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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 297)

California deputy lucky to be alive after bodycam blocks bullet during ‘ambush’ attack, investigators say

A northern California sheriff’s deputy was “lucky” to survive a gunshot to the chest after his body camera helped to block the bullet an unknown suspect fired during an “ambush” attack near a reservoir Friday night, investigators said.

Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Deputy Sukhdeep Gill was on a routine patrol along a rural mountain road in the foothills of unincorporated Morgan Hill, Calif., near the Uvas Reservoir, when he got out of his patrol vehicle, the sheriff’s office said in a news release.

ILLINOIS TROOPER FATALLY SHOT IN CIGAR BAR BY WOMAN WHO SCRAWLED THREAT ON CONDO WALL

An unknown vehicle approached Gill and suddenly switched off its headlights. At least four gunshots were fired, with one bullet striking the deputy in the chest, FOX KTVU reported. The deputy returned fire, but it was not known whether the suspect was hit.

The sheriff’s office released Gill’s frantic call to dispatchers in which he can be heard shouting “shots fired,” the San Jose Mercury News reported. After two minutes of radio silence, Gill told dispatchers, “I think I was hit.”

The deputy was treated at a hospital and subsequently released without any serious injuries, officials said.

Westlake Legal Group Santa-Clara-depupty-body-cam California deputy lucky to be alive after bodycam blocks bullet during ‘ambush’ attack, investigators say Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 3d676c5e-1b47-5adf-8c05-3cd6c110928d

A body camera worn by Gill was partially to thank for protecting him from a bullet that struck him in the chest, officials said. (Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office)

Investigators described the shooting during a news conference Monday as an “unprovoked attack” that  Gill “was very lucky” to survive, according to local news outlets.

“It was an ambush,” Santa Clara County Sheriff Laurie Smith said. “Anyone of those rounds could have hit him anywhere. He was very brave under fire.”

VIRGINIA COP DIES AFTER BEING DRAGGED BY VEHICLE TRYING TO FLEE TRAFFIC STOP, POLICE SAY

Gill survived thanks in part to the bullet hitting his body camera, which was backed up by his standard-issue protective body armor, according to Lt. Brenden Omori, head of the department’s Major Crimes Unit.

“We do know the bullet was stopped by a combination of the bodycam and the body armor,” he said.

The shooting is being looked at as both a potential hate crime and a premeditated attack on a law enforcement officer. Gill, who is a practicing Sikh, wears a turban that is clearly visible, officials said.

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Investigators are searching for the suspect. The suspect’s vehicle is believed to be a silver-colored Honda sedan from the 2000s.

Westlake Legal Group Santa-Clara-depupty-body-cam California deputy lucky to be alive after bodycam blocks bullet during ‘ambush’ attack, investigators say Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 3d676c5e-1b47-5adf-8c05-3cd6c110928d   Westlake Legal Group Santa-Clara-depupty-body-cam California deputy lucky to be alive after bodycam blocks bullet during ‘ambush’ attack, investigators say Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 3d676c5e-1b47-5adf-8c05-3cd6c110928d

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Cal Thomas: Trump’s impeachment is almost over – But Dems’ war on GOP, president just getting started

Westlake Legal Group image Cal Thomas: Trump's impeachment is almost over – But Dems' war on GOP, president just getting started Tribune Media Services fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Cal Thomas article 01fbfbd9-0154-5193-8722-0f4bcd376047

Just because the Senate is about to acquit President Trump of charges Republicans believed never rose to the level of “high crimes and misdemeanors,” don’t think Democrats will raise the white flag of surrender. They (and their media allies) have only just begun.

Next is a campaign to defeat enough of the 23 Republican senators up for re-election and, if possible (it doesn’t look possible, but this is February), keep President Trump from winning reelection.

Democrats have virtually no issues on which to run, except the promise of free stuff — from Elizabeth Warren’s student loan forgiveness plan,  which does nothing for those who struggled to pay off their student loans without assistance, to Bernie Sanders’ free “Medicare for All.”

REP. ANDY BIGGS: TRUMP’S STATE OF THE UNION AMIDST IMPEACHMENT HIGHLIGHTS AMERICAN CROSSROAD

A new Gallup poll released last week shows how difficult it will be for Democrats.

According to Gallup, 41 percent of Americans “are satisfied with the way things are going in the U.S.” That’s the highest satisfaction level in 15 years. Seventy-two percent of Republicans are satisfied, a number likely to grow if the economy remains strong and there is stability in international affairs.

Only 14 percent of Democrats are satisfied. That is likely, in part, because President Trump is racking up success after success without any cooperation from the other party. If Democrats had cooperated on at least some issues (other than the new trade agreement between the U.S., Canada and Mexico) they might have been able to legitimately claim some credit, but their opposition to all things Trump and their attempts to undo the results of the 2016 election leaves them out in the political cold.

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What is most remarkable about this Gallup poll is that it was taken in the middle of the Senate impeachment trial and in the face of some of the most hostile media coverage any president has ever had to endure in modern times.

According to the conservative Media Research Center, which monitors the broadcast network’s evening news programs, “… evening news coverage of the opening arguments of both sides, found ABC, CBS, and NBC did not live up to the standard they demanded of Republicans. They gave Democrats double the airtime and showered their arguments with mostly praise, while expressing only criticism of the President’s legal team.”

More from Opinion

The New York Times and Washington Post have cast aside any cloak of fairness by going anti-Trump nonstop. Their news coverage, editorials and virtually all of their columnists are constantly looking for new ways to express opposition to and hatred of the president. One advantage for readers is that it is easier to get through those papers because they have become predictable and tiresome.

Democrats may feel good about this as they keep company with their media fellow travelers, but President Trump is newly empowered to take his case for four more years of prosperity and relative peace to the public. Every Democrat running for president would raise taxes, giving more money to Washington, which cannot constrain its spending lust under either party. As taxes rise, so would unemployment because many businesses would no longer be able to afford workers they hired during the economic boom.

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Look for more investigations — perhaps additional allegations and articles of impeachment — and more “leaks” from former Trump staffers between now and the election. The only way to stop this is for Republicans to regain a House majority and maintain their majority in the Senate.

Barring an unforeseeable disaster (always a possibility), Trump is positioned to win re-election, perhaps in a landslide, which will send the left and most of the media into another deep depression.

Westlake Legal Group image Cal Thomas: Trump's impeachment is almost over – But Dems' war on GOP, president just getting started Tribune Media Services fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Cal Thomas article 01fbfbd9-0154-5193-8722-0f4bcd376047   Westlake Legal Group image Cal Thomas: Trump's impeachment is almost over – But Dems' war on GOP, president just getting started Tribune Media Services fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Cal Thomas article 01fbfbd9-0154-5193-8722-0f4bcd376047

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Jessica Simpson describes heart-breaking ‘mom jeans’ backlash: ‘I was taken down by the world’

Jessica Simpson revisited a negative moment in her career that she says broke her heart and contributed to an increase in her drinking at the time.

The 39-year-old singer spoke with Hoda Kotb on the “Today” show Tuesday about the humiliation she felt following intense social media backlash after her wardrobe choice at a 2009 event went viral. At the time, the star was ridiculed for wearing high-waisted jeans.

“This picture that circulated and went worldwide broke my heart,” she said. “Not the picture necessarily, the captions. All the captions and it was just, like… viral.”

JESSICA SIMPSON CALLS DISASTROUS ELLEN DEGENERES 2017 INTERVIEW ‘A WEAK MOMENT FOR ME’

Simpson wore the infamous “mom jeans” while performing at a chili cook-off in South Carolina. She explained that she felt very confident on stage, but immediately felt insecure about her body after the images went viral.

Simpson gets into more detail about the entire ordeal in her new memoir, “Open Book,” with an entire chapter titled “Death By Mom Jeans.”

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-84450916 Jessica Simpson describes heart-breaking 'mom jeans' backlash: 'I was taken down by the world' Tyler McCarthy fox-news/person/jessica-simpson fox-news/entertainment/genres/viral fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6ea7082f-8681-5658-b678-8bfef28f045f

Jessica Simpson described the backlash she received for an outfit she wore during a performance in 2009. (Logan Fazio/Getty Images)

Although the viral moment made her question herself, she explained that she mostly felt bad for her then-boyfriend, former NFL player Tony Romo.

JESSICA SIMPSON ADMITS FEELING ‘RESENTMENT’ DURING MARRIAGE TO NICK LACHEY: ‘THE LOVE WASN’T ENOUGH’

“I think that that comes from other relationships. Tony never made me feel that way. I always felt confident when I was with Tony,” she said. “I was taken down by the world.”

She admitted to the host that the negative attention she received over what she thought was an innocuous outfit contributed to her increased alcohol consumption at the time, a topic she discusses in more detail in her book as well. The book also reveals allegations of past sexual abuse, drug use and more.

Westlake Legal Group Jessica-Simpson-and-Tony-Romo-first Jessica Simpson describes heart-breaking 'mom jeans' backlash: 'I was taken down by the world' Tyler McCarthy fox-news/person/jessica-simpson fox-news/entertainment/genres/viral fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6ea7082f-8681-5658-b678-8bfef28f045f

Jessica Simpson explained how her viral moment in 2009 made her feel like she upset then-boyfriend Tony Romo. (AP)

Simpson and Romo eventually broke up, but she moved on with her current husband, Eric Johnson. Previously she was married to Nick Lachey from 2002 until 2006. Lachey spoke about her book on the “Today” show, admitting he hadn’t read it.

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“I’ll be honest, I obviously haven’t read the book, so I don’t know what she said or what she revealed there,” Lachey said, according to Entertainment Tonight. “But certainly happy for her in her life and I know she is happy for us. There is definitely a mutual respect there.”

Westlake Legal Group jessica-simpson-Getty Jessica Simpson describes heart-breaking 'mom jeans' backlash: 'I was taken down by the world' Tyler McCarthy fox-news/person/jessica-simpson fox-news/entertainment/genres/viral fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6ea7082f-8681-5658-b678-8bfef28f045f   Westlake Legal Group jessica-simpson-Getty Jessica Simpson describes heart-breaking 'mom jeans' backlash: 'I was taken down by the world' Tyler McCarthy fox-news/person/jessica-simpson fox-news/entertainment/genres/viral fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6ea7082f-8681-5658-b678-8bfef28f045f

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Germany Has A New Receipt Law — And Bakeries Are Getting Sweet Revenge

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1196446184-c8676adfd84e06afc1b3c00ebe81627e1f57bc4a-s1100-c15 Germany Has A New Receipt Law — And Bakeries Are Getting Sweet Revenge

Doughnuts with a receipt made of fondant were on display last week at a bakery in Moosinning, Germany. These Kassenbon Krapfen — receipt doughnuts — are a reaction to Germany’s new receipt law. Tobias Hase/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Tobias Hase/picture alliance via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Germany Has A New Receipt Law — And Bakeries Are Getting Sweet Revenge

Doughnuts with a receipt made of fondant were on display last week at a bakery in Moosinning, Germany. These Kassenbon Krapfen — receipt doughnuts — are a reaction to Germany’s new receipt law.

Tobias Hase/picture alliance via Getty Images

A new law has taken effect in Germany that requires receipts to be issued at businesses such as restaurants, bakeries, hairdressers, no matter how small the transaction.

It’s known as Kassengesetz, or “Cash Act”: a law for protection against the manipulation of digital records. The measure is meant to increase transparency and prevent tax fraud. The idea is to log each transaction in a format that can be reviewed and verified.

Many of these businesses — and their customers — have taken umbrage at the new requirement, but none has done so more deliciously than the country’s beloved bakeries.

In some towns in Bavaria, in southern Germany, some bakeries are incorporating the receipts into the goods themselves. The Bäckerei Ways in Moosinning has begun peddling Kassenbon Krapfen — receipt doughnuts. The pastries are slathered with pink icing and then topped with a receipt made of fondant, tax included.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1197723737-9ebeef92faf66a419814b2aeb15da05070f8f609-s1100-c15 Germany Has A New Receipt Law — And Bakeries Are Getting Sweet Revenge

A bakery in Ansbach, Bavaria, collected receipts in the window last month to register its opposition to the law. The sign says “receipt not required.” Daniel Karmann/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Daniel Karmann/picture alliance via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Germany Has A New Receipt Law — And Bakeries Are Getting Sweet Revenge

A bakery in Ansbach, Bavaria, collected receipts in the window last month to register its opposition to the law. The sign says “receipt not required.”

Daniel Karmann/picture alliance via Getty Images

The Streicher bakery in Grosshabersdorf had the same idea. “Edible and not hazardous waste,” baker Roland Streicher told inFranken.de.

Despite its verisimilitude, the sugary doppelgänger doesn’t count: A regular receipt still has to be generated.

Businesses must provide a receipt, but customers aren’t obligated to take it. Some bakeries have begun collecting the receipts from customers in a growing pile in the shop window, a visible reminder of displeasure with the new policy.

At the Gasthaus Gutenberg restaurant in Karlsruhe, the proprietors took that idea a step further, stringing receipts in a garland crisscrossing the room.

There is in fact no requirement to issue paper receipts in particular. Businesses can issue receipts by email or cellphone. But Germany is still a notoriously cash-based society, making those options unpopular. Companies also aren’t required to use an electronic recording system (in which case they are not obligated to issue a receipt), but they still need to keep complete and orderly records.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1183584001-66575bf30d4adc8d21b2cc8389a2dbdf48aaef97-s1100-c15 Germany Has A New Receipt Law — And Bakeries Are Getting Sweet Revenge

Bakers demonstrated against the receipt law in Hanover in November, seeing it as a symbol of increased bureaucratization. The law went into effect last month. Sina Schuldt/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Sina Schuldt/picture alliance via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Germany Has A New Receipt Law — And Bakeries Are Getting Sweet Revenge

Bakers demonstrated against the receipt law in Hanover in November, seeing it as a symbol of increased bureaucratization. The law went into effect last month.

Sina Schuldt/picture alliance via Getty Images

Many critics of the law point to the huge amounts of waste generated by issuing all those receipts. Receipts are often made of thermal paper coated in chemicals that shouldn’t be recycled.

A German trade association estimated that all those compulsory receipts will generate enough paper each year to wrap around the world 50 times.

So the controversial law could be good for other enterprises, like the small company Ökobon: It makes organic receipt paper.

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Track coronavirus’ global spread in real time with this interactive map

As the coronavirus outbreak prompts new measures to prevent it from becoming a pandemic, experts have created a map that tracks and visualizes its global spread.

The map, which was produced by researchers from at Johns Hopkins University, uses data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization, China’s CDC, and other sources.

The map tracks the total number of confirmed cases, the total deaths and the total recoveries — all in real time. Clicking on one of the larger red dots shows how bad the outbreak is in each particular region.

US NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE CONTAINERS COULD CORRODE, NEW STUDY WARNS

Westlake Legal Group coronavirus-AP Track coronavirus’ global spread in real time with this interactive map fox-news/tech fox-news/science fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article 9dab6f50-c95b-5793-a746-06260d904601

Medical workers in protective gear stand as a woman suspected of being ill with coronavirus waits to be seen at a community health station in Wuhan in central China’s Hubei Province, Monday, Jan. 27, 2020. ((Chinatopix via AP))

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Along the lefthand side of the map, you can click each country that has reported cases to see their location.

This type of map could help to stem the tide of false or panic-inducing information that has spread since the outbreak’s start in December.

Thus far, the virus has spread to more than two dozen countries outside of China. There are 20,704 confirmed cases; there have been 427 deaths and 727 recoveries.

Westlake Legal Group coronavirus-AP Track coronavirus’ global spread in real time with this interactive map fox-news/tech fox-news/science fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article 9dab6f50-c95b-5793-a746-06260d904601   Westlake Legal Group coronavirus-AP Track coronavirus’ global spread in real time with this interactive map fox-news/tech fox-news/science fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article 9dab6f50-c95b-5793-a746-06260d904601

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Bloomberg Plans to Double Ad Spending After Iowa Caucus Problem

Westlake Legal Group 04bloomberg-facebookJumbo Bloomberg Plans to Double Ad Spending After Iowa Caucus Problem Presidential Election of 2020 Political Advertising Iowa Democratic Party Bloomberg, Michael R

COMPTON, Calif. — Michael R. Bloomberg’s presidential campaign moved on Tuesday to exploit the chaotic outcome of the Iowa caucuses, escalating an already enormous campaign of television advertising and publicly making the case that a messy outcome in the early states opened the way for Mr. Bloomberg.

Mr. Bloomberg, the former New York City mayor whose campaign is fueled by a multibillion-dollar personal fortune, conferred with advisers on Tuesday morning about the muddled results in Iowa. Encouraged by the murky outcome, Mr. Bloomberg authorized his campaign team to double his spending on television commercials in every market where he is currently advertising and expand his campaign’s field staff to more than two thousand people, strategists involved in the conversations said.

The Bloomberg campaign has been trying to chart an unprecedented route to the Democratic nomination, skipping the first four contests in February but aggressively contesting the array of larger states that begin voting in March. From the outset, Mr. Bloomberg’s advisers believed the strategy would only have a chance of working if another moderate candidate — most likely former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. — failed to emerge from February with a decisive upper hand in the race.

In an interview on Monday in Compton, Calif., Mr. Bloomberg was unusually blunt about his campaign spending strategy and his intent to seek advantages while his rivals toiled in the four early states, which have relatively few delegates needed to win the nomination.

“It’s much more efficient to go to the big states, to go to the swing states,” Mr. Bloomberg said. “The others chose to compete in the first four. And nobody makes them do it, they wanted to do it. I think part of it is because the conventional wisdom is ‘Oh you can’t possibly win without them.’”

Later, he added: “Those are old rules.”

Mr. Bloomberg hopscotched through California on Monday, trying to rally supporters on the same day early voting began in the delegate-rich state. He began his day in a Sacramento coffee shop, stopped at Fresno City College and ended at a community center in Compton.

Many of those in the crowds said they were undecided, but were drawn to Mr. Bloomberg because they believed his fortune would give Democrats the best chance to beat President Trump in the fall, though they remained undecided on their preferred candidate.

Tanya Young, a 39-year-old actor who lives in Compton, said that while she respected “the halo Biden has for working with Obama,” she was not convinced that any of the other Democratic candidates could win, and was particularly impressed by Mr. Bloomberg’s past contributions to other Democrats and his promise to back whoever wins the nomination.

“He’s not a stupid man and if he did not see a path, he would not be doing this,” she said.

Vera Robles Dewitt of Carson, Calif., who also attended the Compton event, said that she admired Mr. Biden and had donated a few hundred dollars to his campaign, but had lost confidence in his ability to defeat Mr. Trump. Mr. Bloomberg struck her as a more capable adversary.

“If you have two New Yorkers punching each other out, he’ll be able to handle it,” she said, referring to Mr. Bloomberg. “He knows how to fight and he will.”

Though his California crowds were largely enthusiastic, in both Fresno and Compton, his events were briefly disrupted by a few protesters who were critical of an ultrawealthy candidate for president. In Compton, one man held up a sign that read, “Billionaires should not buy elections.”

On Tuesday, Mr. Bloomberg’s campaign announced a fresh list of endorsements from more than a dozen mayors around the country, as well as prominent former mayors of big cities including Houston, Tampa and Chattanooga.

The campaign also released a new advertisement scheduled to air Tuesday on cable stations nationally, as a pre-emptive response to the State of the Union address.

The spot focuses on criticism of Mr. Trump, calling the country “a nation divided by an angry, out-of-control president” and saying that the White House is “beset by lies, chaos and corruption.”

Just as he did during his campaign swing in California, the advertisement tries to portray Mr. Bloomberg as the candidate who is best equipped to beat Mr. Trump in November.

It is still possible that Mr. Biden or another candidate will wind up finishing February with a clear advantage. But the early indications from Iowa suggested that the former vice president was highly unlikely to win the state.

“It turns out that a lot of things we thought were true, are true,” said Kevin Sheekey, Mr. Bloomberg’s campaign manager.

Mr. Sheekey said on Tuesday morning that Mr. Bloomberg had set out to run a national campaign and that he would “double down on that bet, as we prepare both a Super Tuesday strategy, but at the same time, to stand up against the president in battleground states in November.”

Mr. Bloomberg has faced little resistance so far from other Democratic candidates, who have focused instead on jockeying for position against their rivals who are competing in the February primary and caucus states. But as he becomes a more immediate threat, he is likely to face new criticism of his extreme wealth and long record in public life.

Ahead of the Iowa results, several allies of Mr. Biden suggested that Mr. Bloomberg was overdue for a closer examination from Democratic voters. “He’s not been perceived as a threat by any of the major candidates yet,” Representative Donald McEachin of Virginia, a supporter of Mr. Biden, said in an interview before Iowa.

Alluding to Mr. Bloomberg’s past record of supporting invasive policing tactics, Mr. McEachin said, “He still has to answer for stop-and-frisk.”

Mr. Bloomberg’s campaign manager, Mr. Sheekey, said the former mayor was not inclined to clash directly with other Democrats, warning that such a conflict could weaken the party for the general election. But in private, Bloomberg advisers have been making intensive overtures to Democratic elected officials to seek their support, including reaching out to officials who have already endorsed Mr. Biden and other Democratic candidates.

The tone of the overtures has been diplomatic, according to Democrats who have heard from the campaign, but Mr. Bloomberg’s emissaries have made plain that they hope officials who are currently backing Mr. Biden will move in his direction if the former vice president flags badly in the coming weeks.

Jennifer Medina reported from Compton, Calif., and Alexander Burns from Des Moines.

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‘The Majority’ of Iowa Caucus Results Will Be Released This Afternoon: Live Updates

Video

transcript

‘A Complete Mess’: Still No Results from Iowa Caucus

Democratic candidates tried to spin the chaotic situation at the Iowa caucuses, and campaigned in New Hampshire as they awaited the results.

“Anybody with an S to Z last name —” “L to R! L to R!” “Anybody want a sign?” “Bernie! Bernie! Bernie! Bernie!” [whistle] “Seven, eight —” “Forty!” “Fifty-five, 56, 57, 58, 59 —” “There is no name on it.” “I need these guys right here. I need his name and his number.” “Could you verify your last name and address for me?” “O.K., I’m going to write Joe Biden for first preference. That’s your first preference, correct?” “We’re counting all of ours.” “Yeah, we’re just making sure everything’s signed.” “O.K., good.” “So we’re going to need each representative to sign off on here.” “So we don’t know all the results, but we know by the time it’s all said and done, Iowa, you have shocked the nation. By all indications, we are going on to New Hampshire victorious.” “And when those results are announced, I have a good feeling we’re going to be doing very, very well here in Iowa.” “Thank you so much. So listen, it is too close to call. So I’m just going to tell you what I do know.” “You won!” “We don’t know exactly what it is yet, but we feel good about where we are.”

Westlake Legal Group 04primary-livebriefing-top2-videoSixteenByNine3000 ‘The Majority’ of Iowa Caucus Results Will Be Released This Afternoon: Live Updates Warren, Elizabeth Presidential Election of 2020 Manchester (NH) Iowa Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- )

Democratic candidates tried to spin the chaotic situation at the Iowa caucuses, and campaigned in New Hampshire as they awaited the results.CreditCredit…Mark Makela for The New York Times

  • The Iowa Democratic Party will begin releasing results from the caucuses at 5 p.m. Eastern time. The party blamed a “coding issue” in the app used to tabulate results.

  • A frustrated pack of Democratic presidential candidates sought to turn the mood of chaos to their own advantage Tuesday morning as they barreled toward the next nominating contest, in New Hampshire. And Michael R. Bloomberg, the multibillionaire former New York City mayor, is trying to capitalize by doubling his spending on television commercials.

  • Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, and Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., among others, have events in New Hampshire today.

  • Unexplained inconsistencies in results, heated conference calls and firm denials of hacking: Read more about how the Iowa caucuses melted down.

Here’s what you need to know:

The Iowa Democratic Party will begin to release results from Monday’s caucuses at 5 p.m. Eastern time on Tuesday, its chairman, Troy Price, told the Democratic campaigns in a conference call.

Mr. Price told the campaigns that “the majority” of results the party had in hand would be made public later Tuesday, but he dodged questions from the campaigns about how much would be released and when final totals would become available.

“I don’t want to put a number on it but I can tell you it’s going to be more than 50 percent,” he said.

Officials on the call said the party was trying to verify results using paper records collected from each precinct and that it had dispatched staff members to collect them around the state.

The call quickly turned combative, as campaign representatives pressed the party officials about when results would be released and why it was taking so long.

“What do you have to back up these results?” one campaign representative asked.

“We have always said we have a paper trail in the process,” Mr. Price replied. “This is what we would have done on caucus night,” he added, of releasing verified results, as they have them.

Jeff Weaver, a senior aide to Mr. Sanders, praised the officials on the call and noted, “You do have a paper trail.” He warned rival campaigns against “discrediting the party,” a veiled reference to the Biden campaign, which had objected earlier in the call to the process.

“I do want to urge people in the interest of not discrediting the party, that folks who are just trying to delay the return of this because of their relative positioning in the results, last night, I think that’s a bit disingenuous,” Mr. Weaver said. “Those results should be rolled out as we get them.” But how long the process could take was not answered.

“Today, tomorrow, the next day, a week, a month?” said Jesse Harris, a senior adviser to Mr. Biden in Iowa, pressing the party. “We’re continuing to work through our process and just as soon as we can,” Mr. Price replied.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168332433_f6ea3ec3-e5ae-4e34-b44e-21fcd13f97e2-articleLarge ‘The Majority’ of Iowa Caucus Results Will Be Released This Afternoon: Live Updates Warren, Elizabeth Presidential Election of 2020 Manchester (NH) Iowa Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- )

Mr. Bloomberg at a campaign event in Sacramento, Calif., on Monday.Credit…Jim Wilson/The New York Times

Mr. Bloomberg’s presidential campaign moved on Tuesday to exploit the chaotic outcome of the Iowa caucuses, authorizing his campaign team to double his spending on television commercials in every market where he is currently advertising and expand his campaign’s field staff to more than two thousand people, strategists involved in the conversations said.

The Bloomberg campaign has been trying to chart an unprecedented route to the Democratic nomination, skipping the first four contests in February but aggressively contesting the array of larger states that begin voting in March. From the outset, Mr. Bloomberg’s advisers believed the strategy would only have a chance of working if another moderate candidate — most likely former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. — failed to emerge from February with a decisive upper hand in the race.

In an interview on Monday in Compton, Calif., Mr. Bloomberg was unusually blunt about his campaign spending strategy and his intent to seek advantages while his rivals toiled in the four early states, which have relatively few delegates needed to win the nomination.

“It’s much more efficient to go to the big states, to go to the swing states,” Mr. Bloomberg said. “The others chose to compete in the first four. And nobody makes them do it, they wanted to do it. I think part of it is because the conventional wisdom is ‘Oh you can’t possibly win without them.’”

Later, he added: “Those are old rules.”

Mr. Bloomberg, the former New York City mayor whose campaign is fueled by a multibillion-dollar personal fortune, conferred with advisers on Tuesday morning about the muddled results in Iowa. Encouraged by the murky outcome, Mr. Bloomberg authorized his campaign team to undertake the expansion in advertising and staff.

His campaign also released a new advertisement scheduled to be aired nationally Tuesday night, when President Trump is set to deliver his State of the Union address. The spot focuses on criticism of Mr. Trump, warning of a nation “divided by an angry, out-of-control president” and a White House “beset by lies, chaos and corruption.”

The advertisement tries to portray Mr. Bloomberg as the candidate who is best equipped to beat Mr. Trump in November.

The Iowa Democratic Party said Tuesday that there were delays in announcing the results from the precincts because the new app that it planned to use for its caucus results reported only partial data.

“As part of our investigation, we determined with certainty that the underlying data collected via the app was sound,” Mr. Price said. “While the app was recording data accurately, it was reporting out only partial data. We have determined that this was due to a coding issue in the reporting system. This issue was identified and fixed.”

Sean Bagniewski had seen the problems coming.

It wasn’t so much that the new app that the Iowa Democratic Party had planned to use to report its caucus results didn’t work. It was that people were struggling to even log in or download it in the first place. After all, there had never been any app-specific training for this many precinct chairs.

So last Thursday Mr. Bagniewski, the chairman of the Democratic Party in Polk County, Iowa’s most populous, decided to scrap the app entirely, instructing his precinct chairs to simply call in the caucus results as they had always done.

The only problem was, when the time came during Monday’s caucuses, those precinct chairs could not connect with party leaders via phone. Mr. Bagniewski instructed his executive director to take pictures of the results with her smartphone and drive over to the Iowa Democratic Party headquarters to deliver them in person. She was turned away without explanation, he said.

It was a surreal opening act for the 2020 campaign that included unexplained “inconsistencies” in results that were not released to the public, heated conference calls with campaigns that were hung up on by the state party, firm denials of any kind of hacking and a presidential primary left in a strange state of almost suspended animation.

“A systemwide disaster,” said Derek Eadon, a former Iowa Democratic Party chairman.

Amid the chaos and confusion, there were conflicting candidate speeches declaring various degrees of victory, as Mr. Sanders’s campaign released its own set of favorable partial results, and multiple campaigns hoped that the mess would not lessen the eventual impact of what they said appeared to be a disappointing first test for Mr. Biden.

DES MOINES — In a brief question-and-answer session with reporters aboard his charter plane before it took off for New Hampshire, Mr. Sanders denounced the Iowa Democratic Party for not being able to report caucus results as his campaign released internal numbers that showed him winning the state on all metrics.

“I think we should all be disappointed in the inability of the party to come up with timely results,” he said. “But we are not casting aspersions on the votes that are being counted.”

“This is not a good thing,” he added. “This is not a good night for democracy.”

At the same time, his campaign released its internal results, with 60 percent of precincts counted, that it said showed Mr. Sanders winning the first head count, with 29.08 percent, followed by Mr. Buttigieg with 21.63 percent, Ms. Warren with 19.51 percent, Ms. Klobuchar with 12.27 percent and Mr. Biden with 12.04 percent.

After realignment, his campaign said, Mr. Sanders had 29.4 percent, followed by Mr. Buttigieg at 24.87 percent, Ms. Warren at 20.65 percent, Mr. Biden at 12.92 percent and Ms. Klobuchar at 11.18 percent.

Still, Mr. Sanders stopped short of saying he had won, saying only that based on that information, “We’re in pretty good shape.”

“We’re not declaring victory,” he said.

Asked what his reaction was to Mr. Buttigieg declaring victory on Monday night, before any results were reported, Mr. Sanders was dismissive.

“I don’t know how anybody declares victory before you have official statement as to election results,” he said.

Mr. Sanders also said attempts by the Biden campaign to discredit the results were “unfair.”

KEENE, N.H. — Ms. Warren of Massachusetts called on the Iowa Democratic Party to “get it together,” saying the reporting errors that upended caucus results threatened to damage trust in the Democratic process.

Speaking to reporters after an event in Keene, her first in New Hampshire after landing at 4 a.m., Ms. Warren said reports that the Iowa Democratic Party planned to release half of the caucus results later this afternoon made little sense.

“I just don’t understand what that means to release half of the data,” she said. “So, I think they ought to get it together and release all of the data.”

Ms. Warren told the audience that the results showed a close race atop the Iowa field between her, Mr. Sanders and Mr. Buttigieg. Her campaign has sought to frame the caucus results — however unclear — as a bad night for Mr. Biden.

Asked if voters will be able to trust results, Ms. Warren replied, “I hope they’ll be able to.” At the same time, her campaign sent an email to supporters framing the results as a good night for them amid a tumultuous time for democracy.

“I know there are reasons to feel frustrated and discouraged,” it read. “Yesterday we had a bumpy democratic process. Tonight a lawless president will deliver his State of the Union. Tomorrow Republicans in the Senate will likely declare that their loyalty is to Donald Trump rather than our Constitution and the rule of law.”

As Democrats struggled to count the votes in the opening presidential nominating contest, the one person clearly rejoicing was the man they hope to evict from the White House.

“The Democrat Caucus is an unmitigated disaster,” President Trump wrote on Twitter on Tuesday morning as the Iowa results remained unknown. “Nothing works, just like they ran the Country. Remember the 5 Billion Dollar Obamacare Website, that should have cost 2% of that. The only person that can claim a very big victory in Iowa last night is ‘Trump.’”

But Mr. Trump, who won the Republican caucuses in Iowa handily, rejected suggestions that the breakdown in counting should cause the state to lose its status as the first stop in the presidential nomination process.

“It is not the fault of Iowa, it is the Do Nothing Democrats fault,” he wrote. “As long as I am President, Iowa will stay where it is. Important tradition!”

Read more here.

The app that the Iowa Democratic Party commissioned to tabulate and report results from the caucuses was not properly tested at a statewide scale, said people who were briefed on the app by the state party.

The party decided to use the app only after another proposal for reporting votes — which entailed having caucus participants call in their votes over the phone — was abandoned, on the advice of Democratic National Committee officials, according to David Jefferson, a board member of Verified Voting, a nonpartisan election integrity organization.

The app was built by Shadow Inc., a for-profit technology company that is also used by the Nevada Democratic Party, the next state to hold a caucus, as well as by multiple presidential campaigns.

The secrecy around the app this year came from the Iowa Democratic Party, which asked that even its name be withheld from the public. According to a person familiar with the app, its creators had repeatedly questioned the need to keep it secret, especially from the Iowa precincts where it would be used.

That person, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he had agreed not to discuss details of the app, said that there were concerns that the app would malfunction in areas with poor connectivity, or because of high bandwidth use, such as when many people tried to use it at the same time.

NASHUA, N.H. — Fresh off an overnight flight from Des Moines, Mr. Buttigieg met the mayor of Nashua, Jim Donchess, for a coffee at the Riverwalk Café downtown.

“You did a great job last night on your speech,” Mr. Donchess said, as he greeted Mr. Buttigieg on a sidewalk outside of the coffee shop.

“Thanks,” Mr. Buttigieg said. “Felt good.”

As the two men walked down the sidewalk, Mr. Buttigieg told the Nashua mayor that it was “frustrating” to not have good results, but said “you can’t deny” that he had had a strong night.

Mr. Donchess, a four-term mayor, announced his endorsement of Mr. Buttigieg this morning, though said he had been considering it for some time and was not influenced by the reports of a strong finish in Iowa.

Mr. Buttigieg lingered in the coffee shop for about 10 minutes, sitting down with three voters to talk about local issues. He ignored questions from reporters about whether his speech last night in Iowa, seemingly declaring victory absent any official results, was premature.

Voters here — both those who said they were undecided and those who said they would vote for Mr. Buttigieg — offered a collective shrug at the former mayor’s decision to declare victory in the absence of any official results.

Asked if it was appropriate for Mr. Buttigieg to have suggested he had won, Ben Gayman, an undecided voter from Manchester, did not hesitate.

“Of course,” he said. “They all did.”

A lot of reasons contributed to Monday night’s events, chiefly a breakdown of the process by which caucus leaders were supposed to report results to the Iowa Democratic Party.

But one factor was baked into that process from almost the moment the caucuses ended four years ago.

Historically, the party had focused on highlighting only one caucus result: the number of delegates each candidate had earned for the state convention. The winner of the Iowa caucuses was the person who earned the most state delegates, which translate into national delegates, which determine the nomination. This year, however, the state party chose to release four results from the caucuses.

That’s because in 2016, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton edged out Mr. Sanders in the state delegate count by a quarter of a percentage point, earning roughly 700 to Mr. Sanders’s 697. That meant 23 national delegates for Mrs. Clinton and 21 for Mr. Sanders — an inconsequential difference between the two rivals.

Mr. Sanders’s 2016 campaign fought for an audit in Iowa — comparing the reported results with the papers on which caucus leaders had recorded voters’ preferences — and accused the state Democratic Party of a lack of transparency.

Largely because of Mr. Sanders’s objections, the party decided to release additional numbers in 2020 that it had always logged but never made public: the number of supporters each candidate had in the first round of voting and the number he or she had in the second round, after nonviable candidates were eliminated and caucusgoers realigned.

The idea was that all this data would provide a fuller picture of each candidate’s strength. But it also made reporting the results more complicated. Read more here.

In a joint statement released Tuesday morning, Senators Chuck Grassley and Joni Ernst of Iowa and the state’s governor, Kim Reynolds, defended the Iowa caucuses, saying they were confident the results would ultimately be tallied.

“Iowa’s unique role encourages a grass-roots nominating process that empowers everyday Americans, not Washington insiders or powerful billionaires,” they said. “The face-to-face retail politics nature of Iowa’s caucus system also encourages dialogue between candidates and voters that makes our presidential candidates accountable for the positions they take and the records they hold.”

They also defended the state’s position at the start of the nominating calendar.

“Iowa’s large population of independent voters and its practice of careful deliberation contributes greatly to the national presidential primary and makes it the ideal state to kick off the nominating process,” they said. “Iowans and all Americans should know we have complete confidence that every last vote will be counted and every last voice will be heard.”

Reporting was contributed by Maggie Astor, Peter Baker, Alexander Burns, Nick Corasaniti, Sydney Ember, Reid J. Epstein, Sheera Frenkel, Shane Goldmacher, Christine Hauser, Astead W. Herndon, Nicole Perlroth, Jonathan Martin, Jennifer Medina and Matt Stevens.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

3 Big Questions After The Iowa Results Meltdown

Westlake Legal Group ap_20035152249783-cc6c7f0a317da1f01dcb9662ccb2e15a5de1eb11-s1100-c15 3 Big Questions After The Iowa Results Meltdown

People wait for results at a caucus night campaign rally for former Vice President Joe Biden on Monday in Des Moines, Iowa. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Westlake Legal Group  3 Big Questions After The Iowa Results Meltdown

People wait for results at a caucus night campaign rally for former Vice President Joe Biden on Monday in Des Moines, Iowa.

John Locher/AP

Yes, it really happened. After millions of dollars spent by the candidates, Iowa’s caucuses were a bust. A delay in results has stalled the Democratic presidential race.

Now, the country is (so far) left with no winner from the contest that was supposed to kick off the Democratic presidential contest and help determine which candidate will take on President Trump this fall.

The Iowa Democratic Party tried out an app that was supposed to deliver fast results, but it failed. Luckily, the party had instituted paper backups. The state party says it expects some results at some point Tuesday, but the delay has real consequences and raises some major questions:

What might this mean for the Democratic presidential campaign?

First of all, the winner is not yet known and, above all, this debacle robbed whomever that is of a chance to have their moment in the sun.

The campaigns worked so hard in this state because it has been predictive of who has become the Democratic nominee — the last four and seven of last nine have gone on to be the party’s standard-bearer over the past 40 years.

Iowa, being first, also serves to winnow the field and help elevate front-runners. That’s especially important in a year like this with a record number of candidates running. Whoever actually won was stripped of the potential momentum they were banking on to catapult them into New Hampshire and beyond.

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg declared measures of victory Monday night. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts is saying she finished in the top three with Sanders and Buttigieg — and her campaign is pointedly saying that former Vice President Joe Biden finished a “distant fourth.”

At this point, it is all spin. But imagine, for example, if on caucus night, it was known in prime time that Sanders and Buttigieg were the top two. And imagine what that would mean for Biden’s candidacy — and fundraising. Eventually, the result will be known, though, and what will that mean for Biden’s hopes next week in New Hampshire?

Sen. Amy Klobuchar used the lack of results as a reason to continue on to New Hampshire. What would have happened if she finished fifth with that result known on caucus night? Now, the moderates in the race may continue to split the vote for longer than they would have liked.

What the delayed result did was stall the race — after a year of time, money and effort expended.

What does this mean for Iowa’s first-in-the-nation status?

It may very well be Bye-owa. Traditions are hard to change, but this mess is going to likely mean a fresh push for removing Iowa from being first.

The caucuses have already come under fire for being too complicated, too inaccessible and too white.

And this is not the first time there have been complications — with both parties. As it is, the state Democratic Party was going to make matters more confusing with three separate results.

Quirky and quaint may have given way to clunky and antiquated, especially in the 21st century with voters coming of age who look at this system and think it makes no sense.

There have been other efforts to change the calendar in the past and entrenched interests have stopped it. But before 2024, after what happened Monday night, the Democratic Party is going to have to have a real conversation and debate about how to reinvent this process.

What does this mean for faith in the vote?

Democracy is messy. And states want to go to faster, more modern ways of voting. But, if 2016 foreign interference efforts weren’t enough, the Iowa delay is a real warning shot against moving too soon, too fast.

At least Iowa instituted a paper backup system this year. Imagine the level of disaster this would have been had it not.

Several places in the country are looking to use smartphones for voting with no paper backup. Every state and municipality has to be rethinking those plans today.

What’s more, the Iowa Democratic Party has not been transparent about the maker of the app. And, you know what a lack of transparency breeds? Conspiracy theories. That started happening immediately Monday night (egged on by the Trump campaign).

“A Republic if we can keep it,” the founders warned.

All that holds democracies together is the trust in elections. If that’s lost, good luck keeping the Republic.

Another lesson for November’s general election — Americans have to realize that vote counting takes awhile. News networks do a great job modeling and projecting elections. But those aren’t final votes, and when a result is close, it’s going to take awhile.

Remember those California congressional districts in 2018. Remember that Hillary Clinton’s popular vote lead ballooned into the millions after midnight and the election of President Trump in 2016.

But in an age juxtaposed by the public’s distrust and its simultaneous social media need for speed, can Americans find the will power to slow down, be judicious, wait and be patient? It seems unlikely.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Iowa Caucus: Live Results and Updates

Video

transcript

‘A Complete Mess’: Still No Results from Iowa Caucus

Democratic candidates tried to spin the chaotic situation at the Iowa caucuses, and campaigned in New Hampshire as they awaited the results.

“Anybody with an S to Z last name —” “L to R! L to R!” “Anybody want a sign?” “Bernie! Bernie! Bernie! Bernie!” [whistle] “Seven, eight —” “Forty!” “Fifty-five, 56, 57, 58, 59 —” “There is no name on it.” “I need these guys right here. I need his name and his number.” “Could you verify your last name and address for me?” “O.K., I’m going to write Joe Biden for first preference. That’s your first preference, correct?” “We’re counting all of ours.” “Yeah, we’re just making sure everything’s signed.” “O.K., good.” “So we’re going to need each representative to sign off on here.” “So we don’t know all the results, but we know by the time it’s all said and done, Iowa, you have shocked the nation. By all indications, we are going on to New Hampshire victorious.” “And when those results are announced, I have a good feeling we’re going to be doing very, very well here in Iowa.” “Thank you so much. So listen, it is too close to call. So I’m just going to tell you what I do know.” “You won!” “We don’t know exactly what it is yet, but we feel good about where we are.”

Westlake Legal Group 04primary-livebriefing-top2-videoSixteenByNine3000 Iowa Caucus: Live Results and Updates Warren, Elizabeth Presidential Election of 2020 Manchester (NH) Iowa Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- )

Democratic candidates tried to spin the chaotic situation at the Iowa caucuses, and campaigned in New Hampshire as they awaited the results.CreditCredit…Mark Makela for The New York Times

  • The Iowa Democratic Party will begin releasing results from the caucuses at 5 p.m. Eastern time. The party blamed a “coding issue” in the app used to tabulate results.

  • A frustrated pack of Democratic presidential candidates sought to turn the mood of chaos to their own advantage Tuesday morning as they barreled toward the next nominating contest, in New Hampshire. And Michael R. Bloomberg, the multibillionaire former New York City mayor, is trying to capitalize by doubling his spending on television commercials.

  • Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, and Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., among others, have events in New Hampshire today.

  • Unexplained inconsistencies in results, heated conference calls and firm denials of hacking: Read more about how the Iowa caucuses melted down.

Here’s what you need to know:

The Iowa Democratic Party will begin to release results from Monday’s caucuses at 5 p.m. Eastern time on Tuesday, its chairman, Troy Price, told the Democratic campaigns in a conference call.

Mr. Price told the campaigns that “the majority” of results the party had in hand would be made public later Tuesday, but he dodged questions from the campaigns about how much would be released and when final totals would become available.

“I don’t want to put a number on it but I can tell you it’s going to be more than 50 percent,” he said.

Officials on the call said the party was trying to verify results using paper records collected from each precinct and that it had dispatched staff members to collect them around the state.

The call quickly turned combative, as campaign representatives pressed the party officials about when results would be released and why it was taking so long.

“What do you have to back up these results?” one campaign representative asked.

“We have always said we have a paper trail in the process,” Mr. Price replied. “This is what we would have done on caucus night,” he added, of releasing verified results, as they have them.

Jeff Weaver, a senior aide to Mr. Sanders, praised the officials on the call and noted, “You do have a paper trail.” He warned rival campaigns against “discrediting the party,” a veiled reference to the Biden campaign, which had objected earlier in the call to the process.

“I do want to urge people in the interest of not discrediting the party, that folks who are just trying to delay the return of this because of their relative positioning in the results, last night, I think that’s a bit disingenuous,” Mr. Weaver said. “Those results should be rolled out as we get them.” But how long the process could take was not answered.

“Today, tomorrow, the next day, a week, a month?” said Jesse Harris, a senior adviser to Mr. Biden in Iowa, pressing the party. “We’re continuing to work through our process and just as soon as we can,” Mr. Price replied.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168332433_f6ea3ec3-e5ae-4e34-b44e-21fcd13f97e2-articleLarge Iowa Caucus: Live Results and Updates Warren, Elizabeth Presidential Election of 2020 Manchester (NH) Iowa Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- )

Mr. Bloomberg at a campaign event in Sacramento, Calif., on Monday.Credit…Jim Wilson/The New York Times

Michael R. Bloomberg’s presidential campaign moved on Tuesday to exploit the chaotic outcome of the Iowa caucuses, authorizing his campaign team to double his spending on television commercials in every market where he is currently advertising and expand his campaign’s field staff to more than two thousand people, strategists involved in the conversations said.

The Bloomberg campaign has been trying to chart an unprecedented route to the Democratic nomination, skipping the first four contests in February but aggressively contesting the array of larger states that begin voting in March. From the outset, Mr. Bloomberg’s advisers believed the strategy would only have a chance of working if another moderate candidate — most likely former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. — failed to emerge from February with a decisive upper hand in the race.

In an interview on Monday in Compton, Calif., Mr. Bloomberg was unusually blunt about his campaign spending strategy and his intent to seek advantages while his rivals toiled in the four early states, which have relatively few delegates needed to win the nomination.

“It’s much more efficient to go to the big states, to go to the swing states,” Mr. Bloomberg said. “The others chose to compete in the first four. And nobody makes them do it, they wanted to do it. I think part of it is because the conventional wisdom is ‘Oh you can’t possibly win without them.’”

Later, he added: “Those are old rules.”

Mr. Bloomberg, the former New York City mayor whose campaign is fueled by a multibillion-dollar personal fortune, conferred with advisers on Tuesday morning about the muddled results in Iowa. Encouraged by the murky outcome, Mr. Bloomberg authorized his campaign team to undertake the expansion in advertising and staff.

His campaign also released a new advertisement scheduled to be aired nationally Tuesday night, when President Trump is set to deliver his State of the Union address. The spot focuses on criticism of Mr. Trump, warning of a nation “divided by an angry, out-of-control president” and a White House “beset by lies, chaos and corruption.”

The advertisement tries to portray Mr. Bloomberg as the candidate who is best equipped to beat Mr. Trump in November.

The Iowa Democratic Party said Tuesday that there were delays in announcing the results from the precincts because the new app that it planned to use for its caucus results reported only partial data.

“As part of our investigation, we determined with certainty that the underlying data collected via the app was sound,” Mr. Price said. “While the app was recording data accurately, it was reporting out only partial data. We have determined that this was due to a coding issue in the reporting system. This issue was identified and fixed.”

Sean Bagniewski had seen the problems coming.

It wasn’t so much that the new app that the Iowa Democratic Party had planned to use to report its caucus results didn’t work. It was that people were struggling to even log in or download it in the first place. After all, there had never been any app-specific training for this many precinct chairs.

So last Thursday Mr. Bagniewski, the chairman of the Democratic Party in Polk County, Iowa’s most populous, decided to scrap the app entirely, instructing his precinct chairs to simply call in the caucus results as they had always done.

The only problem was, when the time came during Monday’s caucuses, those precinct chairs could not connect with party leaders via phone. Mr. Bagniewski instructed his executive director to take pictures of the results with her smartphone and drive over to the Iowa Democratic Party headquarters to deliver them in person. She was turned away without explanation, he said.

It was a surreal opening act for the 2020 campaign that included unexplained “inconsistencies” in results that were not released to the public, heated conference calls with campaigns that were hung up on by the state party, firm denials of any kind of hacking and a presidential primary left in a strange state of almost suspended animation.

“A systemwide disaster,” said Derek Eadon, a former Iowa Democratic Party chairman.

Amid the chaos and confusion, there were conflicting candidate speeches declaring various degrees of victory, as Mr. Sanders’s campaign released its own set of favorable partial results, and multiple campaigns hoped that the mess would not lessen the eventual impact of what they said appeared to be a disappointing first test for Mr. Biden.

KEENE, N.H. — Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts called on the Iowa Democratic Party to “get it together,” saying the reporting errors that upended caucus results threatened to damage trust in the Democratic process.

Speaking to reporters after an event in Keene, her first in New Hampshire after landing at 4 a.m., Ms. Warren said reports that the Iowa Democratic Party planned to release half of the caucus results later this afternoon made little sense.

“I just don’t understand what that means to release half of the data,” she said. “So, I think they ought to get it together and release all of the data.”

Ms. Warren told the audience that the results showed a close race atop the Iowa field between her, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, and former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind. Her campaign has sought to frame the caucus results — however unclear — as a bad night for former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.

Asked if voters will be able to trust results, Ms. Warren replied, “I hope they’ll be able to.” At the same time, her campaign sent an email to supporters framing the results as a good night for them amid a tumultuous time for democracy.

“I know there are reasons to feel frustrated and discouraged,” it read. “Yesterday we had a bumpy democratic process. Tonight a lawless president will deliver his State of the Union. Tomorrow Republicans in the Senate will likely declare that their loyalty is to Donald Trump rather than our Constitution and the rule of law.”

The Iowa Democratic Party changed its rules for this year to accommodate concerns that the caucus process was not transparent. But instead of making things clearer, the new process only muddled matters, leaving a procession of candidates to hustle onstage Monday night before any official outcome could alter the mood.

Mr. Sanders predicted that he would “be doing very, very well” whenever Iowa’s tale was told. Ms. Warren vowed that her campaign was “built for the long haul.” Ms. Klobuchar claimed to “punching above our weight.”

“We’re going to walk out of here with our share of delegates,” Mr. Biden told supporters, as rival campaigns suggested that their data showed the long-assumed front-runner underperforming. “We feel good about where we are.”

But Mr. Buttigieg was almost certainly boldest, inching toward an outright declaration of victory: “By all indications,” he said, “we are going on to New Hampshire victorious.”

At the time, none of those indications were public.

More on the make-or-break night in Iowa that could break the caucuses.

As Democrats struggled to count the votes in the opening presidential nominating contest, the one person clearly rejoicing was the man they hope to evict from the White House.

“The Democrat Caucus is an unmitigated disaster,” President Trump wrote on Twitter on Tuesday morning as the Iowa results remained unknown. “Nothing works, just like they ran the Country. Remember the 5 Billion Dollar Obamacare Website, that should have cost 2% of that. The only person that can claim a very big victory in Iowa last night is ‘Trump.’”

But Mr. Trump, who won the Republican caucuses in Iowa handily, rejected suggestions that the breakdown in counting should cause the state to lose its status as the first stop in the presidential nomination process.

“It is not the fault of Iowa, it is the Do Nothing Democrats fault,” he wrote. “As long as I am President, Iowa will stay where it is. Important tradition!”

Read more here.

The app that the Iowa Democratic Party commissioned to tabulate and report results from the caucuses was not properly tested at a statewide scale, said people who were briefed on the app by the state party.

The party decided to use the app only after another proposal for reporting votes — which entailed having caucus participants call in their votes over the phone — was abandoned, on the advice of Democratic National Committee officials, according to David Jefferson, a board member of Verified Voting, a nonpartisan election integrity organization.

The app was built by Shadow Inc., a for-profit technology company that is also used by the Nevada Democratic Party, the next state to hold a caucus, as well as by multiple presidential campaigns.

The secrecy around the app this year came from the Iowa Democratic Party, which asked that even its name be withheld from the public. According to a person familiar with the app, its creators had repeatedly questioned the need to keep it secret, especially from the Iowa precincts where it would be used.

That person, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he had agreed not to discuss details of the app, said that there were concerns that the app would malfunction in areas with poor connectivity, or because of high bandwidth use, such as when many people tried to use it at the same time.

Read more here.

NASHUA, N.H. — Fresh off an overnight flight from Des Moines, Mr. Buttigieg met the mayor of Nashua, Jim Donchess, for a coffee at the Riverwalk Café downtown.

“You did a great job last night on your speech,” Mr. Donchess said, as he greeted Mr. Buttigieg on a sidewalk outside of the coffee shop.

“Thanks,” Mr. Buttigieg said. “Felt good.”

As the two men walked down the sidewalk, Mr. Buttigieg told the Nashua mayor that it was “frustrating” to not have good results, but said “you can’t deny” that he had had a strong night.

Mr. Donchess, a four-term mayor, announced his endorsement of Mr. Buttigieg this morning, though said he had been considering it for some time and was not influenced by the reports of a strong finish in Iowa.

Mr. Buttigieg lingered in the coffee shop for about 10 minutes, sitting down with three voters to talk about local issues. He ignored questions from reporters about whether his speech last night in Iowa, seemingly declaring victory absent any official results, was premature.

Voters here — both those who said they were undecided and those who said they would vote for Mr. Buttigieg — offered a collective shrug at the former mayor’s decision to declare victory in the absence of any official results.

Asked if it was appropriate for Mr. Buttigieg to have suggested he had won, Ben Gayman, an undecided voter from Manchester, did not hesitate.

“Of course,” he said. “They all did.”

A lot of reasons contributed to Monday night’s events, chiefly a breakdown of the process by which caucus leaders were supposed to report results to the Iowa Democratic Party.

But one factor was baked into that process from almost the moment the caucuses ended four years ago.

Historically, the party had focused on highlighting only one caucus result: the number of delegates each candidate had earned for the state convention. The winner of the Iowa caucuses was the person who earned the most state delegates, which translate into national delegates, which determine the nomination. This year, however, the state party chose to release four results from the caucuses.

That’s because in 2016, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton edged out Mr. Sanders in the state delegate count by a quarter of a percentage point, earning roughly 700 to Mr. Sanders’s 697. That meant 23 national delegates for Mrs. Clinton and 21 for Mr. Sanders — an inconsequential difference between the two rivals.

Mr. Sanders’s 2016 campaign fought for an audit in Iowa — comparing the reported results with the papers on which caucus leaders had recorded voters’ preferences — and accused the state Democratic Party of a lack of transparency.

Largely because of Mr. Sanders’s objections, the party decided to release additional numbers in 2020 that it had always logged but never made public: the number of supporters each candidate had in the first round of voting and the number he or she had in the second round, after nonviable candidates were eliminated and caucusgoers realigned.

The idea was that all this data would provide a fuller picture of each candidate’s strength. But it also made reporting the results more complicated. Read more here.

In a joint statement released Tuesday morning, Senators Chuck Grassley and Joni Ernst of Iowa and the state’s governor, Kim Reynolds, defended the Iowa caucuses, saying they were confident the results would ultimately be tallied.

“Iowa’s unique role encourages a grass-roots nominating process that empowers everyday Americans, not Washington insiders or powerful billionaires,” they said. “The face-to-face retail politics nature of Iowa’s caucus system also encourages dialogue between candidates and voters that makes our presidential candidates accountable for the positions they take and the records they hold.”

They also defended the state’s position at the start of the nominating calendar.

“Iowa’s large population of independent voters and its practice of careful deliberation contributes greatly to the national presidential primary and makes it the ideal state to kick off the nominating process,” they said. “Iowans and all Americans should know we have complete confidence that every last vote will be counted and every last voice will be heard.”

Reporting was contributed by Maggie Astor, Peter Baker, Alexander Burns, Nick Corasaniti, Sydney Ember, Reid J. Epstein, Sheera Frenkel, Shane Goldmacher, Christine Hauser, Astead W. Herndon, Nicole Perlroth, Jonathan Martin, Jennifer Medina and Matt Stevens.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘No Longer A Friend’: Ukrainians Are Losing Faith In The U.S.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1197678597-52f86cdb19cae3bf576e6b581732d29f1227c0ad-s1100-c15 'No Longer A Friend': Ukrainians Are Losing Faith In The U.S.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo (left) and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy arrive for a joint news conference in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Jan. 31. Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  'No Longer A Friend': Ukrainians Are Losing Faith In The U.S.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo (left) and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy arrive for a joint news conference in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Jan. 31.

Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images

Nataliya Gumenyuk grew up in a small town outside of Kyiv during the first hungry years after Ukraine gained independence from the Soviet Union in 1991. Like many Ukrainians of her generation, she was raised on Hollywood movies — but also the American credo of positive social change.

Today Gumenyuk, 36, is a prominent Ukrainian journalist, who co-founded Hromadske, a noncommercial, nongovernmental public broadcaster, during street protests that rocked Kyiv six years ago.

Gumenyuk, who traveled to the U.S. to cover the last three presidential elections, says America has lost its sheen since Ukraine unwittingly became the focus of President Trump’s impeachment process in Washington.

“There was the idea of a moral example, which is definitely no longer there,” Gumenyuk says.

Revelations that President Trump asked Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden are at the heart of the impeachment trial in the Senate. Trump’s decision to freeze military aid to Ukraine over the summer, as well his administration’s back-channel efforts to contact Zelenskiy, have shaken many Ukrainians’ belief in the U.S. as a steadfast ally and role model.

Last week, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was the first high-ranking administration official to visit Ukraine since the impeachment scandal broke last fall. There hasn’t been a U.S. ambassador in Kyiv since May, when Trump abruptly recalled Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch. And Kurt Volker, who was the top U.S. diplomat tasked with negotiating an end to Ukraine’s six-year conflict with Russia, resigned in September before giving testimony in the impeachment inquiry.

Before leaving for Europe last month, Pompeo called into question whether Americans care about Ukraine.

“Maybe there was the idea that with this visit, Pompeo could say: ‘Look, I care about Ukraine and have come to Ukraine’ so it could be used in the impeachment trial,” says Gumenyuk.

Zelenskiy wants to secure a White House visit and a replacement for Volker. That would signal to the Kremlin that the U.S. still supports the Ukrainian government in its bid to end the low-level war with Russian-backed separatists in eastern Ukraine. But Pompeo offered neither a date for a meeting with Trump nor a new envoy to Ukraine.

Ivan Yakovina, a political commentator in Kyiv, says Ukraine’s political class has become disillusioned with the United States.

“Previously it was Ukraine that was unpredictable. Now, we have no idea what’s going to happen in the United States next week,” Yakovina says. “A lot of people are disappointed. America used to be a beacon of freedom, liberty and anti-corruption efforts. Now a lot of Ukrainians feel like, ‘yeah, we are by ourselves.'”

After his talks with Zelenskiy last Friday, Pompeo held a meeting with representatives of Ukrainian civil society, including Olena Tregub, head of the Independent Defence Anti-Corruption Committee, a nongovernmental watchdog group.

Tregub says the meeting lasted more than an hour and focused on the challenges the Zelenskiy government faces in fighting corruption and improving Ukraine’s investment climate. Ukraine ranks 126th in Transparency International‘s 2019 Corruption Perception Index, between Bolivia and Laos.

While Tregub welcomed the opportunity to speak with Pompeo, she says the U.S. can do more to support civil society beyond providing financial assistance.

“This is not a safe environment for anti-corruption campaigners,” she says. “The U.S. should continuously show that it supports agents of change. One visit is just a start but definitely not enough.”

Gumenyuk, whose TV channel depends on funding from foreign governments, says Ukraine’s reliance on U.S. assistance makes it awkward to criticize the Trump administration for its transactional approach to foreign policy.

“America is not an adversary — but maybe no longer a friend,” Gumenyuk says. “You’d want to have the U.S. be a more trustworthy partner.”

But not everyone in Kyiv takes such a bleak view of U.S.-Ukrainian relations.

Ivan Pohrebniyak, an IT entrepreneur, doubts whether Pompeo was speaking for the Trump administration when he questioned Americans’ interest in Ukraine.

“Is this the general opinion of the entire government of the U.S.? I don’t think so,” says Pohrebniyak, 36. “How much did previous presidents care about Ukraine?”

Pohrebniyak, who travels frequently to the U.S. for work, says Trump appeals to him as a businessman who gets things done.

He says he is keeping an open mind about whether Trump deserves to be impeached and still believes the rule of law will prevail in the U.S. — unlike in Ukraine.

With the Senate all but certain to acquit Trump on Wednesday, political analyst Yakovina is less sanguine.

“As long as Donald Trump is president of the United States, nobody can be sure of anything,” Yakovina says. “I’m afraid that after his acquittal in the Senate, Trump will start pressuring Ukraine even more. Now he won’t have anything to fear.”

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