [Space Launch Vehicle] Launch at Semnan Launch Site One in Iran,” the president said in a tweet that accompanied the image on Friday. “I wish Iran best wishes and good luck in determining what happened at Site One.”

NPR broke the news of the launch failure on Thursday, using images from commercial satellites that flew over Iran’s Imam Khomeini Space Center. Those images showed smoke billowing from the pad. Iran has since acknowledged an accident occurred at the site.

Some of the highest-resolution imagery available commercially comes from the company Maxar, whose WorldView-2 satellite sports 46-centimeter resolution.

But the image shown in the president’s tweet appears to be of far better quality, says Ankit Panda, an adjunct senior fellow at the Federation of American Scientists, who specializes in analyzing satellite imagery. “The resolution is amazingly high,” says Panda. “I would think it’s probably below well below 20 centimeters, which is much higher than anything I’ve ever seen.”

Panda says that the tweet discloses “some pretty amazing capabilities that the public simply wasn’t privy to before this.”

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence referred questions about the image to the White House, which declined to comment.

The image shows the aftermath of the accident, which experts believe took place while the rocket was being fueled. Clearly visible is the truck used to transport and erect the rocket, and the words “The product of national empowerment,” which have been written along the edge of the pad. The picture also shows extensive debris and charring around the pad.

It was not entirely clear where the president’s photo came from. Panda believes it was likely taken by a classified U.S. satellite. But Melissa Hanham, deputy director of the Open Nuclear Network at the One Earth Foundation, believes that the resolution is so high, it may be beyond the physical limits at which satellites can operate. “The atmosphere is thick enough that after somewhere around 11 to nine centimeters, things get wonky,” she says.

That could mean it was taken by a drone or spy plane, though such a vehicle would be violating Iranian airspace. Hanham also says that the European company Airbus has been experimenting with drones that fly so high, they are technically outside the atmosphere and thus operating outside of national boundaries. But she says she doesn’t know whether the U.S. has such a system.

Glare in the center of the image suggest the image in the tweet was itself a photo of a briefing slide. Panda suggests it could have been displayed on a computer screen in a so-called Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility. It’s also possible it was a photo of a piece of paper.

Either way, Panda notes a small redaction in the upper-left-hand-corner suggests that the intelligence community had cleared the image for release by the president.

But, both he and Hanham question whether releasing it was a good idea. “You really risk giving away the way you know things,” Hanham says. “That allows people to adapt and hide how they carry out illicit activity.”

“These are closely held national secrets,” Panda adds. “We don’t even share a lot of this kind of imagery with our closest allies.” In tweeting it out to the world, Trump is letting Iran know exactly what the U.S. is capable of. He’s also letting others know as well, Panda says. “The Russians and the Chinese, you’re letting them know that these are the kind of things that the United States has the capability of seeing,” he says.

With additional reporting by Greg Myre and Ayda Pourasad.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Hurricane Dorian Updates: Storm Intensifies to Category 3 Strength

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group 30dorian-briefing02sub-articleLarge Hurricane Dorian Updates: Storm Intensifies to Category 3 Strength Hurricane Dorian (2019) Florida

There were long lines at a supermarket in West Palm Beach, Fla., on Friday.CreditSaul Martinez for The New York Times

Forecasters expect Hurricane Dorian to arrive somewhere along the east coast of Florida early on Tuesday morning. But exactly where is still a mystery, with some prediction models suggesting a direct blow to Central Florida and others projecting the storm to veer north or south.

“It all depends on this dance of the pressure systems around the storm,” said Hugh Willoughby, a meteorologist at Florida International University in Miami.

If the forecast for its strength holds, Dorian would be the first hurricane of Category 4 or higher to make landfall on Florida’s east coast since 1992, when Andrew ripped through the Miami area as a Category 5 storm, causing widespread damage.

On Friday afternoon, Dorian was gaining strength over the Atlantic Ocean, becoming a Category 3 storm with winds of 115 m.p.h.

“The biggest concern will be Dorian’s slow motion when it is near Florida, placing some areas of the state at an increasing risk of a prolonged, drawn-out event of strong winds, dangerous storm surge, and heavy rainfall,” the National Hurricane Center said.

Also on Friday, President Trump approved an emergency declaration for Florida, allowing for increased federal support and resources to flow to the state.

[Hurricane Dorian in pictures: See the preparations here.]

Gov. Ron DeSantis said that 2,500 National Guard troops had been activated, a force that could grow to 4,000 by Saturday night. He added that the state had ordered a million gallons of water and sent 860,000 bottles of water to counties for distribution.

Some gas stations have been running out of fuel, Mr. DeSantis said at a news conference on Friday morning. The state has waived regulations and set up police escorts to get more gas to stations, including from nearby states, the governor said.

State authorities were also visiting and calling about 120 nursing homes that have not reported whether they have working generators.

Westlake Legal Group hurricane-dorian-map-promo-1566933204147-articleLarge-v122 Hurricane Dorian Updates: Storm Intensifies to Category 3 Strength Hurricane Dorian (2019) Florida

Maps: Tracking Hurricane Dorian’s Path

Live tracking the storm, which could strengthen to a Category 4 hurricane by the weekend as it approaches the Florida coast.

A strike by Dorian in a densely populated region could be especially dangerous, said W. Craig Fugate, a former administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

He rattled off a list of Florida cities — Miami, Fort Lauderdale, West Palm Beach, Jacksonville — where, he said, storm surge could be deadly “once you start measuring in feet, not inches.”

“That’s not saying it won’t be devastating wherever it hits the shore,” said Mr. Fugate, who is also a former director of the Florida Division of Emergency Management. “But the reality is: What drives the response is people.”

Orlando is inland in Central Florida, but if the storm dumps rain for many hours, the city’s lakes could overflow. In North Florida, the St. Johns and Matanzas Rivers have flooded Jacksonville and St. Augustine even when storms have not directly hit the cities, Mr. Fugate noted.

[Here are some tips on how to prepare for an evacuation order.]

He also laid out other concerns.

Expensive installations along the flourishing Space Coast, around Cape Canaveral, could be affected. Fuel shipments could be delayed by any disruptions at major hubs for cargo such as Jaxport in Jacksonville or Port Everglades in Fort Lauderdale.

Powerful waves in Lake Okeechobee, Florida’s largest inland lake, could test its aging dike. Pounding rains might force the release of polluted waters into fragile estuaries to the east and west, which could lead to toxic algae blooms.

“What we’ve always encouraged in Florida is catastrophic disaster planning,” Mr. Fugate said.

People stocked up in West Palm Beach, Fla., on Friday.CreditSaul Martinez for The New York Times

Lines at some gas stations, especially on the east coast, were reminiscent of when Hurricane Irma struck in 2017, when most gas stations in South Florida exhausted their supply.

In West Palm Beach, drivers were reporting a growing number of stations with limited or no fuel supply, according to Gas Buddy, a tracking app.

Governor DeSantis said the state would begin highway patrol escorts for fuel trucks. “Some parts of the state you have cars lined up, it makes it more difficult for the trucks to get in and replenish the supply so we think those escorts will help with that,” he said.

The state’s price gouging law was also in effect. It bans excessive raises in the price of essential goods for the duration of a state emergency declaration.

By Friday afternoon, the attorney general’s office had received more than 700 complaints alleging price gouging. The majority of them were over gas and bottled water, said Kylie Mason, the press secretary for Attorney General Ashley Moody.

Forecasters have warned of the risk of “life-threatening” storm surge. Making matters worse, Dorian is arriving at a time of king tides for the East Coast.

A king tide happens when gravitational forces of the moon, the sun and the earth are lined up, pulling the ocean back and forth with greater force than is usual.

Well ahead of Dorian’s arrival, tides reached eight feet — around two feet above normal — in Charleston, S.C., on Thursday, flooding roads and causing major headaches. Tides there are expected to climb even higher on Friday evening, perhaps reaching 8.2 feet and submerging many low-lying roads.

Shannon Scaff, Charleston’s emergency management director, said he was most concerned about what happens when Dorian arrives in five to seven days there. Heavy rainfall — possibly more than a foot — could coincide with still elevated high tides.

Over the past few years, he said, hurricanes like Matthew and Irma have wrought new and unpredictable flooding patterns.

“Sometimes the forecasts are just off,” he said. “We can’t stop the storm. We can’t stop the tides, but we’re going to make ourselves as ready as we can.”

The mobile launch platform, which will be used to hold the Space Launch System rocket currently under development, had been at the launchpad at the Kennedy Space Center for tests. It can withstand strong winds, but “it’s best to bring it back to a safe and secure location,” said Gregory Harland, a NASA spokesman.

On Friday, a crawler moving at 1 m.p.h. took the launcher from the launchpad to the 525-foot-high Vehicle Assembly Building, which is like a gigantic garage for rockets.

The center is scheduled to shut down at 6 p.m. Saturday. Only a small “ride out” team was to remain there through the storm at the center’s launch control center. Once the storm passes, teams will inspect the center for damage before it reopens.

The space center has never experienced a direct hit from a hurricane but has suffered near misses. In August 2004, Hurricane Frances blew off 850 panels off the Vehicle Assembly Building, and Hurricane Jeanne, just three weeks later, pulled off 25 more. Mr. Harland said corroded fasteners have been replaced, and the building is now much more resilient.

The United Launch Alliance and SpaceX, two companies which launch rockets from Kennedy and the nearby Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, are also making preparations.

“We are closely monitoring weather conditions and planning to take all necessary precautions to protect our employees and safeguard facilities in the potentially affected areas,” SpaceX said in a statement.

A hurricane watch was also in effect for the northwestern Bahamas. As of 8 a.m., Dorian was centered about 250 miles east-northeast of the southeastern Bahamas and was moving northwest near 12 miles per hour.

Dorian was expected to arrive in the northwest Bahamas, a popular tourist spot, on Saturday and move over the area on Sunday. Residents were racing to finish their preparations on Friday. They cleaned out grocery store shelves, and worked to secure their homes and businesses.

Wayne Neely, a local meteorologist, told the Nassau Guardian that the storm’s current track meant that it could miss the islands, “but any wobble, left or right, could take it either further north or further south and then there would be catastrophe.”

Flights were still landing at Grand Bahama International Airport in Freeport on Friday morning. The Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line canceled its Sept. 1 and 3 departures on its Grand Celebration, but its cruise on Friday was still scheduled to depart as planned.

The authorities in the Bahamas were asking tourists with vacations planned for the Labor Day weekend to check with airlines, hotels and cruise lines before leaving their homes.

Powerful winds are what define a hurricane, so they are named and classified based on how hard their winds are blowing. To qualify as a hurricane, a storm must have sustained winds of 74 miles an hour or more.

All hurricanes are dangerous, but some pack more punch than others. So meteorologists try to quantify each storm’s destructive power by using the Saffir-Simpson scale, placing it in one of five categories based on sustained wind speed.

The National Hurricane Center said on Thursday that Dorian was expected to hit Florida as a “major” hurricane — in Category 3 or possibly Category 4.

Category 3 hurricanes, with wind speeds of 111 to 129 m.p.h., can take roofs off well-constructed houses and knock out electric and water systems for days or weeks. Category 4 hurricanes do catastrophic damage, felling most trees and power poles and wrecking some buildings with their wind speeds of 130 to 156 m.p.h.

[For details on how Hurricane Dorian is affecting flights, cruises and Disney World, read our story here.]

But some experts say the scale is a limited way to assess a storm’s destructive potential because it focuses only on the power of its winds, and not on the surge of seawater that a storm flings ashore, or on the flooding caused by its torrential rains. Most hurricane fatalities and property damage tend to be caused by those factors.

Hurricane Katrina was a Category 3 storm when it slammed into the Louisiana coast on Aug. 29, 2005. But it was the storm surge that overwhelmed New Orleans’s flood walls and levees and devastated the city.

[Read more about how hurricanes are categorized.]

Video

Westlake Legal Group 30vid-desantis-still-videoSixteenByNine3000 Hurricane Dorian Updates: Storm Intensifies to Category 3 Strength Hurricane Dorian (2019) Florida

Gov. Ron DeSantis of Florida described the actions he has authorized as Hurricane Dorian approached Florida.CreditCreditTim Short/Florida Today, via Associated Press

Hurricanes have a tragic history of interrupting Labor Day Weekend in Florida, including a 1935 storm that killed hundreds of World War I veterans who were working in the Florida Keys. It remains one of the strongest hurricanes to hit the United States in modern history.

That storm, a Category 5, had been expected to miss the Keys. But an unexpected change in its route left a group of more than 600 veterans working on a highway construction project exposed to its wrath. An 11-car train sent to attempt a rescue was swept off the tracks by a tidal wave.

“Negligence played no part in the failure to evacuate the 684 World War veterans from camps in the Florida Keys,” a New York Times article published days after the storm said, citing an official report to the president that attributed the losses to “an act of God.”

The 1935 storm, known simply as the Labor Day Hurricane, pushed up Florida’s west coast after battering the Keys, leading to high tides in St. Petersburg and Tampa and ripping roofs off buildings in Sarasota.

In all, 408 deaths were blamed on the Labor Day Hurricane, most of them in the Keys. A crowd of 20,000 mourners later gathered to pay their respects. The Times reported that the bodies of the veterans were burned at the scene “for the protection of those who survived.”

Teams of researchers are routinely sent on flights into the centers of storms to gather crucial data. These so-called hurricane hunters from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, based in Lakeland, Fla., and their partners went to get a snapshot of the storm’s insides.

On Thursday, the agency announced that it had completed a reconnaissance mission with its first all female three-pilot flight crew, featuring Capt. Kristie Twining, Cmdr. Rebecca Waddington and Lt. Lindsey Norman.

Last month, The Times sent a reporter and a photographer into the heart of Tropical Storm Barry. They learned that it is not for the faint of heart.

[Join the flight into the heart of Barry here.]

Reporting was contributed by Kenneth Chang, Patrick J. Lyons, Mitch Smith, Chris Dixon and Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Jack Dorsey’s Twitter Account Compromised

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey’s account sent a series of incendiary tweets on Friday after his account was compromised.

Dorsey’s account tweeted out “#nigger” and “Hitler is innocent,” among other inflammatory remarks. Another tweet read, “Intel is there’s a bomb at Twitter HQ.”

Some tweets were up for half an hour, though all were eventually deleted. Within the first few minutes of the inappropriate tweet spree, they had garnered thousands of likes and retweets. 

“Yes, Jack’s account was compromised. We’re working on it and investigating what happened,” said a Twitter spokesperson shortly after the tweets were posted.

Westlake Legal Group 5d6981042000002e00f3783b Jack Dorsey’s Twitter Account Compromised

HuffPost A tweet from Jack Dorsey’s account Friday.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

With ‘Talking to Strangers,’ Malcolm Gladwell Goes Dark

In the weeks I spent listening to Malcolm Gladwell’s podcast, I learned that lobsters have serotonin, that Elvis Presley suffered from parapraxis and that Mr. Gladwell adheres to a firm life rule that he drink only five liquids: water, tea, red wine, espresso and milk.

On the afternoon I met the author and journalist, I had just listened to an episode in which he interviews an intimidating guest. His audio recorder malfunctions, and he has to sprint to Staples to get a replacement. “I was embarrassed,” Mr. Gladwell confides in the podcast. “I worried that he would think I was pathetic.” It sounded mortifying. And yet when I sat down to interview Mr. Gladwell, at the kitchen table of his Manhattan apartment, I went ahead and trusted my own recorder.

This is what Mr. Gladwell, in his new book, “Talking to Strangers,” calls “default to truth.” Human beings are by nature trusting — of people, technology, everything. Often, we’re too trusting, with tragic results. But if we didn’t suppress thoughts of worst-case scenarios, we’d never leave the house. We definitely wouldn’t go on dating apps or invest in stocks or let our kids take gymnastics.

“It would be impossible!” Mr. Gladwell said, throwing up his hands, almost giddy at imagining the social paralysis that would occur if we were a less trusting species. “Everyone would withdraw their money from banks,” he continued. “In fact, the whole internet exists because people default to truth. Nothing is secure! They are hacking into the cloud as we speak!”

The “default to truth” theory is Mr. Gladwell’s latest obsession and the theme of his first book in six years. Lots of readers will scoff. After his first two pop-science smash hits — “The Tipping Point” (2000) and “Blink” (2005) — Mr. Gladwell’s reviews have steadily worsened, with prominent critics savaging his anecdote-heavy methodology. I counted myself among the skeptics. I doubted the premise of “Talking to Strangers” and dismissed it as armchair psychology.

And then my audio recorder broke midinterview, and I became a believer.

This wasn’t just coincidence. It’s exactly what Mr. Gladwell’s towering success — his five best-selling books, his six-figure speaking fees, his top-rated podcast — rests on: the moment when the skeptic starts to think that maybe we’re wrong about everything and maybe, just maybe, this Mr. Gladwell guy is onto something.

Nearly 20 years and millions of sales after his nonfiction debut, Mr. Gladwell is at something of a professional tipping point. He elicits from readers the kind of polarized reactions usually reserved for talk-radio hosts. To one camp, he is a master storyteller, pithily translating business concepts and behavioral science to a lay audience. To others, he is a faux intellectual, dressing up ordinary truths (such as an “Outliers” argument that success results from a combination of hard work and opportunity) as counterintuitive genius. How “Talking to Strangers” is received could cement Mr. Gladwell in one of those camps for good.

The book is weightier than his previous titles. There are no romps through pop culture (“The Tipping Point”), no tinge of self-help about the power of first impressions (“Blink”). Rather, Mr. Gladwell asks readers to rethink grim topics like police misconduct, child sexual assault, suicide and campus rape, all through the prism of our often disastrous instinct to trust that the people we meet are telling us the truth.

The topic — and Mr. Gladwell’s message that we should all approach strangers “with caution and humility” — has fortuitous timing, given a political climate in which we can hardly stand to interact with people who watch a different cable network. But Mr. Gladwell recoils at the implication that “Talking to Strangers” has anything to do with President Trump.

“I first got the idea in the pre-Trump era of police violence,” Mr. Gladwell said. In 2014, after the fatal police shooting of a black teenager in Ferguson, Mo., Mr. Gladwell started to think about a book that would explore these topics. A year later, Sandra Bland, a 28-year-old black woman in Texas, was found hanged in her jail cell after a traffic stop, and Mr. Gladwell’s idea crystallized.

“That was the case that made me realize: ‘Oh, this is what my book is about. This is the moral reason behind it,’” he said.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_159842979_677fbd26-fb72-4756-b11c-50307fbfd434-articleLarge With ‘Talking to Strangers,’ Malcolm Gladwell Goes Dark podcasts Gladwell, Malcolm Books and Literature Book Trade and Publishing Bland, Sandra (1987-2015)

Malcolm Gladwell begins and ends his latest book with the case of  Sandra Bland, who was found hanged in her Texas jail cell in 2015.CreditLittle, Brown and Company

“Talking to Strangers” includes a second-by-second assessment of what happened on July 10, 2015, when Trooper Brian Encinia — “white, short dark hair, thirty years old” — pulled over Ms. Bland near the campus of Prairie View A&M University.

“He was courteous — at least at first,” Mr. Gladwell writes, in his typical pared-down prose. “He told her that she had failed to signal a lane change. He asked her questions. She answered them. Then Bland lit a cigarette, and Encinia asked her to put it out.”

That is the moment when the interaction turned. Mr. Gladwell examines it not simply through a lens of race, but through the fact that they were strangers. People seemingly so different that they were destined to collide.

“If we were more thoughtful as a society — if we were willing to engage in some soul-searching about how we approach and make sense of strangers — she would not have ended up dead in a Texas jail cell,” Mr. Gladwell writes.

The Bland case opens and closes the book, and Mr. Gladwell said he could have devoted the entire volume to her. “If I was rewriting this book as a purely intellectual exercise and didn’t have to worry about reaching a wide audience, you could just do it on Sandra Bland,” he said.

But his publisher, and his fan base, have come to expect a sprawl of anecdotes. And so he applies the truth-default theory — which originated with a professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Timothy R. Levine — to Jerry Sandusky, Amanda Knox, Brock Turner, Bernie Madoff. Sylvia Plath makes an appearance.

In many ways, “Talking to Strangers” is Mr. Gladwell’s bleakest work. “Each of my books has had moments or chapters of things that were consequential,” he said, “but this is a lot of them. There’s no happy, uplifting part.”

I ended the book thinking that we are all doomed to misunderstand one another forever.

Yeah, Mr. Gladwell said. “It’s a little bit like that.”

At 55, in clear-framed spectacles and a head of curls, Mr. Gladwell still has the spindly, featherweight look of someone who can break a five-minute mile on a casual weekend run. He lives in a two-story townhouse apartment in the West Village, brimming with books, vintage furniture and a set of eclectic paintings of the Ethiopian Army. We sat at a heavy wooden table as 90-degree August soup poured through the open windows.

He had just finished interviewing applicants for a job as his assistant. Mr. Gladwell, who early in his career wrote a memorable New Yorker takedown of the hiring practices of McKinsey & Company, recognized the irony.

“I told them, ‘You know I don’t believe in job interviews, or that you can learn anything meaningful about people in job interviews,’” he said.

Lately, there is a lot for an assistant to assist with. Mr. Gladwell continues to give paid speeches and is a favorite on the cerebral festival circuit. Last year, he started a podcasting company, Pushkin Industries, with his friend Jacob Weisberg, the former chairman and editor in chief of the Slate Group. Mr. Gladwell’s flagship show, “Revisionist History,” draws as many as three million listeners per episode — several times the audience that even a top-selling nonfiction title draws in a year.

Books take years to complete, but thanks to Pushkin, Mr. Gladwell’s typical reader — whom he has described as “a 45-year-old guy with three kids who’s an engineer at some company outside of Atlanta” — can partake in a virtuous cycle of Gladwell programming. The podcast teases interest in a souped-up “Talking to Strangers” audiobook, which builds an audience for more speeches, which stokes advertisers for the podcasts. Mr. Gladwell lends his voice, with its emo librarian timbre, to a varied list of sponsors, from home security to hair loss. (“Ten percent off your first month with discount code ‘GLADWELL.’”)

When I suggested that all of this constituted a vast and expanding Gladwell Industrial Complex, he cringed. “Ack!” he said. “Careful. No, I don’t have a media empire. I am part of a podcasting company.”

The way Mr. Gladwell sees it, despite his equity stake in Pushkin, all of his work is still journalism — a natural offshoot of the articles that made him famous, first at The Washington Post and then at The New Yorker. He’s just grown up, and gotten a little more entrepreneurial.

“You can’t be a reporter forever,” he said. True enough. But few reporters ever become discount codes.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_159893313_3a31aba7-fa22-4360-b9bd-d70c1d3c21ff-articleLarge With ‘Talking to Strangers,’ Malcolm Gladwell Goes Dark podcasts Gladwell, Malcolm Books and Literature Book Trade and Publishing Bland, Sandra (1987-2015)

Mr. Gladwell at the South by Southwest conference in March. His “Revisionist History” podcast draws as many as three million listeners.CreditSamantha Burkardt/Getty Images

Mr. Gladwell loves to remind people that he is Canadian — more specifically, “a short Canadian.” He says this all the time, starting sentences with “The Canadian in me …” and “Growing up in a small town in Canada …”

His parents — Mr. Gladwell is the son of a Jamaican mother and an English father — moved to Elmira, Ontario, “a small, conservative, Bible Belt town,” when he was a child. After graduating from Trinity College at the University of Toronto, he struck out for a job in advertising but ended up in journalism, writing for two conservative magazines.

Mr. Gladwell joined The Post as a health and business reporter in 1987 and became a staff writer at The New Yorker about a decade later. There, he produced a string of knockout articles that reshaped the conventional wisdom on subjects from ketchup to the “broken windows” theory of policing.

“He was never interested in the traditional profile of a C.E.O. or an investigative piece on the malfeasance of some bank or company,” David Remnick, the magazine’s editor, said. “He got intrigued by this combination of reporting, thinking, reading, storytelling, telling two stories at once that lead you to a revelatory conclusion.”

When “The Tipping Point” was published, it became such a part of marketing vernacular that M.B.A. programs made it assigned reading. The Roots named their 2004 album after the book. The founder of Starbucks publicly credited his chain’s success with “the tipping-point phenomenon.” Donald Rumsfeld even used the term to describe the teetering status of the war in Iraq.

Mr. Gladwell became synonymous with an emerging genre of wonky but readable nonfiction. “Everyone thinks I wrote ‘Freakonomics,’” he said. Readers were captivated by his artful repurposing of academic research, as he repeatedly launched ideas and phrases — “mavens” and “connectors” and “the 10,000-hour rule” — into the lexicon. Time magazine named him one of its 100 Most Influential People.

But as Mr. Gladwell’s sales soared — his third book drew a reported $6 million advance — critics didn’t just sour on his work. They started to rip it apart.

“The reasoning in ‘Outliers,’ which consists of cherry-picked anecdotes, post-hoc sophistry and false dichotomies, had me gnawing on my Kindle,” a Harvard professor wrote in 2009. In 2013, a Times columnist ended his review bluntly: “It’s time for Malcolm Gladwell to find a new shtick.”

Mr. Gladwell said he didn’t really get ruffled by his critics. “I’ve never had a particularly thin skin,” he said. His friends point out that journalists can be especially jealous when one of their own so wildly succeeds. But the assertion that Mr. Gladwell has a schtick — or even a brand — does seem to irk him.

“Does Michael Lewis worry if he has a new schtick or an old schtick? I just enjoy his literary company,” Mr. Gladwell said. (Incidentally, Mr. Lewis, the author of such megahits as “Moneyball” and “The Big Short,” hosts a top-rated Pushkin podcast.)

“Critics take a more meta position that isn’t reflective of the audience,” Mr. Gladwell said. Besides, he added, “the marketplace value of a review has fallen. They’re not the gatekeeper anymore.” Despite mixed reviews, “Outliers” debuted at No. 1 on the Times best-seller list. And the paperback version is still there — for the 287th week.

“I’ve never had a particularly thin skin,” Mr. Gladwell said.CreditBryan Derballa for The New York Times

Some reviewers and Twitter critics may be out for blood when it comes to Mr. Gladwell’s writing. But that’s not really the case in podcasting, a younger and friendlier medium in which he can explore his every whim and not get raked over the coals.

“People don’t listen to what they don’t like,” Mr. Weisberg said. “It’s the opposite of The Times or Slate, when people don’t read an article but say something nasty about the writer or the headline. It’s just a constant today. You put your armor on because people are just going to start feeding on you.”

At Slate, Mr. Weisberg had conceived several hit podcasts, and he persuaded Mr. Gladwell to think about starting an audio program. “Revisionist History” began in 2016, billed as a journey through “things misunderstood and overlooked,” such as Wilt Chamberlain’s refusal to shoot free throws underhand to improve his accuracy and the decline of McDonald’s french fries.

Mr. Gladwell’s smooth Canadian lilt worked perfectly in the sensitive-bro realm of podcasting, although his habit of narrative digressions — which worked so well in a magazine story — made for a potential mess in audio.

Julia Barton, Pushkin’s executive editor, would send him heavily edited transcripts. “It’s like saying, ‘You’re a master sand painter, but suddenly, for whatever reason, you have to sand paint at night when it’s dark, and you know what you’re doing but you don’t know,” Ms. Barton said.

Whereas “Talking to Strangers” is Mr. Gladwell at his most sky-is-falling serious, his podcast delivers the unexpected whimsy of his earlier writing. In one episode this season, he reframes the Boston Tea Party as the tea mafia trying to gain a market advantage. Another episode was sparked by a friend’s jog around the perimeter of the exclusive Brentwood Country Club in Los Angeles. Mr. Gladwell connects his disgust over the off-limits greenery to Bob Hope, Plutarch and the theory of spatiotemporal continuity.

For the past several months, Mr. Gladwell has used his podcasts to promote the “newfangled” audiobook for “Talking to Strangers” — the kind of cross-promotion most publishers can only dream about. The audiobook merges Mr. Gladwell’s narration with interviews with criminologists, scientists, actors reading court transcripts and a Janelle Monáe song. His publisher — Little, Brown — produced the audiobook with Pushkin, which has plans to invest in more of these immersive hybrid book-podcast experiences.

Book publishing has been slow to figure out how to get in on the podcast craze, and Mr. Gladwell’s latest will be a major test in an industry increasingly reliant on Audible. While e-book sales have fallen and print has remained stagnant, publishers’ revenues from downloaded audiobooks have nearly tripled in the last five years, according to data from the Association of American Publishers.

“Talking to Strangers” begins with an introduction about his father, Graham Gladwell, and an encounter with a celebrity at the chic Mercer Hotel in Manhattan. As the two men enjoyed a chat about gardening, people kept approaching for pictures and autographs. His father never got the celebrity’s name. The interaction still makes Mr. Gladwell smile.

“It had to be someone huge for anyone to bother them at the Mercer Hotel!” he said. Robert Redford? Mick Jagger? He’ll never know. His father died in 2017, but his genteel approach to allowing strangers to remain strangers informs the whole of Mr. Gladwell’s book.

The “Talking to Strangers” focus on misunderstanding one another raises the obvious question of whether Mr. Gladwell feels misunderstood himself. In our interview, he never said as much explicitly. But he gave the unmistakable impression of being an introverted, maybe even aloof, person who is uncomfortable with elements of his literary celebrity.

Mr. Gladwell returned often to the subject of Sandra Bland. When he was growing up in Elmira, he said, police officers weren’t just police officers — they were also neighbors, fellow shoppers at the grocery store, people speaking up at P.T.A. meetings.

“I can’t tell you how many times I was 16 or 17 in my hometown and was pulled over,” he said. “You knew the cop in five different ways.”

But to Ms. Bland, the state trooper who pulled her over had a single face: cop. “That happens in these divided times — your professional identity becomes your identity,” Mr. Gladwell said.

“On every level,” he added, “I feel like there is this weird disconnect between the way the world is presented to us in the media and the way it really is. The goal is simply to give people an opportunity to reflect on things they otherwise wouldn’t reflect on. What they do next is out of my control.”

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A Hot Job Market Is Causing Labor Pains for State Governments

Peanut season is nearly upon South Carolina and, like governments across the country, the state has been scrambling to hire.

Its Department of Agriculture is lifting pay for crop inspectors to $13 to $16 an hour from the previous $9.50 to $11.50, and creating an “aide” version of the position that requires less education and experience. It is even tweaking the title to make it sound more appealing: what used to be “temporary inspector” is now a “peanut grading inspector.” All this in a bid to find the 125 people it needs to help ensure peanut safety during the September to November harvest.

It is an example of what’s happening nationwide. Public agencies that perform crucial functions are struggling to compete as unemployment hovers near its lowest level in a half-century. The public sector has been posting record job openings, and state governments have lost about 20,000 employees since mid-2018, based on Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

The tight labor market is forcing both states and localities to take a second look at imperfect applicants, raise wages and even run short-staffed as they try to keep police departments, schools and state capitols functioning smoothly.

Public sector employers compete with the private sector for manpower, but often face more rigid budget constraints. As a result, they often pay less or raise wages more slowly; in fact, only a little more than half of state and local agencies think that they pay competitively, based on one recent survey. They can struggle to compete when labor markets are tight and workers have plentiful options.

“State and local governments are having to do a lot more with a lot less,” said Dan White, director of fiscal policy research at Moody’s Analytics. He noted that the public sector has been cautious in hiring for years as mandatory spending on health care and pensions sucks up their budgets. The hot labor market is making matters worse. “There’s a lot more opportunity for advancement and higher pay in the private sector.”

In addition, states are rebuilding workforces that took a major hit during and after the Great Recession and now face a wave of retirements delayed by the downturn. The result is widespread employee shortages. There were two public-sector job openings for every new hire in June, a sign that state, local and federal agencies are struggling to quickly fill positions.

That is up from 1.7 a year earlier, and much higher than the private-sector ratio, which is 1.2.

In South Carolina, “last season was the worst season we’ve ever had,” said Dave Baer, human resources manager at South Carolina’s Department of Agriculture and the person in charge of hiring peanut inspectors.

The state turned to contractors in 2018 after failing to attract enough laborers, a trend across governments as they look for more flexible staffing. It resulted in fraud and inefficiencies, so Mr. Baer got raises approved this year, which helped him find enough new workers to satisfy the state’s needs.

“We knew it was going to be a struggle to compete,” he said.

For people like Cynthia Cuffie, 62, the more aggressive push to hire has created opportunities.

Ms. Cuffie has not worked formally in years. The Hartsville, S.C., resident lives in a house her mother left her and helps take care of her sister, who in turn pays for Ms. Cuffie’s basic living expenses. But peanut inspecting could allow her to better maintain her beloved truck, a 1997 Toyota T-100 given to her by a relative. When she saw the peanut-inspector job advertised on Facebook, she knew she ought to try for it.

“It’s going to do marvels for me,” said Ms. Cuffie, who landed the gig and began training on Aug. 20. She is planning to repay her sister for new tires she has just bought, and then pay tithes at her church. “It’s going to get me out of the hole.”

In Washington State, a shortage of information technology and health care workers has prompted it to compete with the private sector despite budgetary constraints, said Franklin Plaistowe, assistant director of the state’s human resources division. To attract workers, it touts its public service-oriented mission, as well as good benefits and unique perks: Some employees can now bring their infants to the office.

“We’ve had four babies come through and retire,” Mr. Plaistowe said of his own department. “We’re thinking, from a human perspective, of our employees, and how we can meet them where they are.”

Gerald Young, a researcher at the nonprofit Center for State and Local Government Excellence, said he has seen governments in Iowa share health care personnel across county lines, and school districts in Nebraska allow science and math teachers to return from retirement to fill workplace gaps.

There are unique risks in public employee shortages. Police departments, prisons and state hospitals provide essential services, so society can pay the price when those jobs go unfilled.

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South Carolina has been training peanut field inspectors for the 2019 harvest.CreditDave Baer

About 32 percent of local governments report difficulty filling policing jobs, 29 percent are struggling to find engineers and 24 percent are searching for laborers and skilled tradesmen, the survey found. And states are finding it’s hardest to find office, information technology and accounting workers.

It is tough for states to be more nimble in a hot labor market. Nearly all have balanced-budget requirements, according to the Urban Institute, which means they cannot spend more money than they collect. Many have strict taxing and spending limits and use salary brackets that are slow to change. Pay for state and local public employees has grown more slowly than private-sector pay since the last recession, based on Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

Pay for many unionized public sector workers has improved in recent years against the strong economic backdrop, according to Steven Kreisberg, research director at the American Federation of State County & Municipal Employees. But some states are using higher tax revenue from a strong economy to cut taxes instead of hiring new public workers or paying more.

America’s prisons show what can happen when the public work force shrinks as a share of the population. Federal and state penitentiaries have been understaffed for years, because of structural problems — prison work can have a bad reputation — and policy choices, including a hiring freeze at federal prisons from 2017 to early this year. The hot job market is exacerbating the problem.

In Wisconsin, overtime payments increased by $7.5 million between 2016 and the 2018 fiscal year as the state correction system struggled to fill jobs. Colorado and Texas are also plagued by shortages and high overtime.

“There were always concerns about the competitiveness of correctional jobs compared to law enforcement,” said Brian Jackson, a researcher at the RAND Corporation. “Then you add the hot labor market and there are a lot of other options, especially for people who have gone through training, and it becomes a human capital challenge.”

The question for state, local and even federal employers now is: What happens next?

The economy may be slowing, which could offer an unhappy reprieve. President Trump’s trade war has dragged on business investment and is beginning to put a dent in consumer confidence, and a global economic slowdown could eventually weigh on Americanoutput and employment growth.

For now, the job market has appeared unfazed. Unemployment stands at 3.7 percent and wages are climbing. While fissures may be forming — factory hiring has slowed and the share of Americans who are working or looking for work seems to have peaked — it’s too soon to tell if that will cause a broader slowdown.

That’s great news for people like Ms. Cuffie, the soon-to-be peanut inspector.

“I can’t wait to get the check,” Ms. Cuffie said. “So I can’t wait to do the work.”

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Hurricane Dorian: Delta capping flight prices, American offering reduced fares from Florida as hurricane nears

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Hurricane Dorian: Delta capping flight prices, American offering reduced fares from Florida as hurricane nears

Florida officials are working to get roads ready for additional traffic due to Hurricane Dorian. Fox – 35 Orlando

Major airlines are capping prices on fares out of Florida and adding additional capacity to flight routes as Hurricane Dorian approaches the U.S.

In anticipation of the increased demand spurred by residents trying to flee the area, Delta Air Lines added six additional flights (equaling 930 seats) to the normal flight schedule between Atlanta and Florida, including Miami, Fort Lauderdale, West Palm Beach and Orlando.

Delta also capped fares on one-way flights to and from these locations between $299 and $599 in the main cabin and $499 and $799 in first class, based on flight distance, according to Delta spokesperson Adrian Gee.

In years past, airlines have been accused of raising prices as people in the path of storms attempted to book travel out of the area.

Gee noted that fares may be slightly higher for flights that include a connection from those same cities through Sept. 4.

American Airlines has also added reduced, last-minute fares for impacted cities.   According to spokesperson Ross Feinstein, this includes one-way, non-stop fares from 13 cities in Florida: Daytona Beach (DAB), Fort Lauderdale (FLL), Fort Myers (RSW), Gainesville (GNV), Jacksonville (JAX), Key West (EYW), Melbourne (MLB), Miami (MIA), Orlando (MCO), Sarasota / Bradenton (SRQ), Tallahassee (TLH), Tampa (TPA) and West Palm Beach (PBI).

As of Friday at 1 p.m. ET, a search on American’s website showed available fares from Miami to Atlanta for $129 on Monday. 

Forecasters say Dorian is expected to make landfall Monday into Tuesday along Florida’s east coast.Heavy rainfall, dangerous winds and life-threatening storm surge are expected.

In 2017, airlines were criticized on social media for “fare gouging” as people tried to evacuate before Hurricane Irma.

USA TODAY has reached out to Southwest, United, Frontier, Spirit and JetBlue for comment. Their websites do not list information on capped prices.

As of Friday at 3 p.m. ET, a search on Southwest’s website shows one-way fares from Ft. Lauderdale to Atlanta ranging from $129 to $317. On United’s site, a one-way flight from Miami to Atlanta Monday ranges from $366 to $753. And one-way JetBlue flights from Ft. Lauderdale to Atlanta Monday range from $129 to $639. 

Contributing: Ryan W. Miller

Hurricane Dorian travel guide: What to know if you’re flying or cruising Labor Day weekend

When will Hurricane Dorian hit Florida?: What we know about the dangerous storm

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Ex-Canadian PM apologizes after saying she hoped Hurricane Dorian would hit Mar-a-Lago

Westlake Legal Group Kim-Campbell Ex-Canadian PM apologizes after saying she hoped Hurricane Dorian would hit Mar-a-Lago Sam Dorman fox-news/world/world-regions/canada fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/media fnc d7cc0d7b-16fe-5ca1-84a5-540bd4076837 article

Former Canadian Prime Minister Kim Campbell apologized Friday for hoping Hurricane Dorian would hit President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, saying she was being sarcastic and should “know better.”

“I have deleted my tweet about the hurricane & Mar a Lago and sincerely apologize to all it offended. It was intended as sarcasm-not a serious wish of harm,” Campbell tweeted. “Throwaway lines get a life of their own on Twitter. I shd [sic] know better. Mea culpa.”

A day earlier, Campbell tweeted: “I’m rooting for a direct hit on Mar a Lago!”

HURRICANE DORIAN ALREADY STIRRING POLITICAL STORM AS DEMS RIP TRUMP

Before apologizing, Campbell initially responded to criticism by telling her critics she was sorry they didn’t understand “snark.”

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“As there are in Puerto Rico- sorry you don’t get snark- but Trump’s indifference to suffering is intolerable!” Campbell previously said in response to a user who told her that “there are real people who live and work” at the resort.

“We’d also help if he tackled climate change which is making hurricanes more destructive! Instead, he will remove limits on methane! Get a grip!” she added.

Campbell wasn’t the only one to criticize the president as Dorian approached the United States. Democrats railed against Trump even before the storm makes landfall over the state — accusing him of playing racial politics and blasting his decision to redirect funding from the nation’s primary disaster relief agency toward border enforcement operations.

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Campbell served less than five months as Canada’s prime minister following the resignation of Brian Mulroney in 1993.

Fox News’ Joseph A. Wulfsohn contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Kim-Campbell Ex-Canadian PM apologizes after saying she hoped Hurricane Dorian would hit Mar-a-Lago Sam Dorman fox-news/world/world-regions/canada fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/media fnc d7cc0d7b-16fe-5ca1-84a5-540bd4076837 article   Westlake Legal Group Kim-Campbell Ex-Canadian PM apologizes after saying she hoped Hurricane Dorian would hit Mar-a-Lago Sam Dorman fox-news/world/world-regions/canada fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/media fnc d7cc0d7b-16fe-5ca1-84a5-540bd4076837 article

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