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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 305)

Klobuchar vows to take campaign to New Hampshire: ‘We are strong’

Westlake Legal Group image Klobuchar vows to take campaign to New Hampshire: ‘We are strong’ fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox news fnc/politics fnc Brooke Singman article 4f348d27-31cb-5fdd-be7d-1a0d6c528fd5

Sen. Amy Klobuchar vowed to take her campaign to New Hampshire regardless of the results from Monday’s Iowa caucuses.

Klobuchar, D-Minn., was the first 2020 Democratic presidential hopeful who took the stage Monday night amid a delay in results from the Iowa Democratic Party.

IOWA CAUCUS VOTES TOTALS DELAYED AMID ‘INCONSISTENCIES’

“Somehow, someway, I’m going to get on a plane tonight to New Hampshire,” Klobuchar said. “We are bringing this ticket to New Hampshire, so even in a crowded field of candidates, even during the well-earned impeachment hearing of Donald J. Trump—which kept me bolted to my Senate desk for the last two weeks—we kept fighting and you kept fighting for me.”

She added: “All I can say is, we are here, and we are strong.”

Klobuchar applauded her family, her “tireless” field organizers and “unstoppable volunteers,” who she says “would never give up.”

“My friends here in Iowa, we have beaten the odds every step of the way,” she said. “We have done it on the merits, we have done it with ideas and we have done it with hard work.”

The Iowa Democratic Party reported a delay due to “quality control.” By 11:30 p.m. EST, there were no early results from the caucuses to report.

SANDERS PROJECTS CONFIDENCE AMID IOWA CAUCUS DELAYS

“The integrity of the results is paramount. We have experienced a delay in the results due to quality checks and the fact that the IDP is reporting out three data sets for the first time,” communications director for the Iowa Democratic Party Mandy McClure said in a statement Monday. “What we know right now is that around 25% of precincts have reported, and early data indicates turnout is on pace for 2016.”

Meanwhile, Klobuchar slammed the president and touted her campaign’s message.

“We know, in our hearts, that in a democracy, it is not about the loudest voice and the biggest bank account,  it is about the idea and the person who can turn those ideas into action,” she said. “It is a simple idea that the heart of America is so much bigger than the heart of this guy in the White House.”

Westlake Legal Group image Klobuchar vows to take campaign to New Hampshire: ‘We are strong’ fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox news fnc/politics fnc Brooke Singman article 4f348d27-31cb-5fdd-be7d-1a0d6c528fd5   Westlake Legal Group image Klobuchar vows to take campaign to New Hampshire: ‘We are strong’ fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox news fnc/politics fnc Brooke Singman article 4f348d27-31cb-5fdd-be7d-1a0d6c528fd5

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Delays Mar Iowa Caucuses as Democrats Start Nominating Process

DES MOINES — A night that was supposed to bring clarity to the Democratic presidential contest turned into a long ordeal of confusion and delays on Monday, as the Iowa Democratic Party failed to report results from more than a handful of precincts for hours after the state’s famed caucuses began.

Struggling to adopt a new byzantine process of tabulating results, Iowa Democrats offered little explanation for the problem for hours after the caucuses began. Eventually, not long before midnight on the East Coast, a spokeswoman for the state party said there was no issue with the integrity of the vote but it was taking longer than anticipated to collect and check the reported data for irregularities.

“This is simply a reporting issue, the app did not go down and this is not a hack or an intrusion,” said Mandy McClure, a spokeswoman for the Iowa Democratic Party. “The underlying data and paper trail is sound and will simply take time to further report the results.”

In the absence of hard results, election watchers in Iowa and across the country, who had eagerly been awaiting the start of the Democratic nominating process, had to make do with televised snippets of scenes from caucus sites, many of them playing out in messy fashion on college campuses and in local meeting halls and gymnasiums.

And after anxiously awaiting results for much of the evening, the candidates grew impatient and, one after another, raced to their election night parties to address their supporters and get a few minutes of live television coverage. Without final results, none of them immediately emerged as a loser, allowing the candidates to project optimism and conceal their frustrations.

Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., was the most upbeat, crowing that “we are going on to New Hampshire victorious,” though there were no results to back up his boast.

By 10:15 Central time, the Iowa Democratic Party acknowledged in an emergency conference call with representatives for the candidates that there had been difficulties with the tabulation, according to a senior official with one of the campaigns. The delay, officials said, arose from the new rules requiring caucus leaders to report three sets of numbers to party headquarters, rather than just the delegate totals emerging from the complex caucus process.

But when the campaign officials grew impatient and asked when the results would be disclosed, the state party leaders quickly ended the discussion, according to two Democrats who were on the call.

While precinct captains across the state struggled to report the results, first with the app and then after calling and waiting on hold, the campaigns vented quiet fury at the lack of clarity about the outcome in a contest most of them had spent hundreds of days and millions of dollars to win.

Mr. Biden’s campaign hastily dashed off a letter to the Iowa Democratic Party’s leaders requesting “full explanations” for the failures “before any official results are released.”

As the throng of candidates waited for the results, Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, an underdog in the caucuses, finally broke the silence before a crowd of supporters in downtown Des Moines.

Briefly noting the delays, Ms. Klobuchar declared, “We do know one thing: We are punching above our weight.” With her actual standing in the caucuses unknown, she said she would be headed to New Hampshire soon to continue campaigning there.

Live Reporter Analysis »

Follow live coverage and analysis from Times reporters in Iowa and New York.

Westlake Legal Group author-shane-goldmacher-thumbLarge Delays Mar Iowa Caucuses as Democrats Start Nominating Process United States Politics and Government Sanders, Bernard Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Klobuchar, Amy Elizabeth Warren Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Biden, Joseph R Jr

Shane Goldmacher, reporting from Des Moines 1m ago

Klobuchar campaign chief says they believe they’re close to Biden. No numbers are public so campaigns can set their own narratives.

Westlake Legal Group author-nicole-perlroth-thumbLarge Delays Mar Iowa Caucuses as Democrats Start Nominating Process United States Politics and Government Sanders, Bernard Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Klobuchar, Amy Elizabeth Warren Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Biden, Joseph R Jr

Nicole Perlroth, in Austin, Tex. 15m ago

J. Alex Halderman, computer science prof.: “This is an embarrassment but it shouldn’t shake people’s confidence in the results.” Read more.

Westlake Legal Group author-nicole-perlroth-thumbLarge Delays Mar Iowa Caucuses as Democrats Start Nominating Process United States Politics and Government Sanders, Bernard Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Klobuchar, Amy Elizabeth Warren Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Biden, Joseph R Jr

Nicole Perlroth, in Austin, Tex. 31m ago

Christopher Krebs, director of the Homeland Security Department’s cybersecurity agency, says the agency didn’t evaluate the results-reporting app.

Mr. Biden and Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts addressed their supporters soon afterward, with Mr. Biden noting that the state party was laboring to determine the results and that he was turning toward New Hampshire’s primary. Ms. Warren, branding the contest “too close to call,” pointed to the next round of contests and said her campaign was prepared for “a long haul.”

Following them was Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont — perceived as the candidate gathering momentum in the days before the caucuses — who promised his crowd that “at some point the results will be announced.”

When that happens, Mr. Sanders said, “we’re going to be doing very, very well here in Iowa.”

But nobody tried to seize the moment more aggressively, or perhaps brazenly, than Mr. Buttigieg, who said Iowa had “shocked the nation.”

His attempt to claim a victory without any corresponding evidence recalled Bill Clinton’s memorable declaration before the 1992 New Hampshire primary results were fully known that the state’s voters had made him “the comeback kid.”

The vote-counting delay, though, was a deflating moment at the outset of an election Democrats have been eagerly awaiting since President Trump’s victory and, momentarily at least, denied them any hint of clarity about their presidential primary.

Mr. Trump’s campaign was quick to express glee about the confusion and issued a statement taunting Democrats about their “caucus mess” and “train wreck.”

This was not the first caucus — a process staffed by volunteers at more than 1,600 precincts across the state — that did not produce clear results on the night of the vote.

Four years ago, Hillary Clinton’s narrow victory over Mr. Sanders was not clear until early the next morning after delays in reporting results. And in 2012, Republican state party officials declared a split decision only to reveal more than two weeks later that former Senator Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania had narrowly won, a delay that robbed him of momentum he could have taken into New Hampshire.

Since the caucuses began 50 years ago, Iowa Democrats reported only one number: the delegate count from each of the state’s precincts.

But after the razor-close finish in 2016, Mr. Sanders’s allies pushed the Democratic National Committee to require caucus states to track and report the raw numbers of how many people supported each candidate.

For Iowa, the new reporting standards meant counting how many people backed each candidate on the first and second balloting. That change, requiring reporting of three separate numbers from each of the state’s precincts, slowed reporting the results.

Iowa remained a prize well worth winning for the leading Democratic campaigns: After a year of trying to differentiate themselves in what began as a sprawling field, each candidate hoped that finishing well here would encourage Democratic voters to see him or her as a strong general-election challenger for President Trump.

The candidates made their final pitches throughout the day on Monday, with an undercurrent of urgency that Iowa would be a critical test of their viability going forward. “Everything comes down to today,” said Mr. Buttigieg, 38, as he spoke to a crowd in West Des Moines. “All of the dates, all of the appearances, all of the conversations with friends and neighbors.”

Yet even as Democratic voters were united chiefly by a ravenous hunger to oust Mr. Trump, many Iowans went to register the first verdict of 2020 still undecided or convinced more of the risk of the candidate they opposed than of the promise of the one they ultimately backed.

Democrats here and beyond are deeply divided along generational lines, with Mr. Sanders building deep support among millennials, Mr. Biden appealing to those over 65 and each drawing sharp opposition from those voters in the opposite demographic.

As revealing was the chasm between Iowa progressives, who sided with Mr. Sanders and Ms. Warren, and more moderate voters who backed Mr. Biden, Ms. Klobuchar and Mr. Buttigieg.

A pre-caucus survey conducted for The Associated Press found that a majority of voters participating in the Iowa contest were female, a slight majority had graduated from college and about two-thirds were over age 45. Notably, in a contest in which voters have been divided by age, 34 percent of caucusgoers were over 55.

And in a reflection of how little Iowa’s demographics resemble those of the nation, nine in 10 respondents in the survey were white.

The survey found the caucus-going electorate ideologically divided, with somewhat more moderates than liberals. But there was near unanimity that it was important to nominate someone who could defeat Mr. Trump.

This state helped catapult Barack Obama to the Democratic nomination in 2008, but it has not always been so prescient. Representative Richard Gephardt of Missouri triumphed in the Democratic caucuses in 1988 but did not capture the nomination, and the last three Republican standard-bearers failed to win here but went on to win the nomination.

Still, the caucuses offered a first indication of Democratic voters’ preferences after an unusually unsettled primary season, defined mainly by voters’ angst and indecision about finding a strong challenger for Mr. Trump. The diffuse nature of the Democratic field has already given rise to temporary surges by several candidates — including Ms. Warren, Mr. Buttigieg and Senator Kamala Harris of California, who dropped out of the race in December — and drew two late entrants from the party’s moderate wing, Michael R. Bloomberg, the former New York City mayor, and Deval Patrick, the former governor of Massachusetts.

At the heart of the party’s schism is a debate over whether Democrats are more likely to defeat Mr. Trump by appealing to the electoral middle, nominating a pragmatist of the sort who helped them prevail in the 2018 elections, or by elevating a progressive who can galvanize some of the young and nonwhite voters who sat out the 2016 general election.

Even before the caucuses got underway on Monday evening, Mr. Buttigieg offered a warning about deviating from the party’s midterm formula.

Pointing to the largely moderate class of freshman Democrats in Congress, Mr. Buttigieg said there was “a lot of concern” in their ranks about running with Mr. Sanders. “Look at how we actually took the House,” he said of 2018.

Yet Mr. Sanders, in his final appeals to Iowa Democrats, said that the party would tempt another presidential defeat if it did not nominate a candidate who could excite the party’s base. “If it is a low turnout election, Trump will win,” he warned over the weekend.

While all of the leading candidates had their ardent supporters, many Iowa voters seemed even more passionate when discussing those contenders they were most opposed to the party putting forward this fall.

As he has since he was sworn in three years ago, Mr. Trump could ultimately prove to be the most powerful force for Democratic unity.

But that prospect seems elusive now and may grow only more difficult over a long primary race. After New Hampshire, a larger and more diverse array of states will cast ballots that may further highlight the party’s generational, ideological and racial divisions.

Of all the candidates, none may have a more fraught relationship with Iowa than Mr. Biden, whose last attempt at the presidency in 2008 disintegrated after a dismal finish here. In the 2020 race, Mr. Biden for months took an ambivalent approach to the state, seeming wary of an all-out push that would raise expectations for him to win outright. But he took a more decisive stance by late fall, deploying senior aides to the state and approving the creation of a super PAC that has devoted millions of dollars to television advertising here.

Over the last weekend of the race, Mr. Biden kept pace with his rivals’ television advertising only as a result of super PAC spending. His campaign was far outspent on the airwaves by every major rival and a few lower-profile ones, including Mr. Yang and Mr. Steyer.

Ms. Warren has appeared to be a resilient force in Iowa. In the closing weeks of the campaign, Ms. Warren shifted her political strategy, taking a more direct approach to talking about the subjects of electability and gender, and branding herself in television ads as the candidate best positioned to unite the party.

“Women win,” Ms. Warren told supporters on a conference call on Monday morning, in a refrain she has used frequently over the past month.

Reid J. Epstein, Astead W. Herndon and Sydney Ember contributed reporting from Des Moines.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump campaign manager blasts Democrats, calls Iowa Caucuses a ‘train wreck’

Brad Parscale, Donald Trump’s campaign manager, issued a statement Monday on the Iowa caucuses that have suffered a series of largely unexplained delays and raised questions about the legitimacy of the contest.

“Democrats are stewing in a caucus mess of their own creation with the sloppiest train wreck in history. It would be natural for people to doubt the fairness of the process. And these are the people who want to run our entire health care system?” Parscale said.

In the statement, he also said the Republican caucuses had a “record turnout” for Trump.

CAMPAIGNS DEMAND EXPLANATION AS DELAYS PREVENT IOWA DEM PARTY FROM REPORTING VOTE TOTALS

Westlake Legal Group AP20035112725758 Trump campaign manager blasts Democrats, calls Iowa Caucuses a 'train wreck'

Supporters for Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., raise their hands to be counted during a Democratic party caucus at Hoover High School, Monday, Feb. 3, 2020, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

“Tonight President Trump posted a record performance in the well-run GOP Iowa caucuses with [a] record turnout for an incumbent,” he added.

His statement comes as people been reportedly waiting hours for the Iowa Democratic Party to share their results. Inconsistencies in reporting are allegedly causing the delay.

TRUMP EASILY WINS IOWA REPUBLICAN CAUCUSES

The Iowa Democratic Party said Monday night that results from the state’s first-in-the-nation caucus were indefinitely delayed due to “quality checks” and “inconsistencies” in some reporting, an embarrassing complication that added a new layer of doubt to an already uncertain presidential primary season.

The party said the problem was not a result of a “hack or an intrusion.”

Monday’s confusion allowed every candidate to claim momentum, though no results were announced by the state party as Monday night was about to turn to Tuesday.

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“It looks like it’s going to be a long night, but we’re feeling good,” former Vice President Joe Biden said, suggesting the final results would “be close.” “We’re in this for the long haul.”

Fox News’ Gregg Re and the Associated Press contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group AP20035112725758 Trump campaign manager blasts Democrats, calls Iowa Caucuses a 'train wreck'   Westlake Legal Group AP20035112725758 Trump campaign manager blasts Democrats, calls Iowa Caucuses a 'train wreck'

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APP-OCALYPSE: The Democratic Firm That Botched The Iowa Caucuses

Westlake Legal Group 5e390252210000f900e1c62b APP-OCALYPSE: The Democratic Firm That Botched The Iowa Caucuses

The tech arm of ACRONYM, a Democratic digital nonprofit group that has rapidly expanded in recent years, was responsible for building the Iowa caucus app that contributed to delays in reporting Monday night’s results in the first vote in the party’s presidential race. Multiple Democratic sources, including one of the presidential campaigns, confirmed the app’s creator. 

State campaign finance records indicate the Iowa Democratic Party paid Shadow, a tech company owned by ACRONYM, more than $60,000 for “website development” over two installments in November and December of last year. A Democratic source with knowledge of the process said those payments were for the app that caucus site leaders were supposed to use to upload the results at their locales. 

ACRONYM founder Tara McGowan and a spokesman for the group did not immediately respond to phone calls requesting comment.

The Iowa Democratic Party had refused to reveal details about the app, including the company behind it and what security measures were being taken to safeguard the results, arguing that it made the technology more vulnerable to hackers. 

The app was supposed to make reporting the results easier and quicker. But on Monday, numerous Democrats in Iowa reported major problems in attempting to download the application and upload results, with many saying they resorted to calling the results into state party headquarters in Des Moines. 

As of 12:30 a.m. Tuesday morning, the party had not released any results from the caucuses, which were seen as a four-way battle between former Vice President Joe Biden, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

The Nevada Democratic Party, scheduled to hold the next Democratic caucus on Feb. 22, has also paid Shadow for website development. 

ACRONYM, which McGowan, a digital strategist, launched in the wake of the 2016 election, has become a growing part of the Democratic digital ecosystem. The group has raised tens of millions of dollars with a buzzy message about how Democrats have fallen behind in digital advertising. In 2018, the group funded an onslaught of ads on platforms like Facebook and Google.

The group launched a super PAC, PACRONYM, this year to mount a major digital effort attacking President Donald Trump, and won the backing of David Plouffe, who led Barack Obama’s victorious 2008 presidential campaign. PACRONYM reported raising $7.7 million in 2019.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

2020 Iowa Caucus Discussion Live Thread – Part V

Somebody got robbed.

Everyone knows Sanders will win New Hampshire and everyone knows Biden will easily take South Carolina.

So they’ll get a quick victory to get momentum back.

Warren probably had the most to lose if she was the winner. Her campaign is faltering and tonight would’ve re-energized her. Now she has to wait 2 more primaries at least before she can compete again.

Mayor Pete had the last and longest speech but even if he actually won he got robbed because the speech wasn’t during prime time.

Sanders got robbed because 2 victories in a row would’ve helped. Iowa then NH.

Biden got the most advantage tonight since his loss was blunted. He can claim Sanders will win NH no matter what because its so close to Vermont and then he’ll easily win South Carolina because he has the black vote covered.

So Biden is going to have a good night no matter what on Feb 29th. A month from now. Because tonight was blunted and the New Hampshire primary is a given.

That’s why I’m saying somebody got robbed tonight.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

APP-OCALYPSE: The Democratic Firm That Botched The Iowa Caucuses

Westlake Legal Group 5e390252210000f900e1c62b APP-OCALYPSE: The Democratic Firm That Botched The Iowa Caucuses

The tech arm of ACRONYM, a Democratic digital nonprofit group that has rapidly expanded in recent years, was responsible for building the Iowa caucus app that contributed to delays in reporting Monday night’s results in the first vote in the party’s presidential race. Multiple Democratic sources, including one of the presidential campaigns, confirmed the app’s creator. 

State campaign finance records indicate the Iowa Democratic Party paid Shadow, a tech company owned by ACRONYM, more than $60,000 for “website development” over two installments in November and December of last year. A Democratic source with knowledge of the process said those payments were for the app that caucus site leaders were supposed to use to upload the results at their locales. 

ACRONYM founder Tara McGowan and a spokesman for the group did not immediately respond to phone calls requesting comment.

The Iowa Democratic Party had refused to reveal details about the app, including the company behind it and what security measures were being taken to safeguard the results, arguing that it made the technology more vulnerable to hackers. 

The app was supposed to make reporting the results easier and quicker. But on Monday, numerous Democrats in Iowa reported major problems in attempting to download the application and upload results, with many saying they resorted to calling the results into state party headquarters in Des Moines. 

As of 12:30 a.m. Tuesday morning, the party had not released any results from the caucuses, which were seen as a four-way battle between former Vice President Joe Biden, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

The Nevada Democratic Party, scheduled to hold the next Democratic caucus on Feb. 22, has also paid Shadow for website development. 

ACRONYM, which McGowan, a digital strategist, launched in the wake of the 2016 election, has become a growing part of the Democratic digital ecosystem. The group has raised tens of millions of dollars with a buzzy message about how Democrats have fallen behind in digital advertising. In 2018, the group funded an onslaught of ads on platforms like Facebook and Google.

The group launched a super PAC, PACRONYM, this year to mount a major digital effort attacking President Donald Trump, and won the backing of David Plouffe, who led Barack Obama’s victorious 2008 presidential campaign. PACRONYM reported raising $7.7 million in 2019.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

2020 Iowa Caucus Live Updates: Delayed Results Lead to Confusion

ImageWestlake Legal Group 03whattowatch-top04-articleLarge 2020 Iowa Caucus Live Updates: Delayed Results Lead to Confusion Warren, Elizabeth Sanders, Bernard Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Klobuchar, Amy Iowa Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Biden, Joseph R Jr

A Sanders caucus party watches the results in confusion in Des Moines.Credit…Hilary Swift for The New York Times

  • The release of Iowa caucus results was delayed after inconsistencies in the reporting of data.

  • “This is not a hack or an intrusion,” said a spokeswoman for the state Democratic Party. The party is using photos of results and a paper trail to validate the results.

  • The lack of results didn’t stop multiple Democratic candidates from addressing their supporters late on Monday night. Nearly all claimed that they expected a strong finish in the state, whenever the results are eventually announced.

  • Seven candidates mounted competitive campaigns in the state: Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusets, former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, the former tech executive Andrew Yang and the former hedge fund investor Tom Steyer.

  • There are 41 delegates up for grabs, a tiny fraction of the 1,991 delegates needed to win the Democratic presidential nomination.

  • Follow our results page here.

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Here’s what you need to know:

Results in the Iowa Democratic caucuses were delayed Monday evening, creating widespread confusion among the presidential campaigns.

Rumors of all kinds of technical failures flew across the state, as representatives for the candidates were briefed by the Iowa Democratic Party. Party officials said the results had been delayed because of efforts to do “quality control” before data was made public.

“We found inconsistencies in the reporting of three sets of results,” said Mandy McClure, the party’s communications director. “In addition to the tech systems being used to tabulate results, we are also using photos of results and a paper trail to validate that all results match and ensure that we have confidence and accuracy in the numbers we report. This is simply a reporting issue, the app did not go down and this is not a hack or an intrusion. The underlying data and paper trail is sound and will simply take time to further report the results.”

On a conference call with the presidential campaigns, Iowa Democratic Party officials largely reiterated their public statements. The delay, officials said, was because of the new rules requiring caucus leaders to report three numbers to party headquarters, rather than just the delegate totals.

Representatives from the campaigns became angry at Iowa party officials who hung up after being asked about when results might be known, according to two people who listened to the call.

Since the caucuses began 50 years ago, Iowa Democrats reported only one number: the delegate count from each of the state’s precincts.

But after the razor-close 2016 race in Iowa between Hillary Clinton and Mr. Sanders, Mr. Sanders’s allies pushed the Democratic National Committee to require caucus states to track and report the raw numbers of how many people backed each candidate.

For Iowa, the new reporting standards meant counting how many people backed each candidate on the first and second alignment. That change, requiring reporting of three separate numbers from each of the state’s more than 1,600 precincts, has slowed reporting of results to a crawl.

Additionally, many precinct chairs across the state abandoned the new app that was built to help tabulate and report results as users struggled to log in. They opted instead to use the telephone hotline to report, which can also slow down the reporting of results.

“I have had three precincts unable to report results,” said William Baresel, the Floyd County chair.

Shawn Sebastian, the caucus secretary for a precinct in Story County, said he had spent an hour on hold with the state party to report the results. He finally got through while in the midst of an on-air interview with CNN, but the state party official hung up on him before he could relay the tallies.

In the hours before the caucuses began, Iowa Democratic Party officials received multiple calls from precinct chairs around the state reporting problems with the app. The state party dismissed the calls as related to user-error problems but they fueled speculation about hacking and other security issues.

Already, a number of prominent Democrats have questioned the role of Iowa casting the first ballots in the primary process, criticizing the largely white, older state as unrepresentative of the diversity of their party. Technical issues, happening in the midst of such a highly-watched caucus, could contribute to doubts about Iowa’s standing in the primary process.

Christopher C. Krebs, the director of the Homeland Security Department’s cybersecurity agency, said late Monday evening that the mobile app being used in the caucuses had not been vetted or evaluated by the agency.

Live Reporter Analysis »

Follow live coverage and analysis from Times reporters in Iowa and New York.

Westlake Legal Group author-shane-goldmacher-thumbLarge 2020 Iowa Caucus Live Updates: Delayed Results Lead to Confusion Warren, Elizabeth Sanders, Bernard Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Klobuchar, Amy Iowa Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Biden, Joseph R Jr

Shane Goldmacher, reporting from Des Moines 1m ago

Klobuchar campaign chief says they believe they’re close to Biden. No numbers are public so campaigns can set their own narratives.

Westlake Legal Group author-nicole-perlroth-thumbLarge 2020 Iowa Caucus Live Updates: Delayed Results Lead to Confusion Warren, Elizabeth Sanders, Bernard Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Klobuchar, Amy Iowa Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Biden, Joseph R Jr

Nicole Perlroth, in Austin, Tex. 15m ago

J. Alex Halderman, computer science prof.: “This is an embarrassment but it shouldn’t shake people’s confidence in the results.” Read more.

Westlake Legal Group author-nicole-perlroth-thumbLarge 2020 Iowa Caucus Live Updates: Delayed Results Lead to Confusion Warren, Elizabeth Sanders, Bernard Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Klobuchar, Amy Iowa Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Biden, Joseph R Jr

Nicole Perlroth, in Austin, Tex. 31m ago

Christopher Krebs, director of the Homeland Security Department’s cybersecurity agency, says the agency didn’t evaluate the results-reporting app.

Cybersecurity experts also said that the app had not been properly tested at scale, and that it was hastily put together over the past two months. Iowa Democratic Party officials only decided to use the app to report results after a previous party proposal — which entailed having caucus participants call in their votes over the phone — was scrapped, on the advice of Democratic National Committee officials.

J. Alex Halderman, a professor of computer science at the University of Michigan, and David Jefferson, a computer scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, said Monday night that they had warned state officials that the mobile reporting app was vulnerable to what is known as a “denial of service attack,” in which hackers flood the central servers used to power the app with traffic, stalling them or knocking them offline.

“This app has never been used in any real election or tested at a statewide scale and it’s only been contemplated for use for two months now,” said Mr. Jefferson, who also serves on the board of Verified Voting, a nonpartisan election integrity organization.

“This is an embarrassment but it shouldn’t shake people’s confidence in the results,” Mr. Halderman said. “If this had been an election conducted by phone, or online, that would have been a major disaster. We might never know the results and would have had to re-run the entire contest.”

“This is an urgent reminder,” Mr. Halderman said, “of why online voting is not ready for prime time.”

Mr. Jefferson warned that Nevada is also currently slated to use a similar mobile app to report its caucus results in a few weeks.

DES MOINES — Ms. Warren said the early returns in Iowa showed an appetite for her campaign of “big, structural change,” even as official results were muddled by technical difficulties.

In a rare set of prepared remarks, after being introduced by her grandchildren, Ms. Warren repeated a new refrain: “This campaign is for you.” It was in keeping with her attempts to paint herself as the candidate best suited to unite the Democrats’ moderate and progressive wings.

She acknowledged that the race’s official results were still muddled. “It is too close to call. But I’m just going to tell you what I do know,” she said. “As the baby daughter of a janitor, I’m so glad to be on this stage tonight.”

She then gave the sort of positive speech often given by victorious candidates.

“This race started here in Iowa, but from tomorrow it will run ocean to ocean, east to New Hampshire, and then west to Nevada, then down to South Carolina,” she said. “This fight will stretch across all 57 states and territories that make up this great nation until we unite together as a party in Milwaukee. The road won’t be easy. But we are built for the long haul.”

On a frustrating night for every candidate, all of whom were hoping to declare victory quickly and then jet off to New Hampshire, Mr. Sanders tried a bit of humor.

“Let me begin by stating that I imagine — I have a strong feeling — that at some point the results will be announced,” Mr. Sanders told supporters at his election-night watch party. “And when those results are announced, I have a good feeling we’re going to be doing very, very well here in Iowa.”

DES MOINES — The Biden campaign sent a letter to the Iowa Democratic Party late Monday night citing “considerable flaws” in the reporting system for the caucuses and seeking information from the party before results are made public.

“The integrity of the process is critical, and there were flaws in the reporting systems tonight that should raise serious concerns for voters,” Kate Bedingfield, a deputy campaign manager for Mr. Biden, said on Twitter.

Addressing supporters, Mr. Biden said he wanted to make sure the state party was “very careful in their deliberations” and added that he expected the results to be “close.”

“We’re going to walk out of here with our share of delegates,” he said. “We don’t know exactly what it is yet, but we feel good about where we are.”

In the letter, the Biden campaign’s general counsel, Dana Remus, wrote that the app to relay results from the caucuses had “failed,” and that the backup telephone reporting system had not work either.

“These acute failures are occurring statewide,” Ms. Remus wrote.

Ms. Remus said that campaigns should get more information from the state party — as well as a chance to respond — before official results are made public.

“We believe that the campaigns deserve full explanations and relevant information regarding the methods of quality control you are employing, and an opportunity to respond, before any official results are released,” she wrote.

There may have been no official confirmation of how anyone was doing, Ms. Klobuchar told supporters Monday evening, but she knew she was doing well.

“We know there’s delays,” Ms. Klobuchar said, speaking at the Des Moines Marriott. “But we know one thing — we are punching above our weight.”

“Even in a crowded field of candidates, even during the well-earned impeachment hearing of Donald J. Trump, which had me bolted to my Senate desk for the last two weeks, we kept fighting and you kept fighting for me,” she said. “Somehow, some way, I’m going to get on a plane tonight to New Hampshire, and we are bringing this to New Hampshire.”

“I gotta say, I’m a numbers guy, and we’re still waiting on numbers from tonight,” Mr. Yang said in a speech to supporters in Des Moines. “We’re all looking around being like, ‘What’s the math?’”

“But the math that I care most about is the fact that this movement has become something that has already shocked the political world,” he added. “And it’s going to keep on going from here — it’s going to keep on growing from here.”

In the annals of expected news, President Trump won the G.O.P. caucuses in Iowa.

The contest was largely symbolic: While Democrats have saturated the Iowa airwaves for over a year, Mr. Trump faced little opposition in the Republican caucuses. In past years, Republicans have canceled their caucuses when an incumbent president was running for re-election.

Still, Mr. Trump and his team have used the past week to try and grab some attention away from the Democrats. On Thursday, Mr. Trump drew more than 7,000 fans to a rally where he predicted that Iowa would deliver for him again in November. He also deployed cabinet secretaries, top Republican officials and Trump family members to the state.

The Trump campaign reacted to the confusion on the Democratic side with glee, and questioned the legitimacy of the contest.

“Democrats are stewing in a caucus mess of their own creation with the sloppiest train wreck in history,” said Brad Parscale, Mr. Trump’s campaign manager. “It would be natural for people to doubt the fairness of the process. And these are the people who want to run our entire health care system?”

DES MOINES — Ms. Warren tried to win some last-minute support at Roosevelt High School here, holding a photo line and thanking caucusgoers as they headed into a small gymnasium.

Ms. Warren, who needs to do well in Iowa in order to springboard her candidacy in other parts of the country, appeared confident and relaxed as she shook hands with well-wishers, many of whom were wearing “Warren” pins and buttons, or donning her signature “liberty green” color.

She won big on the first alignment at the precinct, Des Moines 41. Her total was 204; Mr. Sanders’s was 140; Mr. Buttigieg’s was 111; and Ms. Klobuchar’s was 104. Mr. Biden, at 71, was not viable.

JOHNSTON — Ms. Klobuchar made her final pitch to Iowa caucusgoers here, telling a crowd of about 350 that Democrats must defeat Mr. Trump in November. “The most important thing is that we win in the general election,” she said, addressing a precinct at Johnston Middle School.

Ms. Klobuchar came here because Johnston is a Des Moines suburb that flipped from Republican to Democratic in 2018. It’s filled with the sort of moderate Democrats she is banking on to support her.

Mr. Biden is also counting on those moderates, but the results of the first alignment were disappointing for him.

The viable candidates at Johnston 2: Mr. Sanders, who had the support of 76 caucusgoers; Ms. Klobuchar, 75; Mr. Buttigieg, 70; and Ms. Warren, 59.

Not viable were Mr. Biden, at 37; Mr. Yang, at 33; Mr. Steyer, at 4, and Ms. Gabbard, at 4.

In the final round, Ms. Warren picked up more of Mr. Biden’s supporters than her rivals. The numbers: Ms. Klobuchar, 106; Mr. Sanders, 83; Mr. Buttigieg, 81; Ms. Warren, 69.

Shortly before the first-round totals were announced, a Yang supporter tried convincing the Biden precinct captain to jump to Mr. Yang, saying of Mr. Biden, “He’s the one that caused this whole impeachment trouble.”

“He shouldn’t have gotten his son that job for $50,000 per month,” the Yang supporter, who declined to give her name, added. But her argument fell flat.

Mr. Biden’s weakness at the Johnston precinct, however, suggests he may have a poor showing statewide.

WAUKEE — Roughly 100 people showed up for a Republican caucus at Waukee Elementary School, a turnout that delighted Mick Mulvaney, the White House chief of staff — here in his personal capacity, he said. “I was told to expect like 30,” he told the crowd.

The results of the caucus were a foregone conclusion, and Jim Marwedel knew it.

Mr. Marwedel, visibly nervous, came to the front of the gymnasium to encourage his fellow caucusgoers to support Joe Walsh, who is running against Mr. Trump for the G.O.P. nomination. It was a matter of protecting the Constitution, he said, arguing that Mr. Trump’s use of executive authority could open the door for a Democratic president to abuse his or her power.

“We need to stand for the Constitution, even if it means we have to stand up to our friends,” Mr. Marwedel, 50, said. “So with that, I’m thankful that you let me talk to you. I hope you can see why I’m voting for Joe Walsh, and I just encourage you as you go forward —”

He cut himself off.

“I know you’re mostly going to support Trump,” he said, before adding plaintively: “But please understand that people like me are conservative, and we’re not trying to just bad-mouth the president. We’re trying to preserve the Constitution.”

COMPTON, Calif. — There’s one candidate saying that whatever happens in Iowa tonight does not matter all that much: Mr. Bloomberg.

The former New York mayor spent Monday flying through California, stopping in Sacramento, Fresno and Compton. He shook hands with voters, took a few questions from reporters and plans to get on a plane to Michigan tonight.

Mr. Bloomberg is waging an extremely unconventional campaign, skipping the first four early states entirely and instead focusing on Super Tuesday and beyond.

“I’m a believer that if you want to fight the last war, you believe things like whoever wins Iowa goes all the way,” Mr. Bloomberg said in an interview at a community center in Compton on Monday. “You believe that only six states matter. That was the last election. That’s not true today.”

Early voting officially began Monday in California, and Mr. Bloomberg is urging supporters to cast a ballot for him now. Though Mr. Bloomberg mostly demurred from playing pundit, he stands to gain if the moderates stumble in Iowa.

Maggie Astor, Nick Corasaniti, Reid J. Epstein, Trip Gabriel, Shane Goldmacher, Michael Grynbaum, Astead W. Herndon, Thomas Kaplan, Lisa Lerer, Jennifer Medina, Jonathan Martin, Nicole Perlroth and Jeremy W. Peters contributed reporting.

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Trump campaign manager blasts Democrats, calls Iowa Caucuses a ‘train wreck’

Brad Parscale, Donald Trump’s campaign manager, issued a statement Monday on the Iowa caucuses that have suffered a series of largely unexplained delays and raised questions about the legitimacy of the contest.

“Democrats are stewing in a caucus mess of their own creation with the sloppiest train wreck in history. It would be natural for people to doubt the fairness of the process. And these are the people who want to run our entire health care system?” Parscale said.

In the statement, he also said the Republican caucuses had a “record turnout” for Trump.

CAMPAIGNS DEMAND EXPLANATION AS DELAYS PREVENT IOWA DEM PARTY FROM REPORTING VOTE TOTALS

Westlake Legal Group AP20035112725758 Trump campaign manager blasts Democrats, calls Iowa Caucuses a 'train wreck' fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc David Aaro article 6b69010a-a3ff-59e9-bca6-27682783ce64

Supporters for Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., raise their hands to be counted during a Democratic party caucus at Hoover High School, Monday, Feb. 3, 2020, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

“Tonight President Trump posted a record performance in the well-run GOP Iowa caucuses with [a] record turnout for an incumbent,” he added.

His statement comes as people been reportedly waiting hours for the Iowa Democratic Party to share their results. Inconsistencies in reporting are allegedly causing the delay.

TRUMP EASILY WINS IOWA REPUBLICAN CAUCUSES

The Iowa Democratic Party said Monday night that results from the state’s first-in-the-nation caucus were indefinitely delayed due to “quality checks” and “inconsistencies” in some reporting, an embarrassing complication that added a new layer of doubt to an already uncertain presidential primary season.

The party said the problem was not a result of a “hack or an intrusion.”

Monday’s confusion allowed every candidate to claim momentum, though no results were announced by the state party as Monday night was about to turn to Tuesday.

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“It looks like it’s going to be a long night, but we’re feeling good,” former Vice President Joe Biden said, suggesting the final results would “be close.” “We’re in this for the long haul.”

Fox News’ Gregg Re and the Associated Press contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group AP20035112725758 Trump campaign manager blasts Democrats, calls Iowa Caucuses a 'train wreck' fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc David Aaro article 6b69010a-a3ff-59e9-bca6-27682783ce64   Westlake Legal Group AP20035112725758 Trump campaign manager blasts Democrats, calls Iowa Caucuses a 'train wreck' fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc David Aaro article 6b69010a-a3ff-59e9-bca6-27682783ce64

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APP-OCALYPSE: The Democratic Firm That Botched The Iowa Caucuses

Westlake Legal Group 5e390252210000f900e1c62b APP-OCALYPSE: The Democratic Firm That Botched The Iowa Caucuses

The tech arm of ACRONYM, a Democratic digital nonprofit group that has rapidly expanded in recent years, was responsible for building the Iowa caucus app that contributed to delays in reporting Monday night’s results in the first vote in the party’s presidential race. Multiple Democratic sources, including one of the presidential campaigns, confirmed the app’s creator. 

State campaign finance records indicate the Iowa Democratic Party paid Shadow, a tech company owned by ACRONYM, more than $60,000 for “website development” over two installments in November and December of last year. A Democratic source with knowledge of the process said those payments were for the app that caucus site leaders were supposed to use to upload the results at their locales. 

ACRONYM founder Tara McGowan and a spokesman for the group did not immediately respond to phone calls requesting comment.

The Iowa Democratic Party had refused to reveal details about the app, including the company behind it and what security measures were being taken to safeguard the results, arguing that it made the technology more vulnerable to hackers. 

The app was supposed to make reporting the results easier and quicker. But on Monday, numerous Democrats in Iowa reported major problems in attempting to download the application and upload results, with many saying they resorted to calling the results into state party headquarters in Des Moines. 

As of 12:30 a.m. Tuesday morning, the party had not released any results from the caucuses, which were seen as a four-way battle between former Vice President Joe Biden, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

The Nevada Democratic Party, scheduled to hold the next Democratic caucus on Feb. 22, has also paid Shadow for website development. 

ACRONYM, which McGowan, a digital strategist, launched in the wake of the 2016 election, has become a growing part of the Democratic digital ecosystem. The group has raised tens of millions of dollars with a buzzy message about how Democrats have fallen behind in digital advertising. In 2018, the group funded an onslaught of ads on platforms like Facebook and Google.

The group launched a super PAC, PACRONYM, this year to mount a major digital effort attacking President Donald Trump, and won the backing of David Plouffe, who led Barack Obama’s victorious 2008 presidential campaign. PACRONYM reported raising $7.7 million in 2019.

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Biden targets Trump in Iowa caucus speech: ‘This is about ending an era’

Westlake Legal Group image Biden targets Trump in Iowa caucus speech: 'This is about ending an era' fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc Brooke Singman article a6342c2b-28aa-5fb8-b9b2-0093a0af19db

Former Vice President Joe Biden took on President Trump Monday night, telling voters that the 2020 presidential election is “about ending an era,” as Democrats were engaged in an hourslong wait for Iowa caucus results.

Despite frustration over the delays, Biden signaled confidence while casting the election as one of the most important in history.

“I want us to remember, not just tonight, but throughout this campaign, this is about ending an era — well, about ending an era, god-willing, of a president — this is bigger than any of us,” he said. “We cannot allow Donald Trump to be re-elected.”

He added: “Character is at stake on the ballot. That’s what this is. America is at stake — literally, democracy is at stake.”

Biden also said he was running for president to “rebuild the backbone of this country,” while slamming the Trump administration, and stating that working-class and middle-class families were “being hurt very badly by this administration.”

“We have to unify this country as well,” Biden said. “A president is supposed to heal as well as fight. I’m going to go all over this country, every part of this Democratic Party, and reunite its men, women, gays, straight, black, brown, a whole universe of people out there.”

Biden also teased the party about the delay in caucus results, saying he wanted “to make sure they’re very careful.”

BIDEN ADVISER ON CANDIDATE’S SCOLDING OF NBC REPORTER: ‘HE’S NOT GOING TO BACK DOWN’

“We’re going to walk out of here with our share of delegates,” he said. “We feel good about where we are, so, it’s onto New Hampshire! Nevada! South Carolina, and well beyond.”

He added: “We’re in this for the long haul.”

The Iowa Democratic Party reported its delays were due to “quality control.”

“The integrity of the results is paramount. We have experienced a delay in the results due to quality checks and the fact that the IDP is reporting out three data sets for the first time,” Iowa Democratic Party Communications Director Mandy McClure said in a statement Monday. “What we know right now is that around 25% of precincts have reported, and early data indicates turnout is on pace for 2016.”

Biden campaign general counsel Dana Remus penned a letter to leaders of the state party, calling them out for their handling and the “considerable flaws” of the caucuses Monday night.

“The app that was intended to relay caucus results to the party failed; the party’s back-up telephonic reporting system likewise has failed,” Remus wrote. “Now, we understand that caucus chairs are attempting to — and, in many cases, failing to — report results telephonically to the party.  These acute failures are occurring statewide.”

Remus also noted that all campaigns deserved “full explanations and relevant information regarding the methods of quality control” the party was employing, and that campaigns needed to be briefed and given a chance to respond prior to official results being released to the public.

Remus added: “In the meantime, we are on to New Hampshire, on the road to the most important election of our lifetimes.”

Later, a Biden campaign spokesperson confirmed to Fox News that the former vice president was en route to New Hampshire.

“I want to thank our incredible supporters and volunteers in Iowa–and all across the country,” he tweeted. “Now, it’s onto New Hampshire, Nevada, South Carolina, and beyond!”

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Despite the focus of Monday being on Iowa’s Democrats, Republicans in the state also caucused, delivering Trump his first victory of 2020.

Trump easily defeated his primary rivals—former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld and former Illinois Rep. Joe Walsh—with roughly 97 percent of the vote. The primary challengers walked away with about 1 percent each. Monday’s results also indicated that those attempting to take on Trump within his own party stood a very slim chance of making headway against the incumbent.

Fox News’ Allie Raffa contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group image Biden targets Trump in Iowa caucus speech: 'This is about ending an era' fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc Brooke Singman article a6342c2b-28aa-5fb8-b9b2-0093a0af19db   Westlake Legal Group image Biden targets Trump in Iowa caucus speech: 'This is about ending an era' fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc Brooke Singman article a6342c2b-28aa-5fb8-b9b2-0093a0af19db

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