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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 265)

Colbert’s World War III Graphic Gets A Last-Minute Update After Trump Tweet

Westlake Legal Group 5e16a8dc250000dce1d32358 Colbert’s World War III Graphic Gets A Last-Minute Update After Trump Tweet

Trump used the phrase in a mystifying tweet sent Tuesday night as Iran lobbed missiles at a base in Iraq housing both Iraqi and U.S. forces. 

There were no casualties reported, but the escalation caused widespread fear of war between the two nations. 

However, Trump’s “all is well” tweet caused Colbert and his team to do some last-minute tweaking to their World War III graphic: 

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3 Hours From Alert to Attacks: Inside the Race to Protect U.S. Forces From Iran Strikes

Westlake Legal Group 08dc-reconstruct-1-facebookJumbo 3 Hours From Alert to Attacks: Inside the Race to Protect U.S. Forces From Iran Strikes United States Politics and Government United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Pompeo, Mike Pence, Mike National Security Council Military Bases and Installations Iraq Iran House of Representatives Haspel, Gina Espionage and Intelligence Services Defense Department central intelligence agency

WASHINGTON — The alert came to the White House shortly after 2 p.m. on Tuesday, a flash message from American spy agencies that officials sometimes call a “squawk.” In the coming hours, it warned, an Iranian attack on American troops was almost certain.

A blizzard of potential threats had already come throughout the day — of attacks with missiles and rockets, of terrorist strikes against Americans elsewhere in the Middle East, even one warning that hundreds of Iran-backed militia fighters might try to assault Al Asad Air Base, a sprawling compound in Iraq’s western desert.

But the specificity of the afternoon’s latest warning sent Vice President Mike Pence and Robert C. O’Brien, the White House national security adviser, to the basement of the West Wing, where aides were assembling in the Situation Room. President Trump joined shortly after wrapping up a meeting with the Greek prime minister.

Three hours later, a hail of ballistic missiles launched from Iran crashed into two bases in Iraq, including Al Asad, where roughly 1,000 American troops are stationed. The strikes capped a frenetic day filled with confusion and misinformation, where at times it appeared that a dangerous military escalation could lead to a broader war. Mr. Trump spent hours with his aides monitoring the latest threats. Military planners considered options to retaliate if Iran killed American troops.

The early warning provided by intelligence helps explain in part why the missiles exacted a negligible toll, destroying only evacuated aircraft hangars as they slammed into the desert sand in barren stretches of the base. No Americans or Iraqis were killed or wounded, and Mr. Trump, who indicated to advisers he would prefer to avoid further engagement, was relieved.

Afterward, the president and vice president spoke to Democratic and Republican congressional leaders, and some urged Mr. Trump to try to dampen the crisis.

This account of the tense hours surrounding Tuesday’s attacks is based on interviews with current and former American officials and military personnel in both Washington and Iraq.

As it turned out, the missile strikes might end up being a bloodless close to the latest chapter in America’s simmering, four-decade conflict with Iran. Mr. Trump declared on Wednesday that Iran “appears to be standing down” after days of heightened tensions since the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, although few who closely follow the dynamics of the United States’ relationship with Iran foresee a peaceful future.

“If this is indeed the sum total of Iran’s response, it is a big signal of de-escalation that we should gratefully receive,” said Kirsten Fontenrose, who handled Middle East issues on the National Security Council earlier in the Trump administration.

Hours before officials at the White House and Pentagon arrived at their desks on Tuesday, American troops in Iraq were preparing for Iran’s retaliation to avenge the death of the general.

Spy satellites had been tracking the movements of Iran’s arsenal of missile launchers, and communications among Iranian military leaders intercepted by the National Security Agency had indicated that the response to General Suleimani’s killing might come that day.

Al Asad base in Iraq’s Anbar Province was the focus of numerous vague threat reports, including one warning that hundreds of fighters from Kataib Hezbollah, an Iraqi militia trained and equipped by Iran, might launch a frontal assault on the base.

The base was relatively vulnerable; no Patriot antimissile systems protected it, according to an American military official. They had been deployed to other countries in the Middle East deemed more susceptible to Iranian missile attacks. So American commanders prepared to partly evacuate the base and assigned most other remaining forces to hardened shelters to ride out whatever attack would come.

By morning in Washington, the intelligence was still vague enough that White House officials decided to keep Mr. Trump’s planned schedule, including the meeting with the prime minister of Greece, Kyriakos Mitsotakis.

Administration officials resumed their defense of General Suleimani’s killing amid increasing criticism that they lacked, or were unwilling to share, the intelligence that they said prompted the strike. At the State Department, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told reporters at a packed news conference that killing General Suleimani “was the right decision.”

Days earlier, he had said the killing had been necessary to prevent “imminent” attacks. On Tuesday morning, he gave a different message, citing the death of an American contractor killed in late December when Iranian-backed Shiite militias fired rockets at a military base in Iraq.

“If you’re looking for imminence, you need to look no further than the days that led up to the strike that was taken against Suleimani,” Mr. Pompeo said.

Hours later, as Mr. Trump met with Mr. Mitsotakis, the White House received the squawk alert about a likely missile strike. Mr. Pence and Mr. O’Brien led the initial discussion in the Situation Room about how to confront the threat, assessing the intelligence about the Iranians’ most likely targets.

Upstairs inside the Oval Office, Mr. Trump sat beside Mr. Mitsotakis as reporters peppered him with questions about the Iran crisis. The president hedged about threats he had made days earlier that the United States might consider targeting Iranian cultural sites — but he maintained a menacing tone.

“If Iran does anything that they shouldn’t be doing, they’re going to be suffering the consequences, and very strongly,” Mr. Trump said. “We’re totally prepared.”

After the brief news conference ended, Mr. Trump descended several flights of stairs to the Situation Room.

With sandwiches piled on a sideboard in the room, the group that advised the president there at different times throughout the day included a handful of seasoned national security officials, including the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark A. Milley, an Army veteran of nearly 40 years; Keith Kellogg, a retired Army lieutenant general who serves as national security adviser to Mr. Pence; and Joseph Maguire, the acting director of national intelligence.

It also included Mr. Pompeo, who has become a driving force in the Trump administration’s Iran policy and an advocate of what he often calls “restoring deterrence” against Tehran’s aggression in the Middle East. As a forceful proponent of the Jan. 3 strike that killed General Suleimani, Mr. Pompeo had played an instrumental role in bringing Mr. Trump to the crisis point.

But others around the long, rectangular table in the Situation Room had only modest foreign policy experience — including Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff and a former congressman from South Carolina, and Mr. O’Brien, who was a Los Angeles lawyer before spending two and a half years as Mr. Trump’s chief hostage negotiator and assumed the post of national security adviser in September.

Appearing on a video screen was Gina Haspel, the C.I.A. director, who was monitoring the crisis from the agency’s headquarters in Northern Virginia. In the days before General Suleimani’s death, Ms. Haspel had advised Mr. Trump that the threat the Iranian general presented was greater than the threat of Iran’s response if he was killed, according to current and former American officials. Indeed, Ms. Haspel had predicted the most likely response would be a missile strike from Iran to bases where American troops were deployed, the very situation that appeared to be playing out on Tuesday afternoon.

Though Ms. Haspel took no formal position about whether to kill General Suleimani, officials who listened to her analysis came away with the clear view that the C.I.A. believed that killing him would improve — not weaken — security in the Middle East.

But at that moment days after General Suleimani’s death, the president and his aides were confronting a flurry of conflicting information. Around 4 p.m., reports came in that a training camp north of Baghdad might have been hit. Officials at the White House and the State Department waited anxiously for the Pentagon to provide damage reports about the camp, Taji air base, where American troops are stationed. It was a false alarm, though American officials said on Wednesday that they believed that several missiles fired in the barrage a day earlier were intended for the base.

As the reports about Taji came in, loudspeakers at the American Embassy in Baghdad announced that an attack could be imminent. As they had in the previous days, American and Iraqi personnel inside the compound raced toward bomb shelters.

Roughly one hour later, the first missiles bound for Al Asad streaked over their heads.

Around 5:30 p.m. in Washington, the Pentagon detected the first of what would be 16 short- and medium-range Fateh 110 and Shahab missiles, fired from three locations in Iran.

Several slammed into Al Asad but did only minimal damage. They hit a Black Hawk helicopter and a reconnaissance drone, along with parts of the air traffic control tower, according to a military official familiar with a battle damage assessment of the strike.

The attack also destroyed several tents.

Minutes later, a salvo of missiles hit an air base in Erbil, in northern Iraq, that has been a Special Operations hub for hundreds of American and other allied troops, logistics personnel and intelligence specialists throughout the fight against the Islamic State. The damage to that base was unclear, though no personnel were killed or wounded.

Why did the Iran strikes do such little damage? Mr. Trump attributed it to the “precautions taken, the dispersal of forces and an early warning system that worked very well.” A senior American military official dismissed the idea that Iran had intentionally avoided killing American troops by aiming instead for uninhabited parts of the two bases.

Still, American officials acknowledged that Iran’s leaders showed restraint in planning the missile strikes, especially after the fiery talk from Tehran after General Suleimani’s killing.

“We’re receiving some encouraging intelligence that Iran is sending messages to those very same militias not to move against American targets or civilians,” Mr. Pence said during an interview on Wednesday evening with CBS News. “And we hope that that message continues to echo.”

After the attacks subsided, Mr. Trump and Mr. Pence made a round of calls to congressional leaders, and even some of the president’s hawkish allies said that Mr. Trump should be measured in his response to the Iranian strikes.

Recounting his conversation with Mr. Trump, Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, said he told the president, “Let’s just stand down and see what happens for a few days.”

Advisers also discussed whether Mr. Trump should give an address, and several aides, including Jared Kushner and Stephen Miller, as well as Mr. Pence, worked on one on Wednesday morning in the hours before the president spoke on national television. More than a half-dozen drafts circulated as aides scrambled to prepare for the speech. One military official was given only 20 minutes’ notice to head to the White House to stand behind Mr. Trump as he spoke in the Grand Foyer of the White House in the late morning, and the president made edits right until he stepped up to the lectern.

Reporting was contributed by Julian E. Barnes, Catie Edmondson, Michael Crowley, Helene Cooper and John Ismay from Washington, and Maggie Haberman from New York.

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Laura Ingraham blasts Pelosi and Dems over impeachment ‘fiasco’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120840163001_6120855095001-vs Laura Ingraham blasts Pelosi and Dems over impeachment 'fiasco' Victor Garcia fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 392f3209-ba1d-5b7d-8e83-eaa95319b62f

Laura Ingraham mocked Democrats and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi over their impeachement “blunder,” comparing it to President Trump’s recent conflicts with Iran.

“President Trump’s enemies at home and abroad are really frustrated right now. I can’t really blame them. They keep launching attacks, but the president just keeps getting stronger and the Republicans more unified,” Ingraham said on “The Ingraham Angle.” “Last night, Iran, of course, fired their show missiles into Iraq where our troops are stationed, doing some damage, but without casualties. Thank goodness. But that’s not the only assault on this president that’s fizzled. At home, we see the same with the impeachment fiasco.”

SEN. TIM KAINE: US STRIKE ON SOLEIMANI WAS NOT ALLOWED BY BUSH-ERA MILITARY FORCE AUTHORIZATION

Ingraham criticized  House Speaker Nancy Pelosi saying she pictured her playing “San Francisco Hold’em.”

“She has their cards close to the vest, but it really means she just doesn’t want a Senate trial after all, because she won zero concessions from Mitch McConnell and now members of her own party are turning against her,” Ingraham said.

Ingraham said Pelosi should admit defeat.

“I think Pelosi should just raise the white flag and admit that caving to the impeachment demands of the radicals in her caucus, it was just a huge blunder,” Ingraham suggested.

The host called out Democrats for their negative predictions saying they were wrong.

“Think about all the hyperbole that we’ve heard from Democrats recently. ‘Trump’s dealings on Ukraine will bring down his presidency. Then it was his ordered killing of Soleimani will trigger asymmetrical attacks, mass carnage,'” Ingraham said.  “Well, this is nothing more than the dark art of projection.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Ingraham advised Pelosi, Democrats and Iran to think before launching any new “assaults” on the president.

“Given Trump’s uncanny resilience in the face of their repeated attacks, both the Democrats and Iran would do well to think twice before launching any new assaults,” Ingraham said.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120840163001_6120855095001-vs Laura Ingraham blasts Pelosi and Dems over impeachment 'fiasco' Victor Garcia fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 392f3209-ba1d-5b7d-8e83-eaa95319b62f   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120840163001_6120855095001-vs Laura Ingraham blasts Pelosi and Dems over impeachment 'fiasco' Victor Garcia fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 392f3209-ba1d-5b7d-8e83-eaa95319b62f

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Oliver North: Trump can launch an attack that would shut Iran down ‘completely’

Westlake Legal Group ap18127637558722 Oliver North: Trump can launch an attack that would shut Iran down 'completely' Yael Halon fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 1f586a20-7f87-573f-b1c4-652fcbd22504

Retired Marine Lt. Col. Oliver North responded to President Trump’s national address Wednesday, and shed light on actions taken by the president to aid U.S. troops amid rising tensions in the Middle East.

“I was pleased to see him explain to the world why we did what we did,” North said on “Hannity” of Trump’s decision to order a drone strike that killed Iran Gen. Qassem Soleimani. “I don’t think he [Trump] backed down at all. I think he laid out the parameters that if you kill an American, someone in Iran is going to be paying the price for that.”

TRUMP ADDRESSES NATION AFTER MISSILE STRIKES 

North also praised Trump for his efforts to aid American forces stationed in the Middle East and slammed the mainstream media for their failure to cover the issue.

“Let me give you three things that he will never get credit for because the rest of the so-called mainstream media doesn’t want the American people to know it,” North said.

IRAN’S SUPREME LEADER CALLS MISSILE STRIKE AT BASES A ‘SLAP IN THE FACE,’ WARNS IT’S NOT ENOUGH

“Way back in May, he [Trump] convinced the Russians not to sell one of the finest and most effective aircrafts in the world… to Iran. Now, people didn’t hear boo. They didn’t look at it,” said North.

“Number two, last week he started delivering … missiles and aircraft out there to the [Middle Eastern] region,” he added.

IRANIAN OFFICIAL TWEETS PHOTO OF IRANIAN FLAG AFTER ATTACK ON US TROOPS IN IRAQ

“Then, this week they started sending six B-52s. A B-52 is a standoff weapon. They carry 20 cruise missiles. Twenty times six. That’s a whole bunch of cruise missiles coming down in your oil refinery,” North said. “We can launch an attack that will shut the country down completely.”

“Those are the kinds of things that he started in motion months ago,” North said. “He’s never going to get the credit for it.”

In his address Thursday, Trump touted the strengthening of the military under his administration but added: “The fact that we have this great military and equipment, however, does not mean we need to use it. … We do not want to use it.”

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His remarks come after Iran fired 16 ballistic missiles into Iraq. Eleven missiles hit the Ain al-Asad Air Base, which houses U.S. troops, one missile hit a U.S. military base in Erbil, and four missiles failed to hit their targets.

Westlake Legal Group ap18127637558722 Oliver North: Trump can launch an attack that would shut Iran down 'completely' Yael Halon fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 1f586a20-7f87-573f-b1c4-652fcbd22504   Westlake Legal Group ap18127637558722 Oliver North: Trump can launch an attack that would shut Iran down 'completely' Yael Halon fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 1f586a20-7f87-573f-b1c4-652fcbd22504

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Sean Hannity: Trump ‘prevented a massive war’ with Iran, critics have ‘incurable’ Trump Derangement Syndrome

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096898958001_6096890350001-vs Sean Hannity: Trump 'prevented a massive war' with Iran, critics have 'incurable' Trump Derangement Syndrome Victor Garcia fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 0435dbbc-eed3-5020-95a3-334ffcfa0e65

Sean Hannity praised President Trump Wednesday night for his handling of Iran and blasted the president’s critics, accusing them of having incurable “Trump Derangement Syndrome.”

“The president’s actions have just protected Americans abroad and our interests abroad. He held Iran in check,” Hannity said on his television program. “He prevented a massive war. And for now, that is a good thing.”

IRAN’S SUPREME LEADER CALLS MISSILE STRIKE AT BASES A ‘SLAP IN THE FACE,’ WARNS IT’S NOT ENOUGH

The host also said it was up to the Tehran regime if they want peace.

“[Iran’s] response was feeble. It was weak. And now, because of the president’s restraint, once again, de-escalation is a possibility. But ultimately, it will be Iran,” Hannity said. “They will determine their own fate, their own destiny here. Clearly, the president has shown he will act swiftly with the might of the greatest fighting force in the history of the world behind him.”

The host said this week’s events revealed two incontrovertible facts, the first being that Trump’s detractors will not soften their stance toward him.

“It doesn’t matter what this president does. Democrats and their allies, state TV, the media mob will never, ever give him any credit,” Hannity lamented. “Trump Derangement Syndrome seems incurable.”

The second fact, according to Hannity, is the establishment of the “Trump doctrine.”

“The Trump doctrine, pretty much what he told us in the election, in the campaign, it’s now clear for everybody to see,” Hannity said. “This president is not a cowboy, doesn’t want war. Frankly, the president’s a businessman. It’s bad business. We’re not going to get involved in foreign entanglements that are protracted. And more importantly, he values human life.”

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Hannity once again criticized the media and the president’s detractors, saying the Trump Doctrine doesn’t fit their image of him.

“The president showed tremendous restraint. Nobody in the media seems to have noticed. It’s really confusing the mob and the appeasement Democrats,” Hannity said. “This doesn’t fit their caricature, the cartoon, the false narrative of the president that maybe they’ve even convinced themselves is true and is not.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096898958001_6096890350001-vs Sean Hannity: Trump 'prevented a massive war' with Iran, critics have 'incurable' Trump Derangement Syndrome Victor Garcia fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 0435dbbc-eed3-5020-95a3-334ffcfa0e65   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096898958001_6096890350001-vs Sean Hannity: Trump 'prevented a massive war' with Iran, critics have 'incurable' Trump Derangement Syndrome Victor Garcia fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 0435dbbc-eed3-5020-95a3-334ffcfa0e65

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Rep. Elise Stefanik: Nancy Pelosi needs to know she has ‘no authority over the Senate’

Westlake Legal Group ENC3_132230118588660000 Rep. Elise Stefanik: Nancy Pelosi needs to know she has 'no authority over the Senate' fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 482e16fb-56f1-5808-afcd-934608186b0d

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., must understand that she does not have the authority to control a Senate impeachment trial, according to Rep. Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y.

Stefanik, who notably sparred with House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., during the House impeachment inquiry, told “Hannity” on Wednesday that Pelosi has been politically “exposed.”

“The impeachment dam is breaking,” she said, hours after several Democratic senators made statements urging the House to forward the impeachment articles.

“We need to continue to keep up the pressure,” Stefanik continued. “She has no authority over the Senate.”

TUCKER CARLSON: NOW IS THE TIME TO PULL OUT OF IRAQ FOR GOOD

Stefanik called Pelosi’s refusal to forward the impeachment articles “audacious and outrageous,” adding that she forced the House to follow an arbitrary schedule that claimed the Trump must be impeached as soon as possible. Stefanik also questioned whether Pelosi is afraid that Schiff’s alleged contact with the Ukraine phone call whistleblower could be revealed.

Earlier Wednesday, a handful of Democratic senators including Dianne Feinstein of California, Jon Tester of Montana, Chris Coons of Delaware, Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Doug Jones of Alabama made statements in favor of having the Senate receive the impeachment articles against Trump.

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In addition, Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, who caucuses with the Democrats, said that Pelosi holding onto the articles likely doesn’t “put any particular pressure” on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., according to Axios.

Host Sean Hannity added that he sees the impeachment proceedings as having “backfired” on Pelosi and her caucus.

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, agreed, pointing to the fact Rep. Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey — now a Republican — changed parties as the House’s inquiry concluded.

Westlake Legal Group ENC3_132230118588660000 Rep. Elise Stefanik: Nancy Pelosi needs to know she has 'no authority over the Senate' fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 482e16fb-56f1-5808-afcd-934608186b0d   Westlake Legal Group ENC3_132230118588660000 Rep. Elise Stefanik: Nancy Pelosi needs to know she has 'no authority over the Senate' fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 482e16fb-56f1-5808-afcd-934608186b0d

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U.S. Alcohol-Related Deaths Have Doubled, Study Says

Westlake Legal Group ap_17222817836989-ce6063024226b8b91c6149a78be88de6d9178026-s1100-c15 U.S. Alcohol-Related Deaths Have Doubled, Study Says

Overall, researchers found men died of alcohol-related causes in 2017 at a higher rate than women. But when analyzing annual increases in deaths, the largest increase was among white women. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Westlake Legal Group  U.S. Alcohol-Related Deaths Have Doubled, Study Says

Overall, researchers found men died of alcohol-related causes in 2017 at a higher rate than women. But when analyzing annual increases in deaths, the largest increase was among white women.

Eric Risberg/AP

More Americans are ordering more rounds and that’s leading to more funerals, according to a new study on alcohol-related deaths.

Looking at data from the National Center for Health Statistics researchers estimate deaths from alcohol-related problems have more than doubled over the last 20 years.

Death certificates spanning 2017 indicate nearly 73,000 people died in the U.S due to liver disease and other alcohol-related illnesses. That is up from just under 36,000 deaths in 1999.

Some of the greatest increases were found among women and people who were middle-aged and older.

The study comes from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, which is part of NIH. It was published on Wednesday in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Overall, researchers found men died at a higher rate than women. But when analyzing annual increases in deaths, the largest increase was among white women.

“With the increases in alcohol use among women, there’s been increases in harms for women including ER visits, hospitalization and deaths,” Aaron White, who authored the paper, told NPR.

The research shows that in 2017, alcohol proved to be even more deadly than illicit drugs, including opioids. That year there were about 70,000 drug overdose deaths — about 2,300 fewer than those involving alcohol, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Only cigarettes are deadlier than alcohol; more than 480,000 people die each year in the U.S. because of smoking-related illnesses.

However, alcohol-related overdoses — either alone or with drugs — rose between 1999 and 2017. Other alcohol-related causes included heart disease, cancer and accidental injuries like falls.

The number of deaths caused by drunken driving over the same two decades declined.

Other findings included in the study:

  • “70.1% of the population aged 18 and older … consumed alcohol in 2017, averaging approximately 3.6 gallons of pure alcohol per drinker.”
  • “While the overall prevalence of drinking and binge drinking did not change for men, there was a 10.1% increase in the prevalence of drinking and a 23.3% increase in binge drinking among women.”
  • “Increases in consumption were larger for people aged 50 and older relative to younger age-groups.”

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Tulsi Gabbard calls Hillary Clinton a ‘warmonger,’ says US troops should leave Iraq and Syria

Westlake Legal Group Carlson-Gabard Tulsi Gabbard calls Hillary Clinton a 'warmonger,' says US troops should leave Iraq and Syria Victor Garcia fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/shows/tucker-carlson-tonight fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 799a03e1-8a84-5f18-bfdf-92184e00ddee

Democratic presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, called former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton a “warmonger” Wednesday night.

“I think everybody knows and understands that she is a warmonger,” Gabbard said on “Tucker Carlson Tonight.” “And it is her record.”

TULSI GABBARD RIPS SOLEIMANI STRIKE

Gabbard was responding to the trending hashtag “#ivotedforHullaryClinton,” which gained traction following Iran’s ballistic missile attack on two Iraqi airbases housing American troops Tuesday night. Clinton herself was among those who tweeted the hashtag, which indicated a backlash against President Trump’s decision to order an airstrike that killed Iranian general Qassem Soleimani last week.

The premise of the hashtag, according to Carlson, was that “President Hillary would not be starting a war with Iran.” The host then asked, “Was that true?” before playing a clip of Clinton bragging about the death of Libyan dictator Muammar Qaddafi in 2011. That was followed by a video of then-presidential candidate Clinton warning that if Iran attacks Israel with nuclear weapons during her presidency, she would attack Iran.

“You look throughout, obviously, her support for the war in Iraq [in 2003], throughout her history. Her track record is well known,” said Gabbard, who referred to Clinton as “the queen of warmongers” back in October. “And I think this is why a lot of people back in 2016 and the general election decided that they would vote for Trump, because of what he was saying on the campaign trail about ending stupid wars and bringing our troops home.”

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Gabbard criticized Trump for the current conflict with Iran and sending more troops to the Middle East, saying her supporters believe she can keep her promise to get America out of what she calls unwinnable wars.

“Getting out, getting our troops out of Iraq and Syria is essential,” Gabbard said, “because the longer that they are there, the more likely it is that they are at risk and that we will end up in this endless tit-for-tat, back-and-forth quagmire of a war with people wondering, what is it all for?”

Westlake Legal Group Carlson-Gabard Tulsi Gabbard calls Hillary Clinton a 'warmonger,' says US troops should leave Iraq and Syria Victor Garcia fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/shows/tucker-carlson-tonight fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 799a03e1-8a84-5f18-bfdf-92184e00ddee   Westlake Legal Group Carlson-Gabard Tulsi Gabbard calls Hillary Clinton a 'warmonger,' says US troops should leave Iraq and Syria Victor Garcia fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/shows/tucker-carlson-tonight fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 799a03e1-8a84-5f18-bfdf-92184e00ddee

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No Surprise, 2019 Was The Second-Hottest Year On Record

European researchers on Wednesday said 2019 was the second-hottest year in recorded history, the latest bellwether as activists and scientists urge dramatic action to rein in carbon emissions and the fallout from climate change.

The findings, published by the Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S), a monitoring agency backed by the European Union, underscore a series of bleak reports published in recent months: The world is getting hotter, ice sheets are melting faster, oceans are rising more and animals are dying at a breakneck pace.

“2019 has been another exceptionally warm year, in fact the second warmest globally in our dataset, with many of the individual months breaking records,” Carlo Buontempo, the head of C3S, said in a statement.

Only 2016 was hotter, but just by a razor-thin margin of 0.04 degree Celsius. The 2010s were also the warmest decade on record, researchers noted.

The results come as another environmental tragedy, a string of severe bushfires in Australia, have cast a sharp lens on the effects of climate change not just decades in the future but right now. The country has been on fire for more than a month, scorching 12 million acres so far. At least 24 people have been killed, more than 2,600 homes have been destroyed and some experts estimate more than a billion animals have perished in the blazes.

Westlake Legal Group 5e168d8b24000059345a5567 No Surprise, 2019 Was The Second-Hottest Year On Record

Wolter Peeters/The Sydney Morning Herald via Getty Images A series of catastrophic wildfires in Australia have prompted renewed calls for climate action throughout the country. 

Though climate change doesn’t cause wildfires, it can exacerbate conditions, experts say. This year’s fire season in Australia has been particularly hot and dry, and 2019 was the country’s hottest and driest on record. (In the U.S., California also experienced a devastating fire season last year, and the state’s fire agency has said climate change is a “key driver” of a longer, more intense fire season.)

“The past five years have been the five warmest on record [globally]; the last decade has been the warmest on record: These are unquestionably alarming signs,” Jean-Noël Thépaut, the director of ECMWF Copernicus, said in a statement.

But though scientists have been issuing increasingly bleak warnings about the rate of global carbon emissions and the pace of climate change, the planet has largely failed to rein in the burning of fossil fuels, the main driver of climate change.

Researchers released forecasts last month that the planet would release more carbon emissions than ever before in 2019. Officials have urged the world to wean itself off fossil fuels by 2050 in order to keep the planet from warming more than 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, the threshold scientists say the planet must stay beneath to avert the worst effects of climate change.

Westlake Legal Group 5e168e3e250000dce1d3234a No Surprise, 2019 Was The Second-Hottest Year On Record

Richard Drew/ASSOCIATED PRESS Activists, such as Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg, have called for dramatic action to scale back carbon emissions.

Even at that level of warming, the planet would see a slew of dramatic effects, including the deaths of 70% to 90% of the planet’s coral reefs.

Despite the bleak news, 2019 did bring renewed attention and demands that world leaders address climate change, including a worldwide series of demonstrations spearheaded by Swedish activist Greta Thunberg.

U.S. science agencies, including NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, will release their own detailed looks at the climate later this month.

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CollegeHumor hit with mass layoffs as parent company cuts funding

Westlake Legal Group CollegeHumor-Logo CollegeHumor hit with mass layoffs as parent company cuts funding Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/genres/comedy fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/media fnc e48db0b0-450b-5c28-971e-9adcce549de1 article

The long-running comedy outlet CollegeHumor has cut nearly its entire staff as its parent company decided to no longer fund the website.

Sam Reich, CollegeHumor’s COO, acknowledged the company’s troubles on Twitter, announcing that media company IAC decided to “no longer finance” the site, leading to over 100 cut jobs. However, he did stress a “twist” amid the bad news.

“IAC, our parent company, has made the difficult decision to no longer finance us. Today, 100+ brilliant people lost their jobs, some of whom are my dear, dear friends. Hire them,” Reich began. “The twist, however, is that IAC has agreed to let me run with the company myself. In words that I’m sure are as surreal to read as they are to type, I will soon become the new majority owner of CH Media.”

‘THE CONNERS’ TO AIR LIVE, POLITICALLY-CHARGED EPISODE ON NIGHT OF NH PRIMARY

Reich urged fans to remain subscribed to the comedy platform Dropout, promising at least six month’s worth of content that has yet to be released. Despite expressing optimism, he did admit that other branches of CollegeHumor media will need “bold new creative directions in order to survive.”

“I will, however, do my very best to stay true to the talent, shows, fans, and principles that got us where we are today,” Reich continued. “We dropped out once before; we can do it again. Independent comedy lives on — just now more independent (gulp) than ever before.”

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CollegeHumor was launched in 1999 and featured both in-house and user-submitted content, including funny videos, images and articles. Notable comedians that contributed to the site include Paul Scheer, Amir Blumenfeld and Judah Friedlander.

It was acquired by IAC in 2006.

Westlake Legal Group CollegeHumor-Logo CollegeHumor hit with mass layoffs as parent company cuts funding Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/genres/comedy fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/media fnc e48db0b0-450b-5c28-971e-9adcce549de1 article   Westlake Legal Group CollegeHumor-Logo CollegeHumor hit with mass layoffs as parent company cuts funding Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/genres/comedy fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/media fnc e48db0b0-450b-5c28-971e-9adcce549de1 article

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