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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 284)

Warren: ‘The American people do not want a war with Iran’

Westlake Legal Group QdDiGI4zHxNbVYwK--HSAkKe5RZ76m4SXezvM34S8G4 Warren: 'The American people do not want a war with Iran' r/politics

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2020 Dems offer prayers to US troops following Iran missile attacks, call for de-escalation

Westlake Legal Group Warren-Biden-Booker-Buttigieg 2020 Dems offer prayers to US troops following Iran missile attacks, call for de-escalation Vandana Rambaran fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc e311bbfc-6520-5483-b809-eeb74fcf276d article

Democratic 2020 presidential hopefuls responded to Iran’s targeted attacks on U.S. military and coalition forces at two military bases in Iraq on Tuesday, offering prayers to U.S. servicemembers and calling for the de-escalation of tensions in the Middle East.

The attacks on Al-Assad Air Base and the base in Erbil comes days after a U.S.-led airstrike that killed Iranian Quds Force Gen. Qassem Soleimani and sparked promises of retaliation against the U.S. from Iranian forces.

LAWMAKERS REACT AFTER IRAN MISSILE ATTACK TARGETS US FORCES IN IRAQ, PELOSI SAYS WORLD ‘CANNOT AFFORD WAR’

At a campaign event in Brooklyn, N.Y., on Tuesday night Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., said “We have to start on sober note. For any of you who haven’t been able to follow, within last hour the Iranian government has announced that it has sent missiles to attack our military bases in Iraq.

“My three brothers all served in the military,” Warren continued. “At this moment, my heart and my prayers are with all the members of the military and with their families, in Iraq and all around the world. This is a reminder [of] why we need to de-escalate tension in the Middle East. The American people do not want a war with Iran”

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J.; former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind.; former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick; and Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., all posted notes of gratitude and concern for members of the U.S. military impacted by the tensions in Iraq and Iran.

“Praying for the safety of our troops and personnel in Iraq right now,” Booker wrote on Twitter.

He later added: “We are quickly heading to a point of no return in the region. We must use diplomacy to de-escalate and keep Americans safe at home and abroad.”

Buttigieg, a veteran who deployed to Afghanistan, who has criticized President Trump for alluding to war crimes after comments Trump made insinuating that attacking cultural monuments in Iran was justified if the foreign nation attacked the U.S., tweeted “Tonight, Americans in Iraq are under fire. My prayers are with them, their loved ones, and their families.”

“Americans and our allies are under fire tonight.Let us keep them and their families in our prayers,” Patrick said.

“Closely monitoring what is happening in Iraq. We must do all we can to protect our servicemembers and Americans at risk,” Klobuchar said.

Former Vice President Joe Biden, who slammed Trump at a campaign event in New York earlier Tuesday for being “dangerously incompetent” to handle the situation in Iran said “I’m going to hold off on commenting on the news tonight until we know more, but there is one thing I will say: Jill and I are keeping our troops and Americans overseas in our prayers. We hope you’ll keep them in yours.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Westlake Legal Group Warren-Biden-Booker-Buttigieg 2020 Dems offer prayers to US troops following Iran missile attacks, call for de-escalation Vandana Rambaran fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc e311bbfc-6520-5483-b809-eeb74fcf276d article   Westlake Legal Group Warren-Biden-Booker-Buttigieg 2020 Dems offer prayers to US troops following Iran missile attacks, call for de-escalation Vandana Rambaran fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc e311bbfc-6520-5483-b809-eeb74fcf276d article

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US military bases attacked

The world anxiously awaited how Iran would retaliate after the U.S. killed its top general in a drone strike last week and Iran appeared to deliver its answer by launching more than a dozen missiles at two Iraqi bases housing U.S. and coalition troops. 

It is unclear the extent of the damage caused by the attack but so far there have been no reports of casualties. 

It is also unknown if Iran plans to take further action or how the U.S. plans to respond to the attack, which was the latest aggression in an escalating conflict between the two nations that experts fear could lead to war. 

President Donald Trump plans to deliver a public address Wednesday morning about the attack. 

Here is what we know: 

The Iranian attack 

Iran fired the ballistic missiles at about 5:30 p.m. EST on Tuesday, which was early Wednesday in Iraq, Department of Defense spokesman Jonathan Hoffman said in a statement. 

The barrage targeted the Ain Assad air base in western Iraq and the Erbil base, which is located in Iraq’s semi-autonomous Kurdish region. The Ain al-Assad base was used by U.S. forces after the 2003 invasion that toppled dictator Saddam Hussein and it currently houses about 1,500 U.S. and coalition forces.

“It was a massive attack with ballistic missiles,” a U.S. official who was not authorized to speak publicly told USA TODAY. The official said a hangar was damaged in the attack but fortunately troops had advance warning of the attack and were able to take cover. 

Trump made a surprise visit there just after Christmas 2018, when he celebrated successes against the Islamic State. Vice President Mike Pence also visited the base in 2019, serving Thanksgiving dinner to service members and addressing troops at the Erbil base.

More:Trump once visited Iraq base attacked by Iran missiles

Westlake Legal Group  US military bases attacked

Why did Iran attack? 

The Pentagon said it was “clear that these missiles were launched from Iran” and Iranian officials acknowledged they were behind the attack, which they called an act of defense in response to the death of Gen. Qasem Soleimani. 

Soleimani was the head of Iran’s Quds Force, an elite unit within the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, which was designated a terrorist organization by the Trump administration. The U.S. said Soleimani was killed because he posed an imminent threat and was plotting an attack on Americans, though officials have yet to present evidence about the plot. 

The U.S. says Soleimani was behind the training of Iraqi militants after the 2003 invasion and that he is responsible for more than 600 U.S. service members killed in Iraq. 

Soleimani was killed early Friday outside the Baghdad airport days after demonstrators who belonged to Iran-backed militias stormed the U.S. Embassy in the Iraqi capital. U.S. airstrikes had killed at least two dozen fighters from one of those militias, which the U.S. said was behind a rocket attack that killed an American contractor. 

‘This was an act of war’:Lawmakers react to Iran’s missile strike on US military bases

Trump to address the nation 

Trump said in a tweet following the attack that he plans to address the nation Wednesday morning. The White House said he is scheduled to give his remarks at 11 a.m. EST

“All is well! Missiles launched from Iran at two military bases located in Iraq. Assessment of casualties & damages taking place now. So far, so good! We have the most powerful and well equipped military anywhere in the world, by far!” Trump said. 

The president had warned Iran that any attack on “Americans, or American assets” would lead to a counter-attack on 52 Iranian sites. So far, the U.S. has not acted on that threat. Some observers have said that because there were apparently no casualties in the attack, the U.S. has the opportunity to deescalate the budding conflict. 

Will Iran continue to attack? 

Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei called the attack a “slap” that was “not sufficient” to avenge Soleimani, according to The Associated Press. 

But Foreign Minister Mohammed Javad Zarif said in a tweet that Iran had “concluded proportionate measures in self-defense” with the missile strike. 

“We do not seek escalation or war, but will defend ourselves against any aggression,” Zarif said. 

The missile strike could be the end of Iran’s retaliation barring a retaliatory attack from the U.S. It is possible that Iran could take further direct military action, attack Americans with its proxy forces in the region or turn to unconventional attacks such as cyberwarfare

Ukrainian airliner goes down in Tehran 

Hours after Iran launched its missiles, a Ukrainian passenger plane crashed after takeoff from Tehran’s airport, killing all 176 people on board. 

A spokesman for Iran’s Road and Transportation Ministry said the pilot lost control after a fire broke out in one of the plane’s engines. 

There does not appear to be any connection between the crash and the tensions between the U.S. and Iran, though the investigation is ongoing. 

Contributing: Tom Vanden Brook, John Fritze and Adrianna Rodriguez, USA TODAY; The Associated Press

Westlake Legal Group  US military bases attacked   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Pompeo Upended Middle East by Pushing Trump to Kill Iranian General

WASHINGTON — Last week, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was the loudest voice in the administration pushing President Trump to kill Iran’s most important general. This week, he is back in his role as the nation’s top diplomat, trying to contain the international crisis the general’s death created.

True to form, Mr. Pompeo is not backing down. “You saw, more tactically, just these last few days the president’s response when the Iranians made a bad decision to kill an American,” he told reporters at the State Department on Tuesday, referring to a deadly rocket attack in Iraq on Dec. 27 by an Iran-backed militia. “We hope they won’t make another bad decision just like that one.”

The strike against the Iranian general has affirmed Mr. Pompeo’s position as the second-most powerful official in the Trump administration, behind only the president himself. A hawk brimming with bravado and ambition, Mr. Pompeo is ostensibly the cabinet member who smooths America’s relations with the rest of the world.

But as the man at the center of the argument to launch the drone strike that killed Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani — and who pushed Mr. Trump to withdraw from the landmark Iran nuclear deal in 2018 — he is in the unusual role of shaping national security policy that makes his diplomatic job harder.

“Pompeo’s end run got the decision he may have wanted, but the messy day after — sloppy explanations of the threat, disorganized public statements, and hasty diplomatic and military efforts — limited the effectiveness of the policy and made it far riskier for the country and president,” said John Gans, a former chief speechwriter at the Pentagon and author of a new book on the National Security Council, which includes Mr. Pompeo.

Congress is demanding that Mr. Pompeo and other senior administration officials testify about the intelligence that led to the decision to blow up General Suleimani’s convoy on Friday as it was leaving Baghdad International Airport.

Westlake Legal Group iraq-embassy-baghdad-airport-attack-1578026455663-articleLarge-v8 Pompeo Upended Middle East by Pushing Trump to Kill Iranian General United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Targeted Killings Suleimani, Qassim State Department Pompeo, Mike Iraq Iran Defense and Military Forces Benghazi Attack (2012)

Maps: How the Confrontation Between the U.S. and Iran Escalated

Here’s how the situation developed over the last two weeks.

And as Iran begins retaliating aggressively, Mr. Pompeo, 56, could become known as the man who helped lead the United States into another conflict in the Middle East — breaking one of Mr. Trump’s key campaign promises just as the president faces re-election. Early Wednesday, Iran launched more than a dozen ballistic missiles at two bases in Iraq that house American troops, the Pentagon said.

“I think Secretary Pompeo is playing a rather naïve and destructive role in all this,” said Wendy R. Sherman, who was the third-ranking State Department official in the Obama administration and helped negotiate the 2015 nuclear agreement between Iran and other countries from which the United States withdrew just days after Mr. Pompeo arrived at the State Department.

Mr. Pompeo said he and other Americans officials “evaluated the relevant risks” that the strike against General Suleimani might bring. He cited “continuing efforts on behalf of this terrorist to build out a network of campaign activities that were going to lead potentially to the death of many more Americans.”

In the fall, during the impeachment inquiry, Mr. Pompeo’s standing plummeted among career employees at the State Department, Democrats in Congress and much of the public, when it became obvious he had enabled Mr. Trump’s shadow Ukraine policy. He also lost some of Mr. Trump’s confidence after failing to prevent veteran diplomats from testifying on Capitol Hill.

The Iran crisis presents similar risks for Mr. Pompeo, who considered running this year for an open Senate seat in Kansas. His associates say he now has an eye on a presidential campaign in 2024.

The upheaval is unfolding at a pace that Mr. Trump and top aides never expected, officials said.

Millions of Iranians have taken to the streets to protest General Suleimani’s killing — a drastic change from only weeks ago, when demonstrators were denouncing the rulers in Tehran. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Iran’s supreme leader, told officials that any retaliation should be direct, proportional and carried out by Iran itself.

European allies have expressed anger to Mr. Pompeo over the strike, which they were not told about in advance.

And Mr. Pompeo has been unable to convince Iraq’s government that the United States remains a reliable partner. Its parliament, furious at what Iraqi officials call a violation of their sovereignty, voted Sunday to expel more than 5,000 American troops from the country.

Diplomats and other American employees at the United States Embassy in Baghdad remain on high alert, with some heading by airplane to the safety of the American Consulate in Erbil, in Kurdish-controlled northern Iraq. The Pentagon has added 4,500 troops to some 50,000 who were already in the region, and the British Navy deployed two warships to the Persian Gulf.

American embassies around the world are warning American citizens to stay alert to potential dangers — an action that undermines the administration line that the killing of General Suleimani made Americans safer.

The security of State Department personnel abroad is a big potential political liability both for Mr. Pompeo, who played a leading role in the House Benghazi inquiry as a Republican congressman from Kansas, and for Mr. Trump.

Both men excoriated Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of state who ran for president against Mr. Trump, for the 2012 deaths of four Americans, including an ambassador, in an attack against a diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya. As director of the C.I.A. and then secretary of state, Mr. Pompeo has warned his subordinates that he does not want to see “any Benghazis.”

Mr. Trump and Mr. Pompeo were outraged by images of pro-Iran protesters in Baghdad on Dec. 31 attacking buildings at the United States Embassy, though no Americans were injured.

A senior administration official said a severe but unspecified threat against the embassy was the reason that Mr. Trump made the decision to kill General Suleimani.

Yet no major attack against the sprawling and heavily-fortified diplomatic compound in Baghdad’s Green Zone is “imminent,” even though Mr. Pompeo has asserted that repeatedly, said the official, who discussed administration deliberations only on the condition of anonymity. Some Pentagon officials had said earlier that there was no intelligence revealing any unusual threats.

On Tuesday, Mr. Pompeo did not repeat his assertions that the United States had intelligence about an “imminent” attack and instead pointed to recent violent episodes.

“If you’re looking for imminence, you need look no further than the days that led up to the strike that was taken against Suleimani,” Mr. Pompeo said, apparently referring to the rocket attack by an Iranian-backed militia that killed an American interpreter, Nawres Hamid, in Iraq on Dec. 27. The Americans then carried out airstrikes that killed 25 militiamen, which led to protests by mostly Iranian-backed militiamen inside the American Embassy compound in Baghdad.

American officials say that over the last two months, there have been 11 attacks by Iran-backed militias on bases in Iraq where American service members, diplomats and contractors work.

Critics say Mr. Pompeo, the only surviving member of the president’s original foreign policy team, is a chief architect of the rising tensions between the United States and Iran.

As Mr. Trump’s first C.I.A. director, he created a special center to deal with Iran, appointing as its head Michael D’Andrea, a veteran officer and convert to Islam known as the Dark Prince, who oversaw the hunt for Osama bin Laden and the drone strike campaign in the Middle East and Central Asia.

In December 2017, Mr. Pompeo said he had sent a letter to General Suleimani warning him against attacking American forces in Iraq. The general had helped plan deadly attacks on American troops in Iraq during the mid-2000s. When he received the letter, Mr. Suleimani was in Syria guiding a campaign against the Islamic State — which meant he was nominally on the same side in that fight as the Americans.

Days after becoming secretary of state in 2018, Mr. Pompeo pushed Mr. Trump to withdraw from the nuclear agreement and reimpose strict sanctions on Iran. He has nurtured closer partnerships with Israel, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, enemies of Iran that sometimes have agendas that run counter to American interests.

In April, he advised Mr. Trump to designate as a foreign terrorist organization the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, an arm of the Iranian military that includes General Suleimani’s elite Quds Force. It was the first time the United States had applied that label to a part of another government.

And after the Dec. 31 breach of the American Embassy in Baghdad, Mr. Pompeo pushed for the strike against Mr. Suleimani, which Defense Department officials had presented to Mr. Trump as an extreme and not particularly palatable option only days earlier.

Yet Mr. Pompeo’s hawkish role on Iran could increase his support in a Republican establishment that has long wanted the United States to adopt more aggressive policies toward Tehran, with some advocating leadership change against the ayatollahs.

A notable voter base — conservative supporters of Israel, including white evangelical Christians like Mr. Pompeo — promotes hard-line actions against Iran. They denounced the 2015 nuclear deal as appeasement. Last year, on a trip to Israel, Mr. Pompeo invoked the Bible in saying Mr. Trump was a modern-day Queen Esther sent by God to save the Jews from Iran.

Since Friday, Mr. Pompeo has spoken on the phone with senior officials and leaders in Europe, the Middle East and Asia to explain the United States’ need for defensive actions and, in some cases, stress that Washington wanted de-escalation. The United States also sent a message to Tehran on Friday through a Swiss diplomat, a senior administration official said.

In a joint statement issued Sunday, the leaders of Britain, France and Germany condemned Iran for its “negative role” in the Middle East but also described “an urgent need for de-escalation.”

Julian E. Barnes and Eric Schmitt contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Pompeo Upended Middle East by Pushing Trump to Kill Iranian General

WASHINGTON — Last week, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was the loudest voice in the administration pushing President Trump to kill Iran’s most important general. This week, he is back in his role as the nation’s top diplomat, trying to contain the international crisis the general’s death created.

True to form, Mr. Pompeo is not backing down. “You saw, more tactically, just these last few days the president’s response when the Iranians made a bad decision to kill an American,” he told reporters at the State Department on Tuesday, referring to a deadly rocket attack in Iraq on Dec. 27 by an Iran-backed militia. “We hope they won’t make another bad decision just like that one.”

The strike against the Iranian general has affirmed Mr. Pompeo’s position as the second-most powerful official in the Trump administration, behind only the president himself. A hawk brimming with bravado and ambition, Mr. Pompeo is ostensibly the cabinet member who smooths America’s relations with the rest of the world.

But as the man at the center of the argument to launch the drone strike that killed Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani — and who pushed Mr. Trump to withdraw from the landmark Iran nuclear deal in 2018 — he is in the unusual role of shaping national security policy that makes his diplomatic job harder.

“Pompeo’s end run got the decision he may have wanted, but the messy day after — sloppy explanations of the threat, disorganized public statements, and hasty diplomatic and military efforts — limited the effectiveness of the policy and made it far riskier for the country and president,” said John Gans, a former chief speechwriter at the Pentagon and author of a new book on the National Security Council, which includes Mr. Pompeo.

Congress is demanding that Mr. Pompeo and other senior administration officials testify about the intelligence that led to the decision to blow up General Suleimani’s convoy on Friday as it was leaving Baghdad International Airport.

Westlake Legal Group iraq-embassy-baghdad-airport-attack-1578026455663-articleLarge-v8 Pompeo Upended Middle East by Pushing Trump to Kill Iranian General United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Targeted Killings Suleimani, Qassim State Department Pompeo, Mike Iraq Iran Defense and Military Forces Benghazi Attack (2012)

Maps: How the Confrontation Between the U.S. and Iran Escalated

Here’s how the situation developed over the last two weeks.

And as Iran begins retaliating aggressively, Mr. Pompeo, 56, could become known as the man who helped lead the United States into another conflict in the Middle East — breaking one of Mr. Trump’s key campaign promises just as the president faces re-election. Early Wednesday, Iran launched more than a dozen ballistic missiles at two bases in Iraq that house American troops, the Pentagon said.

“I think Secretary Pompeo is playing a rather naïve and destructive role in all this,” said Wendy R. Sherman, who was the third-ranking State Department official in the Obama administration and helped negotiate the 2015 nuclear agreement between Iran and other countries from which the United States withdrew just days after Mr. Pompeo arrived at the State Department.

Mr. Pompeo said he and other Americans officials “evaluated the relevant risks” that the strike against General Suleimani might bring. He cited “continuing efforts on behalf of this terrorist to build out a network of campaign activities that were going to lead potentially to the death of many more Americans.”

In the fall, during the impeachment inquiry, Mr. Pompeo’s standing plummeted among career employees at the State Department, Democrats in Congress and much of the public, when it became obvious he had enabled Mr. Trump’s shadow Ukraine policy. He also lost some of Mr. Trump’s confidence after failing to prevent veteran diplomats from testifying on Capitol Hill.

The Iran crisis presents similar risks for Mr. Pompeo, who considered running this year for an open Senate seat in Kansas. His associates say he now has an eye on a presidential campaign in 2024.

The upheaval is unfolding at a pace that Mr. Trump and top aides never expected, officials said.

Millions of Iranians have taken to the streets to protest General Suleimani’s killing — a drastic change from only weeks ago, when demonstrators were denouncing the rulers in Tehran. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Iran’s supreme leader, told officials that any retaliation should be direct, proportional and carried out by Iran itself.

European allies have expressed anger to Mr. Pompeo over the strike, which they were not told about in advance.

And Mr. Pompeo has been unable to convince Iraq’s government that the United States remains a reliable partner. Its parliament, furious at what Iraqi officials call a violation of their sovereignty, voted Sunday to expel more than 5,000 American troops from the country.

Diplomats and other American employees at the United States Embassy in Baghdad remain on high alert, with some heading by airplane to the safety of the American Consulate in Erbil, in Kurdish-controlled northern Iraq. The Pentagon has added 4,500 troops to some 50,000 who were already in the region, and the British Navy deployed two warships to the Persian Gulf.

American embassies around the world are warning American citizens to stay alert to potential dangers — an action that undermines the administration line that the killing of General Suleimani made Americans safer.

The security of State Department personnel abroad is a big potential political liability both for Mr. Pompeo, who played a leading role in the House Benghazi inquiry as a Republican congressman from Kansas, and for Mr. Trump.

Both men excoriated Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of state who ran for president against Mr. Trump, for the 2012 deaths of four Americans, including an ambassador, in an attack against a diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya. As director of the C.I.A. and then secretary of state, Mr. Pompeo has warned his subordinates that he does not want to see “any Benghazis.”

Mr. Trump and Mr. Pompeo were outraged by images of pro-Iran protesters in Baghdad on Dec. 31 attacking buildings at the United States Embassy, though no Americans were injured.

A senior administration official said a severe but unspecified threat against the embassy was the reason that Mr. Trump made the decision to kill General Suleimani.

Yet no major attack against the sprawling and heavily-fortified diplomatic compound in Baghdad’s Green Zone is “imminent,” even though Mr. Pompeo has asserted that repeatedly, said the official, who discussed administration deliberations only on the condition of anonymity. Some Pentagon officials had said earlier that there was no intelligence revealing any unusual threats.

On Tuesday, Mr. Pompeo did not repeat his assertions that the United States had intelligence about an “imminent” attack and instead pointed to recent violent episodes.

“If you’re looking for imminence, you need look no further than the days that led up to the strike that was taken against Suleimani,” Mr. Pompeo said, apparently referring to the rocket attack by an Iranian-backed militia that killed an American interpreter, Nawres Hamid, in Iraq on Dec. 27. The Americans then carried out airstrikes that killed 25 militiamen, which led to protests by mostly Iranian-backed militiamen inside the American Embassy compound in Baghdad.

American officials say that over the last two months, there have been 11 attacks by Iran-backed militias on bases in Iraq where American service members, diplomats and contractors work.

Critics say Mr. Pompeo, the only surviving member of the president’s original foreign policy team, is a chief architect of the rising tensions between the United States and Iran.

As Mr. Trump’s first C.I.A. director, he created a special center to deal with Iran, appointing as its head Michael D’Andrea, a veteran officer and convert to Islam known as the Dark Prince, who oversaw the hunt for Osama bin Laden and the drone strike campaign in the Middle East and Central Asia.

In December 2017, Mr. Pompeo said he had sent a letter to General Suleimani warning him against attacking American forces in Iraq. The general had helped plan deadly attacks on American troops in Iraq during the mid-2000s. When he received the letter, Mr. Suleimani was in Syria guiding a campaign against the Islamic State — which meant he was nominally on the same side in that fight as the Americans.

Days after becoming secretary of state in 2018, Mr. Pompeo pushed Mr. Trump to withdraw from the nuclear agreement and reimpose strict sanctions on Iran. He has nurtured closer partnerships with Israel, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, enemies of Iran that sometimes have agendas that run counter to American interests.

In April, he advised Mr. Trump to designate as a foreign terrorist organization the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, an arm of the Iranian military that includes General Suleimani’s elite Quds Force. It was the first time the United States had applied that label to a part of another government.

And after the Dec. 31 breach of the American Embassy in Baghdad, Mr. Pompeo pushed for the strike against Mr. Suleimani, which Defense Department officials had presented to Mr. Trump as an extreme and not particularly palatable option only days earlier.

Yet Mr. Pompeo’s hawkish role on Iran could increase his support in a Republican establishment that has long wanted the United States to adopt more aggressive policies toward Tehran, with some advocating leadership change against the ayatollahs.

A notable voter base — conservative supporters of Israel, including white evangelical Christians like Mr. Pompeo — promotes hard-line actions against Iran. They denounced the 2015 nuclear deal as appeasement. Last year, on a trip to Israel, Mr. Pompeo invoked the Bible in saying Mr. Trump was a modern-day Queen Esther sent by God to save the Jews from Iran.

Since Friday, Mr. Pompeo has spoken on the phone with senior officials and leaders in Europe, the Middle East and Asia to explain the United States’ need for defensive actions and, in some cases, stress that Washington wanted de-escalation. The United States also sent a message to Tehran on Friday through a Swiss diplomat, a senior administration official said.

In a joint statement issued Sunday, the leaders of Britain, France and Germany condemned Iran for its “negative role” in the Middle East but also described “an urgent need for de-escalation.”

Julian E. Barnes and Eric Schmitt contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

San Francisco store owner describes horror of doing business in ‘American Dystopia’

Westlake Legal Group sf3 San Francisco store owner describes horror of doing business in 'American Dystopia' Tucker Carlson Tonight fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox-news/shows/tucker-carlson-tonight fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Couger article 266509b3-3381-524f-908f-613d257f0a7a

Editor’s note: This report is a summary of Part 2 of a ‘Tucker Carlson Tonight’ investigation — the full segment is available above.

Gilles DeSaulnier says running his San Francisco grocery store has become “very, very difficult” thanks to rampant shoplifting and lawlessness in the city.

“You often see people walk in with bags into these stores and just shovel stuff in there and walk out,” DeSaulnier said in an exclusive interview with “Tucker Carlson Tonight.” “It happens every few minutes, literally in our store.”

DeSaulnier says the uptick in shoplifting began in 2014 after California voters passed a ballot referendum called Proposition 47 that downgraded theft of items worth up to $950 to a misdemeanor from a felony.

“What’s happened is [it’s] embolden[ed] people to actually do it [shoplift] more often because there is no consequence,” he said. “We’ve been here 16 years now. I think most of this has happened in the last five, six years.”

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE LIEUTENANT: LIBERAL PROSECUTORS RESPONSIBLE FOR CHAOS, DISORDER ON CITY STREETS

The proprietor says he deals with many of the same people over and over: “They just keep coming back because nothing is going to happen.”

DeSaulnier also described one instance where a shoplifter got violent.

“One woman, one time was stealing about a hundred dollars’ worth of meat and we stopped her at the door, brought her back in, tried to get it out of a bag, and she reached in [the bag] and grabbed pepper spray and she sprayed the cashier in the face with it.”

Such attacks happen routinely at DeSaulnier’s Urban Harvest Market in San Francisco’s SoMa neighborhood, just blocks from City Hall. He says he’s been attacked by homeless people twice in the past four months.

FLASHBACK: SAN FRANCISCO HOMELESS STATS SOAR; CITY BLAMES BIG BUSINESS, RESIDENTS BLAME OFFICIALS

“I put my arm up for [one woman] to show her the way out. And she grabbed it and bit me with her teeth really hard and dropped her weight on the ground and brought me down with it until I was able to free myself,” he said.

A second assailant gloated that he wouldn’t face consequences for the attack.

“He told me ‘Why are you calling the police? Because they’re not going to do anything.’”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

DeSaulnier also says low-income tenants who live above the store routinely flood his space when they overdose on drugs and leave their bathtubs running, an occurrence he says happens “every few months, pretty much.”

The proprietor says he sees people doing drugs “every few minutes.” “Tucker Carlson Tonight” producers found syringes outside the store.

When asked why he remains in San Francisco, DeSaulnier replied: “You make investments in businesses and your homes and you buy property and you can’t just pick up and leave.”

Tucker Carlson Tonight’s series on San Francisco, “American Dystopia,” airs each night this week at 8 p.m. ET

Fox News’ Kyle Rothenberg contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group sf3 San Francisco store owner describes horror of doing business in 'American Dystopia' Tucker Carlson Tonight fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox-news/shows/tucker-carlson-tonight fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Couger article 266509b3-3381-524f-908f-613d257f0a7a   Westlake Legal Group sf3 San Francisco store owner describes horror of doing business in 'American Dystopia' Tucker Carlson Tonight fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox-news/shows/tucker-carlson-tonight fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Couger article 266509b3-3381-524f-908f-613d257f0a7a

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Lawmakers react to missile strike

WASHINGTON —  Lawmakers quickly reacted after Iran fired more than a dozen missiles at U.S. troops and coalition forces in Iraq on Tuesday, an apparent retaliation for a U.S. drone strike days earlier that killed one of Tehran’s most powerful generals, Qasem Soleimani. 

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was gathered with Democrats discussing impeachment and the House’s agenda Tuesday evening when a staff member brought in a note, informing her of the strike.

More:Pentagon: Iran launched ‘more than a dozen’ missiles at bases in Iraq housing U.S. troops

Pelosi paused, told members what had happened and said “we’ve got to pray,” according to Rep. Debbie Dingell who was present for the meeting.

“She’s a Catholic woman like me,” Dingell said. “We all care deeply about our military men and women that are serving this country.”

Soon after, Pelosi tweeted that she was “Closely monitoring the situation following bombings targeting U.S. troops in Iraq. We must ensure the safety of our servicemembers, including ending needless provocations from the Administration and demanding that Iran cease its violence. America & world cannot afford war.”

Vice President Mike Pence briefed top Democrats in Congress on the Iranian strikes, including Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, though he has not released a statement, yet.

Justin Goodman, a spokesman for Schumer, says the New York Democrat is closely monitoring the situation and is praying for the safety of service members and other personnel.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy was briefed by the White House tonight, too, and tweeted that “Tonight we must be united in the fight against terrorism and those who would do our country harm. America’s full support is with our courageous service men and women standing the watch.” 

“With reports of missile strikes launched by Iran against U.S. bases in Iraq, my thoughts and prayers are with our service members, diplomats and other personnel at risk, and with their families,” Judiciary Chairman Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., tweeted.

Republican Senator Rand Paul, who has been critical of the airstrike and escalation against Iran, tweeted that he is “praying for the safety of our troops in Iraq tonight. While I would have preferred they come home long ago, there is also no excuse for this action by Iran.”

Marco Rubio, R-Fla., tweeted that “#Iran is now openly calling for American’s to turn on each other. The time will come to debate U.S. policy. Tonight American & allied troops have come under direct attack by a nation-state & Americans must come together to support & protect them & respond appropriately.”

Both Senators Kamala Harris, D-CA, and Amy Klobuchar, D-MN, tweeted they were monitoring the situation and thinking of the servicemembers. 

“For everyone’s sake, I pray there are no casualties and that #Iran does not continue its escalation,” Senator Ron Johnson, R-WI, posted. 

Freshman Congresswoman Ilhan Omar, D-MN, tweeted that “War doesn’t have a reset button, I learned this lesson at the age of Eight. Lives will be lost, many innocent lives will be lost and the future of generations will be impacted. Let’s call for peace.”

Speaking at a 2020 campaign rally tonight in Brooklyn, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren stated, “At this moment, my heart and my prayers are with our military and with their families in Iraq and all around the world. This is a reminder why we need to deescalate tension in the Middle East. The American people do not want a war with Iran.”

Rep. Ted Lieu, D-Calif., tweeted, “As we pray for our troops & civilians, there is still no coherent strategy from @realDonaldTrump. The White House can’t adequately answer simple questions like, what are our goals with Iran? Did a drone strike advance those goals? Does Iraq voting us out advance those goals?”

Contributing: Christal Hayes, Tom Vanden Brook, John Fritze

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Sen. John Kennedy on appeasing Iran: ‘Weakness invites the wolves’

Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., blasted his Democratic colleagues on Tuesday for suggesting that the U.S. try appeasement with Iran, likening the strategy to a weakness that “invites the wolves.”

Kennedy, 68, made the comments during an appearance on “The Story” with Martha MacCallum, shortly after Iran fired more than a dozen ballistic missiles into Iraq, targeting U.S. military and coalition forces housed at Iraqi military bases at Al-Assad and Erbil.

Westlake Legal Group AP20008036613035 Sen. John Kennedy on appeasing Iran: 'Weakness invites the wolves' fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox news fnc/politics fnc Bradford Betz article 0b16cbaf-2188-5b75-827e-a57f3fde8420

Chart shows estimated missile ranges for Iranian weapons. Iran has launched a missile strike against two bases in Iraq housing US troops.  (AP)

The senator noted that the attack marked the 12th time in the last several months in which either Iran or its proxies had fired at American military personnel in Iraq. The difference this time, Kennedy said, is that Iran has claimed responsibility, whereas the last 11 times “they lied about it.”

“The Iranians have shot down drones. They tried to destroy the Saudi oil fields. They tried to storm our embassy,” Kennedy said. “So, when my Democratic friends say we need appeasement, well appeasement hasn’t worked. And I think that we’ve learned, with respect to Iran, that weakness invites the wolves.”

GRAHAM SAYS HE TOLD TRUMP ON IRAN: ‘CULTURAL SITES, RELIGIOUS SITES ARE NOT LAWFUL TARGETS’

Tuesday’s attack came five days after a U.S. airstrike at Baghdad’s airport killed Iranian Quds Force Gen. Qassem Soleimani. Iran state TV described Tuesday’s attacks as revenge for Soleimani’s death.

“Do I wish this was happening? No,” Kennedy said. “But America is not the bad guy here.”

The senator then laid out demands for Iran: stop hurting the U.S., stop hurting America’s allies, and cease their ambitions to build nuclear weapons.

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“Based on your past experience, we don’t know how you would use it,” Kennedy said. “Other than that we’re fine to just leave Iran alone and let them run their lives like they want to. But they just won’t stop these provocative acts.”

Westlake Legal Group MacCallum-Kennedy_Fox Sen. John Kennedy on appeasing Iran: 'Weakness invites the wolves' fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox news fnc/politics fnc Bradford Betz article 0b16cbaf-2188-5b75-827e-a57f3fde8420   Westlake Legal Group MacCallum-Kennedy_Fox Sen. John Kennedy on appeasing Iran: 'Weakness invites the wolves' fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox news fnc/politics fnc Bradford Betz article 0b16cbaf-2188-5b75-827e-a57f3fde8420

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Iran Fires Missiles at U.S. Troops at Two Bases in Iraq: Live Updates

Here are the latest developments:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_166461435_4844cadb-e6d4-47d0-92db-6c5681d358c5-articleLarge Iran Fires Missiles at U.S. Troops at Two Bases in Iraq: Live Updates Trump, Donald J Targeted Killings Suleimani, Qassim Khamenei, Ali Iran Diplomatic Service, Embassies and Consulates Defense and Military Forces

The Asad air base in Anbar Province, in western Iraq, last month. It was the site of a missile attack by Iran, the Pentagon said.Credit…Nasser Nasser/Associated Press

Iran fired more than a dozen ballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq where American troops are based, the Pentagon said Tuesday.

“It is clear that these missiles were launched from Iran and targeted at least two Iraqi military bases hosting U.S. military and coalition personnel at Al-Asad and Erbil,” Jonathan Hoffman, the Pentagon’s chief spokesman, said in a statement.

There were no immediate reports of casualties, and the Pentagon said Tuesday evening that it was still assessing the damage.

Iranian officials said the attacks were the start of a promised retaliation for the killing of a top Revolutionary Guards commander. “The fierce revenge by the Revolutionary Guards has begun,” Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps said in a statement on a Telegram channel.

Iranian news media reported the attacks hours after the remains of the commander, Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, were returned to his hometown in Iran for burial.

Hossein Soleimani, the editor in chief of Mashregh, the main Revolutionary Guards news website, said that more than 30 ballistic missiles had been fired at the American base at Asad, in Anbar Province, in western Iraq.

An American base in Erbil, in northern Iraq, was also attacked.

A Revolutionary Guards statement on state television said: “If America responds to these attacks there will be bigger attacks on the way. This is not a threat, it’s a warning.”

Some Iranian officials tweeted images of Iranian flags in a pointed rejoinder to President Trump, who tweeted an American flag after General Suleimani was killed.

In a statement, the White House said, “The president has been briefed and is monitoring the situation closely and consulting with his national security team.”

Throughout the day, reports from American intelligence agencies of an imminent attack from Iran had intensified, and senior officials said they were bracing for some kind of attack against American bases in Iraq or elsewhere in the Middle East.

As tensions mounted, Mr. Trump’s top national security advisers met Tuesday afternoon in the White House Situation Room, where they were joined by the president after his meeting with the Greek prime minister.

Westlake Legal Group iraq-embassy-baghdad-airport-attack-1578026455663-articleLarge-v7 Iran Fires Missiles at U.S. Troops at Two Bases in Iraq: Live Updates Trump, Donald J Targeted Killings Suleimani, Qassim Khamenei, Ali Iran Diplomatic Service, Embassies and Consulates Defense and Military Forces

Maps: How the Confrontation Between the U.S. and Iran Escalated

Here’s how the situation developed over the last two weeks.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was meeting with senior Democrats Tuesday evening in her Capitol office suite, discussing Mr. Trump’s impeachment, when she was handed a note about the Iranian attack.

“We’ve got to pray,” she said, according to Representative Debbie Dingell, Democrat of Michigan, who was at the meeting.

Ms. Pelosi said she was “closely monitoring the situation.”

“We must ensure the safety of our service members, including ending needless provocations from the administration and demanding that Iran cease its violence,” she said in a tweet. “America & world cannot afford war.”

Drew Hammill, Ms. Pelosi’s spokesman, said she returned a call shortly thereafter from Vice President Mike Pence, who briefed her on the strikes.

Mr. Pence also briefed Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the Democratic leader.

In December 2018, Mr. Trump visited American military forces at Al Asad. It was his first trip to troops stationed in a combat zone.

The base at Asad is an Iraqi base that has long been a hub for American military operations in western Iraq. Danish troops have also been stationed there in recent years.

In 2017, as the American-led coalition built up the base for its campaign against the Islamic State, roughly 500 American military and civilian personnel were located there. Some troops departed after the defeat of the Islamic State’s so-called caliphate in 2019, but the base maintains a robust presence of coalition troops.

The American base in Erbil has been a Special Operations hub, home to hundreds of troops, logistics personnel, and intelligence specialists. Transport aircraft, gunships, and reconnaissance planes have used the airport as an anchor point for operations in both northern Iraq and deep into Syria.

Prices for Brent crude, the international oil benchmark, jumped above $70 a barrel in futures markets, a nearly 4 percent rise from Tuesday. West Texas Intermediate, the American oil price benchmark, jumped more than 3 percent to about $65 a barrel.

Stock markets also dropped sharply. Shares in Japan opened 2.4 percent lower, while markets in Hong Kong and South Korea fell more than 1 percent on their opening.

Investors were also predicting a tough day on Wall Street. Futures contracts representing bets on the American stock market indicated a drop of more than 1 percent in New York’s morning.

Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper said Tuesday that General Suleimani had been planning attacks to occur within days, laying out the administration’s legal justification for killing the Iranian commander in a drone strike.

Americans officials have been pressed over their claims that they targeted General Suleimani to forestall imminent attacks against U.S. interests.

At a Pentagon news conference Tuesday, Mr. Esper was asked whether attacks had been expected in days or weeks. “I think it’s more fair to say days,” the defense secretary said.

He declined to offer more details, nor to describe the intelligence underpinning that assessment.

Mr. Esper said General Suleimani, who was killed Friday in Iraq, “was in Baghdad to coordinate additional attacks.”

“He’s been conducting terrorist activities against us and our coalition partners for over 20 years,” Mr. Esper said. “He has the blood of hundreds of Americans, soldiers, on his hands and wounded thousands more. And then we could talk about all of the mayhem he’s caused against the Syrian people, the people of Lebanon. Even his own people in Iran.”

He added: “To somehow suggest that he wasn’t a legitimate target, I think, is fanciful. He was clearly on the battlefield.”

Mr. Esper also said that despite an unsigned draft letter from the American military command in Baghdad on troop withdrawal and a unanimous vote by the Iraqi Parliament, the United States does not plan to pull its troops out of Iraq right now.

The Pentagon has made preparations in anticipation of Iranian retaliation, Mr. Esper said, and American troops in the Middle East are on a heightened state of alert.

“I think we should expect that they will retaliate in some way, shape or form,” Mr. Esper told a news conference at the Pentagon. “We’re prepared for any contingency and then we’ll respond appropriately to whatever they do.”

President Trump on Tuesday told reporters he would avoid targeting cultural sites in military attacks, walking back a threat he made against Iran days earlier.

Following a bipartisan and international uproar, Mr. Trump conceded that striking such sites would amount to a war crime. “If that’s what the law is, I like to obey the law,” he said in the Oval Office as he hosted the visiting prime minister of Greece, Kyriakos Mitsotakis.

His remarks to reporters came a day after Mark T. Esper, the secretary of defense, said striking Iranian cultural sites with no military value would be a war crime. That appeared to put him at odds with his boss.

“We will follow the laws of armed conflict,” the defense secretary said at a news briefing at the Pentagon on Monday when asked if cultural sites would be targeted.

On Saturday, Mr. Trump declared that the United States had identified 52 potential targets in Iran, some “important to Iran & the Iranian culture.”

None of them qualified as cultural sites, according to an administration official who asked not to be identified.

But the president’s threats and his initial refusal to back down in the face of criticism generated condemnation at home and abroad while deeply discomfiting American military leaders.

NATO is removing some of the trainers who have been working with Iraqi soldiers battling the Islamic State, in the wake of the American killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani.

On Monday, the NATO secretary-general, Jens Stoltenberg, announced that training had been temporarily suspended.

Describing security of NATO personnel, the organization said in a statement that it would be taking precautions — including “the temporary repositioning of some personnel to different locations both inside and outside Iraq.’’

NATO “maintains a presence in Iraq’’ and remains committed “to fighting international terrorism,” an official said, but refused to provide “operational details’’ about troop movements.

NATO has had roughly 500 soldiers doing the training.

Some NATO countries, like Canada, Germany and Croatia, have announced that they are moving troops out of Iraq altogether, at least temporarily, because of security concerns.

Canada is temporarily moving to Kuwait some of its 500 military personnel based in Iraq, the country’s top military official, Gen. Jonathan Vance, said in a letter posted on Twitter on Tuesday.

Thirty of the 120 German soldiers in Iraq will be sent to Jordan and Kuwait, while others will remain positioned in the less volatile Kurdistan region, the German defense and foreign ministries said in a joint letter to the German parliament, the Bundestag.

“When the training is able to resume, the military personnel can be reinstated,” the letter said.

Croatia has also moved its small contingent of soldiers — 14 — from Iraq, with seven bound for Kuwait and the rest headed home, the Croatian Defense Ministry said. Slovakia has also removed its seven soldiers.

Some NATO troops began leaving Baghdad’s Green Zone in helicopters Monday night. The NATO training mission began in 2018 at Iraq’s request.

The killing of General Suleimani initially jolted oil markets, but the surge in prices has eased. On Tuesday afternoon, the Brent crude oil benchmark was down about 1.5 percent, to about $67.87 a barrel.

Analysts attribute the modesty of the increase to market skepticism that Iran will seek to hobble oil trading by, for example, closing the Strait of Hormuz, the narrow channel that many oil tankers have to pass through when they leave the Persian Gulf.

Oil flows have not been disrupted, so far, and the markets are “pricing in just a low probability of something happening,” said Bjornar Tonhaugen, head of oil market research at Rystad Energy, a research firm.

Iranian state-run news outlets reported a deadly stampede during the funeral procession for General Suleimani in his hometown, Kerman, in southeastern Iran, on Tuesday.

Millions were reported to have flooded the town’s streets to witness the procession for the general, who was killed in an American drone strike in Baghdad last week. His death has fanned smoldering tensions between the United States and Iran, and fueled fears of a broader conflict.

The crowding and subsequent stampede in Kerman led to General Suleimani’s burial being postponed, state news media reported. He was buried around midnight, as Iran prepared to launch missile attacks against American forces in retaliation for his death, said Hossein Soleimani, the editor in chief of the main Revolutionary Guards news website.

Photographs of the procession showed an elaborately decorated truck carrying General Suleimani’s coffin through streets packed densely with mourners, many wearing black and carrying pictures of the dead commander.

“Unfortunately, as a result of a stampede, some of our compatriots have been injured and some have been killed during the funeral processions,” Pirhossein Koulivand, head of the Iranian emergency medical services, told the news agency IRIB.

Fifty-six people died and 213 were injured, the broadcaster IRIB reported on its website.

Images and videos posted on social media showed the aftermath of the crush, with emergency workers and bystanders attempting to resuscitate people lying on the ground. The lifeless bodies of other victims, jackets covering their faces, could be seen nearby.

The general’s body had been flown to Kerman after a funeral in Tehran on Monday that had brought even bigger crowds into the streets of the Iranian capital.

In a fiery speech made in General Suleimani’s hometown on Tuesday, the leader of Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps vowed to “set ablaze” places where Americans and their allies live.

“We will take revenge — a revenge that will be tough, strong, decisive and finishing and will make them regret,” the corps’s leader, Hossein Salami, said on Tuesday in a front of a crowd of mourners. “We will set ablaze the place they like, and they know where it is.”

“Today, the seeds of hatred for the U.S. have been sown in the hearts of Muslims,” he added, according to Fars, an Iranian news agency associated with the Revolutionary Guards.

The pledge to seek vengeance echoed the rhetoric of many of the country’s leaders since General Suleimani’s killing on Friday. “Death to Israel,” the crowd chanted back, according to news reports. Israel, a close ally of the United States, has long been an enemy of Iran.

Thousands of mourners, dressed in black and carrying photos of General Suleimani, crowded the central square of Kerman, where the general’s body was taken for burial after a funeral procession on Monday in Tehran, the capital.

Before arriving in Kerman, the general’s remains were taken to the holy city of Qom, where thousands of residents came out, hoping for a chance to touch the coffin of a man the state has declared a martyr.

On Monday, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei wept and offered prayers over General Suleimani’s coffin at the enormous state funeral. The ayatollah, Iran’s supreme leader, had a close relationship with the general, who was widely considered to be the country’s second-most powerful man.

General Suleimani’s successor swore revenge during Monday’s ceremony.

“God the almighty has promised to get his revenge, and God is the main avenger,” said Esmail Ghaani, the Iranian general who will succeed General Suleimani as head of the Quds Force, the foreign expeditionary arm of the Revolutionary Guards. “Certainly, actions will be taken,” he added.

With the American role in the Middle East in flux, President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia flew to Damascus, Syria, on Tuesday for a victory lap of sorts.

Highlighting Russia’s newfound influence in the region, Mr. Putin met with President Bashar al-Assad of Syria, the strongman whose rule was largely rescued by Russian military intervention in Syria’s civil war.

Mr. Putin told Mr. al-Assad that “one can now confidently state that huge strides have been made in restoring Syrian statehood and the territorial integrity of the country,” a Kremlin statement said.

The Kremlin made no mention of Iran in its description of Mr. Putin’s visit, which had not been announced ahead of time. But Tehran was a crucial partner of Moscow in propping up Mr. al-Assad against Syrian rebels, including those backed by the United States.

Russia has called the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani of Iran illegal and expressed condolences to Tehran. On Wednesday, Mr. Putin is scheduled to meet with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey in Istanbul, with Syria and Libya on the agenda, according to the Kremlin.

President Emmanuel Macron of France spoke with the president of Iran, Hassan Rouhani, by phone on Tuesday afternoon to plead for calm and de-escalation.

Mr. Macron called on Iran to “refrain from any step that might aggravate the escalation already underway,” according to a statement from the Élysée Palace, the seat of the French presidency.

France has tried to play the role of mediator between the Iranians and Americans for months, but in vain.

The French president also called on Iran to respect the 2015 nuclear accord, and to release two French academics, Fariba Adelkhah and Roland Marchal, who are being held there, a major source of tension between the two countries.

Mohammad Javad Zarif, the Iranian foreign minister, said on Tuesday that he had been rejected for a visa to attend a Security Council meeting at the United Nations headquarters in New York, confirming reports from American news outlets that he would be barred.

Mr. Zarif, in an interview with the Iranian news outlet Press TV, said that his office had requested a visa weeks ago to participate in the meeting on Thursday, rejecting claims by American officials that they had not had time to process the application.

“The Americans are trying to create the impression that our request to attend the meeting was put forth following the assassination of General Suleimani,” Mr. Zarif said, according to the news outlet, adding, “The question everyone needs to be asking this lawbreaking administration is: What are they so scared of?”

Mr. Zarif later posted on Twitter about the situation, taking aim at Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and President Trump.

During a Tuesday morning news conference, Mr. Pompeo was asked about the visa but said he would not comment specifically on visa matters. He added that the United States would “comply with our obligations” under United Nations rules.

Robert C. O’Brien, the American national security adviser, was asked on “Fox & Friends” on Tuesday morning about the visa.

“I don’t think Secretary Pompeo thought that this was the right time for Mr. Zarif to come to the United States, and whenever he comes to New York, he spreads propaganda,” Mr. O’Brien said.

In August, the United States announced sanctions on Mr. Zarif, a seasoned diplomat who helped negotiate the 2015 nuclear deal.

Across the Middle East and the world, United States embassies warned Americans of potential attacks from Iran, as Iranian generals vowed to avenge the senior commander killed in an American drone strike.

In Jerusalem, the embassy told Americans on Monday to watch out for “mortars and rocket fire.” A day earlier, the United States Mission in Saudi Arabia had warned citizens to be prepared for “missile and drone attacks.”

The security alerts follow the targeted killing on Friday of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the leading figure in Iran’s foreign-facing intelligence and military operations.

At General Suleimani’s funeral in Tehran on Monday, military commanders promised vengeance. Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, told advisers that any retaliation against the United States should be direct, proportional and carried out openly by Iran.

That is a startling departure for the Iranian leadership, which has typically cloaked its attacks behind the actions of proxies it has cultivated around the region. But in the fury generated by the killing of General Suleimani, a close ally and personal friend of the supreme leader, the ayatollah was apparently willing to cast aside those traditional cautions.

Warnings to United State citizens were sent by American diplomats not only in the Middle East but also in Asia.

The American Embassy in Beijing, citing “heightened tension in the Middle East,” advised American citizens on Tuesday to keep a low profile, be aware of their surroundings, stay alert in tourist locations, review personal security plans and ensure that their travel documents were updated and accessible. American citizens in South Korea said they had received similar warnings.

American diplomats in the Middle East began sending advisories earlier in the week.

American embassies across the region have been on heightened alert since Dec. 31, when militants, backed by the Iranian government, stormed the embassy in Baghdad. President Trump said the assault was organized by General Suleimani.

Last week, embassies in Baghdad and in Beirut, Lebanon, issued security alerts. Some airlines have halted flights to the Iraqi capital, including EgyptAir, which on Tuesday announced that its flights in and out of the city would stop from Wednesday through Friday.

The Iranian Parliament on Tuesday passed a bill declaring the American military’s top leadership to be “terrorists,” subject to Iranian sanctions, according to news reports in state media.

The bill aimed at the Pentagon’s top brass mirrored a Trump administration policy implemented in April that imposed economic and travel sanctions on the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps as well as organizations, companies and individuals with ties to it.

That policy represented the first time an arm of a sovereign government had been designated a terrorist organization.

The Defense Department said the killing of General Suleimani was justified in part because of the corps’s terrorist designation. General Suleimani led the Quds Force, a unit of the Revolutionary Guards that conducted intelligence-gathering and attacks outside Iran’s borders.

An official letter from the Defense Department informing Iraq that American troops were “repositioning forces” for “movement out of Iraq” produced headlines around the world saying that an American withdrawal had begun.

But the letter, drafted by the United States military command in Baghdad, was sent out by mistake. The furor it caused prompted Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark A. Milley, to call an urgent news conference to deny the reports.

“It was an honest mistake,” General Milley told reporters at the Pentagon. “That letter is a draft, it was a mistake, it was unsigned, it should not have been released.”

Reporting was contributed by Megan Specia, Russell Goldman, Farnaz Fassihi, David D. Kirkpatrick, Melissa Eddy, Edward Wong, Lara Jakes, Peter Baker, Maggie Haberman, Alissa J. Rubin, Ben Hubbard, Mark Landler, Helene Cooper, Thomas Gibbons-Neff, Adam Nossiter and Anton Troianovski.

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Charlie Rose admits to inappropriate relationships, says Gayle King called him ‘Charles f—‘n Rose’

Westlake Legal Group Charlie20Rose20CBS Charlie Rose admits to inappropriate relationships, says Gayle King called him 'Charles f---'n Rose' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/state-and-local/controversies fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/media fnc dc88926e-c985-59a3-919f-856f76f77a3b article

Former CBS News anchor Charlie Rose admitted to having inappropriate relationships with staffers and acknowledged he had a rather lewd nickname, according to newly released deposition documents.

As part of a lawsuit filed by former CBS News employees Katherine Brooks Harris, Sydney McNeal and Chelsea Wei, court filings released late on Monday show Rose confirming improper behavior, including flirting with his former co-anchors Gayle King and Norah O’Donnell. Rose was fired as co-anchor of “CBS This Morning” in 2017.

“Did you ever flirt with Gayle King?” the plaintiffs’ counsel Kenneth Goldberg asked.

“Yes,” Rose answered.

“Did you flirt with Norah O’Donnell?” Goldberg followed.

“Yes,” the disgraced anchor confirmed.

CNN’S BRIAN STELTER OMITS ABC NEWS’ SPIKED JEFFREY EPSTEIN STORY FROM HIS ‘TOP MEDIA STORIES’ OF 2019

During the deposition, Rose was asked about a nickname that was echoed in the workplace: “Charlie f—‘n Rose,” something Rose verified was an attribution to him.

“Did Gayle King refer to you in that way?” Goldberg asked.

“Yes,” Rose said.

“How about Norah O’Donnell, did she use that term with you?”

“I could imagine she did, but I don’t remember specifically,” he replied.

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The veteran journalist acknowledged that he had “inappropriate” relationships and elaborated on how he defined the term when he was asked about his initial response to the 2017 Washington Post report about his misconduct.

“I’m saying inappropriate because the fact I had relationships with people in the workplace over those 45 years and, you know, we have now come to understand and appreciate and had by then that romantic relationships or intimacies were not appropriate in the workplace,” Rose said.

Westlake Legal Group Charlie20Rose20CBS Charlie Rose admits to inappropriate relationships, says Gayle King called him 'Charles f---'n Rose' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/state-and-local/controversies fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/media fnc dc88926e-c985-59a3-919f-856f76f77a3b article   Westlake Legal Group Charlie20Rose20CBS Charlie Rose admits to inappropriate relationships, says Gayle King called him 'Charles f---'n Rose' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/state-and-local/controversies fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/media fnc dc88926e-c985-59a3-919f-856f76f77a3b article

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