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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 280)

Boy, 2, can’t believe mom would leave for work without kissing him goodbye, viral video shows

We bet she won’t be doing that again.

A mom in Jacksonville, Fla., recently shared footage of her 2-year-old son complaining about how she rushed off to work without giving him a kiss goodbye — and the adorable video is going viral.

HOTEL REUNITES GIRL, 10, WITH STUFFED ANIMAL SHE LEFT BEHIND ON VACATION

“After Alexander’s soccer practice I was in such a hurry to get back to work and my baby Alex was very upset he didn’t get the proper goodbye,” Diana Simos wrote on Facebook earlier this month. “He had a lot to say and my husband got it all on video,” she added.

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In footage shot by Diana’s husband Christos, their son Alexander can be seen in disbelief, trying to tell Christos about Diana’s hasty departure.

“She didn’t give you a kiss?” Christos helpfully translates, seeing as Alexander is only communicating in short phrases and kissing noises.

“And she just went to work?” Christos asks his little boy. “What kind of mama does that?!”

Alexander seemed upset, too, that his mom didn’t kiss his dad goodbye, or even his newborn sister.

“Aww man!” he says, echoing his dad’s reaction.

Westlake Legal Group KidKissDianaSimos Boy, 2, can't believe mom would leave for work without kissing him goodbye, viral video shows Michael Bartiromo fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article a3abac0e-bef2-5a81-b380-7605b6f307ff

(Diana Simos)

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Diana said the video had her laughing out loud — and it apparently struck a chord on Facebook, too. The video, which was reposted by WJAX in Jacksonville, has been liked more than 45,000 times since being posted on Monday.

“Mommy u are in big trouble when you get home,” one Facebook user joked. “This is sooo sooo precious.”

“That was adorable and I hope momma doesn’t forget to kiss those babies anymore,” another added.

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For the record, Diana said on Facebook that the video broke her heart too, but she made sure to give Alexander his kisses when she got home.

“#IMadeItUpToHimThough,” she hashtagged her post.

Westlake Legal Group KidKissDianaSimos Boy, 2, can't believe mom would leave for work without kissing him goodbye, viral video shows Michael Bartiromo fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article a3abac0e-bef2-5a81-b380-7605b6f307ff   Westlake Legal Group KidKissDianaSimos Boy, 2, can't believe mom would leave for work without kissing him goodbye, viral video shows Michael Bartiromo fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article a3abac0e-bef2-5a81-b380-7605b6f307ff

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The U.S. Turned Syria’s North Into a Tinderbox. Then Trump Lit a Match.

Westlake Legal Group 15int-syria1-facebookJumbo The U.S. Turned Syria’s North Into a Tinderbox. Then Trump Lit a Match. United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Syria Russia Kurds Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) Assad, Bashar al-

To understand why President Trump’s withdrawal from Syria has unleashed such violence, it helps to see this moment as the culmination of a problem that has been building since the conflict began.

In the war’s first days, northern Syria’s large Kurdish population effectively seceded and, later, came to control the area.

The war’s many actors, Kurds included, knew this was, in the long term, not sustainable.

The Kurds were too weak to hold out forever. But they were too strong, too fearful of outside dominance and, over the course of the war, had built too many institutions of self-rule to be simply folded back into the Syrian state.

At the same time, the outside world saw Kurdish autonomy as essential to running out the Islamic State, but knew it was, long-term, a barrier to ending the war. Syria’s government would never accept losing the north’s oil and agricultural wealth. Turkey’s government, just across the border, saw permanent Kurdish autonomy as an unacceptable threat.

This became the northern Syria problem: How to reconcile these contradictions and create a sustainable, broadly acceptable equilibrium in northern Syria. Only then could the world hope to make the Islamic State’s defeat permanent and to end an eight-year war that has killed hundreds of thousands and displaced millions.

But the northern Syrian problem never got resolved.

Instead, the United States kept what was known to be an unsustainable status quo “frozen in place,” said Frances Z. Brown, who served as a director on the National Security Council under President Barack Obama and Mr. Trump.

That status quo served useful ends for Washington, first to drive out the Islamic State and later, under Mr. Trump, as a potential bargaining chip with the Syrian government and its allies.

American officials knew that the northern Syria problem would have be resolved, Ms. Brown said, and that only Washington had the leverage and relationships to do it. But other priorities took precedence.

The contradictions widened. Northern Syria became a tinderbox. An American troop presence kept it from exploding — until last week, when Mr. Trump suddenly recalled those troops and, in what amounted to tossing a match, invited Turkey to invade.

Now, years of unresolved tensions are exploding as Turkish troops, Syrian government troops and their Russian allies, and Kurdish forces all rush to impose a new equilibrium.

The northern Syria problem has gone from a mostly political issue to an armed struggle, opening a violent new chapter in a war that only a week ago had seemed to be winding down.

Countries often fracture during a civil war. Rebels seize territory. Minorities declare independence. The pieces seem like they will never fit back together until, after years or decades of peacekeeping missions and power-sharing deals, they do.

Syria’s disintegration was unusual in degree, partly because of the government’s brutality and the crisscrossing interventions that helped pull the country apart, but not in kind.

Still, northern Syria fractured in ways that made it particularly complicated to reassemble.

As war broke out, long-oppressed Kurds rose up as much out of self-defense as to carve out a degree of autonomy.

Syria’s government, focused on other fights, largely let them be.

The two sides, nominally opposed, needed each other. Syrian leaders in Damascus, the capital, would rather that Kurds held territory that might otherwise be taken by rebels that sought the government’s downfall. And the Kurds, not quite organized enough to fully control the north, needed Damascus to continue funding local government salaries and institutions.

That cold peace became far less stable with the involvement of the United States and Turkey.

For Turkey, every inch of Kurdish expansion across Syria and every day that the Kurds deepened their autonomy posed an ever-growing threat.

But as Turkey opposed the new order in northern Syria, the United States moved to deepen it. Adopting Syria’s Kurds as its ground force against the Islamic State, Washington gave them the financial, diplomatic and military cover to retake extremist-held territory.

Complicating matters further, the United States and Turkey are NATO allies with a litany of shared issues. This forced each country to accommodate the other’s concerns even as their positions in northern Syria came into greater conflict.

Northern Syria became split along two political axes: first Kurdish-Syrian, and now American-Turkish.

The first of those was tenuous on its own, said Ms. Brown, who is now an analyst at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. But it was the second that created “an unsustainable equilibrium.”

Northern Syria became ground zero for contradictions in Mr. Obama’s approach to Syria and, more recently, Mr. Trump’s, said Aaron Stein, director of the Foreign Policy Research Institute.

Mr. Obama had demanded that Syria’s leader, Bashar al-Assad, step down. But, in practice, he took steps to weaken but not remove Mr. Assad. And after the rise of the Islamic State, Mr. Obama prioritized defeating the extremist group.

Backing Syria’s Kurds, Mr. Obama became the patron of breakaway Syrian territory — and the owner of the northern Syria problem.

But the contradiction in his policy prevented Washington from resolving it.

The Kurds and Damascus could not reconcile without Washington’s acquiescence, which Mr. Obama’s stated opposition to Mr. Assad prevented him from granting. At the same time, Mr. Obama’s emphasis on defeating the Islamic State required him to allow the Kurds and Damascus to maintain their cold peace.

This opened another contradiction: The United States pledged to accommodate both the political aspirations of the Syrian Kurds and Turkey’s vehement opposition to Kurdish autonomy.

So the United States froze the cold peace in place, with plans to resolve the crosscutting disagreements after the Islamic State had been fully defeated and the north stabilized.

Mr. Trump came into office dropping demands for regime change in Syria, seemingly “resolving the tension in American policy,” Mr. Stein said.

“It was in the execution that we got back into tension with ourselves,” he said.

As with other foreign policy initiatives, Mr. Trump and members of his senior staff seemed to pursue diverging agendas.

While the president promised withdrawal, Pentagon and State Department officials reassured Kurdish groups with promises to stay. Last year, the State Department, bowing to Turkish objections, quietly blocked a Kurdish effort to begin reconciliation talks with Damascus.

James F. Jeffrey, the Trump administration’s special envoy for Syria, has described America’s presence as a bargaining chip to secure not just the Islamic State’s defeat but also political change in Syria and a rollback of Iranian influence.

“It was, ‘We’re going to use a permanent occupation in the northeast to force Bashar al-Assad to cut his own head off,’” Mr. Stein said, describing American demands for Mr. Assad to hold elections that would likely see him lose power.

These “maximalist goals,” Mr. Stein said, created the conditions for open-ended occupation, locking the status quo in place.

And they opened a new set of contradictions: The United States was now promising the Kurds a secure future while signaling it might trade the Kurdish territory away for broader goals.

But Mr. Trump’s opposition to an open-ended commitment in Syria and his habit of lashing out when he feels boxed in by his staff made the status quo unlikely to hold.

Beyond that, the approach would work only as long as Turkey tolerated an American-Kurdish ministate on its border — something Turkey insisted it could not allow.

“It was always built on a house of cards,” Mr. Stein said. “Everything was in tension.”

Sure enough, Mr. Trump announced an American departure from Syria late last year, prompting staff resignations that led Mr. Trump to reverse his plan. But the northern Syria problem remained unresolved, waiting to burst.

“Ten months later, the United States is still the only pole holding up the tent in northern Syria,” Aron Lund, an analyst at the Century Foundation, wrote in a policy brief last week. “And Trump seems to be saying that time is up.”

Mr. Trump’s sudden departure has collapsed northern Syria’s already fragile equilibrium. The result is a political and security vacuum that the major forces — Turkish, Syrian government and Syrian Kurd — are scrambling to fill.

In a cycle familiar to such conflicts, all sides feel compelled to shape the new order to their advantage before others can do so first.

That creates an incentive for violence and, because political power in Syria derives from demographics, for atrocities of the sort that have punctuated the war’s worst moments.

The northern Syria problem, far from resolved by the American departure, is entering a new chapter that could be far bloodier, more chaotic and more destabilizing.

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CNN whistleblower: ‘It very quickly descended into a nightmare’

Westlake Legal Group CNN-Atlanta-2 CNN whistleblower: 'It very quickly descended into a nightmare' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 84d41905-d5f4-52c8-a0a2-a62376713280

Sean Hannity interviewed CNN “whistleblower” Cary Poarch Monday night and spoke to him about how his “dream job” at the cable news channel developed into a “nightmare.”

“I came there thinking this was my dream job and it very quickly descended into a nightmare that gave me trouble sleeping every night because it contradicted what I originally thought,” Poarch said.

FOX NEWS CRUSHES MSNBC, CNN TO WIN 71ST STRAIGHT QUARTER AS ‘HANNITY’ FINISHES ATOP CABLE NEWS

Undercover recordings made by Poarch capture CNN employees casually confirming the network’s anti-Trump bias and show company president Jeff Zucker telling top news executives to focus solely on impeachment even at the expense of other important news, according to the conservative activist group that posted the bombshell footage online.

Project Veritas, whose founder, James O’Keefe, describes himself as a “guerrilla journalist” — published the first segment Monday of what is billed as a multi-part series featuring Poarch, who claims he was a satellite uplink technician at CNN’s Washington Bureau.

Poarch said he was disturbed by the network’s dishonesty.

“From the beginning, like, I’m not trying to hurt anybody or take a network down. I just want the biases to be upfront,” Poarch said.

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The former CNN employee also said he was close to quitting before he met O’Keefe.

“I was honestly shocked. I was about to quit at that time… about two years into my employment I had honestly had enough,” Poarch said.

Fox News’ Brian Flood contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group CNN-Atlanta-2 CNN whistleblower: 'It very quickly descended into a nightmare' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 84d41905-d5f4-52c8-a0a2-a62376713280   Westlake Legal Group CNN-Atlanta-2 CNN whistleblower: 'It very quickly descended into a nightmare' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 84d41905-d5f4-52c8-a0a2-a62376713280

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Giuliani says he won’t comply with a congressional subpoena

Westlake Legal Group O69B-KthUOKKN8lOIaRjrSUyHqERmEU1DzVlC3MLvCQ Giuliani says he won't comply with a congressional subpoena r/politics

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Why Evangelical Christian Leaders Care So Deeply About Trump Abandoning The Kurds

White evangelical Christians have long been some of President Donald Trump’s most ardent supporters. But the president’s recent decision to effectively abandon Kurdish fighters, considered key allies in the fight against the so-called Islamic State, appears to have caused a fracturing in this powerful religious group.

The president’s decision to withdraw roughly 1,000 U.S. troops in northern Syria has already contributed to chaos in the region, as hundreds of Islamic State families and supporters escaped a detention camp amid fighting between the Kurds and rapidly advancing Turkish-backed forces. Turkey’s offensive has displaced at least 130,000 people, the United Nations reported Sunday. 

Trump imposed economic sanctions against Turkey on Monday as the situation deteriorated. Trump says his decision to pull the troops was fueled by his desire to fulfill a campaign promise to stop America’s “endless wars” in the Middle East and elsewhere. 

But the president’s actions have struck a nerve among his loyal evangelical fans. Some leaders have broken rank to warn that Turkey’s invasion threatens vulnerable communities of Christians and other religious minorities in the region. Experts say these leaders’ support for the Kurds has a lot to do with how this religious group views itself ― as a persecuted minority standing up for American values. Evangelical reactions to the crisis are also indicative of this group’s deep-seated fears about Muslims.

The fact that even leaders who are usually steadfast allies to the president are speaking out publicly now is an indication of how crucial the issue is for this group. 

Franklin Graham, son of the famous late evangelist Billy Graham, encouraged his substantial Twitter following last week to “pray w/me” that Trump would reconsider the move, because “thousands of lives hang in the balance.” On Monday, he said that his humanitarian organization Samaritan’s Purse is responding to the crisis unfolding in northern Syria. 

The televangelist Pat Robertson, founder of the Christian Broadcasting Network, went so far as to warn that Trump was “in danger of losing the mandate of heaven.” CBN has been covering the crisis extensively on its news website, including with commentary alleging that “Kurds are the evangelicals of the Muslim World.”

As criticism from evangelical leaders became more vocal, Trump attempted to defend his moves during a speech at the Values Voters Summit, a conservative Christian political conference, on Saturday. The president announced that he’s releasing $50 million in emergency assistance to Syrian human rights groups and other organizations protecting religious and ethnic minorities. 

Trump also reiterated his reasoning for pulling U.S. troops out of Turkey’s path. 

“I don’t think our soldiers should be there for the next 50 years guarding a border between Turkey and Syria when we can’t guard our own borders at home,” he said. “So let’s see what happens. And it’s a long ways away. We killed ISIS. We defeated — we did our job. We have to go home. We did our job.”

Westlake Legal Group 5da5f8d5210000510fad0373 Why Evangelical Christian Leaders Care So Deeply About Trump Abandoning The Kurds

ERIC BARADAT via Getty Images U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Values Voter Summit on Oct. 12, 2019, in Washington, D.C.

It’s unclear whether Trump’s words and actions will smooth over conservative evangelical leaders’ concerns. Family Research Council President Tony Perkins, who spoke to the Christian Post at the Values Voter Summit on Saturday, said that while most conservative evangelical voters aren’t bothered by the impeachment proceedings against Trump, they are “more concerned about what’s unfolding right now in Syria.”  

“I think that’s the first time they’ve actually seen any space between them and this president,” said Perkins, who in 2018 told Politico that evangelicals were willing to give Trump a “mulligan” over his questionable personal behavior.

There are several possible reasons why it is this issue ― compared to Trump’s history of infidelity, lies and racist rhetoric ― that has disgruntled these leaders enough that they are compelled to speak out. 

Evangelicals see the Middle East as a unique mission field because it has a low and declining population of Christians. And as the birthplace of Christianity, they believe it will continue to play a special role in God’s plan for the world, according to Daniel K. Williams, a historian at the University of West Georgia who has studied the Christian right. 

The group’s sympathy for the Kurds in particular can be traced to its concerns about religious persecution, both in America and around the world. Many conservative white evangelicals see themselves as a beleaguered minority in imminent danger of persecution in the United States, Williams said. In fact, studies suggest that white evangelicals believe they face more discrimination in the U.S. than Muslims do. 

As a result, white evangelicals see themselves as spiritual brothers and sisters of persecuted Christians around the world. It’s not uncommon for members of this religious group to regularly hear Sunday morning church prayers for persecuted Christians around the world, Williams said.

Westlake Legal Group 5da5f939200000ba0c5032f7 Why Evangelical Christian Leaders Care So Deeply About Trump Abandoning The Kurds

Yuri Gripas / Reuters U.S. President Donald Trump prays between Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, and Pastor Andrew Brunson (right) at the Family Research Council’s annual gala in Washington, U.S., Oct. 12, 2019.

White evangelicals’ sense of kinship with persecuted people of faith around the world is heightened when the religious group in question is facing persecution from Muslims. In a 2017 Pew Research Center poll, 75% of white evangelicals said they were “very concerned” about extremism in the name of Islam around the world these days ― significantly more than any other religious group surveyed.

Even though most Kurds are Muslims, the ethnic group includes a subset of Christians and other religious groups. Today, conservative and politically engaged evangelicals remember the critical role America’s Kurdish allies have played in the region since 2003, including helping in the fight against the Islamic State, according to Daniel Hummel, a historian of U.S. religion and diplomacy at a Christian study center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

“Insofar as many evangelicals see the major confrontation of this age as American power vs. Islamic radicalism, the Kurds are a small but valiant ally,” Hummel said. 

In addition, Trump’s “America First” foreign policy is in some ways an uneasy fit with how evangelicals have historically approached foreign policy. White evangelicals were strong supporters of the Korean War and the Vietnam War. They view the War on Terror in the same way as they viewed the Cold War, Williams said, as a “righteous struggle against an anti-Christian force.”

“President Trump’s decision to abandon the Kurds and pull back from military efforts in Syria is an affront to their sense of duty to Christian allies in the Middle East and their commitment to the fight against ‘radical Islamic terror,’” Williams said.

Evangelical radio host Erick Erickson suggested Sunday that Trump’s decision to pull troops from northern Syria would have an impact on the GOP during the 2020 election season. 

But Hummel doesn’t think the issue is enough of a factor for evangelicals in the pews to swing their vote.

“I think Trump would need to show a pattern of disregarding foreign policy issues of concern to evangelicals for serious erosion to occur,” he said. “This is one data point, but it is after a slew of Trump decisions that evangelicals supported.”

Williams pointed out that Graham, who very rarely speaks up against the president’s policies, voiced concerns in 2018 about the administration’s “zero tolerance” policy that separated migrant children from their parents at the border. But this and other instances of evangelical leaders criticizing Trump didn’t significantly erode white evangelicals’ support for the president, he said.

He believes white evangelicals’ support for Trump would drop if they see Republican leaders they respect breaking with the president and if they are assured that impeachment won’t damage the conservative Christian cause. 

″To the extent that Trump’s decision to pull out of Syria contributes to the loss of Republican congressional support for the president and the loss of evangelical leaders’ support for the administration as well, it may make it easier for white evangelical voters to change their views of the president and to be open to the possibility of impeachment. We’re not quite there yet,” he said. ”A solid majority of white evangelical voters are still in Trump’s camp, and so far, I haven’t seen evidence to indicate that this single decision on Trump’s part will be enough to change this.”

“But it certainly doesn’t help Trump, and as far as white evangelical voters are concerned, it seems to have been an unnecessary affront to a group that he cannot afford to lose,” he added.

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Kim Kardashian had a plan in case she missed Psalm’s birth while at the Met Gala: ‘I wish I had more time’

Westlake Legal Group Kim-Kardashian-Tonight-Show Kim Kardashian had a plan in case she missed Psalm’s birth while at the Met Gala: 'I wish I had more time' fox-news/person/kanye-west fox-news/entertainment/kardashians fox-news/entertainment/events/babies fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article Andy Sahadeo 4fd9bc9b-aa1a-5df0-b81e-0cbbd9eeb668

Kim Kardashian West faced quite a dilemma with the birth of baby number four.

On Sunday’s “Keeping Up with the Kardashians,” the 38-year-old reality star faced the converging deadlines of the Met Gala and the birth of her child, Psalm West, via surrogate. Kim spent eight months preparing for the gala with an intricately designed dress — which led to Kim’s inability to use the restroom for the entirety of the event.

KIM KARDASHIAN TO CHANGE NAME OF CONTROVERSIAL ‘KIMONO’ LINE AFTER EXTREME BACKLASH

“This time right now is so crazy hectic for me,” Kim said. “Studying law and the baby coming soon and I have the Met Ball this week. It’s all really overwhelming, I wish I had more time.”

Kardashian even devised a plan if the baby were to be born during the Met Gala. “I just have to get to the Met and back before the baby comes. [The surrogate] is due in eight days, but I’m going to stay committed to the Met.

“I mean, it has taken eight months to get our Met look perfect,” Kim added, “and I committed to it and I can’t miss this.”

KIM KARDASHIAN SAYS SHE HAD ‘INNOCENT INTENTIONS’ WITH CONTROVERSIAL SHAPEWEAR NAME

At the Met Gala, Kardashian donned a silicone Mugler dress that required extra preparation in case of any bodily mishaps. Kardashian sported a custom waist-cinching corset and knee-length shapewear under the dress, which only added to the stress the outfit put on her body. Knowing that there was no escape from outfit the entire night, Kardashian spoke about the risk involved.

“If it’s an emergency, I think I’d pee my pants and then have my sister wipe my leg up,” Kardashian stated.

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While Kim and Kanye West hit the Met Gala, her contingency plan included having sister Khloe appear at the birth in her place.

“My attorney has my sister’s number,” Kim said. “Because I’m gonna be with two of my sisters and my mom and my husband. Khloe is hoping that this will happen while I’m gone because she wants the baby.”

Everything worked out as planned, as Psalm West was born on May 9, six days after the Met Gala.

Westlake Legal Group Kim-Kardashian-Tonight-Show Kim Kardashian had a plan in case she missed Psalm’s birth while at the Met Gala: 'I wish I had more time' fox-news/person/kanye-west fox-news/entertainment/kardashians fox-news/entertainment/events/babies fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article Andy Sahadeo 4fd9bc9b-aa1a-5df0-b81e-0cbbd9eeb668   Westlake Legal Group Kim-Kardashian-Tonight-Show Kim Kardashian had a plan in case she missed Psalm’s birth while at the Met Gala: 'I wish I had more time' fox-news/person/kanye-west fox-news/entertainment/kardashians fox-news/entertainment/events/babies fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article Andy Sahadeo 4fd9bc9b-aa1a-5df0-b81e-0cbbd9eeb668

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Tariffs Won’t Stop Turkey’s Invasion of Syria, Analysts Warn

Westlake Legal Group 15turkeyecon-sub-facebookJumbo Tariffs Won’t Stop Turkey’s Invasion of Syria, Analysts Warn Volkswagen AG Turkey Trump, Donald J Steel and Iron International Trade and World Market Economic Conditions and Trends Customs (Tariff)

FRANKFURT — Doubling tariffs on Turkish steel imports, as President Trump said he would do Monday, might make investors nervous. But it would take a much broader attack on the economy of Turkey to restrain its tanks from moving deeper into Syria, analysts say.

The reason is simple: Tariffs approved last year by White House officials have already gutted Turkey’s exports to the United States. They can hardly go any lower.

Mr. Trump’s threat to cut off talks on what he called a $100 billion trade deal with Turkey isn’t expected to have much of an effect, either. The figure was, to put it mildly, aspirational. Current two-way trade between Turkey and the United States is only about $21 billion.

Because neither American nor Turkish officials had detailed how they would more than quadruple trade, “analysts did not expect any immediate favorable impact on the Turkish economy,” said Selva Demiralp, economics professor at Koc University in Istanbul. “Thus, the withdrawal of this deal should not have much of an impact, either.”

The measures announced by the president are unlikely to destroy the Turkish economy, as he has warned, but plenty of other existing threats could. Economists have long regarded Turkey as a bubble waiting to burst because of government mismanagement, an inflated building boom and a shaky currency. Turkey’s military incursion into Kurdish-controlled northern Syria has unsettled investors who already had concerns about the region’s stability.

Mr. Trump’s tariff threat does give investors yet another reason to be apprehensive.

“The sanctions are ineffective, and they know they are ineffective,” said Sebastien Galy, senior macro strategist at Nordea Asset Management in Luxembourg. But he added: “Tariffs frighten both businesses and consumers. They save more and invest less because they are afraid of the future. The impact on expectations can be quite considerable.”

If the president really wanted to hurt Mr. Erdogan, Mr. Galy said, he would take steps to make it difficult for Turkish commercial banks and the central bank to conduct transactions in dollars.

The White House also said Monday that it would impose sanctions on several top officials in Ankara, including the defense and energy ministers and their ministries, essentially severing them from the global financial system. Mr. Trump’s executive order allows the sanctions to be expanded to other officials or government entities.

But comprehensive financial sanctions against the Turkish government would be seen as extremely hostile considering Turkey is still nominally a NATO ally.

Turmoil in Turkey has already caused the German carmaker Volkswagen to reconsider a big investment there. The company said Tuesday that it had postponed plans to build a $1.7 billion factory in the western part of the country that would employ 4,000 people and produce 300,000 Volkswagen and Skoda vehicles a year.

“We are monitoring the current situation with great concern,” Volkswagen said in a statement, without elaborating.

A nightmare for the Turkish government, led by Recep Tayyip Erdogan, would be a plunge in the value of the lira. That would cause the prices of imported goods to spike, fuel inflation inside Turkey and undermine popular support for Mr. Erdogan.

On Tuesday, the lira slipped about 0.6 percent versus the dollar, a relatively small amount for an often volatile currency. Analysts assume that the Turkish central bank and state-controlled commercial banks are using their dollar reserves to buy liras in the market and prevent a steeper decline.

Eventually, though, the central bank will run out of dollars. The longer Turkey continues fighting in Syria, the greater the stress on the Turkish currency, analysts say.

“History suggests that geopolitical tensions, especially involving the U.S., are not kind to the lira,” analysts at Oxford Economics said in a note to clients on Tuesday.

The Turkish steel industry is feeling plenty of pain without any help from the United States. Production is down 10 percent this year, said Ugur Dalbeler, a member of the board of the Turkish Steel Exporters Association and chief executive of Colakoglu Metalurji, a steel producer based in Istanbul.

“It is tough,” Mr. Dalbeler said by phone from Mexico, where he was attending an industry gathering.

Turkish steel makers have been slammed from numerous directions. Customers in the Middle East have suffered from tensions in the region. Europe has restricted steel imports in response to a glut in global supply. Demand from Japan, another important customer, has slumped. United States tariffs are, by comparison, a small problem.

Mr. Dalbeler expressed anger that the tariffs, originally justified on national security grounds, were being used to put pressure on Turkey.

“Doubling tariffs again proves that the president is not using his authority for national security,” he said. “He’s using it against Turkey politically.”

The United States imposed tariffs of 50 percent on Turkish steel last year amid a dispute over a detained American pastor. The Trump administration cut the tariffs to 25 percent in May, to the same level as tariffs imposed on most other foreign producers. But the damage was already done.

From January through August, imports of Turkish steel by the United States plunged 80 percent to 136,000 tons, “which is nothing, basically, on a global scale,” said Alex Griffiths, an analyst at Wood Mackenzie, a research firm.

“Exports were already to the level where I wouldn’t consider the United States to be a major export destination,” Mr. Griffiths said.

Mr. Trump mentioned the $100 billion trade deal with Turkey during a news conference with Mr. Erdogan in Japan in June. After Mr. Erdogan said the goal was to expand trade to $75 billion a year, Mr. Trump said that was too low.

“I think the $75 billion is small,” he said, according to an official transcript. “I think it’s going to be well over $100 billion soon.”

In September, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross acknowledged during a visit to Ankara that “$100 billion sounds like a lot.” But he added that it would be less than 2 percent of the United States’ total trade.

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Tariffs Won’t Stop Turkey’s Invasion of Syria, Analysts Warn

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FRANKFURT — Doubling tariffs on Turkish steel imports, as President Trump said he would do Monday, might make investors nervous. But it would take a much broader attack on the economy of Turkey to restrain its tanks from moving deeper into Syria, analysts say.

The reason is simple: Tariffs approved last year by White House officials have already gutted Turkey’s exports to the United States. They can hardly go any lower.

Mr. Trump’s threat to cut off talks on what he called a $100 billion trade deal with Turkey isn’t expected to have much of an effect, either. The figure was, to put it mildly, aspirational. Current two-way trade between Turkey and the United States is only about $21 billion.

Because neither American nor Turkish officials had detailed how they would more than quadruple trade, “analysts did not expect any immediate favorable impact on the Turkish economy,” said Selva Demiralp, economics professor at Koc University in Istanbul. “Thus, the withdrawal of this deal should not have much of an impact, either.”

The measures announced by the president are unlikely to destroy the Turkish economy, as he has warned, but plenty of other existing threats could. Economists have long regarded Turkey as a bubble waiting to burst because of government mismanagement, an inflated building boom and a shaky currency. Turkey’s military incursion into Kurdish-controlled northern Syria has unsettled investors who already had concerns about the region’s stability.

Mr. Trump’s tariff threat does give investors yet another reason to be apprehensive.

“The sanctions are ineffective, and they know they are ineffective,” said Sebastien Galy, senior macro strategist at Nordea Asset Management in Luxembourg. But he added: “Tariffs frighten both businesses and consumers. They save more and invest less because they are afraid of the future. The impact on expectations can be quite considerable.”

If the president really wanted to hurt Mr. Erdogan, Mr. Galy said, he would take steps to make it difficult for Turkish commercial banks and the central bank to conduct transactions in dollars.

The White House also said Monday that it would impose sanctions on several top officials in Ankara, including the defense and energy ministers and their ministries, essentially severing them from the global financial system. Mr. Trump’s executive order allows the sanctions to be expanded to other officials or government entities.

But comprehensive financial sanctions against the Turkish government would be seen as extremely hostile considering Turkey is still nominally a NATO ally.

Turmoil in Turkey has already caused the German carmaker Volkswagen to reconsider a big investment there. The company said Tuesday that it had postponed plans to build a $1.7 billion factory in the western part of the country that would employ 4,000 people and produce 300,000 Volkswagen and Skoda vehicles a year.

“We are monitoring the current situation with great concern,” Volkswagen said in a statement, without elaborating.

A nightmare for the Turkish government, led by Recep Tayyip Erdogan, would be a plunge in the value of the lira. That would cause the prices of imported goods to spike, fuel inflation inside Turkey and undermine popular support for Mr. Erdogan.

On Tuesday, the lira slipped about 0.6 percent versus the dollar, a relatively small amount for an often volatile currency. Analysts assume that the Turkish central bank and state-controlled commercial banks are using their dollar reserves to buy liras in the market and prevent a steeper decline.

Eventually, though, the central bank will run out of dollars. The longer Turkey continues fighting in Syria, the greater the stress on the Turkish currency, analysts say.

“History suggests that geopolitical tensions, especially involving the U.S., are not kind to the lira,” analysts at Oxford Economics said in a note to clients on Tuesday.

The Turkish steel industry is feeling plenty of pain without any help from the United States. Production is down 10 percent this year, said Ugur Dalbeler, a member of the board of the Turkish Steel Exporters Association and chief executive of Colakoglu Metalurji, a steel producer based in Istanbul.

“It is tough,” Mr. Dalbeler said by phone from Mexico, where he was attending an industry gathering.

Turkish steel makers have been slammed from numerous directions. Customers in the Middle East have suffered from tensions in the region. Europe has restricted steel imports in response to a glut in global supply. Demand from Japan, another important customer, has slumped. United States tariffs are, by comparison, a small problem.

Mr. Dalbeler expressed anger that the tariffs, originally justified on national security grounds, were being used to put pressure on Turkey.

“Doubling tariffs again proves that the president is not using his authority for national security,” he said. “He’s using it against Turkey politically.”

The United States imposed tariffs of 50 percent on Turkish steel last year amid a dispute over a detained American pastor. The Trump administration cut the tariffs to 25 percent in May, to the same level as tariffs imposed on most other foreign producers. But the damage was already done.

From January through August, imports of Turkish steel by the United States plunged 80 percent to 136,000 tons, “which is nothing, basically, on a global scale,” said Alex Griffiths, an analyst at Wood Mackenzie, a research firm.

“Exports were already to the level where I wouldn’t consider the United States to be a major export destination,” Mr. Griffiths said.

Mr. Trump mentioned the $100 billion trade deal with Turkey during a news conference with Mr. Erdogan in Japan in June. After Mr. Erdogan said the goal was to expand trade to $75 billion a year, Mr. Trump said that was too low.

“I think the $75 billion is small,” he said, according to an official transcript. “I think it’s going to be well over $100 billion soon.”

In September, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross acknowledged during a visit to Ankara that “$100 billion sounds like a lot.” But he added that it would be less than 2 percent of the United States’ total trade.

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‘The Walking Dead’ actor Ryan Hurst reveals he was hospitalized while filming

Ryan Hurst plays Beta, a tougher-than-nails villain on “The Walking Dead,” but in real life, he’s definitely only human.

The actor, 42, has revealed he had to be rushed to the hospital while filming the zombie-apocalypse series in Georgia over the summer.

“Oh my God,” Ryan told Entertainment Weekly. “I landed in the hospital once this year from heat exhaustion.”

‘THE WALKING DEAD’ TEASES SPINOFF SERIES IN NEW TRAILER

“I’m in a leather trench coat and two layers under that in Georgia in the summer. It’s no joke, man,” he added, referencing his character, Beta’s, costume.

For nonviewers, Beta is the No. 2 in a group of survivors who wear masks made from zombie skin.

Hurst previously talked to EW about Beta’s mask and how he doesn’t ever remove it on the show. “I wish I could say that I hate it, but I love it! … Even though you’re in Atlanta in 110-degree weather, I love wearing that mask. I really, really do,” he said.

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Ryan Hurst as Beta on ‘The Walking Dead’ (Gene Page/AMC)

“The Walking Dead” is currently in its 10th season on AMC and was just renewed for its 11th season.

In related zombie news: At New York Comic Con earlier this month, it was revealed Lauren Cohan will be returning to the series.

FORMER GEORGIA FIREFIGHTER, ‘WALKING DEAD’ ACTOR DIES AT 48 AFTER CANCER BATTLE

Cohan, who played Maggie Greene on the show starting in season two, left as a full-time cast member to pursue other projects after the eighth season then made a few guest appearances in the ninth.

It’s not clear when or how Cohan’s character will return.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group hurst 'The Walking Dead' actor Ryan Hurst reveals he was hospitalized while filming Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/the-walking-dead fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 5c9a0d4f-7dba-5b75-ab41-fb33c9e44045   Westlake Legal Group hurst 'The Walking Dead' actor Ryan Hurst reveals he was hospitalized while filming Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/the-walking-dead fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 5c9a0d4f-7dba-5b75-ab41-fb33c9e44045

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How the U.S. Military Will Carry Out a Hasty, Risky Withdrawal From Syria

President Trump’s decision — made in the span of a week — to withdraw about 1,000 American troops from northern Syria caught the Pentagon, and the forces on the ground, off guard.

To carry out the “endless wars” since Sept. 11, 2001, which Mr. Trump has vowed to wrap up, the American military has perfected the ability to build complex logistics pipelines that can funnel everything from armored vehicles to satellite internet access to gym equipment directly to combat outposts throughout the Middle East.

Now, American troops are making a hasty withdrawal from Syria — under pressure from encroaching Turkish proxy forces, Russian aircraft and columns armored by the Syrian government. This means the Pentagon will have to disassemble combat bases and other infrastructure that were built to stay for a mission that was supposed to last, all while protecting the troops as they withdraw amid a chaotic battlefield.

Before the Turkish offensive, American troops, mostly Special Operations forces, operated in an archipelago of about a dozen bases and outposts across northeastern Syria, mostly living alongside their Syrian Kurdish partners. They were divided into two main headquarters, known by their cardinal directions, East and West.

The outposts are often a mixture of blast-resistant walls known as Hesco barriers, rudimentary structures and all-weather tents. The large air base in the city of Kobani is replete with a small tent city and some container housing units.

The western headquarters, known as Advanced Operational Base West, oversaw roughly half a dozen smaller outposts that covered cities like Manbij and Raqqa. Roughly 500 troops are dedicated to the area partially overseen by A.O.B. West.

The eastern headquarters, known as A.O.B. East, is closer to the Iraqi border and helps monitor some of the roughly 500 troops in that area around the Euphrates River Valley, with several smaller outposts around Deir ez-Zor and some near the Iraq-Syria border in towns like Bukamal and Hajin. The number of forces in the east, however, is fluid, as units frequently move from Syria into Iraq.

As the troops withdraw, they first will collapse inward by abandoning the outposts closest to the line of advancing foreign troops, in this case the Turkish military and its ill-disciplined Syrian militia proxies, along with Russian and Syrian regime forces. That strategy was made clear in a video posted online Tuesday, showing a Russian journalist standing in an abandoned American outpost west of Manbij and closest to Syrian government troops.

Col. Myles B. Caggins III, a spokesman for the American-led coalition based in Baghdad, confirmed in a Tuesday message on Twitter, “We are out of Manbij.”

The troops are likely to be repositioned to Iraq or potentially to Jordan. Some may return to the United States, officials said.

The western and eastern headquarters are likely to withdraw independently of each other. In the west, American forces will, according to American military officials, most likely leave through the Kobani airfield, known as the Kobani Landing Zone. That base, with its long dirt runaway, can support C-17 transport aircraft and has a large Air Force contingent of maintenance staff. In the east, those forces will most likely exit overland and into Iraq in convoys, with some traveling via helicopter airlift.

The risk of confrontation with the medley of different ground forces — both state-led and proxy — is undoubtedly higher than it was several weeks ago.

Convoys moving through contested territory and aircraft making repeated landings all might contribute to an accidental confrontation or a staged attack, especially from any Islamic State leftovers that might want to take advantage of the sudden withdrawal.

One of the biggest risks to the remaining American troops as they pull back will most likely be attacks from Turkish-backed Syrian militia called the Free Syrian Army, which has spearheaded the Turkish offensive in many places along the border. Those troops are supported by Turkish army artillery and mortar fire, and Turkish air force strikes.

American officials say these Turkish-backed militia are less disciplined than regular Turkish soldiers, and deliberately or inadvertently have fired on retreating American troops. Another emerging threat comes from Islamic State fighters, who had gone underground after the defeat of the final shards of the terror group’s caliphate, or religious state, in northern Syria earlier this year.

The hasty, risky nature of the withdrawal might actually require that the number of American troops in Syria be increased, at least temporarily. The military’s Central Command is preparing to send hundreds of additional American forces to help secure bases where American Special Forces have been operating with their Syrian Kurdish partners — many of whom have now left to fight the Turks — and safely evacuate those Americans in the coming weeks.

“We are repositioning additional forces in the region to assist with force protection as necessary,” Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper told reporters at the Pentagon on Friday.

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4 Big Questions About Syria’s Future

The surprise American withdrawal from parts of northern Syria reshuffled old alliances and touched off a new stage of the eight-year war.

In a sign of the concern over the safety of the remaining American troops in Syria, Gen. Mark A. Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, spoke Monday with his Russian counterpart about the deteriorating security in the country’s northeast.

And last Friday, the American military logged an attempt to attack a Marine KC-130 transport aircraft landing in Kobani with “surface-to-air fire,” according to military documents obtained by The New York Times. The aircraft discharged flares as a defensive measure. The flight was unharmed and continued its approach, landing at the airfield.

Yes, there are roughly 150 troops at al-Tanf, a small base in southern Syria near the Jordanian border. While billed as a Special Operations mission to train local forces and go after the Islamic State, the base serves as a tollbooth of sorts for Iranian, Russian and Syrian forces in the region that have to navigate around its kilometers-wide defense bubble. The presence of American forces there gives the United States visibility on the movement and actions of those other military forces.

On the Jordanian side of the border, the American military keeps a quick reaction force staged there, including extra troops and artillery, in case anything were to go awry at the al-Tanf base.

The base also watches over a nearby refugee camp that is run by the United Nations.

That is unclear. Some of the various bases’ hard structures, tents, tables, gym equipment and larger construction machinery might be left behind. What won’t be abandoned is anything sensitive, such as radios, weapons, armored vehicles and important documents.

American military officials say the hastier the withdrawal, the more equipment will be left behind or have to be destroyed. Much depends on the security conditions on the ground.

Thomas Gibbons-Neff reported from Kabul, Afghanistan, and Eric Schmitt from Washington. Carlotta Gall contributed reporting from Ceylanpinar, Turkey

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