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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 296)

Sam Adams’ newest beer is illegal in 15 states

This beer isn’t just scary levels of alcoholic, it’s actually illegal in several states.

Samuel Adams is bringing its Utopias beer back just in time for Halloween, but not everyone will be able to find the brew. Due to the drink’s high level of alcohol, it’s actually illegal in 15 states.

Westlake Legal Group Sam-Adams-Utopias Sam Adams' newest beer is illegal in 15 states Michael Hollan fox-news/food-drink/drinks/beer fox news fnc/food-drink fnc b46176f9-eb82-5453-a4dc-74c774d768d4 article

Sam Adams’ Utopias beer reportedly has an ABV of 28 percent, much higher than the average beer. (Samuel Adams)

Utopias is described as a “barrel-aged extreme beer” and has a multiyear-long brewing process, Forbes reports. The 2019 brew is a blend of Sam Adams’ earlier extreme beers, which have reportedly been aged in wooden bourbon casks.

According to Forbes, Sam Adams’ only brewed 77 wooden casks of Utopias, which the outlet describes as having “distinct vanilla notes and subtle nutty and elegant dark fruit aromas.” The beer also claims to have an ABV (alcohol by volume) of 28 percent, significantly higher than the average beer (which is usually lower than 10 percent).

OKTOBERFEST VISITORS TRIED TO STEAL NEARLY 100K BEER STEINS

A spokesperson for Samuel Adams confirmed to Fox News that due to its high level of alcohol, this already hard-to-find beer is illegal in 15 states. This includes Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont and West Virginia.

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Of course, this isn’t the first beer to face legal limitations.

In mid-August, a Utah based brewery lost an appeal against a ruling that banned its polygamy-themed beer in North Carolina. Wasatch Brewery hoped to bring Polygamy Porter to stores in the state, but were unable to convince the North Carolina Alcohol Beverage Control Commission to allow it.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Apparently, the state decided that the beer promoted polygamy, which is illegal.

Westlake Legal Group Utopias_Barrel Sam Adams' newest beer is illegal in 15 states Michael Hollan fox-news/food-drink/drinks/beer fox news fnc/food-drink fnc b46176f9-eb82-5453-a4dc-74c774d768d4 article   Westlake Legal Group Utopias_Barrel Sam Adams' newest beer is illegal in 15 states Michael Hollan fox-news/food-drink/drinks/beer fox news fnc/food-drink fnc b46176f9-eb82-5453-a4dc-74c774d768d4 article

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Top Democrat says Trump was ‘not in a good mood’ before Pelosi White House walkout

Westlake Legal Group a9f970ba-Smith-Trump-Pelosi Top Democrat says Trump was 'not in a good mood' before Pelosi White House walkout fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/us-regions/west/washington fox-news/shows/your-world fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 7a6fd198-76dd-5368-8a88-ad4fba39d1a0

House Armed Services Committee Chairman Adam Smith, D-Wash., told Fox News Thursday that President Trump’s mood soured a White House meeting on Syria that was capped by a walkout from three top congressional Democrats.

Smith told “Your World” host Neil Cavuto that Trump often speaks in a “disrespectful” way and that he was not surprised by the president’s purported demeanor.

“He was not in a good mood when he came into the room, that was obvious,” Smith said of the meeting, during which House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., walked out.

“Basically, the president said, ‘well, you guys asked for this meeting — I don’t know why we’re here — I don’t know what this meeting’s about, but you asked for it, so what do you want?’.”

Smith claimed the meeting “went downhill from there,” leading to some terse verbal exchanges.

KEVIN MCCARTHY: TOP DEMOCRATS WHO WALKED OUT OF WHITE HOUSE MEETING JUST ‘INFATUATED’ WITH IMPEACHMENT

“The biggest part of this is sort of the way the president talks to people,” he continued. “A lot of people have asked me if I was surprised — No, this is the way the president communicates and I don’t think it is helpful.”

However, Smith added many people from both parties who were present at the meeting were very interested in discussing “substantive issues.”

“We had this meeting because this is a very serious issue, in terms of what’s going on in Syria with the Kurds and Turkey and everybody,” he said, rejecting the notion the walkout was pre-planned.

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“This president has his way of talking — I completely support the speaker.”

Smith also described what precipitated the walkout by the Democrats, claiming Trump became upset when Schumer spoke about the Syria issue.

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“Chuck Schumer got into the issue of Syria and was somewhat accusatory of the president for abandoning the Kurds,” he said, adding Pelosi appeared to “second” the New York Democrat’s comments.

“That did upset the president,” he continued. “As far as the insults, it was definitely coming from the president.”

Smith also rejected House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s, R-Calif., recollection of events, saying “this president is disrespectful, it is how he operates 24/7.”

Westlake Legal Group a9f970ba-Smith-Trump-Pelosi Top Democrat says Trump was 'not in a good mood' before Pelosi White House walkout fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/us-regions/west/washington fox-news/shows/your-world fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 7a6fd198-76dd-5368-8a88-ad4fba39d1a0   Westlake Legal Group a9f970ba-Smith-Trump-Pelosi Top Democrat says Trump was 'not in a good mood' before Pelosi White House walkout fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/us-regions/west/washington fox-news/shows/your-world fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 7a6fd198-76dd-5368-8a88-ad4fba39d1a0

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Top Navy SEAL who oversaw the Osama bin Laden raid says the US is ‘under attack from the president’

Westlake Legal Group AIr_1v7kzVxKDuVz0EsLdPc8d0nbfUKJ7FjpWYEJgLI Top Navy SEAL who oversaw the Osama bin Laden raid says the US is 'under attack from the president' r/politics

Trump did not redefine what constitutes a Patriot.

Trump defines what constitutes an Unpatriot.

.

His GOP enablers frequently behave unpatriotic, as do his media cheerleaders, while superficially pretending the opposite.

.

Edit:

Unfortunately, the erosion of broadcasting standards, coupled with the effects of regulatory capture, has resulted in an increasingly monotonous media diet, heavy on misinformation and misdirection, which has successfully brainwashed a sizeable portion of the populace.

People by and large, (severely) overestimate their own ability to remain objective, and tend to treat an experienced emotion as a justification, rather than as a symptom highlighting a need to investigate its root cause.

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Mulvaney Says Trump Held Back Ukraine Aid Pending Investigation of Democrats

Westlake Legal Group 17dc-impeachbriefing-mulvaney-facebookJumbo-v2 Mulvaney Says Trump Held Back Ukraine Aid Pending Investigation of Democrats United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Presidential Election of 2016 Mulvaney, Mick impeachment

WASHINGTON — Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, said Thursday that the Trump administration withheld nearly $400 million in military aid to pressure Ukraine to investigate what the president has long insisted was Kiev’s assistance to Democrats during the 2016 election.

The declaration by Mr. Mulvaney undercut Mr. Trump’s repeated denials of a quid pro quo that linked security aid for Ukraine’s battle against Russian-backed separatists to Mr. Trump’s unsubstantiated theory that a server with missing Democratic emails was being held by a company based in Ukraine.

A former White House homeland security adviser had told Mr. Trump repeatedly that the theory had been “completely debunked.” But Mr. Trump demanded Ukraine take a look, Mr. Mulvaney said.

“The look-back to what happened in 2016 certainly was part of the thing that he was worried about in corruption with that nation,” Mr. Mulvaney told reporters, referring to Mr. Trump. “And that is absolutely appropriate.”

He said that administration officials initially withheld the aid because “everybody knows this is a corrupt place,” and the president was demanding Ukraine clean up its own government. But, Mr. Mulvaney added, “Did he also mention to me in passing the corruption related to the D.N.C. server? Absolutely. No question about that.”

“But that’s it,” he concluded, “and that’s why we held up the money.”

With his defense of the president, Mr. Mulvaney, one of Mr. Trump’s most loyal lieutenants, effectively confirmed the main premise of the House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry, which is focused on a shadow diplomatic campaign to pressure Ukraine to investigate the Democrats.

“The only thing I’ll say at this point is that Mr. Mulvaney’s acknowledgment certainly indicates that things have gone from very, very bad to much, much worse,” said Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee who is leading the impeachment inquiry.

Jay Sekulow, one of Mr. Trump’s personal lawyers, said Thursday that “the president’s legal counsel was not involved in acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney’s press briefing.”

Mr. Mulvaney made his remarks on the same day that Gordon D. Sondland, the ambassador to the European Union and a wealthy donor to Mr. Trump’s campaign, implicated the president by telling lawmakers that Mr. Trump had delegated Ukraine policy to his personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani.

Mr. Sondland testified behind closed doors for more than six hours at the Capitol, the latest in a series of current and former diplomats and White House aides who have provided detailed accounts of actions by Mr. Giuliani and others related to Ukraine.

Democratic lawmakers are certain to seize on Mr. Mulvaney’s comments as crucial support of the testimony coming from other witnesses, who have accused the administration of improperly pressuring Ukraine and of sidelining veteran diplomats in favor of Mr. Trump’s political loyalists.

“We have a confession,” said Representative Eric Swalwell, Democrat of California.

In wide-ranging remarks, Mr. Mulvaney told reporters at the White House that the $391 million in military aid was initially withheld from Ukraine because the president was displeased that European countries were not as generous with their assistance. He also wanted more attention paid to Ukraine’s persistent political corruption.

Mr. Mulvaney denied that the aid for Ukraine was also contingent on its government opening an investigation into either former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., a leading Democratic candidate for president, or his younger son, Hunter Biden. Asked whether he did anything to pressure President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine to investigate the Bidens, Mr. Mulvaney said “no.”

But the president did pressure Ukraine to re-examine discredited theories that Ukraine, not Russia, had worked to sway the 2016 campaign. Mr. Mulvaney’s mention of a “D.N.C. server” was a reference to an unfounded conspiracy theory promoted by Mr. Trump that Ukraine was somehow involved in Russia’s 2016 theft of emails from the Democratic National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

Mr. Mulvaney tied the server to the Justice Department’s review of the origins of the Russia investigation, led by the United States attorney in Connecticut, John H. Durham, and closely overseen by Attorney General William P. Barr.

“That’s an ongoing investigation,” Mr. Mulvaney said. “So you’re saying the president of the United States, the chief law enforcement person, cannot ask somebody to cooperate with an ongoing public investigation into wrongdoing? That’s just bizarre to me that you would think that you can’t do that.”

But while the Justice Department said last month that Mr. Durham was examining any role that Ukraine might have played in the early stages of the Russia investigation, a department official declined on Thursday to comment on whether he was examining the server conspiracy theory.

Russian military officers hacked Democratic servers to steal thousands of emails in 2016, the intelligence community and the special counsel found, and no one has uncovered evidence of Ukrainian involvement.

Justice Department officials were confused and angry when they heard that Mr. Mulvaney said the White House froze aid to Ukraine in exchange for help with the Durham investigation, according to a person familiar with their discussions.

“If the White House was withholding aid in regards to the cooperation of any investigation at the Department of Justice, that is news to us,” a senior Justice Department official said. Mr. Durham was seen leaving the Justice Department around midday Thursday.

Mr. Mulvaney said the president had done nothing improper and had stayed in normal diplomatic channels. He blasted the current and former administration officials who have testified in the impeachment inquiry, describing them as personally opposed to the changes in foreign policy that Mr. Trump had put in place.

“What you’re seeing now, I believe, is a group of mostly career bureaucrats who are saying, ‘you know what, I don’t like President Trump’s politics, so I’m going to participate in this witch hunt that they are undertaking on the hill.’”

Mr. Mulvaney said holding up Ukraine’s aid was a normal part of foreign policy, and he compared it to the foreign aid to Central America that the administration froze until Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras agreed to adopt the immigration policies pressed by Mr. Trump.

Asked whether he had admitted to a quid pro quo, Mr. Mulvaney said: “We do that all the time with foreign policy.”

His answer ignored the distinction — raised by many of the president’s critics — between holding up foreign aid to further American interests and holding up foreign aid to further Mr. Trump’s personal interests.

Senior White House aides like Mr. Mulvaney are often largely immune from congressional subpoenas to discuss their private conversations with the president, but talking about them publicly in such an extended way could undermine that legal protection.

Democrats had already been interested in Mr. Mulvaney’s role in the Ukraine matter after several impeachment witnesses described the acting chief of staff as a central player in the effort to hold up the aid in the days before Mr. Trump pressed Ukraine’s president to investigate Mr. Biden.

They also have said they want to know whether Mr. Mulvaney helped prevent a White House meeting between Mr. Trump and Mr. Zelensky until the Ukrainian government agreed to investigate the president’s rivals, including the D.N.C. and the Bidens.

Fiona Hill, the president’s former senior director for European and Russian affairs at the National Security Council, testified that Mr. Mulvaney was part of three of Trump loyalists who conducted a rogue foreign policy operation in Ukraine.

Ms. Hill told lawmakers that John R. Bolton, then the national security adviser, instructed her in early July to advise the National Security Council’s chief lawyer about the effort by Mr. Mulvaney, Mr. Sondland and Mr. Giuliani.

“I am not part of whatever drug deal Sondland and Mulvaney are cooking up,” Mr. Bolton told Ms. Hill to tell White House lawyers, according to two people at Ms. Hill’s deposition, which took place on Monday.

In his remarks on Thursday, Mr. Mulvaney said there was nothing wrong with Mr. Trump relying on Mr. Giuliani or others outside of the diplomatic corps to conduct foreign policy.

“That’s the president’s call,” he said. “You may not like the fact that Giuliani was involved. That’s great, that’s fine. It’s not illegal, it’s not impeachable.” He added that “The president gets to set foreign policy and he gets to choose who to do so.”

Democrats are also eager to know about a May 23 meeting during which career diplomats with responsibility for Ukraine were sidelined in favor of Mr. Sondland, Kurt D. Volker, the special envoy for Ukraine, and Rick Perry, the energy secretary, one witness testified.

George P. Kent, the deputy assistant secretary in the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs, testified Tuesday that Mr. Mulvaney called the White House meeting, according to Representative Gerald E. Connolly, Democrat of Virginia, who was in the room for Mr. Kent’s testimony.

Katie Benner and Nicholas Fandos contributed reporting from Washington, and Maggie Haberman from New York.

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Perry Tells Trump He Will Resign as Energy Secretary

Westlake Legal Group 17dc-perry-sub-facebookJumbo Perry Tells Trump He Will Resign as Energy Secretary United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Perry, Rick impeachment Energy Department

Rick Perry, the energy secretary who has drawn scrutiny for his role in the controversy surrounding President Trump’s efforts to push Ukraine officials to investigate the son of a political rival, on Thursday told the president he would resign from the cabinet.

The Perry resignation had been anticipated for several weeks, even before the news emerged of his involvement in efforts to pressure the new president of Ukraine, Volodymyr Zelensky, to investigate a company that had worked with Hunter Biden, the younger son of former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.

In the ensuing weeks, Mr. Perry has been drawn deeper into the questions around the pressure campaign on Mr. Zelensky, which has spurred an impeachment inquiry that threatens to engulf Mr. Trump’s presidency.

Mr. Perry told The Wall Street Journal in an interview published on Wednesday night that he was in contact with Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani about Ukraine-related matters at the direction of Mr. Trump.

It is not known exactly when Mr. Perry will leave his post, but it is expected soon. The New York Times had earlier reported he would leave by year’s end.

Mr. Perry has been instrumental in supporting what President Trump has called a policy of American “energy dominance,” which includes increasing the exports of United States fossil fuels to Ukraine and elsewhere.

As energy secretary, Mr. Perry oversaw a sharp increase in the production of fossil fuels, particularly liquefied natural gas, and promoted it with a patriotic fervor — even dubbing the fossil fuel “freedom gas” and likening its export to Europe to the United States efforts to liberate the continent from during World War II.

“The United States is again delivering a form of freedom to the European continent,” Mr. Perry told reporters in Brussels in May, according to Euractiv.com. “And rather than in the form of young American soldiers,” Mr. Perry said, “it’s in the form of liquefied natural gas.”

Mr. Perry also led a failed effort to engineer a federal bailout for struggling coal and nuclear power plants. Though the plan ultimately ran afoul of White House advisers, Mr. Perry has continued to maintain that the government still has the option of keeping aging plants operating, even as he asserted that incentives might be a better path forward.

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A day without teachers: 32,000+ educators in Chicago went on strike. Here’s what it was like.

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close A day without teachers: 32,000+ educators in Chicago went on strike. Here's what it was like.

The latest teacher strike in the U.S. is in Chicago after the teacher’s union wants CPS and the mayor’s office to commit to hiring more support staff. USA TODAY

CHICAGO – Students flocked to camps, friends’ houses, safe havens and bowling alleys on Thursday as about 32,000 Chicago Public Schools teachers and aides went on strike after negotiators failed to agree on a contract with the nation’s third-largest school district.

Teachers, staff and kids rose before the sun to picket outside their schools, chanting, holding posters and cheering at buses and cars that honked as they drove by. They donned hats, gloves and scarves for the 44-degree morning and warmed up with doughnuts and coffee.

The first major walkout by Chicago teachers since 2012 came after months of talks over pay and benefits, class size and teacher preparation time.

After rejecting the Chicago Teachers Union’s demands, which led to the strike call, Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced classes for about 360,000 students would be canceled Thursday.

About a dozen teachers gathered outside Chalmers Elementary on the city’s West Side before 6:30 a.m. Some held signs saying “speed limit 30, not a class size for young children” and “dumbledore wouldn’t let this happen.” 

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Maggie Sermont, 32, a CTU school delegate and middle school special ed teacher, has taught for seven years at Chalmers, which serves mainly low-income students and students who are experiencing homelessness.

“This is a difficult neighborhood to work in,” she said. “We have a lot of churn and burn and teachers going out the door. No one is working at Chalmers Elementary school for the pay. We really want to help the kids, and we need wraparound services, clinicians, specials teachers.”

In the afternoon, educators across the city converged downtown for a mass demonstration near the Board of Education headquarters. Thousands of teachers clad in red and support staff in purple continued chants that could be heard at schools all morning, including, “Lori Lightfoot, get on the right foot!” and “Get up! Get down! Chicago is a union town!” They banged buckets, clanged bells and shook tambourines. 

Buildings remained open

Per orders from CPS, buildings remained open on a normal bell schedule for children to attend – staffed by administrators and other non-union employees. Meals were served. But only about 6,700 children attended CPS schools Thursday, according to an official estimate that afternoon. That’s about two in every 100 currently enrolled CPS students.

Community centers that normally specialize in afterschool programming turned into places offering daytime education and activities. The century-old community space Hyde Park Neighborhood Club hosted 60 students – its maximum capacity – from across the South Side.

Several other centers visited by USA TODAY, however, were under capacity. Breakthrough, a nonprofit community resource center with five locations in East Garfield Park, a predominantly African American neighborhood, was staffed to accommodate 90 children but only had about 20 by late morning. 

Lightfoot visited the center and read “A Bad Case of the Stripes” to a small group of students.

Earlier, she dropped into a YMCA center to check in on children participating in the Y’s “Schools Day Out” program. Across the participating Y sites, about 305 kids attended the program, which included a full day of curriculum and athletics.

Some students even joined their parents on the picket line.

CPS parents expressed conflicted feelings toward the strike.

Disruptions in the school week are particularly challenging for Shani Blackwell and her 8-year-old son, who live in the Austin neighborhood on the city’s West Side.

“I’m in the weird space of like – I support the teachers, but it’s a hardship for me. My son is a special education student, so while the district offered to keep the schools open, there won’t be the personnel there that he needs,” Blackwell said. “He needs consistency. Transitioning him back to school, however long the strike goes on, will be difficult.”

Blackwell, 43, works in higher education research. She said she supports teachers and has personally seen the incredible difference one teacher can make in a student’s life, but she also said her son needs his routine. 

Blackwell said her son was spending the day about 11 miles away with his grandmother, who usually does workbooks with him.

“Right now, my mom is watching him, but she’s a senior. Trying to keep up with him is a little tricky for her. I’ll probably have to negotiate with my employer if the strike goes past this weekend – negotiate working from home,” Blackwell said.

For Rebecca Eden, this strike gave her 14-year-old triplets a day to relax: One went bowling, one had a friend over, and one played video games. It took a far lighter toll on her than the 2012 strike, when her kids were much younger.

“In 2012, they were in second grade, so that was a big child care concern for me at the time. We took advantage of the school drop-off,” said Eden, who lives in Chicago’s northside neighborhood of Lakeview.

That year, Eden brought food to the picket lines and made her kids wear red, the color of CTU.

But this year feels different, Eden said.

“This time around, I am verbally and in my heart with the teachers, but it feels more like they’re being social justice warriors,” Eden said. “It feels more like an activism strike than a strike for what they’re legally allowed to ask for. And every school does need those things. I just don’t know how we can afford those things, and how we can’t afford those things.”

Ravenswood resident Wendy Walter, 16, is using the extra time to study for the PSATs, which were scheduled for Wednesday but delayed in light of the strike. The Walter Payton College Prep student, a selective enrollment school, plans to go to a friend’s house Thursday night to rehearse lines for the fall play since practice was canceled.

“Certainly for a couple of days, there’s no question, she has productive work to do. I am concerned, obviously, about the degree to which this goes on,” Wendy’s father, Scott Walter, said. “Especially being a junior, she’s in a year that is considered especially significant for her college application process. We hope the situation resolves amenable and quickly.”

A librarian at Illinois Wesleyan University, Walter said he believes the unions’ demands with regard to class size, preparation time and specialized services for students are “reasonable and necessary.”

School closed: What to know about the Chicago teachers strike

Dian Palmer, president of SEIU Local 73, visited picket lines at several schools across the city.

“I’m always hopeful of the city coming around,” Palmer said. “I’m surprised they allowed a strike to happen when they can so easily settle this and get a reasonable contract.

“We’re not looking to harm anybody,” she said. “We’re looking to lift our members out of poverty.”

Educators want promises in writing

Lightfoot said the city had offered a 16% raise for its 25,000 teachers and would increase the pay of the average support staff worker by 38% over the life of the contract. She said management has made more than 80 changes to the proposal and “bent over backward” to meet the union’s requests.

Chicago educators charge that the district has shortchanged schools after years of budget cuts and they want any new promises in writing. The district says its offer of a 16% raise over five years is comprehensive and “historic.”

Among the striking educators were 7,500 school support staff, joining teachers on the picket lines in their own strike for a new contract.

“We wear a lot of hats, and we need to be compensated,” said Natasha Jackson, 38, a special education classroom assistant represented by Service Employees International Union. “A lot of us (at SEIU) have the same education as teachers and need to be compensated.”

About 2,500 Chicago Park District workers initially planned to join the walkout with teachers and school staff workers, but their bargaining unit on Wednesday announced they had reached an agreement with City Hall.

For teachers, the long-anticipated work stoppage drew attention to what labor leaders say is a failure to reach a fair contract with the city that defines and funds more support staff in the form of nurses, librarians, counselors and school psychologists.

Union leaders say they also want enforceable limits on class sizes, which have swelled to the high 30s and mid-40s in some schools.

Lightfoot said the union’s total requests would add an additional $2.5 billion to the CPS annual budget, which she called “completely irresponsible.”

The mayor proposed a $7.7 billion district budget in August, up about $117 million from the 2019 budget.

Union leaders have contested the salary figures in the contract proposal, saying the average teacher salary would be closer to $85,000, not $100,000. They say that other critical demands have not been inserted into the contract language, such as a commitment to put a nurse in every school. They also want the contract to address other issues that affect the city’s students, such as affordable housing.

“I’m striking because class size does matter,” said Victoria Winslow, 29, a fifth-year first grade teacher at Chalmers. “Our support staff deserves a livable wage, and we only have a nurse one day a week – are we supposed to stop teaching and become nurses?”

A matter of resources

At Rudy Lozano Elementary School, located between the rapidly gentrifying Wicker Park and Bucktown neighborhoods, teachers began demonstrating outside before 7 a.m. Thursday. The school serves about 400 students, 75% of whom are Latino.

Middle-school reading teacher Melissa Strum said many low-income parents who have been pushed out of the neighborhood because of rising rent costs still send their children to the school.

She said her school gets fewer resources than schools located in the same neighborhood just blocks away but surrounded by single-family homes and multi-million dollar condos.

“We have a social worker only three days a week, and her caseload is about 80 to 100 students,” Strum said as the sun rose over Lozano. “We only have a nurse two days a week. We should have one every day.”

Inside the classroom: We followed 15 of America’s teachers on a day of frustrations, pressures and hard-earned victories

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Xian Franzinger Barrett, a special education teacher at Telpochcalli Elementary School in Chicago’s Little Village neighborhood, said teachers in Chicago believe their children deserve the same equitable support in schools that children get in suburban Chicago. 

He said that is especially true since CPS is receiving more state money this year because of a 2017 change in the state’s education funding formula.

“We don’t understand the response that this is not financially feasible,” he said. “We see the money there, and we think our children are as deserving of it as anyone else’s children. That’s why you see such a passionate confrontation here.”

Education coverage at USA TODAY is made possible in part by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The Gates Foundation does not provide editorial input.

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/education/2019/10/17/chicago-teachers-union-strike-new-contract/4000656002/

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Trump’s legal team is reportedly ‘stunned’ after Mick Mulvaney admitted to a quid pro quo

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How Elijah Cummings’ unexpected death could affect the impeachment inquiry

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close How Elijah Cummings' unexpected death could affect the impeachment inquiry

Democratic and Republican leaders in Washington expressed their condolences following the death of Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland. He died early Thursday at age 68. (Oct. 17) AP, AP

WASHINGTON – The unexpected death Thursday of Rep. Elijah Cummings has meant the loss of a key Democratic leader, an eloquent voice for and confidante of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi who played a central figure in the House’s ongoing impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

Cummings, who served as chairman of the powerful House Oversight and Reform Committee, will be succeeded by New York Democrat Carolyn Maloney on an acting basis. And there’s no indication that the inquiry, now in its fourth week, is slowing down amid the tragedy.

Pelosi said the House is continuing to gather evidence and talk to witnesses as it investigates efforts by Trump to pressure the Ukrainian government to provide potentially damaging information on 2020 political rival Joe Biden and his son, Hunter. 

Trump’s acting chief of staff acknowledged Thursday that financial aid to Ukraine at the center of a House impeachment inquiry was withheld because of the president’s desire for the country to engage in U.S. politics.

Mick Mulvaney’s assertion was the first time a White House official has conceded Trump set up a quid quo pro scenario in which money approved by Congress for Ukraine was used as leverage, though he defended the arrangement as standard practice. 

The son of sharecroppers, Cummings was one the earliest and most aggressive committee chairmen investigating Trump, sending requests for information while in the minority during the first two years of the president’s term and then calling hearings and demanding documents after Democrats regained control of the House in January.

He accused the administration of stonewalling his requests for documents on a variety of subjects including whether Trump was profiting unconstitutionally from his namesake business while president and why a citizenship question was proposed for the U.S. Census in 2020.

Here are some key questions about Cummings, Maloney and where the impeachment process goes from here:

Q: What was Cummings’ role in helping lead impeachment efforts?

A: As chair of a committee responsible for unearthing evidence of potential corruption, the Maryland Democrat has been at the center of the impeachment effort by leading a panel that demanded key documents and records.

In recent weeks, Cummings’ panel has issued several subpoenas to key witnesses in the investigation: Energy Secretary Rick Perry about his contacts with the Ukrainian government; to the lawyer for two Ukrainian-born business partners who helped Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, in trying to find dirt on the Bidens; and the White House itself for pertinent documents.

Latest witness: Impeachment inquiry: Trump ambassador ‘disappointed’ with Rudy Giuliani’s influence in Ukraine policy

Even before the formal impeachment inquiry, Cummings was responsible for convening the committee hearing in February when Trump’s former attorney, Michael Cohen, testified that the president encouraged him to lie to Congress and the public for Trump’s protection.

Q: How will the loss of Cummings affect impeachment?

A: The West Baltimore native (who got into a very public spat about his hometown with the president earlier this summer)  has been a forceful voice against the Trump administration on a number of issues including the cost of prescription drugs and civil rights.

Leading the Oversight and Reform Committee, Cummings was one of the three chairmen heading the impeachment (along with Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., and Foreign Affairs Eliot Engel). Cummings’ death.

But Pelosi made clear that the inquiry was still on track despite a tragedy that silenced one of Congress’ most powerful voices.

“The timeline (on impeachment) will depend on the truth line,” Pelosi told reporters Thursday morning.

Q: Who is Carolyn Maloney, the congresswoman who will take over the House and Oversight Committee on an acting basis?

A: The former New York City teacher with a first-degree black belt in Taekwondo, Maloney has a reputation as a tenacious champion for women’s rights and consumer protections over her nearly 14 terms in Congress.

Not necessary: Nancy Pelosi: No need for House to hold formal vote on impeachment inquiry already under way

She’s also been a leader on issues tied to the Sept. 11 attacks, including the creation of the commission examining the terrorist attacks and efforts to compensate first responders who developed health problems following the disaster.

Maloney, 73, has also been a vocal supporter of Trump’s impeachment, saying in September during a rally on Capitol Hill that Trump has committed “treason” by pressuring Ukraine to dig up dirt on political rival Joe Biden.

“We will get to the bottom of this,” she said at the rally. “We will not let the president get away with breaking the law.”

Q: What’s next for the impeachment process?

A: Witnesses continue to be called in front of the committee.

Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, was the latest witness, telling the House impeachment panel Thursday that he was disappointed that he had to consult with Giuliani on Ukraine policy and that withholding military aid for a political investigation would be “wrong.”

Republicans had hoped to slow, or kill, the inquiry by forcing the House to hold a formal vote on whether to authorize the inquiry that Pelosi launched last month.

But the Speaker rejected such calls Tuesday, saying it was not necessary to take the additional step on a probe that is already well underway.

“There’s no requirement that we have a vote,” Pelosi said. “We’re not here to call bluffs. We’re here to find the truth to uphold the Constitution of the United States. This is not a game for us. This is deadly serious.”

Trump has vowed not to cooperate with the inquiry unless the House holds a vote to officially launch it. Democrats, in turn, had considered holding such a vote, potentially in case the courts said such a move was necessary to compel administration officials and other potential witnesses in the investigation to provide documents and appear for testimony.

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Mulvaney Says Trump Held Back Ukraine Aid Pending Investigation of Democrats

Westlake Legal Group 17dc-impeachbriefing-mulvaney-facebookJumbo-v2 Mulvaney Says Trump Held Back Ukraine Aid Pending Investigation of Democrats United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Presidential Election of 2016 Mulvaney, Mick impeachment

WASHINGTON — Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, said Thursday that the Trump administration withheld nearly $400 million in military aid to pressure Ukraine to investigate what the president has long insisted was Kiev’s assistance to Democrats during the 2016 election.

The declaration by Mr. Mulvaney undercut Mr. Trump’s repeated denials of a quid pro quo that linked security aid for Ukraine’s battle against Russian-backed separatists to Mr. Trump’s unsubstantiated theory that a server with missing Democratic emails was being held by a company based in Ukraine.

A former White House homeland security adviser had told Mr. Trump repeatedly that the theory had been “completely debunked.” But Mr. Trump demanded Ukraine take a look, Mr. Mulvaney said.

“The look-back to what happened in 2016 certainly was part of the thing that he was worried about in corruption with that nation,” Mr. Mulvaney told reporters, referring to Mr. Trump. “And that is absolutely appropriate.”

He said that administration officials initially withheld the aid because “everybody knows this is a corrupt place,” and the president was demanding Ukraine clean up its own government. But, Mr. Mulvaney added, “Did he also mention to me in passing the corruption related to the D.N.C. server? Absolutely. No question about that.”

“But that’s it,” he concluded, “and that’s why we held up the money.”

With his defense of the president, Mr. Mulvaney, one of Mr. Trump’s most loyal lieutenants, effectively confirmed the main premise of the House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry, which is focused on a shadow diplomatic campaign to pressure Ukraine to investigate the Democrats.

“The only thing I’ll say at this point is that Mr. Mulvaney’s acknowledgment certainly indicates that things have gone from very, very bad to much, much worse,” said Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee who is leading the impeachment inquiry.

Jay Sekulow, one of Mr. Trump’s personal lawyers, said Thursday that “the president’s legal counsel was not involved in acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney’s press briefing.”

Mr. Mulvaney made his remarks on the same day that Gordon D. Sondland, the ambassador to the European Union and a wealthy donor to Mr. Trump’s campaign, implicated the president by telling lawmakers that Mr. Trump had delegated Ukraine policy to his personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani.

Mr. Sondland testified behind closed doors for more than six hours at the Capitol, the latest in a series of current and former diplomats and White House aides who have provided detailed accounts of actions by Mr. Giuliani and others related to Ukraine.

Democratic lawmakers are certain to seize on Mr. Mulvaney’s comments as crucial support of the testimony coming from other witnesses, who have accused the administration of improperly pressuring Ukraine and of sidelining veteran diplomats in favor of Mr. Trump’s political loyalists.

“We have a confession,” said Representative Eric Swalwell, Democrat of California.

In wide-ranging remarks, Mr. Mulvaney told reporters at the White House that the $391 million in military aid was initially withheld from Ukraine because the president was displeased that European countries were not as generous with their assistance. He also wanted more attention paid to Ukraine’s persistent political corruption.

Mr. Mulvaney denied that the aid for Ukraine was also contingent on its government opening an investigation into either former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., a leading Democratic candidate for president, or his younger son, Hunter Biden. Asked whether he did anything to pressure President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine to investigate the Bidens, Mr. Mulvaney said “no.”

But the president did pressure Ukraine to re-examine discredited theories that Ukraine, not Russia, had worked to sway the 2016 campaign. Mr. Mulvaney’s mention of a “D.N.C. server” was a reference to an unfounded conspiracy theory promoted by Mr. Trump that Ukraine was somehow involved in Russia’s 2016 theft of emails from the Democratic National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

Mr. Mulvaney tied the server to the Justice Department’s review of the origins of the Russia investigation, led by the United States attorney in Connecticut, John H. Durham, and closely overseen by Attorney General William P. Barr.

“That’s an ongoing investigation,” Mr. Mulvaney said. “So you’re saying the president of the United States, the chief law enforcement person, cannot ask somebody to cooperate with an ongoing public investigation into wrongdoing? That’s just bizarre to me that you would think that you can’t do that.”

But while the Justice Department said last month that Mr. Durham was examining any role that Ukraine might have played in the early stages of the Russia investigation, a department official declined on Thursday to comment on whether he was examining the server conspiracy theory.

Russian military officers hacked Democratic servers to steal thousands of emails in 2016, the intelligence community and the special counsel found, and no one has uncovered evidence of Ukrainian involvement.

Justice Department officials were confused and angry when they heard that Mr. Mulvaney said the White House froze aid to Ukraine in exchange for help with the Durham investigation, according to a person familiar with their discussions.

“If the White House was withholding aid in regards to the cooperation of any investigation at the Department of Justice, that is news to us,” a senior Justice Department official said. Mr. Durham was seen leaving the Justice Department around midday Thursday.

Mr. Mulvaney said the president had done nothing improper and had stayed in normal diplomatic channels. He blasted the current and former administration officials who have testified in the impeachment inquiry, describing them as personally opposed to the changes in foreign policy that Mr. Trump had put in place.

“What you’re seeing now, I believe, is a group of mostly career bureaucrats who are saying, ‘you know what, I don’t like President Trump’s politics, so I’m going to participate in this witch hunt that they are undertaking on the hill.’”

Mr. Mulvaney said holding up Ukraine’s aid was a normal part of foreign policy, and he compared it to the foreign aid to Central America that the administration froze until Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras agreed to adopt the immigration policies pressed by Mr. Trump.

Asked whether he had admitted to a quid pro quo, Mr. Mulvaney said: “We do that all the time with foreign policy.”

His answer ignored the distinction — raised by many of the president’s critics — between holding up foreign aid to further American interests and holding up foreign aid to further Mr. Trump’s personal interests.

Senior White House aides like Mr. Mulvaney are often largely immune from congressional subpoenas to discuss their private conversations with the president, but talking about them publicly in such an extended way could undermine that legal protection.

Democrats had already been interested in Mr. Mulvaney’s role in the Ukraine matter after several impeachment witnesses described the acting chief of staff as a central player in the effort to hold up the aid in the days before Mr. Trump pressed Ukraine’s president to investigate Mr. Biden.

They also have said they want to know whether Mr. Mulvaney helped prevent a White House meeting between Mr. Trump and Mr. Zelensky until the Ukrainian government agreed to investigate the president’s rivals, including the D.N.C. and the Bidens.

Fiona Hill, the president’s former senior director for European and Russian affairs at the National Security Council, testified that Mr. Mulvaney was part of three of Trump loyalists who conducted a rogue foreign policy operation in Ukraine.

Ms. Hill told lawmakers that John R. Bolton, then the national security adviser, instructed her in early July to advise the National Security Council’s chief lawyer about the effort by Mr. Mulvaney, Mr. Sondland and Mr. Giuliani.

“I am not part of whatever drug deal Sondland and Mulvaney are cooking up,” Mr. Bolton told Ms. Hill to tell White House lawyers, according to two people at Ms. Hill’s deposition, which took place on Monday.

In his remarks on Thursday, Mr. Mulvaney said there was nothing wrong with Mr. Trump relying on Mr. Giuliani or others outside of the diplomatic corps to conduct foreign policy.

“That’s the president’s call,” he said. “You may not like the fact that Giuliani was involved. That’s great, that’s fine. It’s not illegal, it’s not impeachable.” He added that “The president gets to set foreign policy and he gets to choose who to do so.”

Democrats are also eager to know about a May 23 meeting during which career diplomats with responsibility for Ukraine were sidelined in favor of Mr. Sondland, Kurt D. Volker, the special envoy for Ukraine, and Rick Perry, the energy secretary, one witness testified.

George P. Kent, the deputy assistant secretary in the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs, testified Tuesday that Mr. Mulvaney called the White House meeting, according to Representative Gerald E. Connolly, Democrat of Virginia, who was in the room for Mr. Kent’s testimony.

Katie Benner and Nicholas Fandos contributed reporting from Washington, and Maggie Haberman from New York.

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Mulvaney: Trump Held Back Ukraine Aid Pending Investigation of Democrats

Westlake Legal Group 17dc-impeachbriefing-mulvaney-facebookJumbo-v2 Mulvaney: Trump Held Back Ukraine Aid Pending Investigation of Democrats United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Presidential Election of 2016 Mulvaney, Mick impeachment

WASHINGTON — Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, said Thursday that the Trump administration withheld nearly $400 million in military aid to pressure Ukraine to investigate what the president has long insisted was Kiev’s assistance to Democrats during the 2016 election.

The declaration by Mr. Mulvaney undercut Mr. Trump’s repeated denials of a quid pro quo that linked security aid for Ukraine’s battle against Russian-backed separatists to Mr. Trump’s unsubstantiated theory that a server with missing Democratic emails was being held by a company based in Ukraine.

A former White House homeland security adviser had told Mr. Trump repeatedly that the theory had been “completely debunked.” But Mr. Trump demanded Ukraine take a look, Mr. Mulvaney said.

“The look-back to what happened in 2016 certainly was part of the thing that he was worried about in corruption with that nation,” Mr. Mulvaney told reporters, referring to Mr. Trump. “And that is absolutely appropriate.”

He said that administration officials initially withheld the aid because “everybody knows this is a corrupt place,” and the president was demanding Ukraine clean up its own government. But, Mr. Mulvaney added, “Did he also mention to me in passing the corruption related to the D.N.C. server? Absolutely. No question about that.”

“But that’s it,” he concluded, “and that’s why we held up the money.”

With his defense of the president, Mr. Mulvaney, one of Mr. Trump’s most loyal lieutenants, effectively confirmed the main premise of the House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry, which is focused on a shadow diplomatic campaign to pressure Ukraine to investigate the Democrats.

“The only thing I’ll say at this point is that Mr. Mulvaney’s acknowledgment certainly indicates that things have gone from very, very bad to much, much worse,” said Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee who is leading the impeachment inquiry.

Jay Sekulow, one of Mr. Trump’s personal lawyers, said Thursday that “the president’s legal counsel was not involved in acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney’s press briefing.”

Mr. Mulvaney made his remarks on the same day that Gordon D. Sondland, the ambassador to the European Union and a wealthy donor to Mr. Trump’s campaign, implicated the president by telling lawmakers that Mr. Trump had delegated Ukraine policy to his personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani.

Mr. Sondland testified behind closed doors for more than six hours at the Capitol, the latest in a series of current and former diplomats and White House aides who have provided detailed accounts of actions by Mr. Giuliani and others related to Ukraine.

Democratic lawmakers are certain to seize on Mr. Mulvaney’s comments as crucial support of the testimony coming from other witnesses, who have accused the administration of improperly pressuring Ukraine and of sidelining veteran diplomats in favor of Mr. Trump’s political loyalists.

“We have a confession,” said Representative Eric Swalwell, Democrat of California.

In wide-ranging remarks, Mr. Mulvaney told reporters at the White House that the $391 million in military aid was initially withheld from Ukraine because the president was displeased that European countries were not as generous with their assistance. He also wanted more attention paid to Ukraine’s persistent political corruption.

Mr. Mulvaney denied that the aid for Ukraine was also contingent on its government opening an investigation into either former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., a leading Democratic candidate for president, or his younger son, Hunter Biden. Asked whether he did anything to pressure President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine to investigate the Bidens, Mr. Mulvaney said “no.”

But the president did pressure Ukraine to re-examine discredited theories that Ukraine, not Russia, had worked to sway the 2016 campaign. Mr. Mulvaney’s mention of a “D.N.C. server” was a reference to an unfounded conspiracy theory promoted by Mr. Trump that Ukraine was somehow involved in Russia’s 2016 theft of emails from the Democratic National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

Mr. Mulvaney tied the server to the Justice Department’s review of the origins of the Russia investigation, led by the United States attorney in Connecticut, John H. Durham, and closely overseen by Attorney General William P. Barr.

“That’s an ongoing investigation,” Mr. Mulvaney said. “So you’re saying the president of the United States, the chief law enforcement person, cannot ask somebody to cooperate with an ongoing public investigation into wrongdoing? That’s just bizarre to me that you would think that you can’t do that.”

But while the Justice Department said last month that Mr. Durham was examining any role that Ukraine might have played in the early stages of the Russia investigation, a department official declined on Thursday to comment on whether he was examining the server conspiracy theory.

Russian military officers hacked Democratic servers to steal thousands of emails in 2016, the intelligence community and the special counsel found, and no one has uncovered evidence of Ukrainian involvement.

Justice Department officials were confused and angry when they heard that Mr. Mulvaney said the White House froze aid to Ukraine in exchange for help with the Durham investigation, according to a person familiar with their discussions.

“If the White House was withholding aid in regards to the cooperation of any investigation at the Department of Justice, that is news to us,” a senior Justice Department official said. Mr. Durham was seen leaving the Justice Department around midday Thursday.

Mr. Mulvaney said the president had done nothing improper and had stayed in normal diplomatic channels. He blasted the current and former administration officials who have testified in the impeachment inquiry, describing them as personally opposed to the changes in foreign policy that Mr. Trump had put in place.

“What you’re seeing now, I believe, is a group of mostly career bureaucrats who are saying, ‘you know what, I don’t like President Trump’s politics, so I’m going to participate in this witch hunt that they are undertaking on the hill.’”

Mr. Mulvaney said holding up Ukraine’s aid was a normal part of foreign policy, and he compared it to the foreign aid to Central America that the administration froze until Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras agreed to adopt the immigration policies pressed by Mr. Trump.

Asked whether he had admitted to a quid pro quo, Mr. Mulvaney said: “We do that all the time with foreign policy.”

His answer ignored the distinction — raised by many of the president’s critics — between holding up foreign aid to further American interests and holding up foreign aid to further Mr. Trump’s personal interests.

Senior White House aides like Mr. Mulvaney are often largely immune from congressional subpoenas to discuss their private conversations with the president, but talking about them publicly in such an extended way could undermine that legal protection.

Democrats had already been interested in Mr. Mulvaney’s role in the Ukraine matter after several impeachment witnesses described the acting chief of staff as a central player in the effort to hold up the aid in the days before Mr. Trump pressed Ukraine’s president to investigate Mr. Biden.

They also have said they want to know whether Mr. Mulvaney helped prevent a White House meeting between Mr. Trump and Mr. Zelensky until the Ukrainian government agreed to investigate the president’s rivals, including the D.N.C. and the Bidens.

Fiona Hill, the president’s former senior director for European and Russian affairs at the National Security Council, testified that Mr. Mulvaney was part of three of Trump loyalists who conducted a rogue foreign policy operation in Ukraine.

Ms. Hill told lawmakers that John R. Bolton, then the national security adviser, instructed her in early July to advise the National Security Council’s chief lawyer about the effort by Mr. Mulvaney, Mr. Sondland and Mr. Giuliani.

“I am not part of whatever drug deal Sondland and Mulvaney are cooking up,” Mr. Bolton told Ms. Hill to tell White House lawyers, according to two people at Ms. Hill’s deposition, which took place on Monday.

In his remarks on Thursday, Mr. Mulvaney said there was nothing wrong with Mr. Trump relying on Mr. Giuliani or others outside of the diplomatic corps to conduct foreign policy.

“That’s the president’s call,” he said. “You may not like the fact that Giuliani was involved. That’s great, that’s fine. It’s not illegal, it’s not impeachable.” He added that “The president gets to set foreign policy and he gets to choose who to do so.”

Democrats are also eager to know about a May 23 meeting during which career diplomats with responsibility for Ukraine were sidelined in favor of Mr. Sondland, Kurt D. Volker, the special envoy for Ukraine, and Rick Perry, the energy secretary, one witness testified.

George P. Kent, the deputy assistant secretary in the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs, testified Tuesday that Mr. Mulvaney called the White House meeting, according to Representative Gerald E. Connolly, Democrat of Virginia, who was in the room for Mr. Kent’s testimony.

Katie Benner and Nicholas Fandos contributed reporting from Washington, and Maggie Haberman from New York.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com