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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 279)

Ohio doctor charged with fentanyl-overdose murders of 25 patients sues hospital, claiming defamation

A critical-care doctor in Ohio accused of ordering overdoses of the opioid painkiller fentanyl in the deaths of 25 hospital patients has sued his former employer for defamation, according to a report.

Dr. William Husel, who was indicted in June on 25 counts of murder and has pleaded not guilty, argued that he did nothing wrong and did not deviate from hospital policy on end-of-life care.

The doctor, whose license to practice was suspended in January by the State Medical Board of Ohio, filed the lawsuit Thursday in Franklin County against the Columbus-area Mount Carmel Health System and its parent organization, Trinity Health Corp.

MISSOURI MOM’S BEFORE, AFTER PHOTOS OF ADDICTED SON GO VIRAL: ‘THE FACE OF HEROIN AND METH’

Mount Carmel Health System said in an email statement to Fox News Monday afternoon: “Allegations such as these are unfounded. We completed an extensive review of patient care provided by Dr. William Husel and stand by our decisions. Mount Carmel’s focus continues to be on caring for our patients.”

Trinity Health Corp. added in an email statement to Fox News Monday afternoon: “Allegations such as these are unfounded. We completed an extensive review of patient care provided by Dr. William Husel and stand by our decisions. Trinity Health’s and Mount Carmel’s focus continues to be on caring for our patients.”

In the lawsuit, Husel claims that patients died from their illnesses, not the administration of the powerful painkiller fentanyl ordered by him.

Husel also claims he received no formal training on hospital procedures from Mount Carmel when he was hired in 2013 as a critical-care physician and that he received a doctor of the year award in 2014.

Husel’s lawsuit seeks more than $50,000 in damages, along with attorney fees.

Westlake Legal Group Dr-William-Husel Ohio doctor charged with fentanyl-overdose murders of 25 patients sues hospital, claiming defamation Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox news fnc/us fnc article 34af27de-5d99-5e47-8878-9e6436c044e4

William Nusel, facing 25 counts of murder for his role in the deaths of hospital patients said in a defamation lawsuit filed against the hospital system he worked for that he did nothing wrong and did not deviate from hospital policy in providing end-of-life care. (AP Photo/Kantele Franko, File)

The Franklin County Prosecution’s Office said in a statement that Husel ordered that patients receive doses of fentanyl “in various amounts between 500 and 2,000 micrograms … that shortened their life and hastened or caused their death.”

The suspicious deaths occurred at Mount Carmel and St. Ann’s Hospitals in Columbus between Feb. 11, 2015, and Nov. 20, 2018, according to the statement.

Husel was fired from the Columbus-area Mount Carmel Health System in December 2018 and stripped of his medical license when allegations against him began to surface and an internal investigation by the hospital uncovered his fatal prescriptions.

More than two dozen wrongful-death lawsuits have been filed against Husel and the hospital system, some of which have been settled by the hospital for hundreds of thousands of dollars, according to the Associated Press.

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Mount Carmel has admitted that Husel wasn’t removed from patient care until four weeks after concerns about him were raised last fall and that three patients died during that gap after receiving the excessive doses he ordered.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Dr-William-Husel Ohio doctor charged with fentanyl-overdose murders of 25 patients sues hospital, claiming defamation Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox news fnc/us fnc article 34af27de-5d99-5e47-8878-9e6436c044e4   Westlake Legal Group Dr-William-Husel Ohio doctor charged with fentanyl-overdose murders of 25 patients sues hospital, claiming defamation Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox news fnc/us fnc article 34af27de-5d99-5e47-8878-9e6436c044e4

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Why Pete Buttigieg’s Defense Of Wealthy Donors Is So Fuzzy

Craig Hall, the owner of the now-infamous “wine cave” in California’s Napa Valley that hosted a swanky fundraiser for Pete Buttigeig, is the type of billionaire that the Democratic presidential candidate is OK taking money from ― at least according to rules Buttigieg set for his campaign.

In addition to owning a winery and being a real estate magnate, Hall oversees a financial services company and is in the art business. Since the 1980s, he’s donated more than $2.4 million to Democratic causes and served as ambassador to Austria under President Bill Clinton.

But Hall is also a long-time investor in oil and gas, owning an energy company that has a dozen operating wells in Arkansas, a fact that’s been well documented in news reports over the years.

Buttigieg, like most of his fellow Democratic presidential contenders, has signed a voluntary campaign finance pledge that he will not take money from fossil fuel executives. His campaign confirmed to HuffPost that he continues to abide by that pledge, as well as vows swearing off money from corporate political action committees and donations from federal lobbyists. 

Hall doesn’t count, the campaign argues, because he is a real estate executive who invested in fossil fuels, not the other way around.

But Buttigieg’s pledge, and his courting of wealthy donors like Hall, is an example of just how fuzzy these self-imposed rules on donations can be. The pledges are all voluntary — and they are flexible.

Westlake Legal Group 5e0a4aa725000063a4d316fa Why Pete Buttigieg’s Defense Of Wealthy Donors Is So Fuzzy

ASSOCIATED PRESS At the Democratic presidential debate earlier this month in Los Angeles, contenders Pete Buttegieg and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.) sparred over accepting contributions from big-money donors.

Does the fossil fuel pledge apply to investors in the fossil fuel industry? Not so, in Buttegieg’s case. Candidates also can reject corporate PAC money, but corporations can donate to issue-based PACs that may tacitly favor one candidate. Fifty-two members of Congress rejected corporate PAC money, but received a total of $2.95 million in the 2018 midterm cycle from Leadership PACs, which are almost entirely funded by corporations and industry groups, campaign finance watchdog group Open Secrets found.

“These voluntary pledges raise difficult questions around line drawing,” said Brendan Fischer, a campaign finance expert with the nonpartisan Campaign Legal Center, which works to lessen the influence of money in politics. “The most important thing about these pledges is that candidates are signaling to voters that they recognize there is something wrong with the system, and they are not going to fully embrace it.”

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) made grassroots fundraising a centerpiece of his bid for the 2016 Democratic nomination against Hillary Clinton, painting her as part of the elite political class. Since President Donald Trump’s election, the Democratic Party has zeroed in on a campaign finance reform platform; this year, House Democrats passed a bill that proposed publicly financing elections and mandating certain disclosures (the measure remains stalled in the Republican-controlled Senate). 

As the 2020 campaign has geared up, many Democratic presidential candidates made campaign finance promises early on. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.) pledged to forgo high-dollar fundraisers in the primary in February — and later said she would follow through on that pledge in the general election if she wins her party’s nomination. 

“We have a chance right now in a Democratic primary … to say, ‘Here’s how we’re going to do this. We’re going to build from the grassroots, we’re actually going to build a foundation for the Democratic Party that is really about face-to-face, person-to-person, neighbor-to-neighbor, people who are engaged in this campaign,’” she said in an interview with MSNBC’s Chris Hayes in February.

But while Democrats’ seem to have found consensus in displaying contempt for a broken campaign finance system, some resist actually abandoning it, in the name of pragmatism and winning elections.

While the Buttigieg campaign has signed onto three different campaign finance pledges, the candidate has also defended playing within the current system. In a striking moment during the Dec. 19 Democratic presidential debate, Warren attacked the South Bend, Indiana, mayor for hobnobbing with millionaires and billionaires for political donations — specifically calling out the wine cave gathering. Buttigieg justified his decisions to engage in high-dollar fundraising, arguing that wealthy donors don’t necessarily corrupt values and that Democrats cannot afford to turn donations away.

“These purity tests shrink the stakes of the most important election,” Buttigieg said of Warren and Sanders’ decisions to forgo high-dollar fundraising. He added that Warren has also participated in such fundraisers in previous campaigns. 

“Did it corrupt you, senator? Of course not,” Buttigieg asked of Warren at the debate. 

We are proud to have the support of more than 700,000 Americans who have already donated to our campaign and the only promise any donor will ever get from Pete is that he will use their donations to defeat Donald Trump. Sean Savett, Pete Buttigieg’s campaign spokesman

Still, his argument stands in stark contrast with the rejection of wealthy donors that has marked much of the Democratic race. There was a point over the summer when the 24 candidates then in the race had signed a pledge swearing off corporate PAC money. Almost all — 19 candidates — did the same for donations from fossil fuel executives, and lobbyists. 

“The criticism of how Buttigieg is running his campaign, is that the candidate who is elected by embracing the big-money campaign finance system would appear less likely to prioritize reforming that system,” Fischer said.

Buttigieg’s campaign would not comment about how it decides which donors it will take contributions from and which it will not. The campaign appears to operate on a case-by-case basis; early this year, it returned a donation from Steve Patton, a Chicago attorney who pushed against the release of the video of the notorious 2014 police shooting of teenager Laquan McDonald.

“We are proud to have the support of more than 700,000 Americans who have already donated to our campaign and the only promise any donor will ever get from Pete is that he will use their donations to defeat Donald Trump,” said Sean Savett, a Buttigieg campaign spokesperson. “The stakes in this election are clear and stark ― we have one shot to defeat Donald Trump. That’s why, whether you can give $3 or $300, whether you are a Democrat, independent or Republican, if you are ready to defeat Donald Trump, we welcome you to our campaign.”

The campaign also reiterated the mayor’s support for campaign finance reform, including creating a small-dollar matching program, strengthening the Federal Elections Commission and pushing to overturn Citizens United, the landmark Supreme Court case that allowed for so-called dark money to flow into the election system unfettered.

But at the core of this debate is a simple question: Is big money in politics corrupting? Buttigieg’s answer to this question is not clear. At the December debate, he argued that big money in politics was not necessarily corrupting. And since then, his campaign has made the case that Democrats can’t afford to eschew big money donors now.

We need to defeat Donald Trump and we can’t do that with one hand tied behind our back,” Savett said.

But in signing campaign finance pledges, Buttigieg signaled the opposite: that there is a real danger to big money in politics.

American voters certainly seem to think so. A 2018 poll by the Pew Research Center found that 77% of the public agreed that limits should be placed “on the amount of money individuals and organizations” can spend on political campaigns. The same survey found that roughly 72% of the public, across the political spectrum, said they believe people who give a lot of money to elected officials have more influence.

“Voters are fed up with big money in politics and are seeing the impact on democracy, and candidates feel pressure to signal to voters that they hear these concerns and are taking them seriously,” Fischer said. “The impact of money in politics is systemic and complicated and there’s hardly ever and explicit example of quid pro quo.”

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Sharon Osbourne Says She Fired Assistant After He Saved Her Dogs During A House Fire

Westlake Legal Group 5e0a42a2240000c81c5a4909 Sharon Osbourne Says She Fired Assistant After He Saved Her Dogs During A House Fire

“The Talk” host Sharon Osbourne told a bonkers but apparently true anecdote on a British game show about firing an assistant after he saved her dogs during a house fire.

The reason for the pink slip? Looking back on the incident ― in which Osbourne says she took an oxygen mask off the man’s face, put it on a dog and ordered him back into the building to retrieve paintings ― the employee just didn’t find the whole thing very funny.

In a segment from “Would I Lie To You,” where panelists try to guess if a celebrity’s story is real, Osbourne said that she and rocker husband Ozzy Osbourne were burning a Christmas candle they’d received as a gift. After they went to bed, a fire broke out. Ozzy tried to put out the flames, Sharon said, but only succeeded in getting some on himself.

She and her husband made it to safety, and then Sharon summoned the staffer. She ordered him into the burning house to find their dogs and retrieve some art, and became annoyed when the worker hemmed and hawed. Ultimately, he did save the dogs, and firefighters arrived on the scene ― but Sharon grew peeved when she saw one of them giving the assistant oxygen.

“How very dare you!” she remembered telling the employee. “You work here and you get more paintings out right now … I took the mask and I put it on my dog.”

Osbourne said she and her husband later laughed about the blaze, but the assistant saw no comedic value in what he believed might be potential lung damage.

Watch above to learn of the jaw-dropping way in which she canned the staffer.

The segment was posted to YouTube on Dec. 26, and many commenters were not amused, calling Osbourne’s story “appalling” and “disgusting.” Panelist Liz Bonnin, a presenter for nature shows, was among those who guessed Osbourne’s story was true ― but she appeared uncomfortable at times as Osbourne told her tale.

This must be seen to be believed. Watch it above.

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Denver Broncos security guard injures ankle trying to take down field invader, carted off field

Westlake Legal Group Denver-Broncos Denver Broncos security guard injures ankle trying to take down field invader, carted off field Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/denver-broncos fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 54a6ee79-a8ee-5965-a332-3773d79a9403

A Denver Broncos security attempted to subdue a field invader during a game Sunday as the team was playing the Oakland Raiders but instead left the field on a medical cart.

The game between the Broncos and Raiders at Empower Field at Mile High was briefly paused as security guards tried to catch the field invader. One of the moves the trespasser put on caused a security guard Chris Clark to go down with an apparent ankle injury, according to 9 News.

DENVER BRONCOS’ DREW LOCK RAPPING TO JEEZY’S ‘PUT ON’ GOES VIRAL

Clark was spotted being taken off the field on a cart. According to NFL reporters at the stadium, the guard suffered a broken ankle in three spots.

49ERS’ GEORGE KITTLE PAYS HOMAGE TO JIMMY GAROPPOLO WITH T-SHIRT AFTER NFC WEST VICTORY

The person who was eventually in custody was identified as a juvenile. A Denver police spokesperson told 9 News that the young fan was cited for a trespassing charge.

Denver won the game 16-15, holding off a furious comeback by the Raiders. The Broncos got a touchdown pass from Drew Lock in the game.

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The Broncos finish the season with a 7-9 record and went 4-1 with Lock as their starting quarterback down the stretch. Denver may have made the playoffs if the ball bounced their way in the beginning of the season. The Broncos started the year with four straight losses – each of them by 11 points or less.

Westlake Legal Group Denver-Broncos Denver Broncos security guard injures ankle trying to take down field invader, carted off field Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/denver-broncos fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 54a6ee79-a8ee-5965-a332-3773d79a9403   Westlake Legal Group Denver-Broncos Denver Broncos security guard injures ankle trying to take down field invader, carted off field Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/denver-broncos fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 54a6ee79-a8ee-5965-a332-3773d79a9403

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Jessie James Decker reveals husband Eric Decker is ready for another child: ‘He’s getting baby fever again’

Westlake Legal Group deckers-getty Jessie James Decker reveals husband Eric Decker is ready for another child: ‘He’s getting baby fever again’ Julius Young fox-news/person/jessie-james-decker fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment/events/babies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 0b9d49a7-551d-5cf9-b755-4cf4b2a2fb3c

Jessie James Decker wants husband Eric Decker to slow it on down.

The country singer revealed on Monday that the former NFL wide receiver is quickly developing the urge to have another baby. However, the pair seem to be at odds with the idea as she isn’t quite yet ready to be a mother again.

“He told me on the plane … that he is really getting baby fever again,” Decker, 31, told Us Weekly on Monday, “I’m like, ‘You are out of your darn mind. You just need to pump the brakes a little bit. Like, we need to chill.’”

JESSIE JAMES DECKER’S SECRETS FOR RAISING HAPPY CHILDREN, KEEPING THE KIDS ‘SANE’ ON FLIGHTS

JESSIE JAMES DECKER WOWS IN SATIN BLACK DRESS AT 2019 CMAs WITH HUSBAND ERIC DECKER

Although the pair already share daughter Vivianne, 5; son Eric, 4; and son Forrest, 21 months, the “Girl On the Coast” songstress said she is having a blast with parenthood, adding that “having babies just changes everything.”

“It makes everything more fun. I absolutely love having kids,” Decker added.

JESSIE JAMES DECKER FLAUNTS AMAZING BIKINI BODY IN TEENY-TINY SWIMSUIT

Just seven months ago in May, Decker told the outlet her husband, 32, had been begging her to have another child.

“He wants another for sure,” she said at the time. “I’m like, ‘Give me just a moment, give me a second!’”

She explained that Eric’s mention of adding another baby to their brood came during a time when the family was moving and had an abundance of baby equipment strewn about.

JESSIE JAMES DECKER STRUTS AROUND IN BLACK BATHING SUIT: ‘JUST ANOTHER DAY AT THE OFFICE’

“Because we’re moving, we have all of these baby things that we’re finding, like baby girl stuff, baby boy stuff, all the bottles, breast pumps,” said Decker. “I was like, ‘Oh, we can just donate those things or just give them to my sister because I’m sure she’s going to have more babies eventually.'”

“[Eric] was like, ‘I don’t think we’re ready to give those away yet!’” she continued. “I was like, ‘What do you mean?’ He’s like, ‘Let’s talk about it,’ and I’m like, ‘No!’”

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In February, Decker got candid about the couple’s sex life in an interview with Fox News, telling us that since Eric is retired now, they can be a little more “spontaneous” in the bedroom. She also kept the possibility open on having another kid with the former speedster.

“I would say never say never,” she said. “We’re not against it and we’re not planning it either. I think if it were to happen naturally, another baby is always a blessing, but as of right now we are very happy with baby Forrest.”

Westlake Legal Group deckers-getty Jessie James Decker reveals husband Eric Decker is ready for another child: ‘He’s getting baby fever again’ Julius Young fox-news/person/jessie-james-decker fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment/events/babies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 0b9d49a7-551d-5cf9-b755-4cf4b2a2fb3c   Westlake Legal Group deckers-getty Jessie James Decker reveals husband Eric Decker is ready for another child: ‘He’s getting baby fever again’ Julius Young fox-news/person/jessie-james-decker fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment/events/babies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 0b9d49a7-551d-5cf9-b755-4cf4b2a2fb3c

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Ken Cuccinelli Suggested NY Stabbing Attack Was Linked To Suspect Having An Immigrant Father

Westlake Legal Group 5e0a4b1c25000063a4d316fc Ken Cuccinelli Suggested NY Stabbing Attack Was Linked To Suspect Having An Immigrant Father

High-ranking Department of Homeland Security official Ken Cuccinelli claimed on Monday that a U.S. citizen accused of stabbing five Hasidic Jews at a Hanukkah celebration in New York lacked “American values” because the man’s father was an undocumented immigrant who gained legal status more than three decades ago. 

“The attacker is the US Citizen son of an illegal alien who got amnesty under the 1986 amnesty law for illegal immigrants,” Cuccinelli, acting deputy secretary at DHS, said Monday morning in a now-deleted tweet“Apparently, American values did not take hold among this entire family, at least this one violent, and apparently bigoted, son.”

It’s not clear where Cuccinelli got that information or whether he is correct. DHS did not respond to a request for comment about why Cuccinelli felt the suspect’s father’s immigration status from decades ago was relevant or appropriate to share with the public. DHS also did not respond to a question about why Cuccinelli deleted his tweet.  

Before assuming his current position at DHS, Cuccinelli was the acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. There, he sought the power to “unilaterally publicize personal information about asylees, refugees, and their family members in the US who are being prosecuted for certain crimes,” BuzzFeed News reported in September. The request was an effort to “undermine faith in the asylum and refugee system to suggest it is a public safety threat and the data does not support that,” former acting Immigration and Customs Enforcement Director John Sandweg told BuzzFeed at the time. 

The attack Cuccinelli referenced in his tweet took place on Saturday night inside a Hasidic rabbi’s home, where members of the community had gathered to celebrate the seventh night of Hanukkah. The attacker stormed into the home around 10 p.m. wielding a machete he used to stab five people. The accused attacker, 38-year-old Grafton Thomas, pleaded not guilty on Sunday to five counts of attempted murder and one count of first-degree burglary.

Federal prosecutors filed hate crimes charges against Thomas on Monday. Officials found handwritten journals in Thomas’ home which included references to Adolf Hitler and “Nazi culture” on the same page as drawings of the Star of David and a swastika, according to the complaint. They also searched Thomas’ phone and found it had been used to search “Why did Hitler hate the Jews” and the location of temples in New York and New Jersey.

There is no publicly available evidence that Thomas’ father raised him to hate Jewish people — or that children of immigrants are more likely to commit violent hate crimes. But Cuccinelli, an anti-immigration fearmonger, has long tried to portray foreigners as inherently dangerous to Americans.

When a 23-month-old girl and her migrant father drowned as they tried to escape violence in Central America and request asylum in the U.S., Cuccinelli blamed the father for the girl’s death

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James Carafano: US airstrikes in Mideast — sending THIS clear message to friends and foes alike

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118827309001_6118828685001-vs James Carafano: US airstrikes in Mideast — sending THIS clear message to friends and foes alike James Jay Carafano fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc b5efcad6-9fdc-5cdb-8217-5518770dbea9 article

The United States ended the year with punitive airstrikes on extremists in Iraq, Syria and Somalia. That’s a signal to all. America isn’t in withdrawal — anywhere. Nor have Americans declared victory against Islamist terrorism and walked away from the fight.

The strikes are also a reminder of the futility of the “ending the endless war” talk. The U.S. isn’t fighting endless wars, but there is no end in sight to dealing with the violence and turmoil capable of coming out of the Greater Middle East.

Just to review — the two chief sources of instability in the region remain Iran and the persistent specter of transnational Islamist terrorism. These are and will remain, the primary threats for some time to come.

JAMES CARAFANO: TOP 5 WORLD HEADLINES TO WATCH FOR IN 2020 — SOME WILL SURPRISE YOU

Americans cannot afford to turn their backs on all the blood and sand in the Middle East (as much as many would like them to), and for one simple reason — it’s in the middle of everything. Global energy supplies, maritime routes, air traffic, global finance, peoples, goods, and services all transit the region.

The Middle East is both a great global bottleneck and an indispensable connector linking the world together. As a global power with global interests and responsibilities, the U.S. doesn’t need for the region to be the land of milk and honey, but Americans also cannot risk having it collapse into mayhem.

More from Opinion

That explains why U.S. armed forces spent part of their holiday plinking terrorists, chasing elements of both of the chief antagonists in the region.

In Iraq and Syria, Iran continues to arm and fund extremist groups, surrogates to both expand Tehran’s control and directly target American interests. On Sunday, the American planes bombed five facilities directly tied to an Iran-backed militia, Kataib Hezbollah, which took credit for an attack on a base near Kirkuk, Iraq, killing an American civilian contractor and injuring four U.S. service members.

The strikes were a justified and proportional response. The message the U.S. administration sent could not be clearer. American forces are conducting critical advice and support missions in both countries, battling Islamists terrorists and Iranian surrogates that threaten both American forces, as well as friends and allies including the Iraqi people.

The U.S. won’t tolerate interference, and the U.S. will protect its forces. If the bad guys try more of the same, they’ll GET more of the same.

The U.S. won’t tolerate interference, and the U.S. will protect its forces. If the bad guys try more of the same, they’ll GET more of the same.

Meanwhile, in Somalia, the U.S. went after the militant group al-Shabaab after this al Qaeda-linked terrorist organization orchestrated a car bombing in Mogadishu that killed 79 innocent people. That wasn’t the first time. According to the Pentagon, American forces have conducted more than 100 airstrikes over the last three years, supporting the effort to push al-Shabaab out of the capital and diminish their control over the countryside.

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None of these operations look like conventional wars against conventional enemies, but then again, the U.S. isn’t looking for victory in the conventional sense. So these really aren’t endless wars to end. Nor are they really America’s problem. The U.S. isn’t fighting for territorial control or trying to rebuild nations struggling with the internal conflict that both Iran and the terrorists are trying to exploit.

While the U.S. is providing some assistance, its primary goal is to keep the outbreaks of violence and extremism from metastasizing in the manner al Qaeda did in the Sunni uprising during Bush’s presidency or the rise of ISIS in Iraq and Syria under Obama. We’re looking for a sustainable and sufficient presence that defends our interests, reassures our friends in the region that we aren’t leaving, yet at the same time presses and encourages them to do more for themselves, taking the responsibility for fighting for the cause of their own peace and security.

This is a sensible strategy. While violence persists, it doesn’t match the level of mayhem we have seen in the last two decades. Meanwhile, this administration has done more to pressure, punish and isolate Iran than any in modern memory.

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There are signs the region is responding to U.S. leadership. Early in his presidency, Trump floated the idea of a Middle East Security Architecture, a collective security arrangement of like-minded nations in the region.

Expect that idea to pick up momentum in the months ahead, a sure sign that others follow the U.S. on a more prudent and responsible path for building regional stability.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY JAMES JAY CARAFANO

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118827309001_6118828685001-vs James Carafano: US airstrikes in Mideast — sending THIS clear message to friends and foes alike James Jay Carafano fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc b5efcad6-9fdc-5cdb-8217-5518770dbea9 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118827309001_6118828685001-vs James Carafano: US airstrikes in Mideast — sending THIS clear message to friends and foes alike James Jay Carafano fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc b5efcad6-9fdc-5cdb-8217-5518770dbea9 article

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Sharon Osbourne Says She Fired Assistant After He Saved Her Dogs During A House Fire

Westlake Legal Group 5e0a42a2240000c81c5a4909 Sharon Osbourne Says She Fired Assistant After He Saved Her Dogs During A House Fire

“The Talk” host Sharon Osbourne told a bonkers but apparently true anecdote on a British game show about firing an assistant after he saved her dogs during a house fire.

The reason for the pink slip? Looking back on the incident ― in which Osbourne says she took an oxygen mask off the man’s face, put it on a dog and ordered him back into the building to retrieve paintings ― the employee just didn’t find the whole thing very funny.

In a segment from “Would I Lie To You,” where panelists try to guess if a celebrity’s story is real, Osbourne said that she and rocker husband Ozzy Osbourne were burning a Christmas candle they’d received as a gift. After they went to bed, a fire broke out. Ozzy tried to put out the flames, Sharon said, but only succeeded in getting some on himself.

She and her husband made it to safety, and then Sharon summoned the staffer. She ordered him into the burning house to find their dogs and retrieve some art, and became annoyed when the worker hemmed and hawed. Ultimately, he did save the dogs, and firefighters arrived on the scene ― but Sharon grew peeved when she saw one of them giving the assistant oxygen.

“How very dare you!” she remembered telling the employee. “You work here and you get more paintings out right now … I took the mask and I put it on my dog.”

Osbourne said she and her husband later laughed about the blaze, but the assistant saw no comedic value in what he believed might be potential lung damage.

Watch above to learn of the jaw-dropping way in which she canned the staffer.

The segment was posted to YouTube on Dec. 26, and many commenters were not amused, calling Osbourne’s story “appalling” and “disgusting.” Panelist Liz Bonnin, a presenter for nature shows, was among those who guessed Osbourne’s story was true ― but she appeared uncomfortable at times as Osbourne told her tale.

This must be seen to be believed. Watch it above.

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Jessie J shares emotional message following Channing Tatum split: ‘You are never alone’

Jessie J doesn’t want to be defined by her past trauma.

The “Price Tag” singer, 31, took to Instagram on Sunday to share a lengthy message in light of her recent breakup with “21 Jump Street” star Channing Tatum, 39.

JESSIE J TIGHT-LIPPED ON CHANNING TATUM RELATIONSHIP, SAYS ‘EVERYONE DESERVES HAPPINESS’

“Time. Time is the gift. Time is the fear. Time is the magic. Time is the memories. Time is the change. Time is the pain. Time is the healing. Zoom out,” Jessie prefaced the post. “Go somewhere where your world feels and looks small. Gain perspective. Lay in the sea. Walk to the top of a mountain. Drive to view point in a park. Look up at the stars.”

“This isn’t to make you feel like your problems or sadness or the feelings you feel are not valid but to know you are NEVER Alone. Billions of people around the world. Are just trying to smile and mean it. Are actively working out who they are. Are missing someone they have lost. Are feeling worthless. YOU ARE LOVED,” she continued.

CHANNING TATUM DROOLS OVER GIRLFRIEND JESSIE J’S BIKINI SNAP

Westlake Legal Group Jessie-J-Tatum-Getty Jessie J shares emotional message following Channing Tatum split: 'You are never alone' fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc b25d0325-cec5-5826-825c-8b5745085ab6 article Andy Sahadeo

News of Jessie J and Channing Tatum’s split broke in mid-December. (Getty Images)

Jessie then discussed “the puzzle pieces of life” and how they are “sometimes put together in the wrong places.” “They can hurt until tended to,” she noted.

“Don’t let past or current trauma define who you are. You can walk away from it. Take the time to put those puzzle pieces in the right place. Tend to YOU. Be vulnerable. Be there for YOU. Be there for people around you and lift each other up. Break the cycle. Be open. Talk. Be there for yourself,” she continued.

“Walk away from parts of yourself and people or situations that trigger parts of you that are unhealthy. Be honest. Sending LOVE to anyone who feels alone. We need you around. You are stronger than you know, and are capable of finding your happy time again. Talk to someone who can give you professional advice. Honour your pain to be heard by the right ears. It’s your TIME, so take your TIME ❤️ 1-800-273-8255 – National Suicide Prevention Lifeline ✨,” she concluded the post.

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Jessie’s lengthy message follows a cryptic post she shared on the social media platform on Friday, when she wrote, “Delayed emotions are…. well…. Not so fun.” The message was eerily juxtaposed upon an all-black background with the text being shrunk to a very small font.

Reports of Jessie and Tatum’s split surfaced in mid-December when a source revealed to Us Weekly that “Channing Tatum and Jessie J broke up about a month ago,” adding, “They are still really close and still good friends.”

This article discusses suicide. If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

Westlake Legal Group channing-jessie-reuters-getty Jessie J shares emotional message following Channing Tatum split: 'You are never alone' fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc b25d0325-cec5-5826-825c-8b5745085ab6 article Andy Sahadeo   Westlake Legal Group channing-jessie-reuters-getty Jessie J shares emotional message following Channing Tatum split: 'You are never alone' fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc b25d0325-cec5-5826-825c-8b5745085ab6 article Andy Sahadeo

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Suspect in Monsey Stabbings Did Searches for ‘Hitler,’ Charges Say

Federal prosecutors on Monday filed hate crimes charges against the man accused of bursting into a Hasidic rabbi’s home and stabbing five Jewish people at a Hanukkah celebration.

The charges came as the police stepped up patrols in Jewish neighborhoods and stationed officers in front of synagogues and yeshivas across New York and New Jersey.

In the criminal complaint, the authorities revealed evidence that could suggest the motivations of Grafton Thomas, who they say went on a bloody rampage on Saturday at the house in Monsey, N.Y., a hamlet northwest of New York City with a large community of ultra-Orthodox Jews.

Officials said they had found handwritten journals at Mr. Thomas’s home in which he expressed anti-Semitic views, including references to Adolf Hitler and “Nazi culture,” and drawings of a Star of David and a swastika, according to the complaint.

The complaint, signed by an F.B.I. special agent, Julie S. Brown, also said that officials had searched Mr. Thomas’s phone, which showed that he had looked online for the phrase “Why did Hitler hate the Jews” four times in the last month.

He also searched for “German Jewish Temples near me,” and “Zionist Temples” in Elizabeth, N.J., and in Staten Island in recent weeks, the complaint said.

Read the Complaint: United States v. Grafton E. Thomas

Mr. Thomas is charged in the attack at a rabbi’s house in Monsey, N.Y.

Westlake Legal Group thumbnail Suspect in Monsey Stabbings Did Searches for ‘Hitler,’ Charges Say Synagogues Monsey (NY) Jews and Judaism Hasidism Hanukkah discrimination Crime and Criminals Brooklyn (NYC) Assaults anti-semitism   6 pages, 0.28 MB

On Saturday, the complaint said, Mr. Thomas’s phone browser was used to call up an article titled “New York City Increases Police Presence in Jewish Neighborhoods After Possible Anti-Semitic Attacks. Here’s What to Know.”

The complaint was filed in Federal District Court in White Plains, N.Y., by the United States attorney’s office for the Southern District of New York. Mr. Thomas was expected to appear in court on Monday afternoon.

Mr. Thomas’s family said on Sunday that he had a long history of mental illness, including schizophrenia.

The assault in Monsey further rattled the Jewish community in the New York region, which was already reeling from a series of anti-Semitic incidents in New York City last week and a mass shooting in Jersey City, N.J., that targeted a kosher supermarket and left three people, including two Hasidic Jews, dead earlier in the month.

“We will keep the Jewish community safe, and we have a zero tolerance when it comes to hate crimes in New York City,” New York City’s police commissioner, Dermot F. Shea, said on Monday in an interview on “CBS This Morning.”

In an interview on Monday morning on NPR, the public radio network, Mayor Bill de Blasio said of the attacks: “We consider this a crisis. Really, there is a growing anti-Semitism problem in this whole country. It has taken a more and more violent form.”

Mr. de Blasio added that he had directed city schools to undertake an “intensified curriculum” focused on anti-Semitism when classes resume on Thursday. The goal, he said during the interview, was to teach young people that attacks motivated out of hate or ignorance bred only more violence.

In Rockland County, where the Saturday attack took place, the county executive, Ed Day, announced on Monday that a private security firm would work with the police to provide armed guards to synagogues in Monsey.

“We cannot stand around and do nothing,” Mr. Day said. “We are taking proactive action in order to address the concerns, the fears that are out there.”

Rockland County has more than 300,000 people, and 31 percent of the population is Jewish, according to the state. It is believed to have one of the largest populations of ultra-Orthodox Jews outside of Israel.

In recent years, the area’s ultra-Orthodox population has grown as Hasidic families from the city, priced out of their neighborhoods, have relocated there. Despite the distance, the communities in both the city and suburbs retain close ties.

The barrage of incidents left the community feeling particularly under siege as it observed Hanukkah, a celebration of a time long ago when Jews had defied external aggressors to openly practice their faith.

“People are afraid to send their kids out to school,” said Benny Polatseck, 30, an Orthodox Jewish community activist who lives in Monsey. “There is real angst.”

Four Orthodox Jewish elected officials, in a letter sent to Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo on Sunday, went further.

“It is no longer safe to be identifiably Orthodox in the State of New York,” they wrote. “We cannot shop, walk down the street, send our children to school, or even worship in peace.”

The five victims of the attack at the home of the rabbi, Chaim Rottenberg, were taken to the hospital. Four of them were treated there and released. As of Sunday afternoon, one remained there with a skull fracture, officials said.

Mr. Thomas, 38, was later arrested in Harlem, about 30 miles from Monsey, with blood on his clothes, officials said. According to the federal complaint, officers found both a machete and a bloody knife in the car.

On Sunday, Mr. Thomas pleaded not guilty to five counts of attempted murder and one count of first-degree burglary.

A statement issued on Sunday night by a lawyer, Michael Sussman, in the name of the family said Mr. Thomas “had a long history of mental illness and hospitalizations” and “no known history of anti-Semitism.”

The federal complaint did not provide dates of Mr. Thomas’s journal entries, but it said he had searched online for pages expressing anti-Semitic sentiments as early as Nov. 9.

According to the complaint, one statement in his journals suggested that he had been influenced by the Black Hebrew Israelite movement, a religious group to which officials also linked one of the attackers in the Jersey City shooting.

While the movement is not known for promoting violence, some of its offshoots have been described as hate groups by the Southern Poverty Law Center and the Anti-Defamation League, which track extremist organizations.

Officials have not linked the Monsey stabbing and the Jersey City shooting, and they have not established whether Mr. Thomas was part of the Black Hebrew Israelite movement.

On Sunday, Mr. Cuomo said he had ordered the State Police’s hate crimes force to investigate the rampage.

The governor also called the Monsey stabbings an “act of domestic terrorism,” the phrase that officials eventually used to describe the Jersey City shooting.

In their letter to Mr. Cuomo, the four Orthodox Jewish elected officials urged him to declare a state of emergency. They asked him to deploy the New York National Guard to protect Jewish enclaves across the state and to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate anti-Semitic violence.

As of Sunday, New York City had seen a 23 percent rise in anti-Semitic hate crimes so far this year, according to police data.

Since the attack in Jersey City on Dec. 10, the New York Police Department had been deploying more officers to protect synagogues, Mr. Shea, the police commissioner, said. Over the weekend, it stepped up patrols in three Brooklyn neighborhoods after what officials called an “alarming” increase in incidents last week.

After the Monsey attack, the city’s Police Department said it was adding four to six officers per shift, who will focus on houses of worship and community events.

The department is also installing additional security cameras in the three Brooklyn communities and installing six more light towers in one of them.

Mr. Cuomo also ordered the State Police to increase patrols in Orthodox Jewish neighborhoods across the state.

“We should be celebrating this week,” Rabbi Joseph Potasnik, the executive vice president of the New York Board of Rabbis, said on Sunday. “Celebrating life. Not commemorating the loss of life and the attack on life.”

Rebecca Liebson and Ali Watkins contributed reporting.

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