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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 249)

Tomi Lahren on Pete Davidson’s viral rant ripping into student audience: ‘He makes a good point’

Westlake Legal Group tomi-lahren-pete-davidson-FOX-NBC Tomi Lahren on Pete Davidson's viral rant ripping into student audience: 'He makes a good point' Yael Halon fox-news/opinion fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/fox-nation fox-news/entertainment/saturday-night-live fox-news/entertainment/genres/comedy fox news fnc/media fnc article 75fc141f-41c7-5891-9eed-30d73c1a51bf

Fox Nation host Tomi Lahren came to the defense of SNL star Pete Davidson Friday after a now-viral rant showed him ripping into college students during a recent show at the University of Central Florida (UCF).

Lahren explained that while she usually disagrees with much of what Davidson stands for, “he made a good point” rebuking the students for having their cellphones out, despite the “clear no cellphone rule.”

“Listen, I don’t approve of his word choices,” said Lahren, “and he may have overreacted a little bit — but he makes a good point and a point those in my generation need to hear, whether it sounds nice or not,” she said in her Fox Nation daily commentary “First Thoughts.”

During his performance at UCF’s Pegasus Palooza Comedy Knight, the Saturday Night Live comedian halted his stand-up routine and went off on a profanity-filled rant against millennials, berating students who were filming the show.

“If you film everything but not enjoy the show for (expletive) an hour, then like, I don’t gotta be here for that,” he said. “You can just give them their money back because I don’t give a (expletive).”

PETE DAVIDSON ABRUPTLY CANCELS SOLD-OUT GIG, ONE DAY BEFORE HE WAS SCHEDULED TO PERFORM

Davidson continued, throwing shade at the school that was hosting him.

“So like, whenever somebody else comes to your (expletive) town and wants to perform and is exhausted and flies all the way to the middle of (expletive) nowhere to do jokes for you, you little privileged (expletives), don’t (expletive) ruin the show for people who actually want to be here,” he said.

Some in the audience began to laugh and broke out into applause — but Davidson had more to say on the matter.

“Don’t clap, that’s the problem. That’s what’s (expletive) up about our generation,” he said. “That’s why we’re embarrassing.”

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM TOMI LAHREN

He continued on his rant, using insulting and derogatory terms, but eventually calmed down.

“Where’s the next generation? … Don’t you want your parents to be proud of you? … Now we’ll continue. I just wanted to scare you. Just grow up.”

Lahren said Davidson is “far from her favorite person,” but she agreed with his overall message, and blamed the “coddling” of her generation for the students’ inability to properly abide by the rules.

“The sign said no cell phones but these students ignored it because quite frankly, they feel they are entitled to do whatever the heck they want with no consequences. How did we get here? Well, simple. My generation has been coddled with safe spaces, trigger warnings, and bubble wrap for most of our lives,” said Lahren.

PETE DAVIDSON SLAMS ‘CANCEL CULTURE’ IN NEW STAND-UP SET, CITES HARVEY WEINSTEIN, R. KELLY, MICHAEL JACKSON

“My generation has been told red pens are bad for self-esteem, Everyone deserves a trophy, regardless of merit, Conservative speakers coming to campus warrant tantrums and even riots And cry-ins and safe spaces are necessary to remedy election upsets,” she continued.

Lahren urged for millenials and Gen Z’ers to “grow up” and said Davidson “hit the nail on the head.”

“It’s embarrassing. We, as a generation, are embarrassing,” she said. “Why does it seem like most millennials and Gen Z’ers would rather post selfies than earn a living?” the Fox Nation host asked, urging students to “change the narrative.”

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“If this isn’t who we are and we are misrepresented as a generation, let’s wake up and change the narrative. Yes, I said ‘wake up’ not ‘get woke.’ Y’all are plenty ‘woke’ you need to open your eyes to more than victimhood, entitlement and complaining. I am a millennial and I know we are better than this.”

To see the full segment and for daily episodes of “First & Final Thoughts” hosted by Tomi Lahren, visit Fox Nation and join today.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR A FOX NATION FREE TRIAL

Fox Nation programs are viewable on-demand and from your mobile device app, but only available only for Fox Nation subscribers. Go to Fox Nation to start a free trial and watch the extensive library from Tomi Lahren, Pete Hegseth, Abby Hornacek, Laura Ingraham, Greg Gutfeld, Judge Andrew Napolitano and many more of your favorite Fox News personalities.

Westlake Legal Group tomi-lahren-pete-davidson-FOX-NBC Tomi Lahren on Pete Davidson's viral rant ripping into student audience: 'He makes a good point' Yael Halon fox-news/opinion fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/fox-nation fox-news/entertainment/saturday-night-live fox-news/entertainment/genres/comedy fox news fnc/media fnc article 75fc141f-41c7-5891-9eed-30d73c1a51bf   Westlake Legal Group tomi-lahren-pete-davidson-FOX-NBC Tomi Lahren on Pete Davidson's viral rant ripping into student audience: 'He makes a good point' Yael Halon fox-news/opinion fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/fox-nation fox-news/entertainment/saturday-night-live fox-news/entertainment/genres/comedy fox news fnc/media fnc article 75fc141f-41c7-5891-9eed-30d73c1a51bf

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5 things that make Dorian a dangerous hurricane

After walloping the Caribbean as a tropical storm, Hurricane Dorian is forecast to hit somewhere along the east coast of Florida early next week as a major and dangerous hurricane.

And forecasters warn that Dorian could be a treacherous storm.

Along much of Florida’s east coast, as the storm approached, shoppers rushed to stock up on food and emergency supplies at supermarkets and hardware stores and picked the shelves clean of bottled water. Lines formed at service stations as motorists topped off their tanks and filled gasoline cans.

Keep up with Hurricane Dorian: Get USA TODAY’s Daily Briefing in your inbox

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis declared a state of emergency throughout the state and asked President Donald Trump to declare a pre-landfall disaster as well.

Here are five things that make Dorian a dangerous hurricane:

It’s forecast to strengthen to a Category 4 hurricane 

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 5 things that make Dorian a dangerous hurricane

Katrina, Maria, Harvey and Sandy are all infamous names belonging to some of the worst hurricanes in history. But where do these names come from? Just the FAQs, USA TODAY

The latest forecast from the National Hurricane Center said Dorian is expected to reach Category 4 strength as it approaches Florida: “Dorian is forecast to become a dangerous major hurricane later and maintain that status as it heads for the northwestern Bahamas and the Florida peninsula.”

An upper-level low pressure system has brought some southwesterly shear, which has prevented Dorian from strengthening rapidly, the hurricane center said. But the storm is expected to enter a more favorable environment in the next day, “which should allow its structure to become more well developed,” forescasters said.

If it hits as a Category 4, with winds of 130 mph, the damage could be catastrophic: “Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls,” the hurricane center said. “Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles downed.”

A hit from a Category 4 hurricane means that “power outages will last for weeks to possibly months, and long-term water shortages will increase human suffering. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.”

It could hit anywhere along the east coast of Florida – or even Georgia or the Carolinas

Although the current forecast shows landfall along the east coast of Florida, there is a chance the storm could curve up the coast before hitting land, perhaps even tracking into Georgia or the Carolinas.

The hurricane center said that the track guidance becomes less clear beyond 72 hours, primarily because of model differences in the strength of a ridge of high pressure over the Atlantic that will determine Dorian’s path.

“The spread of the … models and the various guidance is still considerable at days 4 and 5, and it is too soon to specify where along the Florida east coast the greatest impacts could occur,” the hurricane center said.

AccuWeather senior meteorologist Adam Douty said that “a very small fluctuation in the overall weather pattern will have a large influence in where Dorian ultimately tracks and how it impacts the continental U.S.”

There’s a risk of life-threatening storm surge

Storm surge – the surge of seawater that comes ashore as a hurricane makes landfall – is often the deadliest and most destructive part of a storm. In fact, only 8% of hurricane-related deaths are caused by strong winds. Almost half are because of storm surge, the Weather Channel said.

The hurricane center warns that “the risk of life-threatening storm surge along portions of the Florida east coast has increased, although it is too soon to determine where the highest storm surge will occur.”

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It could make a second landfall

Though it’s forecast to hit somewhere along the east coast of Florida, there “is certainly a chance that the storm could drift into the Gulf of Mexico and produce a second landfall,” noted University of Georgia meteorologist Marshall Shepherd in Forbes.

“For now, the entire Florida and Southeast coastal community should be on alert. Even if you live in the eastern Gulf Coast states, I wouldn’t completely take my eyes off of the storm yet,” Shepherd said.

South Florida is already sodden from an extremely wet August

It’s been a soggy month and summer in south Florida, so any rain that falls from Dorian will hasten and exacerbate flooding. How wet? Both Miami and West Palm Beach have seen over a foot of rainfall this month, which is about twice as much as average, the National Weather Service said. 

And regardless of the exact track of Dorian, heavy rains are expected to occur over portions of the Bahamas, Florida and elsewhere in the southeastern United States this weekend and into the middle of next week. The hurricane center warns that as much as a foot of rain could fall from Dorian across the southeastern U.S. 

“Dorian’s slower movement as it nears the coast could cause major flooding,” the Weather Channel said.

Contributing: The Associated Press

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/08/29/hurricane-dorian-5-things-make-dangerous-hurricane/2151572001/

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Miranda Devine slams Washington Post columnist: ‘if you’re conservative, you’re automatically a racist’

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2019-08-30-at-10.25.53-AM Miranda Devine slams Washington Post columnist: 'if you're conservative, you're automatically a racist' Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/judiciary/abortion fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/newsedge/politics fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc f094e883-a159-50d5-9237-9232bec13a6a article

New York Post columnist Miranda Devine Friday blasted a columnist for The Washington Post, Marissa Brostoff, for accusing conservative J.D. Vance of being a “closet white supremacist” and linking the pro-life movement to white nationalism.

“If you’re a conservative, you’re automatically a racist,”  Devine told “Fox & Friends.”

“[The left is] trying to demonize the pro-life movement and they are also trying to smear the entire conservative movement and, of course, any supporter of Donald Trump.”

MIRANDA DEVINE: ‘HILLBILLY ELEGY’ AUTHOR J.D. VANCE LATEST CONSERVATIVE TO BE SMEARED BY LEFTIST LIES

Brostoff’s column, titled “How White Nationalists Aligned Themselves With The Anti-Abortion Movement”, argued pro-life conservatives oppose abortion because they fear it will accelerate the demographic “replacement” of white people by nonwhite immigrants, according to Devine.

Devine went on to say that “it makes no sense because black babies are aborted at five times the rate of white babies so how on Earth it could be a white nationalist thing to be against abortion.”

TRUMP CONDEMNS ‘WHITE SUPREMACY,’ CALLS FOR MENTAL HEALTH AND GUN REFORMS AFTER DOUBLE MASS SHOOTINGS

“The whole point about being against abortion is that you say every single life is equal and sacred. It’s not that white lives are better. I don’t know where this comes from, it’s insane,” she added.

Devine wrote a rebuttal op-ed aimed at Brostoff for using J.D. Vance as an example of white supremacist ideas being mainstream conservative thought.

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Devine went on to explain to Fox & Friends why Vance was targeted in Brostoff’s column,

“He was immediately suspect to them because he wrote sympathetically about those parts of the country where Donald Trump was popular and where he won the election because he’s from there,” she said.

“He called himself a hillbilly, yet he emerged from a very difficult background, went to Yale. Now he’s writing about those people that he came from and why Donald Trump is resonating with them.”

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2019-08-30-at-10.25.53-AM Miranda Devine slams Washington Post columnist: 'if you're conservative, you're automatically a racist' Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/judiciary/abortion fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/newsedge/politics fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc f094e883-a159-50d5-9237-9232bec13a6a article   Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2019-08-30-at-10.25.53-AM Miranda Devine slams Washington Post columnist: 'if you're conservative, you're automatically a racist' Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/judiciary/abortion fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/newsedge/politics fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc f094e883-a159-50d5-9237-9232bec13a6a article

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Darth Vader’s birthplace found? Evidence of dangerous volcano, lava world spotted in deep space

Researchers believe they have discovered what they describe as “the first volcanically active exomoon,” a celestial body eerily reminiscent of the tiny, fiery “Star Wars” planet, Mustafar, where Anakin Skywalker turned into Darth Vader.

Potentially located in the WASP-49b exoplanet system, approximately 550 light-years away from Earth, the hypothetical exomoon has been compared to 55 Cancri-e, a Super-Earth that has a surface temperature greater than 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit. It has also been compared to Jupiter’s moon, Io, the most volcanically active celestial body in the solar system.

“It would be a dangerous volcanic world with a molten surface of lava, a lunar version of close-in Super Earths like 55 Cancri-e” said University of Bern researcher and the study’s lead author, Apurva Oza, in a statement.

Westlake Legal Group Exo-Io-Moon Darth Vader's birthplace found? Evidence of dangerous volcano, lava world spotted in deep space fox-news/science/air-and-space/planets fox-news/science/air-and-space/astronomy fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article abd6695c-b13e-59e2-962b-23d30aa47b22

Artist’s composition of a volcanic exo-Io undergoing extreme mass loss. The hidden exomoon is enshrouded in an irradiated gas cloud shining in bright orange-yellow, as would be seen with a sodium filter. Patches of sodium clouds are seen to trail the lunar orbit, possibly driven by the gas giant’s magnetosphere. (Credit: University of Bern, Roger Thibaut)

EXOMOONS COULD BE HOME TO EXTRATERRESTRIAL LIFE, RESEARCHER SAYS

The study, which will be published in The Astrophysical Journal and is available online here, notes that “extrasolar satellites are generally too small to be detected by nominal searches.”

However, it adds that WASP-49b’s atmosphere contains the presence of sodium at an exceptionally high altitude, leading Oza to believe it’s emanating from somewhere other than the exoplanet.

“The neutral sodium gas is so far away from the planet that it is unlikely to be emitted solely by a planetary wind,” the researcher said.

He added the conditions could be “a place where Jedis go to die, perilously familiar to Anakin Skywalker.”

In “Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith,” Skywalker fights his mentor, Obi-Wan Kenobi, in a gruesome battle. The fight leaves him horribly disfigured and near death, but Skywalker is rescued and ultimately becomes the iconic Darth Vader.

Although the researchers have not confirmed the presence of the exomoon and concede the sodium gas could be caused by a ring of ionized gas surrounding the exoplanet, they’re still hopeful.

STRANGE GIANT PLANET ‘UNLIKE ANY OTHER’ DISCOVERED

“While the current wave of research is going towards habitability and biosignatures, our signature is a signature of destruction“, Oza said. “A few of these worlds could be destroyed in a few billion years due to the extreme mass loss. The exciting part is that we can monitor these destructive processes in real time, like fireworks.”

Scientists have yet to concretely say that exomoons exist, but in October 2018, NASA’s Kepler and Hubble space telescopes spotted evidence of a Neptune-size satellite orbiting exoplanet Kepler-1625b.

In June, an astrophysicist at the U.K.’s University of Lincoln posited that exomoons could contain liquid water and, therefore, support life.

So far, more than 4,000 exoplanets have been discovered, but the potential list of exomoons is far smaller. According to Space.com, there could be as many as 100 exoplanets that have exomoons. By comparison, there are more than 150 moons for just the eight planets in the solar system, according to data compiled by NASA.

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Westlake Legal Group Exo-Io-Moon Darth Vader's birthplace found? Evidence of dangerous volcano, lava world spotted in deep space fox-news/science/air-and-space/planets fox-news/science/air-and-space/astronomy fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article abd6695c-b13e-59e2-962b-23d30aa47b22   Westlake Legal Group Exo-Io-Moon Darth Vader's birthplace found? Evidence of dangerous volcano, lava world spotted in deep space fox-news/science/air-and-space/planets fox-news/science/air-and-space/astronomy fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article abd6695c-b13e-59e2-962b-23d30aa47b22

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As Hurricane Dorian approaches Florida, Instagram hashtag being used to promote products

Westlake Legal Group dorian-2-friday-am-NOAA As Hurricane Dorian approaches Florida, Instagram hashtag being used to promote products Greg Norman fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox news fnc/us fnc b9beb7cf-67c3-53b9-a361-af72285e089f article

With Hurricane Dorian looming, have you checked your survival kit to make sure it has enough CBD oils, IV water and honey to sustain you and your dog?

As Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis was urging residents Friday to gear up for a potential Category 4 life-threatening storm, businesses across the Sunshine State are using the #HurricaneDorian hashtag on Instagram as a way to hawk everything from liquid IV’s to children’s dolls.

“Worried about pet anxiety with the #HurricaneDorian on the way? #CBD is a great option to help your #furbabies keep calm,” reads one post.

“Here’s a way to avoid the madness over bottled water during Hurricane prep, get a Hydration IV,” says another.

The posts are appearing amongst warnings about the coming storm, memes and, of course, pictures of dogs with forlorn looks on their faces.

Two of the posts are from businesses based in Florida that sell honey.

“Due to the healing abilities and nutritional value of raw honey it’s a must have in our hurricane kit!” one says.

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Another post by a business that sells children’s toys shows a doll with a glum look on its face in front of a screen indicating Dorian’s current location – and sustained wind speeds of 110 mph.

DeSantis says Florida residents looking for specific information regarding ongoing preparations for the storm in their communities should visit floridadisaster.org/info.

Westlake Legal Group dorian-2-friday-am-NOAA As Hurricane Dorian approaches Florida, Instagram hashtag being used to promote products Greg Norman fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox news fnc/us fnc b9beb7cf-67c3-53b9-a361-af72285e089f article   Westlake Legal Group dorian-2-friday-am-NOAA As Hurricane Dorian approaches Florida, Instagram hashtag being used to promote products Greg Norman fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox news fnc/us fnc b9beb7cf-67c3-53b9-a361-af72285e089f article

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China Expels Wall Street Journal Reporter After Article on Xi’s Cousin

Westlake Legal Group 30wsj-1-facebookJumbo China Expels Wall Street Journal Reporter After Article on Xi’s Cousin Wall Street Journal Politics and Government Newspapers Chun Han Wong China Chai, Ming Australia

BEIJING — China has effectively expelled a reporter working for The Wall Street Journal after he wrote an article about the cousin of the country’s top leader, Xi Jinping, in the latest sign of a government clampdown on media freedom.

The Chinese authorities declined to renew the press credentials of Chun Han Wong, a reporter in Beijing for The Journal, a spokesman from Dow Jones, the parent company of the newspaper, said in an emailed statement on Friday.

“We continue to look into the matter,” said the spokesman for Dow Jones, who did not respond to a question on whether Chinese authorities gave a reason.

In a faxed statement, China’s Foreign Ministry said it handles matters involving foreign journalists in accordance with the law. But it added: “We are resolutely opposed to an individual foreign journalist maliciously smearing and attacking China. As for such journalists, we do not welcome them.”

Mr. Wong was planning to leave Beijing on Friday evening. His expulsion was reported earlier by The Washington Post.

Mr. Wong, 33, a Singaporean national, had reported on Chinese politics from Beijing for The Journal since 2014. He documented a crackdown on dissent under Mr. Xi and had written an article casting doubt about the leader’s health.

But people within Dow Jones believe it was Mr. Wong’s work on an article published in July about a cousin of Mr. Xi, Ming Chai, that got him expelled. Those people spoke on condition of anonymity because the company has not made details public. The Journal’s article, which Mr. Wong co-wrote, said Mr. Chai’s activities were being scrutinized by law enforcement and intelligence officials in Australia.

In its article on Friday about Mr. Wong’s expulsion, the newspaper said Chinese officials “urged the Journal not to publish” the article about Mr. Chai “and warned of unspecified consequences.”

The Foreign Correspondents’ Club of China said on Friday that it “condemns in the strongest possible terms” the expulsion of Mr. Wong. “Such treatment of foreign correspondents runs completely counter to Chinese claims that it supports openness and inclusiveness,” it said.

“This is a troubling development,” said Michael Slackman, the international editor for The New York Times. “We condemn this action by the Chinese government and support our colleague at The Wall Street Journal. The use of visa denials to retaliate against journalists for coverage that the powerful dislike violates international standards and is unacceptable. This action appears intended to impede the free flow of information, and ultimately deprive Chinese citizens of information.”

Under Mr. Xi, China has taken a harder line on the media, both foreign and domestic, as it tries to shape its image around the world. Official state media outlets have become increasingly sophisticated, using social media at home and abroad to portray China’s rise as peaceful and beneficial to the world. Those same outlets can turn on critics of China portraying difficult issues like the unrest in Hong Kong, or China’s internment of hundreds of thousands of mostly Muslim ethnic minorities in the country’s northwestern region of Xinjiang.

At home, Chinese officials have widened the subjects that are considered sensitive, as the Communist Party under Mr. Xi seeks a stronger influence in everyday life. They now include issues like business and economics, with authorities clamping down on what they consider negative coverage as China’s growth slows. China has also clamped down on coverage of celebrities and gossip, citing vulgar content and the need to create a healthy social environment.

Foreign journalists have long been closely tracked in China, but the authorities have become tougher in recent years.

The tightening began in earnest around 2012, when China expelled Melissa Chan, an American journalist working for the English-language arm of Al Jazeera. It was China’s first expulsion of a journalist in 14 years.

In 2015, the government also expelled a French reporter who wrote about Xinjiang. Most recently, in August 2018, it forced out an American reporter for Buzzfeed News, who had written extensively about surveillance and mass incarceration of ethnic Uighurs and other Muslim minorities in Xinjiang.

The Journal’s coverage of Mr. Chai, Mr. Xi’s cousin, touched on the sensitive subject of the wealth of China’s top leaders. Any suggestions of ill-gotten wealth could erode Mr. Xi’s cultivated image of a man of the people and his zero-tolerance approach against corruption.

Nominally Communist, China has seen the gap between rich and poor widen tremendously since Beijing opened up its economy to the world and embraced business, setting off its tremendous growth spurt. The families of China’s top leaders have often benefited from that rise. Officials in Beijing regularly summon foreign journalists to complain about articles and have repeatedly warned them that reporting on the wealth of the country’s top leaders and their families is a “red line” that the authorities would not tolerate.

After The New York Times reported in 2012 on the hidden wealth of the family of China’s then-premier, Wen Jiabao, the newspaper was unable to secure accreditation for their other reporters, one of whom had to wait for close to three years. Bloomberg News also struggled to obtain approval of new visas for journalists after its reporters wrote about the wealth accumulated by the family of Mr. Xi, who became China’s leader a year later. Both services were blocked in China.

The Journal’s article, which quoted unnamed Australian officials, delved deeply into that sensitive area.

It said that the authorities were scrutinizing Mr. Chai, an Australian national, as part of a broad money-laundering and organized crime investigation. It described their interest in Mr. Chai’s high-stakes gambling sessions in Australian casinos, and said “he often flaunted his familial link to Mr. Xi while chasing business opportunities.” It also described his business dealings and big real estate purchases made by him and his wife.

But the reporters noted that there was “no indication that Mr. Xi did anything to advance Mr. Chai’s interests, nor that the Chinese leader has any knowledge of his cousin’s business and gambling activities.”

China’s Foreign Ministry at the time called the accusations groundless. The Journal article followed similar coverage by Australian news outlets. Others, including The New York Times, also covered the investigation. The Times’s article said Mr. Chai was not the main target of the investigation.

Chinese officials have offered little indication they will soften their tone.

In its 2018 annual survey of working conditions for foreign journalists in China, the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of China said that authorities had issued severely shortened visas and reporting credentials, including one for just two and a half months, to at least five correspondents. More than half of the respondents, the largest proportion since 2011, said they believed conditions deteriorated in 2018, when foreign media coverage of pro-democracy protests prompted a government backlash.

“Survey results painted the darkest picture of reporting conditions inside China in recent memory,” the club said.

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Miami Dolphins players vow ‘revolt’ if top offensive lineman gets traded: report

Westlake Legal Group 050716-fsf-nfl-miami-dolphins-tunsi-34c5d9e5ceb84510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ Miami Dolphins players vow 'revolt' if top offensive lineman gets traded: report Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/miami-dolphins fox-news/sports/nfl/houston-texans fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 39016f5a-ce99-57f4-92b0-9898baebd933

Some Miami Dolphins players are reportedly considering a “revolt” should the team part with offensive lineman Laremy Tunsil, who’s been the subject of trade rumors.

Tunsil has been rumored to be the centerpiece of a trade to the Houston Texans for edge rusher Jadeveon Clowney but there could be considerable backlash from some members of the team should the trade occur, a “well-placed source” told the Miami Herald on Thursday.

EX-NFL STAR LARRY JOHNSON SOUNDS OFF ON SUPPOSED ‘EFFEMINATE AGENDA’ IN TWO SPORTS LEAGUES

“The backlash would be amazing,” the source told the newspaper.

It’s unclear what the supposed “revolt” would entail.

Tunsil, 25, has been one of the better offensive linemen on the Dolphins since the team selected him with the No. 13 overall pick of the 2016 NFL Draft. The offensive tackle provides vital protection for Miami quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick and any trade would be a huge blow to the offensive line.

DOLPHINS MAKE FITZPATRICK WEEK 1 STARTER AS PRESEASON ENDS

The team also has Tunsil under contract for two more seasons, according to the Miami Herald.

Trade talks between Miami and Houston have heated up over the last week. The Texans appear adamant about trading Clowney, who has 29 sacks over the last five seasons and who has yet to sign a contract tender with the Texans. Clowney can’t get traded until he signs the tender.

The Dolphins have had a tumultuous offseason.

Wide receiver Kenny Stills stirred controversy when he lashed out at team owner Stephen Ross’ decision to host a fundraiser for President Trump while being on the NFL Players’ Coalition.

Stills also went public with his disagreement over the NFL partnering with Jay-Z on a social justice initiative and the Super Bowl halftime show, which led to new head coach Brian Flores playing Jay-Z in the locker room to apparently “challenge” his player.

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The Dolphins’ season begins Sept. 8.

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Trade war: How tariffs on clothing, TVs and school supplies could affect you next week

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Correction: A previous version of this video incorrectly stated when tariffs would impact pet toys. Tariffs will impact these items in December. USA TODAY

So far, the American shopper has been a bit player in President Donald Trump’s trade war with China.

Starting Sunday, U.S. households take center stage in the escalating fight.

That’s when a 15% U.S. tariff is slated go into effect, essentially a tax on some of the $550 billion in Chinese imports that the White House hasn’t already slapped with levies. A portion of the $300 billion in shipments affected by the 15% tariff will be hit Sunday, and the rest on Dec. 15.  

Here’s the concern: About 60% of the $300 billion – which includes about 3,800 items – is made up of finished consumer products, compared with 30% of the earlier duties on Chinese imports.

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In the crosshairs Sunday are many types of apparel – including suits, jackets, pants, shorts, shirts, and outerwear – as well as TVs, diapers, coffee, whiskey, meat, cheeses and textbooks. Interviews with clothing retailers, a TV and appliance store and a houseware maker reveal growing concerns after Trump ratcheted up the tariffs last Friday.

But don’t expect instant sticker shock when you walk into your favorite big-box store next week. First, most merchandise doesn’t come from China, even though it may seem that way. China supplies about 26% of Walmart’s goods and 34% of Target’s, according to UBS. Also, retailers, manufacturers and distributors generally keep a few weeks of items on hand and many likely stocked up even more to evade the tariffs, says David French, senior vice president of government relations at the National Retail Federation.

In some cases, manufacturers are responding by keeping prices stable but selling products in smaller packages or making them with lower-grade materials, NRF’s French and some retailers say.

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Large chains that order in bulk are better equipped to absorb some of the levies by accepting narrower profit margins, persuading their suppliers to lower costs, spreading the tariff across more products and looking for alternate suppliers in other countries.

Yet while such strategies can blunt the impact of, say, a 10% tariff, several big merchants have said at least part of a 25% duty likely would be felt by shoppers.

The 15% tax taking effect Sunday could fall somewhere in between, with some prices rising modestly, though most retailers will likely do everything possible to avoid increases during the holiday season, French says.

“The supply chain can only absorb so much, and companies will have no choice but to eventually raise prices,” he says. French expects Trump to make good on his threat to lift the tariff to 25% by next year, ultimately pushing up retail prices broadly, barring a U.S.-China deal.

Small retailers most at risk

Many small stores and their customers are likely to feel a bigger effect, possibly within weeks, and some already have raised prices, several merchants said. 

In Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, about 80% of the items in Carlton’s Men’s and Women’s Clothing are from China, says store owner Trey Kraus. In anticipation of a 25% tariff, manufacturers that supply the 59-year-old store began modestly raising their suggested retail prices late last year for spring apparel. They have also boosted prices further on newly arrived fall selections to avoid an abrupt increase when the tariff hits.

As a result, premium men’s pants that sold for $125 a year ago now retail for $149 – a price that includes the tariff and some markup, as well as some modest inflation – with shirts, dresses and other products undergoing similar hikes. Prices for some goods have largely held steady but manufacturers are using synthetic instead of naturaliber or less cotton, Kraus says.

Sales have declined somewhat as a result of the higher price tags, Kraus says.

“It’s frustrating with all the time and money and effort you put in,” he says. Noting he and his wife are in the store seven days a week and expected to be rewarded with healthy profits and a comfortable lifestyle, he added, “That’s not happening.”

Other apparel retailers and producers are rolling out new styles to justify the higher prices.  Vivacity Sportswear makes women’s wear at its own U.S. factories and sells the products at a store in San Diego and online. But it has faced a 25% tariff on fabrics, which it imports from China, forcing 5% to 10% higher retail prices,, says owner Vivian Sayward. That duty is set to rise to 30% Oct. 1, a bump that Sayward says will affect her next year. 

To give shoppers something extra for the higher price, “You can change the fabric, the style,” Sayward says. “Sometimes you can add a pocket.”

Technology products rely on China

Yedi Houseware, a Los Angeles-based product designer and manufacturer, has been hit with a 25% tariff on the oil-free air fryers it sources from China, with the company absorbing half the increase and passing half to consumers, says Vice President Bobby Djavaheri. Despite the higher price, the fryers have been a sensation amid the healthy food craze, helping quadruple sales this year.

But the narrower profits led Djavaheri to shelve plans to expand a warehouse and add 10 employees to his staff of about 20. He says no country other than China has the expertise and manufacturing network to assemble the complex products. The tariff on the fryers is set to increase to 30% in October, nudging the retail price a bit higher and further crimping Djavaheri’s profits.

A 15% tariff on most of the rest of his products – including pressure and precision cookers priced at about $110 on average – will take effect Dec. 15, forcing him to similarly absorb half the levy and pass half to customers. To minimize the impact, Djavaheri has scheduled millions of dollars of additional products to arrive from China before mid-December, tying up valuable capital but providing a stockpile that will last until late January. If Trump cancels the December tariffs, he says, “There’s no turning back.”

And if the levy rises to 25%, Djavaheri says the company his father, Yedidia, launched in 1979 will close down.

“Why do you get penalized for something you have no control over?” he says. “This has occupied every day my life for the past year. This is all I deal with.”

In Lincoln, Nebraska, Schaeffer’s, which sells TVs and appliances, had to raise prices on major appliances 5% to 7% early this year after a 25% tariff on washing machines took effect in early 2018, says store owner Ron Romero. Sales continued to rise, he says, noting that Lincoln has a vibrant economy, with unemployment at 2.8%. And appliances, he says, are a necessity. But he worries a 15% price increase on TVs in coming weeks could hurt revenue.

“People will do without a TV,” Romero says, especially if they have more than one set. 

Trump intensified the trade fight late last Friday by hiking tariffs on Chinese imports more sharply than planned, responding to a new set of duties announced by China that same day. He tweeted at the time that on September 1 the levy would be 15% instead of10% on mostly consumer-targeted products. The rest of that $300 billion in goods – including cellphones, laptops, video game consoles and toys – will be hit with the higher 15% duty in mid-December. 

And an existing tariff on $250 billion in Chinese goods – mostly industrial and intermediate items as well as items such as handbags, luggage, hats, and furniture – rose from 10% to 25% in May and will now climb to 30% Oct. 1.

All told, a 25% tariff on the $300 billion in Chinese imports would raise annual costs for U.S. households by $1,000 on average, according to a recent study by JPMorgan Chase. And the total yearly cost of the trade war, including a 25% tariff on all Chinese imports and related effects, would be $2,300 for a family of four, according to the Trade Partnership, a consulting firm.

Big retailers can soften blow, at first

Large chains are better positioned to mitigate the impact, at least initially.

“We’re going to continue to do everything we can to keep prices low,” Walmart Chief Financial Officer Brett Biggs told reporters on a conference call in May. “However, increased tariffs will lead to increased prices, we believe, for our customers.” In a government filing in late June, Walmart said a 25% tariff will likely mean higher prices “on certain items.”

At June hearings in Washington, Best Buy Chief Merchandising Officer Jason Bonfig said a tariff of up to 25% “could be immediately passed on to the U.S. consumer.”

In an Aug. 14 call with analysts, Macy’s CEO Jeff Gennette said, “What we have found is there’s no customer appetite for price increases.” Big retailers face brutal price battles with online giant Amazon and persistently low inflation.

Yet while Gennette said a 10% tariff is “manageable,” he added, “I think when it goes to 25%, you are dealing with a whole other series of dynamics that I would not say we wouldn’t have to raise prices.”

Car trouble: Trump would cost General Motors billions if he actually orders business out of China

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President Trump’s ‘America First’ approach has relied on slapping tariffs on countries, such as China and Mexico, which have led to current trade wars. What is a tariff and how do they work? We explain. Just the FAQs, USA TODAY

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Illinois boy, 7, scraps Disney trip to meet bone marrow donor

It’s not hard to imagine what many 7-year-olds would choose when given the option of a trip to Disney or a meeting with a stranger, but Gabriel Smith isn’t your average kid.

Six years ago, Gabriel was saved when a bone marrow donor in Germany matched with him, which is why when he was approached by Make-A-Wish he chose to have that man, Dennis Gutt, flown to Chicago so he could thank him in person instead of opting for a trip to “The Happiest Place on Earth.”

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“If the transplant hadn’t happened, if we hadn’t found a match through the registry, he wouldn’t be alive,” Lauren Smith, the boy’s mother, told ABC News.

Gabriel had been receiving treatment at St. Louis Children’s Hospital since shortly after his birth, and when they learned he would need a bone marrow transplant just after his first birthday, they were ecstatic to hear that a then-19-year-old in Germany was a match.

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Two years ago, the family learned the name of Gabriel’s donor through the Be the Match registry, and they connected with Gutt on Facebook, the news outlet reported.

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The pair met last week and formed an instant bond. (Make-A-Wish)

Gutt arrived in the U.S. last week to meet Gabriel and his family, and the group stopped by the Make-A-Wish office to meet the people behind the life-changing trip.

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“It’s like an invisible rope connected you to a family from [the] other side of the world,” Gutt told ABC News. “I felt since the first moment like a part of their family. We bonded immediately and I hope forever too. That’s my wish.”

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NPR Music’s Top 12 Albums Of August

Westlake Legal Group boniver_grahamtolbertcrystalquinn_wide-c9304bd8daec86326997a6e4ee1c7b70a7f9a71e-s1100-c15 NPR Music's Top 12 Albums Of August

Bon Iver’s i,i appears on NPR Music’s best albums of August. Graham Tolbert /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Graham Tolbert /Courtesy of the artist

August, traditionally, is slow month for media. Hollywood takes a (brief) break from blockbusters and gets ready to roll out autumn’s big movies. The music world didn’t get that memo, giving our ears much to love. Bon Iver surprise-released the abstract and beautiful i,i early, Lana Del Rey put the finishing touches on Norman F****** Rockwell! and Young Thug dropped So Much Fun with a week’s notice.

Below you’ll find an alphabetized list of NPR Music’s top 12 albums of August 2019. Be sure to check out our top 16 songs from the month as well.

  • Bon Iver, ‘i,i’

    Westlake Legal Group boniver_sq-6d93ee070b7f57d30fe11d68b98f249b333bc069-s800-c15 NPR Music's Top 12 Albums Of August

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    With i,i, Bon Iver has now released an album for every season — this one’s for autumn. It’s full of songs about connection: to friends, to family, to lovers, to the world at large. Appropriately, the work feels more open and collaborative than ever, letting light pour into everything. — Stephen Thompson

  • Ellen Reid, ‘p r i s m’

    Westlake Legal Group ellenreid_sq-9f9184874cd63ecc08721a0658aa8a516db1eb10-s800-c15 NPR Music's Top 12 Albums Of August

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    Perhaps the most luminous, startling and beautiful theatrical score in many years, Ellen Reid‘s opera p r i s m more than earns its 2019 Pulitzer. The story, set to a pungent and poetic text by Roxie Perkins, delves deep into the shape-shifting reality of a young woman recovering from sexual assault. Stunning. — Tom Huizenga

  • Jay Som, ‘Anak Ko’

    Westlake Legal Group jaysom_sq-05f9efca2cbbcdbefc97578cb7018ad6a0143884-s800-c15 NPR Music's Top 12 Albums Of August

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    Melina Duterte’s third full-length as Jay Som is a profound creative leap for the L.A.-based multi-instrumentalist. Anak Ko (“My Child” in Tagalog) rattles, shakes and sighs while veering into some wonderfully surprising — and stranger — sonic directions, with deep ruminations on love and humility. — Robin Hilton

  • Jazzmeia Horn, ‘Love and Liberation’

    Westlake Legal Group jazzmeiahorn_sq-f85df685bf99488d810657436d78bd58c4e953d6-s800-c15 NPR Music's Top 12 Albums Of August

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    On her poised and pugnacious second album, Jazzmeia Horn slips free of lingering comparisons — to Betty Carter, Sarah Vaughan and other jazz-vocal touchstones — by sharpening the angle of attack. Her singing is exuberant, her original songs reveal a sturdy intellect, and her message is nothing less than everything the title implies. — Nate Chinen, WBGO

  • Joan Shelley, ‘Like the River Loves the Sea’

    Westlake Legal Group joanshelley_sq-185ea07d14a3407e4dd445e453e55d2232c87809-s800-c15 NPR Music's Top 12 Albums Of August

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    It may be a long way from Kentucky to Iceland, where Louisville’s most skillful singer-song-writer recorded this album, but there’s nothing chilly about the songs, which glow in homespun warmth with diaphanous arrangements. And some, like “Cycle,” unfold with the poetic inscrutability of an Alice Munro short story. — Tom Huizenga

  • Lana Del Rey, ‘Norman F****** Rockwell!’

    Westlake Legal Group lanadelrey_sq-38d7e9e8fc7ece6a65dcd51ede458257e7c20d37-s800-c15 NPR Music's Top 12 Albums Of August

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    Lana Del Rey writes languid songs from the perspective of a gloomy Cali pleasure-seeker whose accumulated ache can’t stamp out faint embers of hope. At 67 minutes, Rockwell! sprawls exquisitely, balancing its bleak beauty with real insight into the ways we get by in a world on the brink. — Stephen Thompson

  • Oso Oso, ‘Basking in the glow’

    Westlake Legal Group osooso_sq-08a2f7fcf55e42d6398242cfd9ef885958266501-s800-c15 NPR Music's Top 12 Albums Of August

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    Emo taught to us glower in our feels, or at least that’s the persistent narrative pushed by pop culture. But there’s always been far more nuance to this music, with a glimmering example found in Oso Oso’s Basking in the Glow. Like anyone else in our current hellscape, Jade Lilitri struggles to stay positive, but radiates with melodies and epiphanies about who he is and aspires to be. — Lars Gotrich

  • Raphael Saadiq, ‘Jimmy Lee’

    Westlake Legal Group raphaelsaadiq_sq-6a9306d1eda72c23898f15d33b25157d61b691be-s800-c15 NPR Music's Top 12 Albums Of August

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    Raphael Saadiq‘s Jimmy Lee is an exorcism of family tragedy and trauma, personified in blood, bone and blues. It’s the story of American dysfunction run rampant, while the survivors find the guts to music their way through the pain. This time, Saadiq lights up the darkness by revealing his own. He’s never sounded brighter. — Rodney Carmichael

  • Rapsody, ‘Eve’

    Westlake Legal Group rapsody_sq-eeeb320f7b2ecfd71ebd02b2a7374a4116d5e190-s800-c15 NPR Music's Top 12 Albums Of August

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    Though this is technically Rapsody‘s third studio effort, the narrative of Eve has been centuries in the making. By naming each song after an inspirational black woman (from Cleopatra to Sojourner Truth to Aaliyah to Michelle Obama), Rap traces the legacy of black influence in society while maintaining her measured flow and the scorching wit of a group chat roast session. — Sidney Madden

  • Sleater-Kinney, ‘The Center Won’t Hold’

    Westlake Legal Group sleaterkinney_sq-1eba7f559382af1c3709f9560ca033726d40d7fa-s800-c15 NPR Music's Top 12 Albums Of August

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    Slickly produced by Annie Clark, The Center Won’t Hold breaks new sonic ground for Sleater-Kinney without abandoning the dynamic interplay that makes the iconic band tick. “There are not a lot of all-female rock bands who have stood on this precipice, making their ninth album,” Carrie Brownstein told NPR this month. How lucky we are to have this trio setting the pace. — Marissa Lorusso

  • Tanya Tucker, ‘While I’m Livin”

    Westlake Legal Group tanyatucker_sq-a21f49e136e584b2b8c5fda853bf029a87c72638-s800-c15 NPR Music's Top 12 Albums Of August

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    In the 1970s, Tanya Tucker was country’s wild teenage flame; in the 1980s, a prime purveyor of country pop. Then, like many stars, she found herself grounded for a while. Her ardent fan Brandi Carlile and her spiritual son Shooter Jennings have engineered a comeback for Tucker that rings remarkably true, writing and selecting songs that help her tell her whole life story, redolent of heartbreak, jokes, dreams, and realistic optimism. — Ann Powers

  • Young Thug, ‘So Much Fun’

    Westlake Legal Group youngthug_sq-63ef7d6906865d3ef746cfcfb31e14b2d27e4892-s800-c15 NPR Music's Top 12 Albums Of August

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    You know that screechy, slurred delivery and unpredictable rap partner you hear all the young bucks emulate? That’s all Thugger.
    While copycats have arose and climbed up the charts thanks to what he purveyed, Thug’s long awaited, J. Cole-produced album So Much Fun is the culmination of the rapper’s influence, experimentation and forward thinking of a high-sky caliber. — Sidney Madden

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