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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 278)

Kimberly Strassel: Media wage relentless crusade to destroy Trump

Westlake Legal Group newspaperrack2 Kimberly Strassel: Media wage relentless crusade to destroy Trump New York Post Kimberley A. Strassel fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion/media fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article 46452756-6395-589b-8d86-185651fd266d

Since Donald Trump’s election in 2016, the mainstream media has shed its once-noble mission — the pursuit of the truth — and instead adopted a new purpose: to take down the president. In an excerpt from her new book, “Resistance at All Costs: How Trump Haters are Breaking America,” out Tuesday, Kimberly Strassel of the Wall Street Journal examines how far the press will go in its relentless crusade.

Last week The Washington Post revealed the alarming news that House Democrats were considering having their anonymous “whistleblower” testify from a remote location, and in disguise. Just as shocking as the details of this plan was the justification the Post ladled on this Democratic effort to hide impeachment information from the public.

DAN GAINOR: NY TIMES COLUMNIST ADMITS THERE’S AN ANTI-TRUMP DEEP STATE – BUT CLAIMS MEMBERS ARE THE GOOD GUYS

It explained, high up in the story, that the cloak-and-dagger approach was merely Democrats expressing “distrust of their GOP colleagues, whom they see as fully invested in defending a president who has attacked the whistleblower’s credibility and demanded absolute loyalty from Republicans.”

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This, from a newspaper with a tagline of “Democracy Dies in Darkness.” Maybe the better journalistic epitaph is: Democracy dies in bias. How did journalism get here?

I’ve never engaged much in media criticism, because it’s almost too obvious. Yes, the mainstream media is liberal and biased. But at least in the past, that bias was largely a function of insularity. Most reporters weren’t even fully aware they were prejudiced politically; everyone they worked and socialized with held the same left-of-center views.

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That’s changed in the age of Trump. The press has embraced its bias, joined the Resistance and declared its allegiance to one side of a partisan war. It now openly declares those who offer any fair defense of this administration as Trump “enablers.” It writes off those who question the FBI or Department of Justice actions in 2016 as “conspiracy” theorists. It acts as willing scribes for Democrats and former Obama officials; peddles evidence-free accusations; sources stories from people with clear political axes to grind; and closes its eyes to clear evidence of government abuse.

This media war is extraordinary, overt and increasingly damaging to the country.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THIS PIECE IN THE NEW YORK POST

Excerpted from “Resistance at All Costs: How Trump Haters Are Breaking America” by Kimberley Strassel, Copyright © 2019. Available from Twelve, an imprint of Hachette Book Group, Inc.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY KIMBERLY STRASSEL

Westlake Legal Group newspaperrack2 Kimberly Strassel: Media wage relentless crusade to destroy Trump New York Post Kimberley A. Strassel fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion/media fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article 46452756-6395-589b-8d86-185651fd266d   Westlake Legal Group newspaperrack2 Kimberly Strassel: Media wage relentless crusade to destroy Trump New York Post Kimberley A. Strassel fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion/media fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article 46452756-6395-589b-8d86-185651fd266d

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Hunter Biden to Leave Chinese Company Board, His Lawyer Says

Westlake Legal Group 13xp-bidenchina-facebookJumbo Hunter Biden to Leave Chinese Company Board, His Lawyer Says Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Presidential Election of 2020 Boards of Directors Biden, Joseph R Jr Biden, Hunter Appointments and Executive Changes

Hunter Biden, son of Joseph R. Biden Jr., the former vice president and a Democratic presidential candidate, intends to step down from the board of a Chinese company by the end of the month, according to a statement from his lawyer.

Hunter Biden’s lawyer, George Mesires, said in a statement on Sunday that Mr. Biden would resign from the company, BHR, an equity investment fund manager.

The statement added that if Joseph Biden were to be elected president, his son would “agree not to serve on boards of, or work on behalf of, foreign-owned companies.”

The role of the younger Mr. Biden in foreign companies has been a source of political grist for President Trump, who this month publicly urged China to investigate the Bidens’ role.

In Ukraine, Hunter Biden earned $50,000 a month on the board of an energy company.

As vice president, his father pressured Ukraine to fire a prosecutor whose office oversaw investigations into the company’s owner. But by the time the elder Mr. Biden acted, there was no public evidence that the prosecutor was pursuing an investigation, and no evidence has surfaced that the vice president, who was carrying out Obama administration policy, was motivated by his son’s business interests.

In an interview with reporters, Mr. Trump called for both Ukraine and China to investigate.

“China should start an investigation into the Bidens, because what happened in China is just about as bad as what happened with Ukraine,” Mr. Trump said.

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Japanese pop star’s ‘avid fan’ used pupil image reflections to stalk, assault her: police

Westlake Legal Group hacking-1 Japanese pop star's 'avid fan' used pupil image reflections to stalk, assault her: police Talia Kaplan fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime fox-news/tech/topics/cybercrime fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 7bd8cb6b-ae52-58ca-a331-d7811cc81046

A man described as an  “avid fan” was arrested on suspicion of stalking a female Japanese pop star after allegedly using the reflections of her pupils in photos she shared on social media, then navigating Google Street View to find where she lived, police said.

Tokyo police confirmed on Friday that 26-year-old Hibiki Sato, who they called an “avid fan,” was arrested on September 17 on suspicion of indecent behavior in connection with stalking and causing injuries to the pop star, Ena Matsuoka.

Tokyo police declined comment on the specifics of the investigation, The Associated press reported, adding that the police official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, which is often policy at Japanese bureaucracies, said the case was related to the reports about a stalker and pupil images.

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Matsuoka, 21, was allegedly attacked outside her home in Tokyo last month by Sato, who had been waiting at a bus stop after he figured out her address from selfies she posted on social media, Asia One reported, citing local media reports. Sato allegedly managed to identify a bus stop and the surrounding scenery from the reflection in Matsuoka’s eyes and matched them to a street using Google Maps, according to the news outlet, which added that he was able to also approximate the floor she lived on based on the windows and the angle of the sunlight in her eyes.

Matsuoka, a member of the Japanese pop group Tenshitsukinukeniyomi, had reportedly just reached her door when Sato allegedly approached her from behind and covered her mouth with a piece of cloth. He is accused of dragging her to a dark corner and molesting her, injuring her face in the struggle, according to Asia One.

JAPAN WILL HAVE TO DUMP TOXIC FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR PLANT WATER INTO PACIFIC OCEAN, ENVIRONMENT MINISTER SAYS 

After he was arrested, Sato reportedly admitted to the attack and that he was a huge fan of Matsuoka.

Japan has many young female performance groups and fans have reportedly called for better protection of the pop stars after several high-profile stalking and assault cases in recent years.

Asia One reported that Japan revised its anti-stalking laws to cover online harassment after singer Mayu Tomita was stabbed dozens of times in 2016 by an alleged stalker. The news outlet reported that she tried to report her stalker to police about two weeks before the attack, but her concerns were dismissed.

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Tokyo Shimbun, a metropolitan daily, which reported on Matsuoka’s stalking case, warned readers that selfies could show surrounding buildings that will allow people to identify the location of the photos and said that people shouldn’t make the V-sign with their hand, which is seen in photos in Japan often, because fingerprints could be stolen.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group hacking-1 Japanese pop star's 'avid fan' used pupil image reflections to stalk, assault her: police Talia Kaplan fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime fox-news/tech/topics/cybercrime fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 7bd8cb6b-ae52-58ca-a331-d7811cc81046   Westlake Legal Group hacking-1 Japanese pop star's 'avid fan' used pupil image reflections to stalk, assault her: police Talia Kaplan fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime fox-news/tech/topics/cybercrime fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 7bd8cb6b-ae52-58ca-a331-d7811cc81046

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Hundreds of ISIS Supporters Flee Detention Amid Turkish Airstrikes

Westlake Legal Group 13syria1-facebookJumbo Hundreds of ISIS Supporters Flee Detention Amid Turkish Airstrikes United States Defense and Military Forces Turkey Syrian Democratic Forces Syria Politics and Government Kurds Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) Defense and Military Forces Civilian Casualties

AKCAKALE, Turkey — Hundreds of relatives of Islamic State fighters fled a Kurdish-run detention camp on Sunday morning after Turkish airstrikes hit the surrounding area, an aid group said, deepening the crisis prompted by the Turkish-led invasion of northern Syria.

The escapes raised fears that the attempts to contain affiliates of the militant group were crumbling.

A Kurdish official also said that the flag of the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, had been raised in the countryside between the camp in the Kurdish-held town of Ain Issa and the Turkish border, another indication of how the Kurdish authorities were losing control of a region they had freed from the extremists only months ago.

“We are facing very fierce attacks and we’re forced to decrease numbers of guards,” said the official, Ciya Kurd, of the Kurdish-led regional authority, who confirmed the break from the displacement camp after the Turkish strikes.

Amid the airstrikes and the camp escapes, the American defense secretary, Mark Esper, told CBS’s “Face the Nation” in an interview to be broadcast on Sunday that the United States would evacuate about 1,000 American troops from northern Syria in a “deliberate withdrawal.”

Mr. Esper said that the United States found itself “likely caught between two opposing advancing armies” in northern Syria and called the escalation of the conflict in the region a “very terrible situation.”

He said the United States had learned that Turkey was likely to expand its incursion “farther south than originally planned and to the west” in Syria, according to a transcript of his remarks published by CBS.

Analysts say that President Trump’s initial decision to pull back American troops shielding Kurdish allies in northern Syria could result in the group’s resurgence and have devastating consequences for the Kurds, who lost thousands of fighters in the battle against the extremists. A video capturing the execution on Saturday of at least two Kurdish prisoners by Turkish-backed Syrian Arab fighters illustrated the fallout of the invasion.

On Sunday, Turkey’s airstrikes pummeled Ain Issa, about 20 miles south of the Turkish-Syrian border, causing panic and unrest in the camp that housed nearly 13,000 displaced people, fewer than 10 percent of whom were relatives of Islamic State fighters.

Scores of people, including more than 700 relatives of ISIS, fled the camp, according to the Kurdish authorities. The number could not be independently verified, but a witness confirmed by phone that he had seen crowds of people hurrying from the camp around 9:30 a.m. Sunday.

The humanitarian aid group Save the Children also confirmed that foreign nationals had left the camp. Sonia Khush, who oversees the group’s work in Syria, citing her colleagues at the camp, said that all foreigners had left a secure facility that housed ISIS relatives.

“What was not clear to us was whether some of the women and children were taken by coalition forces or whether they all managed to escape,” Ms. Khush said. “It seems to be a mix of the two. Some women and children may be in the main camp.”

The Kurdish authorities had repeatedly warned that, while they were confronted by the Turkish invasion, they would not have the resources to secure the prisons and camps containing ISIS fighters and their relatives.

After establishing a foothold on Saturday in Ras al-Ain, a strategic town close to the Turkish border, Turkey’s incursion into Kurdish-held territory in northern Syria entered its fifth day on Sunday, as Turkish troops and their Arab proxies made major progress on the ground. A Syrian Arab militia under Turkish command pushed deeper into territory held by the Kurdish militia, blocking major roads, ambushing civilians and claiming the capture of a second strategic town in northern Syria, Tel Abyad, roughly five miles from the border.

Turkey and its Syrian Arab allies are trying to wrest control of northern Syria from a Kurdish-led militia that spearheaded American-backed operations against the Islamic State and that is the offshoot of a Kurdish guerrilla group based in Turkey.

Since the Syrian civil war began eight years ago, northern Syria has changed hands several times, as secular rebels, Islamist rebels, extremist groups and Kurdish factions have vied with government forces for control.

After partnering with American troops to drive out the Islamic State, the Kurdish-led militia emerged as the dominant force across the area, enraging and frightening the Turkish authorities, who see the group, which calls itself the Syrian Democratic Forces, as a terrorist organization.

On Sunday morning, Turkish-backed Arab militias ambushed and captured four employees of the Kurdish Red Crescent, a medical aid group, traveling north from Ain Issa toward the besieged town of Tel Abyad, a member of the aid group said by phone. The four employees were in a two-car convoy.

The Turkish-led force also took control of Suluk, a town about five miles inside Kurdish-held territory, according to the Turkish state-run news agency Anadolu. A Syrian activist in touch with the combatants and civilians in the area, Mustafa Hamida, confirmed the news.

Close-fire fighting could be heard in Tel Abyad on Sunday morning from the Turkish border town of Akcakale, suggesting that Turkish forces had entered the town after a four-day siege. The two adjoining towns are separated by customs buildings and a cement border wall.

Turkish-backed Arab fighters running a chat room called the Tel Abyad news agency announced they were clearing a western neighborhood, Al Sakhani, in the town, and posted photos of fighters standing in front of a security building.

The invasion has caused a huge surge in displacement, with more than 130,000 people fleeing their homes since fighting began on Wednesday. Many had already been displaced during the Syrian conflict.

Carlotta Gall reported from Akcakale, and Patrick Kingsley from Istanbul. Iliana Magra contributed reporting from London.

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5 rappers dropped from NYC festival at request of police

Westlake Legal Group Rolling-Loud-getty 5 rappers dropped from NYC festival at request of police fox-news/entertainment/genres/hip-hop-rap fnc/entertainment fnc Associated Press article 3e96e698-3cec-50e5-a419-d296f45e8182

Organizers of a hip-hop festival taking place in New York this weekend said Saturday they have dropped five rappers from the lineup at the request of police.

The New York Times reported that the performers were removed from the Rolling Loud festival after a New York Police Department official sent the organizers a letter citing safety concerns if the rappers took the stage.

The traveling Rolling Loud festival was scheduled for Saturday and Sunday at Citi Field in Queens on Saturday and Sunday and included major acts like Wu-Tang Clan and Meek Mill.

RONNIE ORTIZ-MAGRO’S LAWYER ADDRESSES ‘JERSEY SHORE’ STAR’S ARREST FOR FELONY DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

The performers who were dropped are 22Gz, Casanova, Pop Smoke, Sheff G and Don Q. The police letter said they “have been affiliated with recent acts of violence citywide.”

The Times said Rolling Loud confirmed receipt of the letter and said the artists would not perform.

Each of the rappers cited by the police has had encounters with law enforcement, the Times said. Jeffrey Alexander, who performs as 22Gz, was charged with murder in Florida in 2017, but the charges were dropped after police identified another man as the gunman. Casanova, whose given name is Caswell Senior, has served prison time in New York on a robbery charge. The other three artists have faced weapons charges.

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Don Q blamed “misinformation” for his removal from the festival lineup in a statement on Instagram. “I love my city and I never been in any gang activities or had issues at any of my previous shows,” he wrote. Casanova added in the comments that the decision “really hurts.”

Tariq Cherif, a founder of the festival, wrote on Twitter that the canceled artists would be paid their full booking fees and invited to perform at future festival sites.

Westlake Legal Group Rolling-Loud-getty 5 rappers dropped from NYC festival at request of police fox-news/entertainment/genres/hip-hop-rap fnc/entertainment fnc Associated Press article 3e96e698-3cec-50e5-a419-d296f45e8182   Westlake Legal Group Rolling-Loud-getty 5 rappers dropped from NYC festival at request of police fox-news/entertainment/genres/hip-hop-rap fnc/entertainment fnc Associated Press article 3e96e698-3cec-50e5-a419-d296f45e8182

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Mattis: Trump’s troop pullout will lead to ‘disarray’ in Syria and Isis resurgence

Westlake Legal Group 6sjht3KRkxiBn9FEUlT-_dhdv4I_ikckljCQ1yojUdM Mattis: Trump's troop pullout will lead to 'disarray' in Syria and Isis resurgence r/politics

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I Ignored The Urgency Of Addressing Climate Change. Then My House Caught On Fire.

Growing up in the dangerously politicized environment of Turkey in the 1980s, I was far from an activist for any cause. In fact, like so many others of my generation who had seen the worst of political violence in those turbulent years of my home country’s history, I tried to avoid actively engaging in any political or social issues — and that included environmentalism. 

In college, I thought of the environmentalists around me as an entitled minority, some of whom were rich elites who had everything, while a few seemed to be sincerely looking for a purpose in life. Others I dismissed then as hard “lefties” with impossible green agendas that did not appeal to me as an educated, middle-class graduate with corporate world ambitions.      

Years went by and I had kids. While I was never an outright denier of climate change, I never fully understood the gravity and urgency around carbon emissions or the melting ice caps — threats that felt so far away. In short: I was ignorant.    

Over the course of this past summer, three things happened that forced me to finally face reality.

Last month, my family’s house in the pine forests of Urla near the village of Demircili by the Aegean Sea in western Turkey barely survived a massive forest fire. 

It started after the power lines above the forest became overheated in temperatures that were higher than normal. I watched in horror as the firefighters tried to control the flames ignited by the sparks of young pinecones that jumped hundreds of meters like loose cannons.

The flames ultimately reached the border of our compound next to the village. While the anxious villagers attempted to extinguish the flames, my neighbors hosed the soil with water to dampen the fire, which eventually died down. (Just weeks after this incident, I would read about the devastating Amazon fires ― 70,000 of them — and remember the day our own house was literally on fire.)  

Then came the shocking images of deforestation carried out by a Canadian mining company near Mount Ida (or Kaz Mountains in Turkish) — a legendary mountain referenced in Homer’s “The Iliad” and “The Odyssey” — in the province of Çanakkale in northwestern Turkey. 

Neither raging fires at my doorstep nor threats of cyanide leaks had delivered a message like the one that came to me much later — and yet, far too late ― as I observed millions of angry young activists march in a Global Climate Strike across three different time zones.

My mother’s side of our family hails from Çanakkale, and I spent my childhood in the working-class town of Çan in the mountains where Alamos Inc. was now thrashing to find gold. I witnessed local activists holding what they called a “Vigil for Water and Conscience” for days on end and fiercely protesting the possible contamination of their water by the cyanide solution that Alamos was planning to use to extract gold from its ore. The local dam provides water to over 180,000 people in that region and irrigates over 5,000 hectares of land. A cyanide leak would be deadly for any living organism in that area.

But neither raging fires at my doorstep nor threats of cyanide leaks had delivered a message like the one that came to me much later — and yet, far too late ― as I observed, from 4 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sept. 20 millions of angry young activists march in a Global Climate Strike across three different time zones. It shook me to the core.

Prior to my departure for New York to visit my 18-year-old college-student daughter in mid-September, I had followed Japanese teenager Takuro Kajiwara and his friends from Fridays for Future Tokyo — the Japanese arm of the environmental movement inspired by 16-year-old Greta Thunberg of Sweden — prepare to protest in front of the United Nations University in Tokyo. Among them was my 13-year-old son.

Six hours later, I connected to Istanbul and watched online as 12-year-old Atlas Sarrafoğlu of SifirGelecek.com (Fridays for Future Turkey’s platform) mourn the death of 13-year old Berivan Karakeçili, who had been forced by her employers to continue picking in the fruit orchards in the southern Turkish city of Antalya when she was killed by an airborne roof during a freak tornado.

Finally, in New York, I marched together with 14-year-old Alexandria Villaseñor, the co-founder of the Earth Uprising movement, and listened to her introduce Thunberg to the 250,000 young people gathered at the Battery Park rally in the final leg of my climate marathon day.       

It was there that Thunberg asked us adults that day (and again in her widely circulated speech at the U.N. Global Climate Summit two days later) why, despite already knowing so much about climate change and its impact, did my generation stall on taking action to fight it?

Westlake Legal Group 5d9e123b2100004207343156 I Ignored The Urgency Of Addressing Climate Change. Then My House Caught On Fire.

Courtesy of Kayra Yorulmaz Activists protesting outside of the United Nations University in Tokyo on Sept. 20.

I have spent all of my life between Turkey and Japan. These two countries have relatively low levels of awareness of and interest in environmental issues, as well as very different economic growth histories. 

Up until the 1990s, many of us Turks didn’t recognize the impact a plastic bag had on the environment and were still using our grandmas’ bags (known as “filé” in Turkish) to carry our purchases home from the market. In the years to come, most of us have deserted these local markets to shop at the American-style malls that spread throughout the country as the current government incentivized a construction boom and encouraged consumption under the pretense of “economic growth” — all at the expense of the environment.

Fortunately, shoppers in Turkey are now charged for plastic bags, but at 25 kuruş (5 cents), the bags are so cheap that many continue using them despite knowing their damage on the environment.  

I must confess that I, too, was drawn to this newfound consumerism during my youth spent in Turkey and, later, as a young adult working in the post-bubble Japan in the late ’90s. I simply could not see or acknowledge the changes coming and the alarm bells ringing in all corners of the world I was jetting to as an expat. But the signs were certainly there.

Take the increasingly volatile weather. 

In Japan, where I now live, we don’t even have a direct phrase translation for climate change, and instead use the phrase “extraordinary weather conditions.” This year, it rained nonstop for a full month during tsuyu (monsoon season). Torrential rains triggered landslides so bad that the Japanese government had to evacuate 1.1 million people from the southernmost island of Kyushu. 

It breaks my heart to think that my generation all around the world could have and should have done more.

Westlake Legal Group 5d9e12ce210000e706343157 I Ignored The Urgency Of Addressing Climate Change. Then My House Caught On Fire.

Courtesy of Nil Sarrafoğlu Climate change activists marching in Istanbul on Sept. 20.

Having family living on three different continents, I still fly quite often. As an example of utter irony, my carry-on bag, which travelled with me for 6,736 miles to New York and back, has a sticker that reads “Combat Climate Change.” Even at the local farmers’ market in New York’s Upper West Side, where I went for shopping on a sunny Friday morning, I was upset to observe supposed environmentally conscious farmers placing two tomatoes in a massive plastic bag. 

Similarly, at my local supermarket in a posh district of Tokyo, a single apple is packaged up in plastic without much concern. 

Owing to local governments’ sorting rules, which are some of the strictest in the world, Japan recycles most of its plastic waste: Council for PET Bottle Recycling puts the figure close to 85% in 2017 – one of the highest in the world. But like Takuro-kun asked me during our conversation in Tokyo: “Wouldn’t it be better if you didn’t use plastics in the first place?”    

Meanwhile, in Turkey, this year’s climate-themed Istanbul Biennale is titled the “Seventh Continent,” which is a reference to the island of plastic floating adrift in the Pacific Ocean. The event’s main sponsor is none other than the Koç Holding — one of Turkey’s biggest conglomerates and, with the oil giant Shell, owner of the top two oil refineries in Turkey, Tüpraş and Petkim. While Koç should be applauded for their sponsorship, it should be noted that they also own Tofaş, Turkey’s largest manufacturer of cars and trucks running on, of course, fossil fuels.      

Other members of my generation, some of whom are political leaders in their countries, are also largely in denial of the urgency these kids, like Thunberg and Takuro-kun, want to emphasize. Take the Alamos gold mining controversy this past summer, where a Turkish government spokesman said that the mine was not even “technically” located in Mt. Ida, and that cyanide would not be used (Alamos’ website says otherwise.)

Westlake Legal Group 5d9e137b20000058074fed2e I Ignored The Urgency Of Addressing Climate Change. Then My House Caught On Fire.

Courtesy of Ilgin Yorulmaz Protesters marching in New York City on Sept. 20.

Again and again these kids say that they want to be part of the solution, not the problem. New protests are being planned as we speak, leading up to and beyond the U.N.’s Santiago Climate Change Conference in Chile in December. I am dreading that after the streets clear and the protest posters are discarded, older generations will continue “business as usual.” 

As for me, I now carry my own shopping bag and no longer have to wonder where to dispose those ugly plastic bags once I’ve used them. I carry my thermos everywhere so that I no longer feel ashamed of the plastic water bottle I used to carry out in public. 

I am more worried than ever about my carbon footprint and try not to fly unless necessary — opting instead for public transportation. I am no Earth scientist, but I began to follow No Fly Climate Sci, the online community of academics who go to lengths to reduce their carbon footprints. I have not yet abandoned eating meat altogether, but living in Japan means we have an abundance of seafood ― as long as we adhere to sustainable fishing, of course.   

At home, I try (with great futility) to convince my husband, an avid Amazon Prime customer, to reduce his online purchases. (At the time of this article, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos pledged the company would become carbon-neutral by 2040 — 10 years ahead of the 2050 deadline set forth by the Paris Agreement.)      

It breaks my heart to think that my generation all around the world could have and should have done more.

Next time I’m in Turkey, I also plan to convince my two business partners to build solar panels to generate electricity in a field we own near our village residence on the Aegean coast. I’m actually dreaming of moving there eventually to lead a self-sufficient life. As my back-to-the-earther hero, the late John Seymour, said, “Self-sufficiency is not being backwards and grubbing for our food with primitive implements. It’s going forward to a new and better sort of life. … It means the acceptance of complete responsibility for what you do or what you do not do.”     

Still, will it be enough to reverse our man-made climate disaster? 

Before Sept. 20, I was convinced that we were past the point of no return, as Jonathan Franzen has recently suggested. I felt panicked and didn’t know what to do. But now, I have hope. The youth of today have spoken loud and clear and it’s long past time we listened to them. 

One sign, carried by a young girl at the climate march, especially comes to mind: “Clean up your s**t. The world isn’t Uranus.” 

Ilgin Yorulmaz has worked for many years as a researcher and multimedia journalist based in Tokyo, London, Istanbul, and New York. She is a 2017 East West Center Senior Journalists Seminar Fellow and a 2016 White House Correspondents Association Scholar. She contributes to BBC Turkish as their Japan/East Asia correspondent, and writes on foreign policy and culture, with a focus on sub-cultures, human rights and problems faced by ethnic minorities. As a foreign correspondent, she has reported in the past from Turkey, India, Nepal, Philippines, China and Japan for HuffPost, VICE, The Guardian UK, PassBlue, Vogue, Condé Nast Traveller UK, Voices and Maison Française, among others. She speaks Turkish, Japanese and French. 

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Hundreds Of ISIS Supporters Escape As Turkish Troops Near Kurdish-Held Syrian Town

AKCAKALE, Turkey (AP) — Turkish forces approached a key Kurdish-held town in northern Syria on Sunday, setting off clashes that allowed hundreds of Islamic State supporters to escape from a camp for displaced people and prompted U.S. soldiers to withdraw from a nearby base.

A U.S. military official said the situation across northeastern Syria was “deteriorating rapidly” and that American forces were cut off from the Syrian Kurdish fighters they had previously partnered with. The official, who was not authorized to disclose operational details and spoke on condition of anonymity, said U.S. troops on the ground are at risk of being “isolated” and cannot travel overland without a “high risk” of armed confrontation with Turkey-backed forces.

The camp in Ein Eissa, some 35 kilometers (20 miles) south of the border, is home to some 12,000 people, including 1,000 wives and widows of Islamic State fighters and their children. The Kurdish-led administration in northern Syria said in a statement that 950 IS supporters escaped after attacking guards and storming the gates. It was not immediately possible to confirm that figure.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said Turkish warplanes struck villages near the camp on Sunday. It said camp residents fled as clashes broke out between Turkey-backed Syrian fighters and Kurdish forces, without providing an exact number.

Westlake Legal Group 5da31b5f200000290b5006b7 Hundreds Of ISIS Supporters Escape As Turkish Troops Near Kurdish-Held Syrian Town

ASSOCIATED PRESS People watch from Akcakale, Sanliurfa province, southeastern Turkey, as smoke billows from fires on targets in Tel Abyad, Syria, caused by bombardment by Turkish forces, Sunday, Oct. 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

Jelal Ayaf, a senior official at the camp, told local media that 859 people successfully escaped from the section housing foreigners. He said a few were recaptured but that supporters inside the other section of the camp also escaped and were carrying out attacks. He described the situation as “very volatile.”

The U.S. official said a “small group” of American troops withdrew from a base in the town because of the threat posed by Syrian fighters allied with Turkey, but that U.S. forces were still present in larger bases nearby.

The Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces were a key U.S. ally in the war against the Islamic State group and drove the extremists from most of the territory they once held in northeastern Syria. The force swept up thousands of Islamic State fighters and their family members in the campaign, and has warned it may not be able to maintain its various detention centers as it struggles to repel the Turkish advance.

NATO member Turkey views the Kurdish fighters as terrorists because of their links to the insurgency in its southeast and has vowed to carve out a “safe zone” along the border. It launched the operation earlier this week after President Donald Trump moved U.S. forces aside, saying he was committed to getting out of America’s “endless” wars.

The United Nations says more than 130,000 Syrians have fled since the operation began five days ago, including many who had taken refuge from previous rounds of fighting in the country’s eight-year civil war. The fighting reached the main highway that runs between Hassakeh, a major town and logistical hub, and Ein Eissa, the administrative center of the Kurdish-held areas.

Westlake Legal Group 5da31900200000290b5006b5 Hundreds Of ISIS Supporters Escape As Turkish Troops Near Kurdish-Held Syrian Town

ASSOCIATED PRESS In this Saturday, Oct. 12, 2019 photo, Turkey-backed Syrian fighters enter Ras al-Ayn, Syria. (AP Photo)

Heavy fighting was also underway Sunday in the town of Suluk, northeast of Ein Eissa. Turkey’s official news agency said Syrian fighters allied with Ankara had captured the town, while Kurdish officials said they were still battling to hold onto it. The Anadolu news agency said Turkey-backed forces had cleared the town center of Suluk, which is located at a strategic crossroads about 10 kilometers (six miles) south of the border.

Turkish troops and their Syrian allies have made steady gains since launching the operation, capturing several northern villages in fighting and bombardment that has killed and wounded dozens of people. The military said it captured the center of the sizable town of Ras al-Ayn Saturday. Turkey continued shelling around the town and sporadic clashes could be heard.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says 440 Kurdish fighters have been killed since the operation began Wednesday. The SDF says 56 of its fighters have been killed since the operation began. It was not immediately possible to reconcile the two accounts. Turkey says four of its soldiers and 16 allied Syrian fighters have been killed since the operation began.

The clashes have spilled across the border, with shells fired from Syria hitting the Turkish border towns of Akcakale and Suruc. Anadolu says one person was wounded in Suruc on Sunday. Cross-border fire has killed 18 civilians in Turkey since the operation began.

Heavy outgoing shelling could be heard in Akcakale early Sunday and at least one incoming projectile hit a house, leaving a gaping hole in the exterior wall and rubble inside. It was not immediately clear if anyone was wounded. Police collected evidence as a crowd gathered outside.

The U.N. meanwhile said a pumping station in the town of Hassakeh was damaged by shelling, affecting the water supply for 400,000 people, including 82,000 residents of camps for displaced people.

El Deeb reported from Beirut. Associated Press writer Zeynep Bilginsoy in Istanbul contributed.

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Warren Wants to Close the Loophole Through Which Brett Kavanaugh and Maryanne Trump Barry Crawled

Westlake Legal Group CDZFPyyYyMfKYuDB5uZzKOwkV0qq0rEDYTeQiUmP8i0 Warren Wants to Close the Loophole Through Which Brett Kavanaugh and Maryanne Trump Barry Crawled r/politics

Because when Republicans were in the minority, they bottled up virtually all of Obama’s judicial appointments, to the point that it was causing a severe shortage in some federal jurisdictions. Once the rule requiring a supermajority was lifted, Obama’s appointments started to fill the ranks of federal judges. In the end, he was able to fill about as many seats with the new rules as Bush had been able to fill under the old rules, with a Democratic majority in the Senate.

  • why are most, if not all, confirmations seemingly based on the idea that once a candidate is nominated, the default outcome is that they will be confirmed

What you’re suggesting — a supermajority requirement, with judges assumed to be unsuitable until proven otherwise, would result in very few confirmations, and would create a crisis in the judiciary.

The fact is, the Republican attack on the independent judiciary has brought us to a point where we need to confirm judges by simple majorities. When and if Republicans give up their hyperpartisan attack on the independence of the judicial branch, we can start talking about returning to a process that requires a supermajority.

As for the actual nominations, I think it’s reasonable to assume that someone who has served as a federal or state judge can be evaluated on the basis of their judicial records. Other nominees should face tougher scrutiny.

What I think needs to change is the perception that the process has to be “fair” to the nominees. It doesn’t. There are plenty of qualifies judges who would serve well on the circuit courts or on the Supreme Court. Virtually everyone who is nominated is already a powerful judge, and will remain so if their nomination is withdrawn. It makes no sense to bend over backward to be “fair” to these individuals while putting the pubic interest at risk.

What this means is that nominees like Kavanaugh or Thomas should be withdrawn, and alternative partisan hacks appointed in their place. We would have judges who haven’t been credibly accused of harassment and sex crimes, Republicans would have their partisan hacks on the Supreme Court, and Kavanaugh and Thomas would continue to be wealthy and powerful judges. Everybody wins.

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Missing Utah woman found dead in car, family says

Westlake Legal Group 18e3271b-valenti Missing Utah woman found dead in car, family says Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/west/utah fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/topic/missing-persons fox news fnc/us fnc article 9974691a-76ec-5124-b33a-76cf5310ea9c

The missing Utah woman who police said disappeared voluntarily has been found dead in her car, according to her family.

Erin Valenti, a 33-year-old CEO of Tinker Ventures, a Salt Lake City-based tech company, was discovered “deceased in her vehicle in San Jose” on Saturday. Before she was reported missing, Valenti was reportedly on her way to the San Jose International Airport in California to head home to Utah on Monday.

“Erin has been found. Please call off the search,” her family said in a statement, posted to Facebook by Missing Pieces Network. “We all greatly appreciate the effort and support people have provided. The family will release more information as they are able to.”

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In the “Help Find Erin Valenti” Facebook group, the family continued: “Many of you have seen that the search for Erin has been called off. While we were praying for a different outcome, we are so appreciative for the help and support you have given.”

“Please remember Erin as the beautiful, smart, funny woman that she was. I don’t have any details that have not been in the media. I’m sure that Harrison will thank you himself when he is able, but please be patient,” the post read.

OREGON COLLEGE FRESHMAN REPORTED MISSING, FAMILY SAYS ‘THIS IS NOT LIKE HIM AT ALL’

Valenti’s husband, Harrison Weinstein, pleaded online Wednesday for help finding his wife. He said she was last seen in Palo Alto, Calif., on Monday afternoon, “but never returned her rental car or made it on her flight home to Utah.”

“Her phone has been off since Monday night. If you have seen or heard from her please let me know,” her husband wrote. “Any information to her whereabouts is much appreciated and can be directed to me, her family, or the San Jose Police Department.”

On Friday, San Jose Police Sgt. Enrique Garcia told KSTU investigators were “treating this case as a voluntary missing person.” However, Valenti’s family says she seemed to be distraught on the night she disappeared. Weinstein and Valenti’s parents told the station that they spoke to her on the phone Monday and she seemed manic, though she has no history of mental illness.

CALIFORNIA ‘TEAM OF JUNIOR DETECTIVES’ HELP FIND MISSING 97-YEAR-OLD WOMAN WITH DEMENTIA

“I get that people have the right to disappear, but that’s not this,” Weinstein told KTVU. “Everything she said, she was planning on coming home. She was trying to get to the airport. She’s not thinking clearly.”

A San Jose police officer made contact with Valenti by phone Monday night, the East Bay Times reported. Weinstein told the outlet: “The officer said she wasn’t making any sense. They drove around looking for her on Monday night and never found her.”

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Valenti’s mother, Whitey Valenti, said she spoke with her daughter “for hours on and off” on Monday night.

“Her thoughts were disconnected. She talked a mile a minute. She’d say I’m coming home for Thanksgiving, then in the next she was saying she’s in the Matrix.”

Fox News’ Morgan Phillips contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 18e3271b-valenti Missing Utah woman found dead in car, family says Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/west/utah fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/topic/missing-persons fox news fnc/us fnc article 9974691a-76ec-5124-b33a-76cf5310ea9c   Westlake Legal Group 18e3271b-valenti Missing Utah woman found dead in car, family says Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/west/utah fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/topic/missing-persons fox news fnc/us fnc article 9974691a-76ec-5124-b33a-76cf5310ea9c

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