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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 302)

Andrew Roberts: Winston Churchill showed ‘qualities of leadership that we desperately need’

Westlake Legal Group Aroberts Andrew Roberts: Winston Churchill showed 'qualities of leadership that we desperately need' fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/topic/world-war-one fox-news/shows/life-liberty-levin fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 789d3105-5a87-5983-9834-d808fa5afa6f

Historian Andrew Roberts says there are many reasons Americans should value the life and legacy of Winston Churchill, Britain’s prime minister during World War II.

Roberts told Mark Levin in an interview airing Sunday at 8 p.m. ET on “Life, Liberty & Levin” that Churchill exhibited the qualities that all nations should look up to.

“I think is an absolutely essential question at a time when leadership is such an important aspect in the world today,” he said. “I think that Churchill enunciated so many of the most important statements that still need to be made.”

Host Mark Levin pointed out that both President Donald Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu both have busts of Churchill displayed prominently in their offices.

SEAN HANNITY: WHAT DID OBAMA KNOW ABOUT RUSSIA INVESTIGATION AND WHEN DID HE KNOW IT

Roberts, the author of the critically acclaimed biography “Churchill: Walking with Destiny,” told Levin that Americans should look for leaders with similar moral courage as Churchill — who bounced back from a massive blunder in World War I that Roberts said brought Churchill to the brink of committing suicide.

In 1915, Churchill — then First Lord of the Admiralty — sent an expedition to the Dardanelles in Southeastern Europe with the goal of knocking the Ottoman Empire out of World War I. However, the attack was easily repulsed by Turkish troops and Allied forces lost six ships and more than 140,000 troops.

“If it had come off [successfully], it would have been one of the great strategic genius moves in the history of warfare,” Roberts said of the Dardanelles campaign.

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“But he [Churchill] did come back from it largely through his extraordinary eloquence. The government didn’t want to have him on the opposition benches, so they brought him back into the cabinet [as Minister of Munitions] in 1917,” Roberts added. “I think that he showed different qualities of leadership that we desperately need.”

Roberts said Americans should also remember Churchill’s 1946 “Iron Curtain” speech in Fulton, Mo., in which he had the foresight to point out the potential dangers of the postwar Soviet Union.

“He went out and said what he believed. And he stuck to it,” Roberts said. “And that’s something I think that is not just [for] the 1930s. That’s, for all time, a great leadership quality.”

Roberts said that Churchill’s life should not only be a model for political leaders but those in business as well.

Churchill died in 1965 at the age of 90.

Westlake Legal Group Aroberts Andrew Roberts: Winston Churchill showed 'qualities of leadership that we desperately need' fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/topic/world-war-one fox-news/shows/life-liberty-levin fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 789d3105-5a87-5983-9834-d808fa5afa6f   Westlake Legal Group Aroberts Andrew Roberts: Winston Churchill showed 'qualities of leadership that we desperately need' fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/topic/world-war-one fox-news/shows/life-liberty-levin fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 789d3105-5a87-5983-9834-d808fa5afa6f

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Smart TV hackers, video doorbell security, AirPods as hearing aids and more: Tech Q&A

Each week, I receive tons of questions from my listeners about tech concerns, new products, and all things digital.

Sometimes, choosing the most interesting questions to highlight is the best part of my job.

This week, I received questions about smart TV hackers, video doorbell security, AirPods as hearing aids, PC bloatware, and more.

Do you have a question you’d like to ask me?

Tap or click here to email me directly.

Smart TV hacker threat

Q: I bought a smart TV at Costco. It was a great price, but I heard you say something about the FBI, hackers and TVs. Should I have not bought it?

A: If you follow us at komando.com, you already know some of the dangers of having Internet of Things (IoT) appliances in your home. These are products that connect to the internet, like smart light bulbs, smart refrigerators, and smart doorbells.

The FBI recently stated your smart TV could be a gateway for hackers to come into your home. They may not be able to access your locked-down computer directly, but it’s possible an unsecured smart TV could give them a simple backdoor through your router, allowing them to take control of your set.

Low-risk threats include changing channels, adjusting the TV volume and showing kids inappropriate videos. Worst-case scenarios involve turning your bedroom TV’s camera and mic into a stalking and spying device. Yikes!

Tap or click here for steps you need to take to protect your network and family.

Video doorbell security settings

Q: My wife got me a video doorbell for Christmas. I am really worried about who has access to these videos. It’s my house and my privacy. Are there security settings on these things?

A: While traditional doorbells are sufficient at letting you know when someone is at your door, newer video doorbells, such as the Google Nest Hello, provide a real-time view of who is outside your home. The initial setup is straightforward, but there are a few settings you will want to adjust to improve your experience.

Tap or click here for the steps to lock down your video doorbell.

Be tech-savvy in 2020

Q: I want to learn more about tech in 2020. You are my trusted source because you never know what you’ll find with a Google search! But the local radio station pre-empts you for sports. How can I listen to your show?

A: I hate when that happens! To listen to my show on your schedule, get the podcast. It’s super easy to subscribe, and when you do, my show is automatically delivered to you — even while you’re sleeping! Each radio show is three hours, so you have 12 hours of quality tech programming and entertainment each month.

You can fast-forward or listen to parts again — and there are no commercial breaks.

Tap or click here to subscribe to my national radio show podcasts.

Be gone, new PC bloatware

Q: I finally got rid of my 8-year-old Windows computer. This new one is fast, but dang, there’re a lot of junk programs on it. What’s the fastest and safest way to clean it up?

A: It can be fun setting up a new PC. Customizing your desktop, so it looks just right, downloading new apps, and sitting down to use it for the first time feels fantastic. Unfortunately, it isn’t always as simple as going through a quick setup process, selecting a few colors for fonts and windows, and going from there.

Tap or click here to learn how to customize your computer.

Many pre-built computers come with at least a modicum of extraneous, unwanted apps and software on them: bloatware. Bloatware can include trials of games you don’t want; apps you’ll never use or proprietary software that can slow down your computer.

Tap or click here for steps to get rid of bloatware.

Use AirPods as hearing aids

Q: I love my Apple AirPods. I thought I heard that you could use them as hearing aids. What’s the insider pro trick to doing that?

A: If you have ever had difficulty hearing someone during a conversation, AirPods can be your on-demand hearing aid. Apple introduced a feature, starting with iOS 12, called Live Listen.

Once set up, you can place your iPhone closer to the person you want to hear and the AirPods will produce clearer audio for you. There are other AirPod tricks you might like, like finding them when you lose them (it will happen!), having Siri announce calls and making your AirPods play nice with all your other devices.

Tap or click here for 10 AirPods secret tricks any owner should know.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch The Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on the Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group SmartTVGetty2012 Smart TV hackers, video doorbell security, AirPods as hearing aids and more: Tech Q&A The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech/topics/privacy fox-news/tech/topics/computers fox-news/tech/technologies/tvs fox-news/tech/companies/apple fnc/tech fnc article 94188476-f604-5e4b-a971-baac29035eb6   Westlake Legal Group SmartTVGetty2012 Smart TV hackers, video doorbell security, AirPods as hearing aids and more: Tech Q&A The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech/topics/privacy fox-news/tech/topics/computers fox-news/tech/technologies/tvs fox-news/tech/companies/apple fnc/tech fnc article 94188476-f604-5e4b-a971-baac29035eb6

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Betsy McCaughey: On Trump impeachment trial, don’t believe Chuck Schumer

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6116447080001_6116450476001-vs Betsy McCaughey: On Trump impeachment trial, don’t believe Chuck Schumer fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Betsy McCaughey article 784f6d0f-5b0f-5f8e-ac47-24831f48e3df

Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., is waging a media blitz to demand that four of President Trump’s White House staff members be compelled to testify at the president’s impeachment trial in the Senate.

Schumer claims that unless that happens, the trial will be unfair. Don’t believe him. It’s a ploy to smear President Trump’s expected acquittal, leaving Trump damaged goods for the November election.

Schumer accused Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Friday of wanting a “mock trial” instead of real justice. This is an act by the New York senator to deceive the public. Schumer knows there is zero chance the White House witnesses he’s demanding will testify.

HOUSE, SENATE STUCK IN IMPEACHMENT LIMBO AS PELOSI KEEPS HOLD OF ARTICLES

Close advisers to all presidents are generally protected by executive privilege. This isn’t something Trump invented. Previous presidents, from George Washington to Barack Obama, have said “no” to similar congressional requests, arguing that it is their duty to protect the presidency from congressional overreach.

More from Opinion

House Democrats could have gone to court to get a ruling on the president’s claim of executive privilege, possibly compelling the testimony. But once the Democrats voted to impeach, they lost any chance of having federal courts order Trump’s staff testify.

The Supreme Court ruled in 1993 that the courts won’t interfere in impeachment trials, because the Senate has “the sole power” over them under the Constitution.  

Now Schumer is pressing Senate Majority Leader McConnell to promise to call four White House witnesses. It’s a charade.  McConnell can’t surrender the president’s executive privilege. It’s not his to give away.

Schumer’s demand is nothing more than a public relations stunt.

Schumer is claiming emails released last week are “a game-changer.” That’s nonsense. The emails confirm that Trump put a hold on aid to Ukraine – a fact already known – but don’t indicate he did it for improper reasons.

In fact, several of the emails underscore the president’s concern about corruption in Ukraine and his legitimate concern to ensure that aid sent there would not be wasted.

Meanwhile, McConnell has so far indicated he’d favor a short impeachment trial without witnesses.

House Democrats have already called 19 witnesses, and produced 8,000 pages of testimony and reports. Republicans were denied any chance to call witnesses there.

If House Democrats decide at some point they want to hear from witnesses, they have the votes to call them. Here’s who should be on the top of the list: the whistleblower, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, and Intelligence Community Inspector General Michael Atkinson. Atkinson inexplicably deemed the whistleblower’s complaint “credible.”

Start with the so-called “whistleblower.” He filed what is technically called a whistleblower complaint. But he had no firsthand knowledge of Trump’s July 25 phone call with the president of Ukraine or Trump’s motives.

Every charge made in the whistleblower’s complaint begins with “I learned from multiple U.S. officials,” or “multiple officials told me,” or “officials with direct knowledge informed me.” He never names any of these sources.

This person is a gossip. Real whistleblowers provide firsthand knowledge and expose dangers or abuses that would otherwise not be known.

During his committee’s impeachment hearings, Schiff, D-Calif., silenced anyone who dared raise questions about the whistleblower. He claimed to be protecting the whistleblower. Nonsense. He was protecting himself.

Last week a nonprofit that promotes government transparency, Judicial Watch, sued to get the whistleblower’s emails. If they become public the truth about Schiff’s role in engineering the complaint will come out too.

What we know so far is that on July 26, one day after Trump’s controversial phone call, Schiff hired Sean Misko to join his staff. Shortly afterward, Schiff’s staff met with the whistleblower, a friend of a co-worker of Misko’s in the intelligence community. Schiff’s staff provided “guidance” to the whistleblower on how to make a complaint.

Schiff lied about these cozy dealings until The New York Times called him on it.

The whistleblower filed his complaint with Intelligence Community Inspector General Atkinson on August 12, also hiding that he had met with Schiff’s staff. When the complaint was made public in September, Schiff pretended to be surprised.

The unanswered question senators need to probe is why Atkinson deemed the complaint “credible” enough to be reported the Congress. That is what allowed Schiff to drive impeachment.

“Second-hand or unsubstantiated assertions” of wrongdoing, including accounts provided by other employees, are not enough for a whistleblower complaint to be acted on. The regulations spell that out clearly.

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Yet that’s all the whistleblower had. No firsthand information. Atkinson’s Sept. 30 statement explaining why he deemed the complaint actionable is doubletalk. No real reason is given.

Atkinson testified to the House Intelligence Committee behind closed doors Oct. 4. He may have given a reason then. But Schiff still won’t release that testimony, even to House members.

The testimony of all the 18 other witnesses grilled in those closed-door meetings has been released. All except Atkinson’s. It’s a troubling omission.

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What is Schiff hiding? His staff’s role in producing the whistleblower complaint and the flimsy nature of the complaint, which was certainly inadequate to begin an impeachment inquiry against the president of the United States.

The public deserves the truth.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY BETSY MCCAUGHEY 

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6116447080001_6116450476001-vs Betsy McCaughey: On Trump impeachment trial, don’t believe Chuck Schumer fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Betsy McCaughey article 784f6d0f-5b0f-5f8e-ac47-24831f48e3df   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6116447080001_6116450476001-vs Betsy McCaughey: On Trump impeachment trial, don’t believe Chuck Schumer fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Betsy McCaughey article 784f6d0f-5b0f-5f8e-ac47-24831f48e3df

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For a Post-9/11 Generation, War Isn’t New but Fears of Another One Are

Westlake Legal Group 00ANXIETY-01-facebookJumbo For a Post-9/11 Generation, War Isn’t New but Fears of Another One Are Youth United States Defense and Military Forces Suleimani, Qassim Iran Draft and Recruitment (Military)

Over high school lunch tables, teenagers spoke of World War III. When they got home, they tearfully asked their parents whether they would be drafted. Social media feeds exploded with predictions of military action and wisecracking memes about end times.

As the United States escalated its conflict with Iran this past week by killing Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, a powerful Iranian commander, Americans scrambled to determine what it all meant for the young men and women whose lives could be upended in the event of an extended conflict.

For now, it remains too soon to tell. The United States’ wars in the Middle East have slogged on for about as long as most teenagers have been alive, with plenty of tense and foreboding moments. But for a generation of young people who were born after the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, or were not old enough at the time to have grasped their impact, the events of the past week signified the most urgent — and perhaps alarming — military escalation in memory.

Adrian Flynn was born a month after the Sept. 11 attacks and he registered for the Selective Service shortly after he turned 18 in October, as all men between 18 and 25 are required to do.

But he and his friends at his Manhattan high school did not give much thought to the ramifications of registering until this past Friday, after a drone strike authorized by President Trump killed General Suleimani and prompted vows of retaliation from Iran.

“Now it’s like, what exactly did we sign up for?” said Mr. Flynn, a senior who was recently accepted to college.

In cafeterias across the country, young men speculate about being sent abroad, even though United States officials have said repeatedly that they did not want a war with Iran, and that reinstating a military draft would require congressional approval. At this point, registering for the Selective Service has little bearing on the likelihood of being conscripted.

When Molly Patterson picked up her 17-year-old daughter from school in a suburb of Detroit on Friday, she was stunned when her daughter immediately asked whether her boyfriend would be drafted. The next morning, Ms. Patterson discovered that her 14-year-old son had been up until 3 a.m.; he was feeling stressed after reading about the possibility of war and texting his uncle about whether he could be sent to fight.

Ms. Patterson had not even thought of the possibility of a draft, but her daughter that said it was all that people at school were talking about, and that many were getting alerts on their phones with updates about the airstrike, more than 6,000 miles away. On Saturday, Ms. Patterson found herself trying to quell her children’s fears.

“We all talked about it this morning and I tried to relax them, saying there’s not going to be a war,” Ms. Patterson said on Saturday. “I like to be very, very honest with my children, but I don’t want them to worry about that. That’s for the adults right now. It’s too much for a kid to handle.”

Some young adults joined thousands of antiwar protesters on Saturday at more than 80 demonstrations to condemn the strike in Baghdad that killed General Suleimani.

At one protest in Seattle, Lukas Illa, 19, said he was not too worried about being drafted, but was concerned about the impact a war would have on others, including service personnel who might come from disadvantaged backgrounds. He also said civilians in Iran were more at risk than Americans.

“We’re not going to be affected by this as much as Iranians will be,” Mr. Illa said.

Citlali Perez, 18, of Chicago, had begun to plan how she might mobilize against another protracted war, were it to come to that.

“Mostly how I feel is scared, but also wanting to do something about it and wanting to prevent it,” said Ms. Perez, a freshman at DePaul University who has become involved in antiwar activism.

Ms. Perez said she had seen a mix of fear and galvanization since news of the attacks. She has also seen the memes that have been widely shared online, making jokes about the draft or a hypothetical world war. Some found the posts distasteful, trivializing what had already become a deadly conflict, while others saw them as a way to laugh off their fear. In any case, the rapid spread of the memes was a clear sign of how preoccupied young people were with the airstrike and the looming question of what would come next.

For most, being shipped off to war is still a theoretical peril — a nerve-racking thought perhaps, but not an imminent threat. But for some young men and women, it was now a reality: At Fort Bragg, N.C., 3,500 troops were ordered to the Middle East in one of the largest rapid deployments in years.

Dia Smith, 21, was nervous for her wife, who is in the Army, even before the airstrike: Her wife was told on New Year’s Day that she would be deploying to Iraq. The rising political tensions since then have only made Ms. Smith’s fears worse.

Ms. Smith said her grandfather had served in the military and had come back so mentally scarred that she and her family found it difficult to visit him. She could not help but worry that if the conflict escalated, her friends — or even her wife — could return the same way.

“Growing up as a kid, you hear about the Vietnam War and all these things that are so surreal to me, until you’re in a time or space when you’re like, ‘This is real,’” Ms. Smith said from Fort Bragg. “Being my age, I can see how this can really shape or form the rest of my life, simply because she’s there.”

Ms. Smith is a member of the National Guard and said she had joined to get away from Montgomery, Ala., where she went to high school. She runs a wig business and attends training on the base each month. She had wondered in recent days whether the National Guard could be deployed next.

“I’m waiting on that call for myself, hoping that it doesn’t come,” she said.

Mike Baker, Dan Levin and Mitch Smith contributed reporting.

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Newt Gingrich: Can aging be reversed? Incredible new research may let us grow younger instead of older

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6112902204001_6112895714001-vs Newt Gingrich: Can aging be reversed? Incredible new research may let us grow younger instead of older Newt Gingrich fox-news/science/natural-science/biology fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/medical-research/genetics fox-news/health fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 84703202-763e-51a3-8deb-c480a5e69493

It’s a seemingly fundamental truth that aging is inevitable. But what if everything we’ve been taught to believe about the aging process is wrong?

What if we could choose how long we live – or how long we stay youthful?

This may sound like science fiction, but incredible new breakthroughs in biological research reveal that we can potentially slow down – or even reverse – the aging process. This is the topic of this week’s episode of “Newt’s World.”

LIFE EXPECTANCY STUDY SHOWS MANY LIKELY TO LIVE BEYOND 90 BY 2030

Scientists and researchers at some of America’s top medical institutions are discovering that aging is largely controlled by our genetic code – and the code can be altered. Tests show that this could mean we can put off or stop the largest causes of disease in the world.

As one of this week’s guests, Dr. David Sinclair, describes it, “Aging is a disease, and the disease is treatable.”

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Sinclair is a professor in the Department of Genetics and co-director of the Paul F. Glenn Center for the Biology of Aging at Harvard Medical School. He is the author of “Lifespan: Why We Age – and Why We Don’t Have To.”

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I also spoke with Dr. Nir Barzilai, who is director of the Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the Paul F. Glenn Center for the Biology of Human Aging Research, and the National Institutes of Health Nathan Shock Centers of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging. He is author of the upcoming book “Age Later: Secrets of the Healthiest, Sharpest Centenarians.”

According to these two doctors, the key to stop aging is activating newly discovered vitality genes. Recent experiments in genetic reprogramming suggest that, in the near future, we may be able to not just feel younger – but actually become younger.

Their studies began in rodents, and other mammals, but they have recently begun researching how these techniques can impact humanity.

To be clear: This isn’t just about putting off sore joints or wrinkles. Slowing the aging process could help us stave off serious conditions such as heart disease, cancer, or Alzheimer’s disease. Imagine finding out that you were genetically likely to come down with one of these crippling illnesses – and then learning that you could postpone them – or avoid them altogether.

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This was a truly fascinating episode for me, and I hope that you will enjoy listening to it.

Please join me this week on “Newt’s World” – and learn how we could one day find modern medicine’s “fountain of youth.”

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY NEWT GINGRICH

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6112902204001_6112895714001-vs Newt Gingrich: Can aging be reversed? Incredible new research may let us grow younger instead of older Newt Gingrich fox-news/science/natural-science/biology fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/medical-research/genetics fox-news/health fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 84703202-763e-51a3-8deb-c480a5e69493   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6112902204001_6112895714001-vs Newt Gingrich: Can aging be reversed? Incredible new research may let us grow younger instead of older Newt Gingrich fox-news/science/natural-science/biology fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/medical-research/genetics fox-news/health fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 84703202-763e-51a3-8deb-c480a5e69493

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Is plastic surgery safe?

Westlake Legal Group 0206abf6-plastic-surgery Is plastic surgery safe? Manny Alvarez fox-news/health/ask-dr-manny fox news fnc/health fnc article 8d3f7454-0e19-5b41-952d-1da144047db1

Dear Dr. Manny,

Is plastic surgery safe? I know so many people get it because they think their faces don’t look right, but surely it can’t be right to cut your face open for no reason? And what is “medical tourism?”

Thanks for your question.

Absolutely no medical procedure or surgery is risk-free. That being said, plastic surgery has been proven to be very safe indeed. Most people who get plastic surgery from competent doctors do not suffer unexpected side effects.

Always check the qualifications and the history of the doctor performing your surgery, but as long as he or she knows what they are doing, then you have a very high chance of recovering perfectly.

WHICH MEAT IS HEALTHIEST TO EAT?

Make sure that you inform your doctor of your complete medical history before the surgery. Give them the list of all prescription and non-prescription drugs that you are currently taking. Your doctor should also give you a complete physical before the procedure, just to rule anything out.

Some people will experience blood clots if they have pre-existing conditions. You are also at risk if you: are obese; have had a recent injury; have a nervous system disorder; a history of cancer; genetic issues that lead to blood clotting; take oral contraceptives; are undergoing hormonal replacement therapy; or smoke regularly. This may not disqualify you, but it does need to be taken into account.

SHOULD YOU POP A PIMPLE OR LET IT HEAL ON ITS OWN?

Fewer than 1 percent of people who have had plastic surgery experience complications. Some people will have a severe reaction to the anesthesia, which may include blood clots, brain damage, a heart attack, irregular heartbeats, hyperthermia, nerve damage, a stroke, or paralysis.

People who smoke are also at high risk for skin death or necrosis.

“Medical tourism,” meanwhile, is when someone travels out of the country looking for a less expensive health procedure. Some countries actually promote medical tourism because patients tend to stay in the country afterward to see the sights.

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Some patients also travel to find better rates on plastic surgery. This is not recommended, because lower costs may indicate a lower quality of care, and a higher risk for complications.

Westlake Legal Group 0206abf6-plastic-surgery Is plastic surgery safe? Manny Alvarez fox-news/health/ask-dr-manny fox news fnc/health fnc article 8d3f7454-0e19-5b41-952d-1da144047db1   Westlake Legal Group 0206abf6-plastic-surgery Is plastic surgery safe? Manny Alvarez fox-news/health/ask-dr-manny fox news fnc/health fnc article 8d3f7454-0e19-5b41-952d-1da144047db1

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‘Diet’ soda does not pretend to aid with weight loss, court decides

Maybe she should try ­water.

“Diet” soda does not pretend to help consumers lose weight, a California appeals court has ruled in response to a lawsuit filed by a woman who chugged it for more than a decade, yet failed to trim down.

SEE IT: SINGAPORE 7-11 OFFERED COKE BOTTLES WITH LIGHT-UP LIGHTSABERS ON THE LABEL

“The prevalent understanding of the term in (the marketplace) is that the ‘diet’ version of a soft drink has fewer calories than its ‘regular’ counterpart,” a three-judge panel with the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously decreed earlier this week.

“Just because some consumers may unreasonably interpret the term differently does not render the use of ‘diet’ in a soda’s brand name false or deceptive.”

The ruling comes in response to a fraud suit filed by Shana Becerra against the company behind Diet Dr Pepper. A lower court threw out her lawsuit, leading to the 9th Circuit’s concurring decision.

The Santa Rosa, Calif., woman claimed she’d been swindled into purchasing the beverage for 13 years in an attempt to whittle her waist — but had yet to shed a single pound.

The appeals court found that when “diet” is used as an adjective, as it is on the soda cans, it refers to something with fewer calories than the “regular” version of the product.

Westlake Legal Group SodaHand 'Diet' soda does not pretend to aid with weight loss, court decides New York Post fox-news/health/nutrition-and-fitness/diet-trends fox-news/food-drink/drinks/soft-drinks fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fnc/food-drink fnc Emily Saul article 32df1f6c-04eb-5847-a495-f9748f0c1b9c

“Just because some consumers may unreasonably interpret the term differently does not render the use of ‘diet’ in a soda’s brand name false or deceptive.” (iStock)

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The woman also claimed she’d been misled, since “attractive, fit models in the ads implies that Diet Dr Pepper will help its consumers achieve those bodies,” yet the court disagreed in its decision, written by Judge Jay Bybee.

Ads depicting slim and beautiful people using the products “cannot be reasonably understood to convey any specific meaning at all,” Bybee wrote.

The same court last week shot down an attempt at appeal by Becerra in her lawsuit against Diet Coke for similar claims.

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She alleged in her 2017 actions that she “did not receive what she paid for,” when she purchased the beverages. She additionally alleged that studies have shown that the artificial sweetener aspartame used in the sodas actually causes weight gain.

Aspartame, meanwhile, has been approved for consumption by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and is used in many low-calorie products.

Because the court ruled that Becerra failed to show false advertising and fraud by the companies, it was not forced to consider aspartame’s possible side effects.

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This article originally appeared in The New York Post.

Westlake Legal Group SodaHand 'Diet' soda does not pretend to aid with weight loss, court decides New York Post fox-news/health/nutrition-and-fitness/diet-trends fox-news/food-drink/drinks/soft-drinks fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fnc/food-drink fnc Emily Saul article 32df1f6c-04eb-5847-a495-f9748f0c1b9c   Westlake Legal Group SodaHand 'Diet' soda does not pretend to aid with weight loss, court decides New York Post fox-news/health/nutrition-and-fitness/diet-trends fox-news/food-drink/drinks/soft-drinks fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fnc/food-drink fnc Emily Saul article 32df1f6c-04eb-5847-a495-f9748f0c1b9c

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Patriots’ playoff loss to Titans inspires social media posts – including from job seeker Antonio Brown

The New England Patriots’ stunning 20-13 loss to the Tennessee Titans in Saturday’s AFC Wild Card Game quickly brought out the trolls on social media.

After all, the defeat meant the Patriots will be missing the Super Bowl for only the second time in the last six seasons. So why not rub it in while you can?

It also inspired a few messages from Antonio Brown, the wide receiver who has been out of a job since being cut by the Patriots back in September after sexual misconduct allegations against him surfaced.

TITANS OUST TOM BRADY AND PATRIOTS 20-13, ADVANCE TO NEXT ROUND OF NFL POSTSEASON

“What Could Of Been,” Brown wrote in an Instagram post, which included a photo of himself embracing Patriots Coach Bill Belichick during a game against the Miami Dolphins – the only game that Brown played for the team this season before he was let go.

“Call Me,” Brown wrote simply in a Twitter message as he retweeted a CBS Sports video of Tom Brady’s post-defeat news conference.

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There were also plenty of other wisecracks from regular fans, many of whom seemed to revel in this year’s setback for a franchise that has won six Super Bowls since owner Robert Kraft purchased the team and hired Belichick as coach.

Westlake Legal Group Antonio-Brown1 Patriots’ playoff loss to Titans inspires social media posts – including from job seeker Antonio Brown fox-news/sports/nfl/tennessee-titans fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/antonio-brown fox news fnc/sports fnc e8fa652e-a29c-53a0-8139-205fd3de36d9 Dom Calicchio article

​​​​​​​Antonio Brown talks with New England Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels during an NFL game against the Miami Dolphins, Sept. 15, 2019. (Getty Images)

Here are some samples:

Westlake Legal Group Antonio-Brown1 Patriots’ playoff loss to Titans inspires social media posts – including from job seeker Antonio Brown fox-news/sports/nfl/tennessee-titans fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/antonio-brown fox news fnc/sports fnc e8fa652e-a29c-53a0-8139-205fd3de36d9 Dom Calicchio article   Westlake Legal Group Antonio-Brown1 Patriots’ playoff loss to Titans inspires social media posts – including from job seeker Antonio Brown fox-news/sports/nfl/tennessee-titans fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/antonio-brown fox news fnc/sports fnc e8fa652e-a29c-53a0-8139-205fd3de36d9 Dom Calicchio article

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Brian Jenkins: All-out US-Iran war is unlikely – But low-level war expected to continue

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6119787980001_6119793018001-vs Brian Jenkins: All-out US-Iran war is unlikely – But low-level war expected to continue fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/conflicts fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Brian Michael Jenkins b25791dc-c7d6-504d-af09-c700986399ce article

The American drone attack that killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani last week is the latest move in a low-level war between Iran and the U.S. that has been waged with varying degrees of intensity for over 40 years – and is likely to continue long into the future.

Some people fear that recent events will escalate the long conflict into a costly all-out war between the two countries. Others may welcome what they see as the necessary and inevitable showdown leading ultimately to regime change in Tehran.

The killing of Soleimani – the most prominent military figure in Iran and close to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei – can be seen as an escalation and will almost certainly provoke Iranian retaliation. President Trump’s boast of ordering the killing of Soleimani may further increase pressure on Iran to respond.

NATIONAL SECURITY ADVISER O’BRIEN WARNS IRAN OF ‘SEVERE CONSEQUENCES’ FOR RETALIATION: ‘VERY BAD PATH FOR THEM TO GO DOWN’

But although Iranian retaliation for Soleimani’s killing and counterretaliation by the U.S. seem likely – and politically advantageous to both governments –Tehran and Washington have good reasons to inflict limited pain without engaging in a full-scale war.

Iran has little interest in beginning an all-out war in which Iran itself would suffer major damage. While Iran’s leaders describe Soleimani as a martyr, the regime does not seek martyrdom.

The U.S. must expect some immediate spontaneous terrorist attacks, but Iran’s leadership takes a longer view. Its paramount objective is survival.

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And while the Trump administration may want to deter the Iranians from creating politically dangerous situations for the U.S. government and distract attention from the president’s own domestic political problems, Trump has made clear his opposition to becoming involved in another costly Middle East war. Indeed, he claims that killing Soleimani was necessary to prevent a war.

The past may be prologue to the future. Iran is a master of hybrid warfare. It has used proxies and its own covert operatives to carry out kidnappings and terrorist bombings, sabotage ships at sea and oil facilities on land, blow up embassies, and assassinate government officials. Its reach is global.

Iran can operate on the cyber battlefield as well to torment the United States without offering a clear-cut justification for war. And Iran is well aware of President Trump’s domestic political problems and America’s election cycle.

Iran has already forced the United States to evacuate diplomats from Iraq, warn U.S. citizens to get out of Iraq, and deploy thousands of additional troops to the Middle East. It can try to create additional crises that draw the United States into further military commitments.

The Iranian regime can also create problems for America’s few remaining allies in the region – Israel, Saudi Arabia and other Gulf monarchies. It can persuade America’s increasingly worried allies elsewhere to distance themselves from Washington. America’s adversaries will benefit.

At the other end of the spectrum, Iran may further accelerate its nuclear weapons program. And if it has not already done so, American military threats could persuade Iran to initiate a parallel clandestine effort to quickly fabricate and secretly deploy a crude nuclear device as a deterrent or instrument of revenge if the regime is overthrown.

Without risking an all-out war, Iran’s leadership can distract attention from its own domestic problems, provoke widespread fear and alarm among Americans as well as U.S. allies, and weaken the United States.

One can understand the apprehension in Washington when Iraqi militias and mobs under Iranian control stormed the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad on Tuesday. Any assault on a U.S. diplomatic facility can turn into another Benghazi, where in 2012 Libyan terrorists murdered the ambassador and three other Americans.

From a domestic political perspective, the worst thing to happen would be the takeover of an American embassy in Baghdad or elsewhere that resulted in a protracted hostage crisis – a repeat of the 1979 takeover of the U.S. Embassy in the Iranian capital of Tehran.

Many blame President Carter’s landslide defeat in the 1980 presidential election on his administration’s inability to rescue or negotiate the release of the 52 American hostages held by Iranians for 444 days.

The episode taught American presidents that extended hostage situations are politically dangerous.

We do not know what Gen. Soleimani was planning when he was killed while meeting with the head of the militia forces behind the assault on the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad. The militia leader was also killed by the American drone.

But everyone in government knows the history. Taking over embassies crosses a red line for any administration.

Iran has a long history of low-level war with the U.S., going back to the creation of the Islamic Republic in the 1979 revolution that replaced the government of Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, who had maintained good relations with the U.S.

The hostage crisis in Tehran was just the first of many anti-American actions by the revolutionary government.

Over 30 years ago, Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps exploited discontent among Lebanon’s Shiites to field proxies who were responsible for the 1983 bombing of the Marine Barracks in Lebanon, in which 241 U.S. service members died.

Iranian-supported Shiite militants also carried out a series of assassinations and kidnappings of Americans and others in Lebanon, creating political crises in Western capitals throughout the 1980s.

President Ronald Reagan’s administration was politically wounded by the scandal that resulted from the revelation that it had secretly sold arms to Iran in exchange for Iran’s assistance in bringing about the release of American hostages. But as some American hostages were released, more Americans were kidnapped.

Iran continues to engage in “detainee diplomacy” – holding American citizens and dual nationals as currency for future negotiations. The regime might step up its kidnappings in the wake of the killing of Soleimani.

From Tehran’s perspective, its actions against Washington were in response to continued American hostility, as well the continued U.S. presence in the Middle East.

Decades ago Iran’s leadership saw its arch-foe Iraq as an American puppet and believed that the United States encouraged Iraqi President Saddam Hussein to invade Iran in 1980. Initially neutral in the contest, the U.S. later tilted toward Iraq, removing it from its list of state sponsors of terrorism and thereby facilitating the shipment of arms and other forms of assistance to Baghdad.

When Iraqi aircraft attacked Iranian oil facilities, Iran retaliated by attacking Kuwaiti ships carrying Iraqi oil. Kuwait appealed to the United States for assistance. Kuwaiti tankers were re-flagged as U.S. vessels and were escorted in the Persian Gulf by U.S. warships.

Iran responded to this by secretly mining the gulf and some of the reflagged vessels were damaged. The U.S. retaliated by attacking Iranian vessels and oil platforms that were being used by Iran’s Revolutionary Guards to coordinate the Iranian campaign.

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The secret war continued into the 1990s. FBI investigators concluded that Iran had instigated the bombing of Khobar Barracks in Saudi Arabia in which 19 American airmen were killed; nearly 500 others in the Air Force were injured by a gigantic truck bomb.

Iran also supported anti-American Shiite militias during the U.S. occupation of Iraq, which were responsible for more than 600 American deaths.

Hezbollah had Iranian support when it launched a new wave of terrorist attacks on Israeli and Jewish targets worldwide. The attacks began after Imad Mugniyah – a senior Hezbollah operative called a legend by Soleimani and the man responsible for the kidnappings of westerners in Lebanon and terrorist attacks on American and Israeli targets – was killed by a bomb. The Hezbollah campaign included bombings and assassinations.

In 2011, Iranian operatives were also reportedly involved in a plot to assassinate the Saudi Arabian ambassador to Washington with a bomb that would certainly have also killed Americans.

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That’s a long list of Iranian actions in its low-level war with the U.S., and unfortunately, the list is likely to get longer.

But it would be surprising if Iranian leaders – despite all their threats following the killing of Soleimani – decided to go further and risk a full-fledged war with the U.S. that would devastate their country and might end with the overthrow of their regime. The danger comes more from miscalculation than madness.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6119787980001_6119793018001-vs Brian Jenkins: All-out US-Iran war is unlikely – But low-level war expected to continue fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/conflicts fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Brian Michael Jenkins b25791dc-c7d6-504d-af09-c700986399ce article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6119787980001_6119793018001-vs Brian Jenkins: All-out US-Iran war is unlikely – But low-level war expected to continue fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/conflicts fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Brian Michael Jenkins b25791dc-c7d6-504d-af09-c700986399ce article

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AOC calls Trump ‘a monster’ over threat to Iran; Omar, other Democrats warn of potential ‘war crimes’

Westlake Legal Group AOC-Omar-Getty AOC calls Trump 'a monster' over threat to Iran; Omar, other Democrats warn of potential 'war crimes' fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson article 8dd53acb-afb4-538f-91f2-f76a549120f3

Outspoken Democrats — from far-left “Squad” members to 2020 presidential hopefuls — wasted little time Saturday in denouncing President Trump’s warning to Iran about possible retaliation for the U.S. airstrike that killed Iran’s Gen. Qassem Soleimani.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., answered by calling the president a “monster.”

“This is a war crime,” Ocasio-Cortez wrote. “Threatening to target and kill innocent families, women and children — which is what you’re doing by targeting cultural sites – does not make you a ‘tough guy,’ It does not make you ‘strategic.’ It makes you a monster.”

TRUMP WARNS IRAN: US HAS TARGETED ’52 IRANIAN SITES’ AND WILL ‘HIT VERY FAST AND VERY HARD’ IF NEEDED

Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., accused Trump of “threatening to commit war crimes.” “God help us all!” she added.

ILHAN OMAR VOWS TO STOP TRUMP FROM CREATING ‘DISTRACTION’ WAR IN IRAN

Presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., expressed a similar message.

AOC SLAMS TRUMP, SAYS SOLEIMANI STRIKE RISKS ‘LIVES OF MILLIONS OF INNOCENT PEOPLE’

“You are threatening to commit war crimes,” Warren wrote. “We are not at war with Iran. The American people do not want a war with Iran. This is a democracy. You do not get to start a war with Iran, and your threats put our troops and diplomats at greater risk. Stop.”

Former Vice President Joe Biden accused the president of “irrational” behavior.

GREG GUTFELD POKES FUN AT DEMOCRATS BIDEN, BLOOMBERG FOR THEIR LATEST CAMPAIGN FOIBLES

“The more the walls close in on this guy, the more irrational he becomes,” Biden wrote.

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In his message Saturday, Trump had warned Iran that the U.S. had already identified 52 sites in the country that its military could target in the event of a retaliatory Iranian strike against the U.S.

Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei had said “harsh retaliation is waiting” for the United States after Trump ordered an airstrike that killed Soleimani in Baghdad early Friday.

Westlake Legal Group AOC-Omar-Getty AOC calls Trump 'a monster' over threat to Iran; Omar, other Democrats warn of potential 'war crimes' fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson article 8dd53acb-afb4-538f-91f2-f76a549120f3   Westlake Legal Group AOC-Omar-Getty AOC calls Trump 'a monster' over threat to Iran; Omar, other Democrats warn of potential 'war crimes' fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson article 8dd53acb-afb4-538f-91f2-f76a549120f3

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