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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 298)

What Happened Today in the Trump Impeachment Inquiry

ImageWestlake Legal Group 11us-pm-briefing-ss-slide-72KU-articleLarge What Happened Today in the Trump Impeachment Inquiry Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry impeachment

Marie Yovanovitch, the former American ambassador to Ukraine, center, arriving to testify in a closed hearing Friday on Capitol Hill.CreditDamon Winter/The New York Times

  • Marie Yovanovitch, the former American ambassador to Ukraine, told impeachment investigators in a closed-door interview that a top State Department official told her that President Trump had pushed for her removal even though the department believed she had “done nothing wrong.”

  • Ms. Yovanovitch said people associated with Rudy Giuliani, Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer, “may well have believed that their personal financial ambitions were stymied by our anti-corruption policy in Ukraine.”

  • Gordon Sondland, the American ambassador to the European Union, like Ms. Yovanovitch, agreed to comply with a House subpoena and testify, defying a State Department order not to appear.


Ms. Yovanovitch delivered her searing account before Congress at the risk of losing her job, since the White House has ordered officials not to cooperate with the impeachment inquiry. This afternoon I stopped by the desk of Sharon LaFraniere, who has written about Ms. Yovanovitch, to discuss why the former ambassador to Ukraine was so intent on speaking out.

Sharon, how unusual was her participation? And how unusual was her testimony?

She testified despite a White House declaration that there would be no more cooperation with Congress. She’s acting in defiance of the White House. Her testimony today was a really damning indictment of how the Trump administration is conducting foreign policy. She warned against people who in search of personal gain or private influence undermined the work of American government officials and threatened the policy goals of the United States. And on top of all that, she said the State Department is being hollowed out from within, because diplomats don’t feel the government has their back.

What does she know that House Democrats want to know?

She seemed to suggest that businesspeople who are allies of Rudy Giuliani may have orchestrated this campaign to get her out for their own private gain. Was she removed because she was standing in the way of some sort of quid pro quo deal that the White House was planning to execute? Did they see her as unwilling to play ball in what might have been a corrupt game? Those are the questions impeachment investigators want to answer.


“Smart, charismatic, ruthless, a little megalomaniacal.” “Ambitious, righteous, then self-righteous.” “Personable … for a little while.” “Decisive, combative, conspiratorial.” “Pugilistic, erratic, extremely smart, reckless.” “Forceful, combative, energetic, vindictive, tireless, annoying.”

That’s Rudy Giuliani, as described by our reporters who have covered him over the past 35 years. A forthcoming episode of The Weekly traces his path from crime-busting prosecutor to Donald Trump’s personal lawyer, now at the center of the impeachment inquiry.

The episode focuses in part on a brutal zinger — that Mr. Giuliani needed only “a noun and a verb and 9/11” to construct a sentence — that was delivered by none other than Joe Biden, which helped sink the former New York City mayor’s 2008 presidential campaign.

“Giuliani did not like that line. I don’t think he ever forgot that Biden said it,” my colleague Maggie Haberman says on the show.

To better understand how we got to this point, I called Dan Barry, who appears in The Weekly episode and has chronicled Mr. Giuliani for decades.

What do you see in Rudy today that reminds you of the guy you’ve covered for so many years?

There’s this combativeness, that need to be at the center of attention — the willingness to go almost anywhere to champion whatever the cause of the moment is for him. All those character traits on display now are quite familiar to anyone who followed him closely 20 or 30 years ago. But the Rudy we see now is also at odds with the Rudy of the ’80s and ’90s, with his moral rectitude then. He was Mr. Law and Order.

Why, after so many years in the public eye, did he want to work for Mr. Trump?

He was leading in the polls in the 2007 to be the Republican nominee for president. He was spending oodles of money. He was getting a lot of ink. And then it all evaporated. He spent millions and ended up with one delegate. That stung. He was an international hero, and then was roundly rejected. He always wanted to be relevant. He needed to be relevant. What happened in 2016? He becomes relevant. Now, he’s effectively the shadow secretary of state. I think he revels in that.

Watch “The Weekly,” our new TV show, on FX Sunday at 10/9c.


  • Mr. Trump’s accounting firm must comply with a House committee’s demands for eight years of his financial records, a federal appeals court panel ruled on Friday.

  • The Justice Department asked another federal appeals court to stop the release of Mr. Trump’s tax returns to the Manhattan district attorney’s office, arguing that local prosecutors should have to meet a very high legal bar before investigating a sitting president.

  • “I think we do need an inquiry because we have to get to the bottom of it,” Gov. Larry Hogan of Maryland, a moderate Republican, said when asked whether he supported the impeachment investigation. “I’m not ready to say I support impeachment and the removal of the president, but I do think we should have an impeachment inquiry.”

  • Trying to keep track of all the Ukraine-related characters from this week’s impeachment news? We wrote up a helpful guide.

The Impeachment Briefing is also available as a newsletter. Sign up here to get it in your inbox every weeknight.

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Juan Williams ‘heartbroken’ over Trump’s rally comments, saying he’s only ‘concerned’ with Biden

Westlake Legal Group Trump-Juan-Biden Juan Williams 'heartbroken' over Trump's rally comments, saying he's only 'concerned' with Biden Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 7e295300-9d6d-5cdf-9a08-d0878a22703a

Juan Williams said he was “heartbroken” after listening to President Trump‘s rally Thursday in Minneapolis. To Wiliams, it is clear that Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden is the only potential opponent Trump is “concerned with.”

“I’m just so heartbroken for America that that’s the president, that’s the way he talks,” Williams said on “The Five” on Friday. “And that’s the way he talks about people who are his political rivals.”

Williams took issue with how Trump unloaded on Joe and Hunter Biden  over their Ukrainian business dealings, and with the president saying Joe Biden’s only useful trait as vice president was to “kiss Barack Obama’s a–.”

Williams also told his co-hosts that he believed this was proof that Trump was focused on Biden as his only threat to reelection.

WHISTLEBLOWER ATTORNEY ADMITS CLIENT HAD CONTACT WITH PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES, AS LAWYER’S ANTI-TRUMP BIAS SURFACES

“I think it’s pretty clear from that attack last night that there’s only one Democrat that he is concerned with and that’s Joe Biden,” Williams said. “He doesn’t attack Elizabeth Warren — who’s been doing well in the polls.

“His actions and his words, everything from Ukraine and those unsubstantiated theories to this, show that he is really worried about Joe Biden.”

Co-host Greg Gutfeld disagreed with Williams over his criticism of Trump’s comments, saying Democrats believed former President Barack Obama would be a “revolutionary” figure but that it is Trump who is actually that.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“How hilarious is it that the revolutionary is a Republican talk show host, right? Their impeachment is going to turn Trump into a revolutionary to a lot of people in a positive way. It will create a movement,” Gutfeld said. “So they got to understand that this is actually going to help Trump when you see the energy that he has.”

Westlake Legal Group Trump-Juan-Biden Juan Williams 'heartbroken' over Trump's rally comments, saying he's only 'concerned' with Biden Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 7e295300-9d6d-5cdf-9a08-d0878a22703a   Westlake Legal Group Trump-Juan-Biden Juan Williams 'heartbroken' over Trump's rally comments, saying he's only 'concerned' with Biden Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 7e295300-9d6d-5cdf-9a08-d0878a22703a

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DOJ reveals no Mueller grand jury material shared with any foreign government

Westlake Legal Group Mueller053119_C_AP DOJ reveals no Mueller grand jury material shared with any foreign government Melissa Leon fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/person/robert-mueller fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 6f5d4078-8af6-51a1-b0fa-9edd4d31a653

The Justice Department disclosed in a court filing Friday that no protected information from the grand jury empaneled by then-Special Counsel Robert Mueller was shared with any foreign government.

The information was disclosed in response to queries from a federal judge in Washingon presiding over a related request by the House Judiciary Committee for the release of certain grand jury material, including redacted portions of Mueller’s report.

Chief Judge Beryl Howell on Tuesday had ordered the department to disclose said material from Mueller’s Russia investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Moscow. The Justice Department fought the case.

JUSTICE DEPT. MUST TURN OVER MATERIAL RELATED TO MUELLER GRAND JURY, JUDGE RULES

Howell had ordered the department to reveal which and how many FBI witness interview reports were turned over to the committee, as well as how many they planned to turn over, according to The Washington Post.

The judge also ordered that the DOJ state by Friday whether Mueller’s team had disclosed grand jury information when asking for help from other countries, saying she wanted to know if the department was withholding information from Congress that was already shared with foreign countries.

TRUMP CLAIMS MUELLER ‘ABSOLUTELY WANTED TO BE FBI DIRECTOR’ WHEN THEY MET IN 2017

“No grand jury information collected from the Mueller investigation and protected from disclosure was shared with any foreign government as part of a Mutual Legal Assistant Treaty (MLAT) request,” and no information was shared pursuant to a rule that governs any mutual assistance treaty with another nation or disclosure to another law enforcement agency, according to court documents.

The court asked “whether grand jury secrecy is the only basis for redaction for those parts of the Mueller report where grand jury secrecy redactions were applied and, if not, what other bases for withholding apply,” court documents stated.

MUELLER REJOINS WILMERHALE LAW FIRM, IN LATEST POST-RUSSIA PROBE LANDING

“In a limited number of instances, grand jury redactions in the Mueller report overlapped with other bases for withholding,” which included “personal privacy, deliberations with respect to charging decisions, protecting ongoing law enforcement matters and protecting information the disclosure of which would affect fair trial rights,” the Justice Department said in its response.

The Justice Department released a redacted version of the Mueller report in April.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Fox News’ Bill Mears, Ashley Cozzolino and Brie Stimson contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Mueller053119_C_AP DOJ reveals no Mueller grand jury material shared with any foreign government Melissa Leon fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/person/robert-mueller fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 6f5d4078-8af6-51a1-b0fa-9edd4d31a653   Westlake Legal Group Mueller053119_C_AP DOJ reveals no Mueller grand jury material shared with any foreign government Melissa Leon fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/person/robert-mueller fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 6f5d4078-8af6-51a1-b0fa-9edd4d31a653

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Fed Unveils Plan to Expand Balance Sheet but Insists it’s Not Q.E.

Westlake Legal Group 11dc-fed-facebookJumbo Fed Unveils Plan to Expand Balance Sheet but Insists it’s Not Q.E. Government Bonds Federal Reserve System

The Federal Reserve said Friday that it would begin buying government-backed securities to expand its balance sheet, a move meant to keep an obscure but critical corner of financial markets functioning smoothly.

Now officials seem to be hoping the public will understand their motivation.

Unlike its postrecession bond-buying campaigns, often called quantitative easing, or Q.E., the new effort is not monetary stimulus, the Fed stressed. Instead, the central bank is trying to keep money markets in check after a messy episode in which interest rates for repurchase agreements — essentially short-term loans between banks and other financial institutions — spiked in September. The run-up spilled over into money markets, pushing the Fed’s policy rate temporarily above the range that policymakers were targeting.

By expanding its balance sheet, the Fed will increase the financial system’s supply of bank reserves, which are currency deposits at the central bank. Doing so should keep episodes like last month’s from repeating by creating a steady supply of dollars to smooth over tumultuous moments.

Here’s what the plan will look like, how the Fed is trying to convince the world that it is not a new round of Q.E. and why it matters whether that message sticks.

The Fed plans to buy Treasury bills, which are shorter-dated government debt, at an “initial” pace of about $60 billion from mid-October to mid-November, it announced Friday. It will then adjust both the timing and amounts of bill purchases “as necessary to maintain an ample supply of reserve balances over time.” The buying will continue at least into the second quarter of 2020.

New purchase amounts will be announced on the ninth business day of each month.

The Fed will also continue to intervene in the market for repurchase agreements, something its New York branch began to do last month — a first since the financial crisis — as rates climbed. The Fed will keep those operations going “at least through January of next year,” according to the release, “to ensure that the supply of reserves remains ample even during periods of sharp increases in nonreserve liabilities.”

Markets expected the Fed to do something to prevent money market turmoil after September’s troubles. The Fed’s chair, Jerome H. Powell, said just this week that a plan was coming “soon.” But the size of the package surprised some onlookers, including Priya Misra, head of global rates strategy at TD Securities.

“This is building a buffer, and it’s doing it faster than I thought,” Ms. Misra said.

While the amount could change, buying $60 billion in Treasury bills over a month is substantial, even by the Fed’s standards. For context, the Fed bought about $85 billion in bonds each month during its final round of quantitative easing, which started in 2012.

Yet the new purchases are different from those postcrisis packages.

Mr. Powell and his colleagues have repeated, time and again, that the current balance sheet expansion should not be confused with quantitative easing.

“It’s not a change in our policy stance,” the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, Neel Kashkari, said in an interview Friday. The amount of bills the Fed buys “is going to depend on how much demand for dollars grows,” he said, and the adjustable approach to buying “gives us a lot of flexibility.”

The simple fact that policymakers are trying to draw the distinction is important, because Q.E. worked to a large extent through market expectations — investors saw it as a sign that the Fed would not lift interest rates soon. That caused them to dial back their expectations for rate increases and helped to keep money cheap and easy to borrow.

To drive home the point that there is no broader policy signal this time, officials made the new package look unique. The Fed is buying only Treasury bills, for one thing. The Fed’s recession-era buying focused on bonds, in a bid to make mortgages and car loans cheaper by pushing down longer-term interest rates. By concentrating this effort on short-term debt, the Fed is forgoing that sort of stimulus.

Officials also announced the package between their scheduled meetings, whereas easing rounds were announced at policy-setting gatherings.

Still, some onlookers were skeptical that the Fed would manage to convince investors that this was not an attempt to bolster the economy, given the size of the purchases.

“When it swims like a duck and quacks like a duck, it’s hard to prove your intentions aren’t fowl,” Paul Ashworth, chief economist at Capital Economics, wrote in research note.

It is important that the Fed’s message sticks. The Fed will be short on room to cut interest rates when the next recession hits, because they are already at just 2 percent — leaving the central bank with far less than the five percentage points of cuts it made in the 2007 to 2009 downturn. That means bond-buying will be an essential part of the Fed’s future easing packages, and one to be used in case of emergency.

“They want to keep Q.E. as something special,” said Laura Rosner, a co-founder of MacroPolicy Perspectives. “I don’t think they want to send a signal that things are bad.”

But if central bankers communicate clumsily, they could create problems for themselves. They are telling investors that their bond purchases do not stimulate the economy — yet they will probably need investors to believe that Fed bond buying is stimulative come the next recession.

“I see some tensions there,” Ms. Rosner said.

The Fed did not have a lot of time to come up with this plan: Last month’s market volatility was bad, and unexpected, news for the central bank.

Rates on repurchase agreements, or repos, shot higher starting Sept. 16 as a confluence of events sucked dollars out of the financial system. A deadline for corporate tax payments and issuance of new Treasury debt led to a dollar shortage — stresses that were unusual but not unexpected. The disruption spilled over into other money markets, temporarily pushing the Fed’s policy interest rate, the fed funds rate, above the range policymakers had set for it.

That raised alarm bells. Officials had decided this year that they wanted to continue setting interest rates in what they called an “ample reserve” framework. In such an approach, the central bank keeps its balance sheet holdings big enough to leave plenty of cash in the financial system. Banks keep their extra cash on deposit at the central bank, and the Fed adjusts interest rates by changing how it pays on those excess holdings, commonly called reserves.

The Fed wanted to shrink its balance sheet to a point where it could run the system without regularly intervening in markets. September’s repo issues suggested that it might have gone too far, getting to a point where reserves — which no longer move around the system as easily as they once did — were insufficient to smooth over turbulence.

Now, the key is to get back to a place where reserves are plentiful, all the while hewing to the refrain Mr. Powell has now aired several times: “This is not Q.E.”

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Nancy Pelosi says Trump’s rally comments about Biden ‘beyond the pale,’ rips Senate Republicans’ ‘cowardice’ on impeachment inquiry

Westlake Legal Group 13f2d382-trump-pelosi Nancy Pelosi says Trump's rally comments about Biden 'beyond the pale,' rips Senate Republicans' 'cowardice' on impeachment inquiry Liam Quinn fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 60ddf27e-0443-5993-a714-1fd005140f48

Nancy Pelosi wants someone to think of the children.

House Speaker Pelosi, D-Calif., blasted President Trump during a caucus call on Friday for his latest crude attack on former Vice President Joe Biden, accusing him of having become a “potty mouth” — before labeling the president “disgraceful.”

“One thing, I do want to say is that, POTUS – you know, that’s the President – POTUS has become a potty mouth and children are listening,” Pelosi said.

“This is – this is beyond disgraceful.”

WHITE HOUSE ANNOUNCES IT WILL NOT COMPLY WITH ‘ILLEGITIMATE AND UNCONSTITUTIONAL’ IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY

She then defended Biden — her party’s potential 2020 presidential nominee — after Trump ramped up his attacks on the former vice president during a raucous rally in Minnesota on Thursday night.

During the rally, the president launched into a mock interview with Hunter, Biden’s son, whom Trump called “not too smart.”

“Hunter, you know nothing about energy, you know nothing about China, you know nothing about anything, frankly. Hunter, you’re a loser,” Trump said, his voice rising. “Your father was never considered smart, he was never considered a good senator — he was only a good vice president because he understood how to kiss Barack Obama’s a–.”

During Friday’s call, Pelosi said: “For him to say the thing that he said about Joe Biden last night was so far beyond the pale.”

TRUMP BELITTLES BIDENS WITH GRAPHIC LANGUAGE AT MINNEAPOLIS RALLY

She then turned her attention to the ongoing impeachment inquiry — and how the “facts” of that should not stop anyone from making some of Trump’s other behavior into an election issue.

“That is about elections, and I will make my final point,” she said.

“What we are doing on impeachment is about the facts — ‘Just the facts, ma’am’ — and the Constitution.  His policy, his personality, his potty mouth, that’s about the election, and let’s make sure that we understand the reasons he is – the inquiry is because he has not honored his oath of office.  We will honor ours.”

Pelosi then called Republicans in the Senate cowardly and said the impeachment inquiry is about saving the Constitution.

WHISTLEBLOWER ATTORNEY ADMITS CLIENT HAD CONTACT WITH PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES, AS LAWYER’S ANTI-TRUMP BIAS SURFACES

“The Senate is saying, ‘Now that you are doing that, we are not doing it.’  You know, just because we have the courage to honor our oath of office doesn’t mean we have to fold to the cowardice of the Senate that is not going to honor theirs,” she said.

“The whole point of this inquiry is to save the Constitution of the United States.  The subpoena is the oversight that Congress has as a separation of powers – political branches of government have checks and balances on each other.

“I’ve said before: Trump, himself, is not worthy of impeachment because it’s divisive in the country.  But our Constitution is worth it. Our democracy is worth it. And, our republic, if we can save it, is worth it.”

Pelosi’s remarks came after the White House outlined in a defiant eight-page letter to the House Speaker and top Democrats on Tuesday why it will not participate in their “illegitimate and unconstitutional” impeachment inquiry, charging that the proceedings have run roughshod over congressional norms and the president’s due-process rights.

Trump administration officials called the letter, which was written by White House Counsel Pat Cipollone and obtained by Fox News, perhaps the most historic letter the White House has sent. The document tees up a head-on collision with Democrats in Congress, who have fired off a slew of subpoenas in recent days concerning the president’s alleged effort to get Ukraine to investigate political foe Joe Biden during a July phone call with Ukraine’s leader.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Pelosi said: “This letter is manifestly wrong, and is simply another unlawful attempt to hide the facts of the Trump administration’s brazen efforts to pressure foreign powers to intervene in the 2020 elections. … The White House should be warned that continued efforts to hide the truth of the president’s abuse of power from the American people will be regarded as further evidence of obstruction. Mr. President, you are not above the law.  You will be held accountable.”

Fox News’ Chad Pergram, Gregg Re, and John Roberts contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group 13f2d382-trump-pelosi Nancy Pelosi says Trump's rally comments about Biden 'beyond the pale,' rips Senate Republicans' 'cowardice' on impeachment inquiry Liam Quinn fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 60ddf27e-0443-5993-a714-1fd005140f48   Westlake Legal Group 13f2d382-trump-pelosi Nancy Pelosi says Trump's rally comments about Biden 'beyond the pale,' rips Senate Republicans' 'cowardice' on impeachment inquiry Liam Quinn fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 60ddf27e-0443-5993-a714-1fd005140f48

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Shepard Smith, Fox News Anchor, Abruptly Departs From Network

Westlake Legal Group 11SMITH-01-facebookJumbo-v2 Shepard Smith, Fox News Anchor, Abruptly Departs From Network Smith, Shepard News and News Media Fox News Channel

Shepard Smith, the chief news anchor of Fox News whose reporting often drew the ire of President Trump, said on Friday that he was leaving the cable news network after 23 years, an abrupt move that left some of his co-workers openly stunned.

“Recently, I asked the company to allow me to leave Fox News,” Mr. Smith told viewers at the close of his regular broadcast. “After requesting that I stay, they obliged.”

A fixture of Fox News, Mr. Smith joined the network as a correspondent at its start in 1996 and became one of its most visible journalists. He is leaving in the middle of his current contract, a rarity in the cutthroat television business, and he told viewers on Friday that, under his exit agreement, “I won’t be reporting elsewhere at least in the near future.”

[embedded content]

Shepard Smith says goodbye to Fox NewsCreditCreditVideo by Fox News

Since Mr. Trump took office, Mr. Smith has stood out at Fox News for his tough coverage of the White House — a stark contrast from the Trump cheerleading often displayed by the network’s prime-time and morning-show commentators.

Mr. Smith’s reporting has sometimes frustrated Mr. Trump, who has repeatedly taunted the anchor on Twitter, referring to him as Fox’s “lowest rated anchor.” On Thursday, Mr. Trump cited Mr. Smith by name, along with the former Democratic strategist Donna Brazile, arguing that Fox News was “much different than it used to be in the good old days.”

Mr. Smith was so prominent a target in the president’s harangues that speculation emerged that the anchor’s departure was related to a meeting this week between Rupert Murdoch, the mogul who controls Fox News, and Mr. Trump’s attorney general, William Barr.

[Read more about the meeting between William Barr and Rupert Murdoch.]

A spokesman for Mr. Smith, Chris Giglio, said there was no connection between that meeting and Mr. Smith’s exit from Fox News. “This was Shep’s decision and his alone,” Mr. Giglio wrote in an email.

Mr. Smith’s coverage of the White House had generated tension between the anchor and some of his colleagues in the network’s opinion division, which produces the right-wing programming that dominates Fox News prime-time and morning shows.

The tensions burst into open view last month as the impeachment inquiry was getting started. Mr. Smith denounced a guest on Tucker Carlson’s program for making “repugnant” comments about a Fox News legal analyst, Andrew Napolitano. Mr. Carlson fired back at Mr. Smith with a not-so-subtle suggestion of bias, saying, “Unlike maybe some dayside hosts, I’m not very partisan.”

[Read about on-air sniping at Fox News.]

In March, the president lobbed another insult at Mr. Smith, saying that, along with a pair of Fox News weekend anchors, he should be working at CNN, a network Mr. Trump has often accused of having a liberal bias.

Several of Mr. Smith’s Fox News colleagues appeared shocked by Mr. Smith’s decision to depart. “I’m a little stunned and a little heartbroken,” the anchor Neil Cavuto, who follows Mr. Smith on weekdays, told viewers moments after Mr. Smith had concluded his 3 p.m. broadcast. It appeared that Mr. Cavuto had no advance warning of Mr. Smith’s decision.

John Roberts, Fox News’s chief White House correspondent, called the move “completely shocking” and compared learning of the news to being “hit by a subway train.”

Mr. Smith has, at times, pointed out Mr. Trump’s false statements in the opening remarks of his program. In September, he criticized the president’s warning that Alabama was in danger from Hurricane Dorian.

“Some things in Trump-landia are inexplicable,” Mr. Smith said. “This week’s edition, the president’s ongoing claim that Alabama was at risk from Hurricane Dorian. It wasn’t. Maybe he got some bad info from somebody, maybe he made a mistake, maybe he was confused — we don’t know. But he was wrong. And since, for days and days, he’s been insisting, with fake visual aids in hand, that he was right.”

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‘Teen Mom’: Farrah Abraham hints how she could return to reality show

Westlake Legal Group farrah-abraham-Getty 'Teen Mom': Farrah Abraham hints how she could return to reality show Mariah Haas fox-news/person/farrah-abraham fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/reality fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article a2c8511f-521b-56c4-8594-80e12ddefb6a

Farrah Abraham is sharing her idea on how she could one day return to her roots.

When asked if she would ever go back to the “small screen” and her role on “Teen Mom OG,” Abraham, 28, told Entertainment Tonight: “Is that a small screen? I think it could be big.”

“I think ‘Teen Mom’ should definitely be taking over YouTube, on the airplane when I’m traveling, all over,” she continued in an interview published on Friday.

FARRAH ABRAHAM TAKES SELFIE WITH JEFF BEZOS AT EMMYS

“Maybe I’ll have to work on the distribution and business part, and then I’ll come back,” she suggested.

Abraham — who has previously revealed that she no longer keeps in touch with her former castmates — noted that she does still have “good relationships” with other individuals who work on the show.

FARRAH ABRAHAM SUFFERS MAJOR WARDROBE MALFUNCTION AT VENICE FILM FESTIVAL

“I’m just blessed to have good relationships with the executives and producers and the people that I first met, so that’s great,” she shared. “But I do wish the other ladies the best. They’re trying their hardest.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

For now, Abraham revealed to the outlet that she is focused on trying to take her memoir, “My Teenage Dream Ended,” to the silver screen.

Westlake Legal Group farrah-abraham-Getty 'Teen Mom': Farrah Abraham hints how she could return to reality show Mariah Haas fox-news/person/farrah-abraham fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/reality fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article a2c8511f-521b-56c4-8594-80e12ddefb6a   Westlake Legal Group farrah-abraham-Getty 'Teen Mom': Farrah Abraham hints how she could return to reality show Mariah Haas fox-news/person/farrah-abraham fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/reality fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article a2c8511f-521b-56c4-8594-80e12ddefb6a

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Shepard Smith, Fox News Anchor, Abruptly Departs From Network

Westlake Legal Group 11SMITH-01-facebookJumbo-v2 Shepard Smith, Fox News Anchor, Abruptly Departs From Network Smith, Shepard News and News Media Fox News Channel

Shepard Smith, the chief news anchor of Fox News whose reporting often drew the ire of President Trump, said on Friday that he was leaving the cable news network after 23 years, an abrupt move that left some of his co-workers openly stunned.

“Recently, I asked the company to allow me to leave Fox News,” Mr. Smith told viewers at the close of his regular broadcast. “After requesting that I stay, they obliged.”

A fixture of Fox News, Mr. Smith joined the network as a correspondent at its start in 1996 and became one of its most visible journalists. He is leaving in the middle of his current contract, a rarity in the cutthroat television business, and he told viewers on Friday that, under his exit agreement, “I won’t be reporting elsewhere at least in the near future.”

[embedded content]

Shepard Smith says goodbye to Fox NewsCreditCreditVideo by Fox News

Since Mr. Trump took office, Mr. Smith has stood out at Fox News for his tough coverage of the White House — a stark contrast from the Trump cheerleading often displayed by the network’s prime-time and morning-show commentators.

Mr. Smith’s reporting has sometimes frustrated Mr. Trump, who has repeatedly taunted the anchor on Twitter, referring to him as Fox’s “lowest rated anchor.” On Thursday, Mr. Trump cited Mr. Smith by name, along with the former Democratic strategist Donna Brazile, arguing that Fox News was “much different than it used to be in the good old days.”

Mr. Smith was so prominent a target in the president’s harangues that speculation emerged that the anchor’s departure was related to a meeting this week between Rupert Murdoch, the mogul who controls Fox News, and Mr. Trump’s attorney general, William Barr.

[Read more about the meeting between William Barr and Rupert Murdoch.]

A spokesman for Mr. Smith, Chris Giglio, said there was no connection between that meeting and Mr. Smith’s exit from Fox News. “This was Shep’s decision and his alone,” Mr. Giglio wrote in an email.

Mr. Smith’s coverage of the White House had generated tension between the anchor and some of his colleagues in the network’s opinion division, which produces the right-wing programming that dominates Fox News prime-time and morning shows.

The tensions burst into open view last month as the impeachment inquiry was getting started. Mr. Smith denounced a guest on Tucker Carlson’s program for making “repugnant” comments about a Fox News legal analyst, Andrew Napolitano. Mr. Carlson fired back at Mr. Smith with a not-so-subtle suggestion of bias, saying, “Unlike maybe some dayside hosts, I’m not very partisan.”

[Read about on-air sniping at Fox News.]

In March, the president lobbed another insult at Mr. Smith, saying that, along with a pair of Fox News weekend anchors, he should be working at CNN, a network Mr. Trump has often accused of having a liberal bias.

Several of Mr. Smith’s Fox News colleagues appeared shocked by Mr. Smith’s decision to depart. “I’m a little stunned and a little heartbroken,” the anchor Neil Cavuto, who follows Mr. Smith on weekdays, told viewers moments after Mr. Smith had concluded his 3 p.m. broadcast. It appeared that Mr. Cavuto had no advance warning of Mr. Smith’s decision.

John Roberts, Fox News’s chief White House correspondent, called the move “completely shocking” and compared learning of the news to being “hit by a subway train.”

Mr. Smith has, at times, pointed out Mr. Trump’s false statements in the opening remarks of his program. In September, he criticized the president’s warning that Alabama was in danger from Hurricane Dorian.

“Some things in Trump-landia are inexplicable,” Mr. Smith said. “This week’s edition, the president’s ongoing claim that Alabama was at risk from Hurricane Dorian. It wasn’t. Maybe he got some bad info from somebody, maybe he made a mistake, maybe he was confused — we don’t know. But he was wrong. And since, for days and days, he’s been insisting, with fake visual aids in hand, that he was right.”

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Shep Smith, Fox News Anchor, Abruptly Departs From Network

Westlake Legal Group 11SMITH-01-facebookJumbo-v2 Shep Smith, Fox News Anchor, Abruptly Departs From Network Smith, Shepard News and News Media Fox News Channel

Shepard Smith, the chief news anchor of Fox News whose reporting often drew the ire of President Trump, said on Friday that he was leaving the cable news network after 23 years, an abrupt move that left some of his co-workers openly stunned.

“Recently, I asked the company to allow me to leave Fox News,” Mr. Smith told viewers at the close of his regular broadcast. “After requesting that I stay, they obliged.”

A fixture of Fox News, Mr. Smith joined the network as a correspondent at its start in 1996 and became one of its most visible journalists. He is leaving in the middle of his current contract, a rarity in the cutthroat television business, and he told viewers on Friday that, under his exit agreement, “I won’t be reporting elsewhere at least in the near future.”

[embedded content]

Shepard Smith says goodbye to Fox NewsCreditCreditVideo by Fox News

Since Mr. Trump took office, Mr. Smith has stood out at Fox News for his tough coverage of the White House — a stark contrast from the Trump cheerleading often displayed by the network’s prime-time and morning-show commentators.

Mr. Smith’s reporting has sometimes frustrated Mr. Trump, who has repeatedly taunted the anchor on Twitter, referring to him as Fox’s “lowest rated anchor.” On Thursday, Mr. Trump cited Mr. Smith by name, along with the former Democratic strategist Donna Brazile, arguing that Fox News was “much different than it used to be in the good old days.”

Mr. Smith was so prominent a target in the president’s harangues that speculation emerged that the anchor’s departure was related to a meeting this week between Rupert Murdoch, the mogul who controls Fox News, and Mr. Trump’s attorney general, William Barr.

[Read more about the meeting between William Barr and Rupert Murdoch.]

A spokesman for Mr. Smith, Chris Giglio, said there was no connection between that meeting and Mr. Smith’s exit from Fox News. “This was Shep’s decision and his alone,” Mr. Giglio wrote in an email.

Mr. Smith’s coverage of the White House had generated tension between the anchor and some of his colleagues in the network’s opinion division, which produces the right-wing programming that dominates Fox News prime-time and morning shows.

The tensions burst into open view last month as the impeachment inquiry was getting started. Mr. Smith denounced a guest on Tucker Carlson’s program for making “repugnant” comments about a Fox News legal analyst, Andrew Napolitano. Mr. Carlson fired back at Mr. Smith with a not-so-subtle suggestion of bias, saying, “Unlike maybe some dayside hosts, I’m not very partisan.”

[Read about on-air sniping at Fox News.]

In March, the president lobbed another insult at Mr. Smith, saying that, along with a pair of Fox News weekend anchors, he should be working at CNN, a network Mr. Trump has often accused of having a liberal bias.

Several of Mr. Smith’s Fox News colleagues appeared shocked by Mr. Smith’s decision to depart. “I’m a little stunned and a little heartbroken,” the anchor Neil Cavuto, who follows Mr. Smith on weekdays, told viewers moments after Mr. Smith had concluded his 3 p.m. broadcast. It appeared that Mr. Cavuto had no advance warning of Mr. Smith’s decision.

John Roberts, Fox News’s chief White House correspondent, called the move “completely shocking” and compared learning of the news to being “hit by a subway train.”

Mr. Smith has, at times, pointed out Mr. Trump’s false statements in the opening remarks of his program. In September, he criticized the president’s warning that Alabama was in danger from Hurricane Dorian.

“Some things in Trump-landia are inexplicable,” Mr. Smith said. “This week’s edition, the president’s ongoing claim that Alabama was at risk from Hurricane Dorian. It wasn’t. Maybe he got some bad info from somebody, maybe he made a mistake, maybe he was confused — we don’t know. But he was wrong. And since, for days and days, he’s been insisting, with fake visual aids in hand, that he was right.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘Friends’: Jennifer Aniston ‘always trying’ to work with her former co-stars

Westlake Legal Group JenniferAniston1 'Friends': Jennifer Aniston 'always trying' to work with her former co-stars Nate Day fox-news/person/jennifer-aniston fox-news/person/courteney-cox fox-news/entertainment/friends fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3acd1860-825a-52d5-a4e7-ccd72bd11b09

Even though all hopes of a “Friends” reboot have been dashed, the stars of the show are constantly looking for ways to work together.

In an interview with Entertainment Tonight, Jennifer Aniston, who played Rachel Green on the hit NBC sitcom, revealed that she’s always looking for ways to bring the gang back together.

“We are always trying to think of something to do, but we have to figure out what the right thing is,” Aniston said. “But we will.”

DEMI MOORE’S DAUGHTER TALLULAH WILLIS SAYS SHE WAS SUICIDAL IN BIKINI DANCE CIDEO: ‘WE ARE NOT WHAT WE SHOW’

As to why Aniston & co. want to work together again: “It’s just like going home,” said Aniston. “We have the best time together.”

The six main cast members are all very close off-screen as well.

Just last weekend, the crew gathered at the home of Courteney Cox (Monica) for dinner. Cox, 55, celebrated by posting a selfie with Aniston, 50, and Matt LeBlanc (Joey), 52.

Cox also recently got a haircut from Aniston’s longtime hairstylist.

ANGELINA JOLIE PRAISES SON MADDOX, NOTES HE ‘GOT TATTOOED’

Cast members of “Friends” have reunited on screen a handful of times, but never all together.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Collaborations include Cox, David Schwimmer and Matthew Perry guest-starring on Lisa Kudrow‘s “Web Therapy,” while Aniston popped up in an episode of “Cougar Town” and Schwimmer, 52, appeared in LeBlanc‘s “Episodes.”

Westlake Legal Group JenniferAniston1 'Friends': Jennifer Aniston 'always trying' to work with her former co-stars Nate Day fox-news/person/jennifer-aniston fox-news/person/courteney-cox fox-news/entertainment/friends fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3acd1860-825a-52d5-a4e7-ccd72bd11b09   Westlake Legal Group JenniferAniston1 'Friends': Jennifer Aniston 'always trying' to work with her former co-stars Nate Day fox-news/person/jennifer-aniston fox-news/person/courteney-cox fox-news/entertainment/friends fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3acd1860-825a-52d5-a4e7-ccd72bd11b09

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