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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 310)

Trump Supporters Upset He Won’t Be Acquitted Before State Of The Union Address

Some Donald Trump supporters are peeved the president won’t be cleared of wrongdoing by the Senate before he walks into the House of Representatives on Tuesday to deliver his annual State of the Union address. 

“It’s unacceptable that they’re going to have [the Senate impeachment vote] the following day after his State of the Union. And you know what they’re going to do…They’re going to have a counter-narrative to everything the president says,” disgraced former White House strategist Steve Bannon complained Sunday in an interview on Fox News.

“If I was the president, I’d say, ‘Hey look. Let’s do it the following Tuesday, let’s do it the night of New Hampshire. I’ll address the nation and see how they like that,’” Bannon added in the interview.

Senate Republicans hoped to move to a quick acquittal vote after successfully blocking witnesses and other evidence from his trial on Friday ― the first time in history a presidential impeachment trial will not feature witnesses.

But Democrats successfully pushed to prolong the proceedings for several days in order to allow time for both the House impeachment managers and Trump’s defense team to give closing arguments and to allow all senators an opportunity to speak on the floor before a final vote on removal on Wednesday afternoon.

“We are in the minority, but we do have some power in the minority and we will use it to prevent things from just being truncated in the dark of night,” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) told reporters on Friday before announcing a deal with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) that laid out the end of the trial.

Westlake Legal Group 5e38a358210000f900e1c5e8 Trump Supporters Upset He Won’t Be Acquitted Before State Of The Union Address

Brendan McDermid / Reuters U.S. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Chris Koons (D-Del) walk together prior to the resumption of the Senate impeachment trial of U.S. President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., Jan. 31, 2020. 

The terms of the agreement, which Trump reportedly signed off on, mean that the president will deliver his State of the Union speech on Tuesday before he is almost certainly acquitted by the Senate the following day. The schedule has created anxiety among some Republican senators about whether Trump will address his impeachment standing before the assembled Congress and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), who will be seated directly behind him.

The situation has left some Trump allies grumbling about Senate Republicans who agreed to the schedule, which they view as robbing the president of a golden opportunity to tout his acquittal not only during his State of the Union address, but also during the annual pre-Super Bowl interview that has become a tradition for recent presidents. 

Bannon agreed in his Fox News interview, saying Trump was “boxed in” by the schedule.

“Why in the world would the majority leader agree to run this thing through the State of the Union address?” Fox News host Lou Dobbs, a favorite of the president, asked last week.

Asked about the schedule on Sunday, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) acknowledged that Democrats stood in the way of a quick acquittal, attributing part of the reason to the Iowa caucuses on Monday.

“Well, the Democrats have the ability to drag out the trial. There was an agreement reached to do it Wednesday at 4 to allow some Democratic candidates to go to Iowa. I think that had a lot to do with it. But we’re going to turn the page on impeachment at 4 o-clock on Wednesday,” Graham said on Fox News.

The far-right outlet Gateway Pundit, however, pinned the blame on Senate Republicans for agreeing to the schedule.

“Once again the GOP let down President Trump. They could not let him have his VICTORY SPEECH at the State of the Union Address,” read a Sunday post on the website.

White House official Eric Ueland, meanwhile, attempted to cast the combination of the State of the Union and Trump’s acquittal in the Senate as a “happy coincidence” that will “launch the president into 2020.”

“You could argue that the State of the Union — that successful vision the president will layout — actually, occludes focus on impeachment,” Ueland said.

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The Gap Between the Haves and Have-Nots of Tech Widens

Westlake Legal Group 03google-facebookJumbo The Gap Between the Haves and Have-Nots of Tech Widens Computers and the Internet Company Reports Cloud Computing Apple Inc Amazon.com Inc Alphabet Inc

SAN FRANCISCO — When Google’s parent company, Alphabet, said on Monday that revenue at the company soared past $161 billion last year, it was a stark reminder of the widening gap between tech’s wealthiest outfits and the rest of the industry.

And there is little reason to believe that will change.

In the last two weeks, Microsoft, Apple and Amazon — like Alphabet, all flirting with a $1 trillion stock value on Wall Street — posted record results. The final member of tech’s Big Five, Facebook, which is a little more than halfway to a $1 trillion valuation, also reported strong earnings.

With each passing quarter, tech’s wealthiest companies are building on their power, making it harder for smaller outfits to compete and for entrepreneurs to build the next Google or Facebook.

Amazon and Microsoft are profiting from the shift to cloud computing. Apple continues to own the premium market for apps, smartphones and wearable devices, while Google and Facebook are maintaining their grip on digital advertising.

This gravitational pull toward a handful of companies could have far-reaching implications for the global economy. Few tech outfits can afford to make the investments necessary to keep pace with the giants. The rest? They often have to pay up for access to the giants’ many, many customers and technology.

“The strong are getting stronger, and the weak are getting weaker. It’s a market of haves and have-nots,” said Daniel Ives, managing director of equity research at Wedbush Securities. “In 20 years covering tech, it’s unlike anything I’ve ever seen.”

Despite saber-rattling in Washington and elsewhere, it is clear that regulatory and legal scrutiny of the tech industry’s most valuable companies so far has done little to hurt the bottom line. Last year’s financial results could lend more weight to arguments that a handful of companies, with dominant market shares and outgunned competition, are unfairly cashing in on their control.

Amazon, Apple, Alphabet, Microsoft and Facebook made a combined $55.2 billion in net profit in the most recent quarter. The next five most valuable tech companies made roughly $45.5 billion in their four most recent quarters. While Facebook is lagging behind the rest of the Big Five, it is still worth twice as much as the next most valuable company, Intel.

The picture is darker the further down tech’s food chain you go. A growing number of start-ups are cutting jobs to get their expenses under control. And older tech companies, still profitable but slowly losing influence, are struggling to adapt to the changing landscape.

As the rich get richer, they are also branching out. They are muscling aside or buying out rivals. And they are locking in the industry’s best engineers with paydays smaller companies could never match.

Amazon said last week that it had invested in the infrastructure needed to speed up shipping times for its Prime members to one day from two, raising the bar even higher for retail competitors. But Monday’s trading on Wall Street showed just how hard it is to stay in the trillion-dollar club. Despite its e-commerce and cloud-computing dominance, Amazon’s value dipped just a bit below $1 trillion.

Apple recently earmarked billions of dollars to create shows and movies for its video subscription service in a challenge to Netflix, while Alphabet agreed to buy the activity tracker Fitbit for $2.1 billion in November and the analytics software firm Looker for $2.6 billion in June.

“Today’s dominant companies have so much power across such a broad array of markets and continue to leverage that power to expand into new markets,” said Patrick Spence, chief executive of the speaker maker Sonos, at a congressional antitrust hearing last month in Boulder, Colo.

Sonos has sued Google, accusing Google of infringing on five of its patents, including technology that lets wireless speakers connect and synchronize with one another.

Tech’s richest companies seem to be defying a Wall Street assumption that as a company gets bigger, it becomes difficult to find new ways to make money and maintain rapid growth. Alphabet said profits in the last quarter of 2019 were 19 percent more than a year earlier. Revenue rose 17 percent to $46.1 billion, slightly below Wall Street expectations. The company’s stock fell 4 percent in after-hours trading

To assuage some concern about sluggishness in its main search ad business, Alphabet disclosed for the first time detailed revenue figures for its YouTube and cloud computing units, which are growing faster than the rest of the company. YouTube sold $15.1 billion worth of ads in 2019, up 36 percent, while its cloud unit grew more than 50 percent to $8.9 billion. Ad revenue from search increased 15 percent to $98.1 billion.

Gene Munster, a managing partner at Loup Ventures, a venture capital firm in Minneapolis, said it was harder than ever for new challengers because the top incumbents were so effective at “incremental evolution,” like Apple’s building subscription offerings to go with its hardware or Google’s branching out into cloud computing. The big tech companies skillfully move into new markets with lower prices and more money for marketing than their new competitors. In time, they take over.

The outsize nature of the profits at some of these companies has driven an explosion of wealth on the stock market.

The total value of Microsoft shares has risen nearly 70 percent over the last year, adding more than half a trillion dollars to the company’s market cap. Apple tacked on more than $550 billion in an 85 percent surge.

Alphabet’s rise of more than 30 percent has added more than $200 billion to its market cap. Amazon, which had a 20 percent jump, has been something of a laggard but still added roughly $200 billion to its market cap.

The large technology firms that dominate the public stock markets are at the extreme edge of a broader trend in American corporate life. Over the last half-century, the biggest American companies have captured a fatter share of profits produced by public companies, according to research from Kathleen M. Kahle, a University of Arizona finance professor, and René M. Stulz, an economist at Ohio State University.

In 1975, the top 100 public companies snared about 49 percent of the earnings of all public companies. By 2015, that share had jumped to 84 percent, their research showed. They have not updated their numbers since then, but Ms. Kahle, in an email exchange, said she doubted the numbers had decreased.

“There are a lot of small, unprofitable firms and a handful of large, very profitable ones,” Ms. Kahle wrote in an email.

Mr. Ives foresees the five companies competing for $2 trillion in new technology spending over the coming years. It will be hard for the rest of the industry to match that.

“Over the last few years, you’ve seen a fork in the road between the winners and the losers,” he said.

Daisuke Wakabayashi reported from San Francisco, and Matt Phillips from New York.

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Live Updates Ahead of the Iowa Caucuses

  • The Iowa presidential caucuses begin at 8 p.m. Eastern time at more than 1,600 sites across the state. The caucuses vary in length; small gatherings can be over in minutes, larger ones can last up to two hours.

  • The first results are expected as early as 8:30 p.m. Eastern time, with most results in hand by 11 p.m., though the outcomes of some satellite caucuses have begun trickling in.

  • Seven Democratic candidates are mounting competitive campaigns in Iowa. They are Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusets, former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, the former tech executive Andrew Yang and the former hedge fund investor Tom Steyer.

  • There will also be Republican caucuses, which President Trump is expected to win handily.

  • Polls show an exceptionally fluid race among Mr. Sanders, Mr. Biden, Ms. Warren and Mr. Buttigieg, with Ms. Klobuchar trailing.

  • There are 41 delegates up for grabs, a tiny number considering a candidate needs 1,991 delegates to win the party’s presidential nomination. But Iowa is all about political momentum heading into the next contest: the New Hampshire primary on Feb. 11.

  • The New York Times will have the latest caucus results, comprehensive visual graphics and live political analysis and news coverage by 13 reporters across Iowa.

Be prepared for Iowa caucus night. Subscribe to “On Politics,” and we’ll send you a link to our live coverage.

DES MOINES — After more than a year of campaigning, the Democratic presidential primary gets underway Monday night in Iowa — and the race is nearly as muddled as when it began.

With many voters split along ideological and generational lines, and others still undecided because they were not sure who would be their best chance to defeat President Trump, any of the four leading candidates could plausibly win Iowa.

Those four candidates — Mr. Sanders, Ms. Warren, Mr. Biden and Mr. Buttigieg — campaigned across Iowa over the weekend, making their final pitches to voters and, in some cases, reigniting divisions that had surfaced in the party four years ago. Mr. Sanders, considered the one to beat based on recent polling, drew most of the fire.

Much of the uncertainty heading into Monday night stems from the unique nature of Iowa’s caucus system. Attendees can rally behind another candidate on a second ballot if their preferred choice does not claim 15 percent in the initial round.

It is those voters who will play the most pivotal role Monday. Mr. Sanders, for example, might garner the most overall votes on the first ballot, but if one of his rivals could amass enough support from the lesser candidates, he or she could vault past Mr. Sanders on the realignment round.

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How the Iowa Caucuses Work

On Monday, Democrats will make their choice for the Democratic presidential nominees at more than 1,600 precincts across Iowa. Here is how that will play out in one middle school gym.

The key question, then, is where do the backers of Ms. Klobuchar, Mr. Steyer and Mr. Yang, who have all been polling below 15 percent, go on that second vote?

But it gets even more complicated. Caucusgoers can also stand as “Uncommitted.” So those most determined fence sitters could emerge as power brokers on the second ballot.

Welcome to Iowa — and hang on.

If you’re already following our results page, you may have been surprised to see some results already trickling in.

That’s because, while the caucuses don’t officially start until 8 p.m. Eastern time, some satellite caucuses — some of which are overseas, in France and Scotland, for instance — have already concluded.

But take the results with enough grains of salt to cover a road in an Iowa blizzard. Fewer than 200 people participated in the satellite caucuses that are reporting results, and we’re expecting more than 200,000 people to caucus in total tonight.

It’s been a year since Pete Buttigieg began his presidential campaign and 10 days since he’s been stumping nonstop in the run-up to Monday night’s Iowa caucuses, so he could be forgiven for not quite knowing what was happening.

“Happy caucus day,” the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., told a crowd of excited supporters at a canvass kickoff Monday morning in West Des Moines. “It feels so great out there I don’t even know what time it is. We’ve done so many interviews. Everything comes down to today.”

Mr. Buttigieg spent much of the last week in rural Iowa, drawing large crowds in sparsely populated counties that carry a disproportionate share of the state’s delegates. He’s built a strong organization to ferret out every supporter across the state: in rural Jasper County on Sunday Mr. Buttigieg had 75 volunteers canvassing for him while Mr. Biden had just two, officials said.

He has bet his campaign on a strong finish, and no candidate has more riding on Iowa’s result than him. If he places first or second — or at least ahead of Mr. Biden — he will have an argument to be the party establishment’s alternative to Mr. Sanders.

But if not, he could be in big trouble.

Mr. Buttigieg has spent down nearly all of his campaign war chest on Iowa and New Hampshire, with another $2 million on TV ads in South Carolina, where his poll numbers have barely budged. It’s left him being outspent on Iowa TV in the final week before the caucuses. If he doesn’t post a strong finish in Iowa, his path becomes far narrower.

Iowa Democrats are expecting a record caucus participation Monday night, with turnout potentially topping the 240,000 who caucused in 2008. Estimates of the statewide caucusgoer universe from the campaigns, party officials and Iowa elected Democrats range between 225,000 and 300,000.

One of the biggest unknowns — the weather — is expected to be favorable for a large turnout: it is clear and not too cold across the state, at least not for February in Iowa. As party officials came to grips in recent weeks with the prospect of a larger turnout than any of them had anticipated, they scrambled to secure larger locations for their caucus precincts.

In Dallas County, a western Des Moines suburb that is the fifth-fastest growing county in the country, Bryce Smith, the Democratic county chairman, said Monday that he expected between 45 and 50 percent of registered Democrats to participate; that’s up from about 30 percent in 2016.

Two weeks ago, Mr. Smith had to relocate a precinct when officials at the community college that hosted it in 2016 said it could not accommodate more than 200 people.

Mr. Smith, with help from the Iowa Democratic Party, found an alternative — a nearby venue that had been reserved by one of the presidential campaigns for its own caucus night event. “It’s going to be tight, it’s going to be crowded,” Mr. Smith said. “That’s the whole point. The rooms are meant to be full.”

Molly Cook, 26, had the flu this past week, but she wasn’t upset about that. “I was mad I couldn’t do door-knocking,” she said, a few minutes before Representative Joaquin Castro of Texas came through the door to rev up a roomful of Elizabeth Warren supporters for a few final hours of canvassing.

The house — Ms. Warren’s Sherman Hill field office — belonged to Michael Tallman, who just moved in with his husband two weekends ago and ended up hosting Ms. Warren herself on Sunday.

“Iowa’s crazy and things happen,” Mr. Tallman said to laughter before turning more serious.

As he watched Ms. Warren’s campaign, he said, his vision for the country “became less of a dream and more of a plan.”

Around 1:15, Mr. Castro arrived for a quick pep talk.

“Y’all know that this is going to be a close race today,” he said before the volunteers swarmed out the front door with canvassing packets. “Every effort we make in the remaining hours to convince folks to caucus for Senator Warren can make a difference.”

One of the more consequential sub-primaries of Monday’s contest is the race between Ms. Warren and Mr. Sanders to become the progressive standard-bearer in the 2020 contest.

Mr. Sanders and Ms. Warren recently clashed over a private remark that she said he had made in 2018 — telling her a woman could not win the White House — and that he denied. For the most part, though, these two leading liberals in the race have stayed away from direct confrontation for the last year.

That has partly been strategic. Mr. Sanders has a solid base and Ms. Warren has sought to first grow her support without trying to take directly from him.

But make no mistake: the path to the Democratic nomination for both candidates involves eventually consolidating the base of the other, if not driving them from the race entirely.

And the first part of that primary within the primary begins on Monday.

Whoever finishes first in Iowa will then have momentum — and likely a financial boost — heading into New Hampshire and beyond.

One of the biggest predictors of who will finish first, second and third will be not just who votes but also how old those voters are.

Age has been one of the biggest divides in the 2020 race, especially between supporters of Mr. Biden and Mr. Sanders. Young voters have generally swooned for Mr. Sanders and old voters have flocked to Mr. Biden.

The New York Times/Siena College poll last month showed Mr. Sanders carrying a sizable 40 percent of voters under the age of 30. That was the highest percentage for any candidate for any age group. Support for the Vermont senator declined in each successively older age bracket down to single digits — 9 percent — among those who were 65 or older.

It was the opposite story for Mr. Biden, who captured a 32 percent plurality of those who were 65 or older. His worst group was younger voters under 30. He only carried 10 percent of such voters.

The same split has been present in poll after poll. The Des Moines Register/CNN poll in early January showed Mr. Sanders with 38 percent of voters under 50 — and Mr. Biden with 37 percent of voters over 65.

Typically, older people are more reliable voters. But caucuses are different, as our colleague Nate Cohn recently pointed out, and many of the differences in polls can be traced to different projected models of who will actually turn out on Monday.

The leaders of Iowa’s county Democrats are a group that has long been in search of a candidate to fall in love with. Since 2018, they have harbored suspicions about septuagenarian candidates and have longed for somebody fresh and new.

And now many of them think that Mr. Sanders, aged 78 and a member of Congress for three decades, is going to win the Iowa caucuses.

In conversations this weekend with 24 of 99 county chairs, 14 said they believed Mr. Sanders would place first in Monday night’s caucuses. Six predicted Mr. Biden would win, while four said they still could not say who would win.

“I suspect that Bernie will end up in first place, as the polling indicates,” said Nathan Thompson, the party chairman in Winneshiek County. “It’s consistent with what I’ve seen in northeast Iowa.”

Several acknowledged that their favorite candidate was not likely to win.

Marjie Foster, the Decatur County chairwoman, said she planned to caucus for Ms. Klobuchar but predicted she would finish behind Mr. Sanders and Mr. Buttigieg.

Terry Kocher, the Humboldt County chairman, said he expected Mr. Biden to win but was hoping that Mr. Buttigieg, for whom he will caucus, did well.

And Rachel Bly, a co-chairwoman in Poweshiek County east of Des Moines, predicted a split decision, with one candidate taking the most delegates and another winning the most raw votes.

“Sanders has pockets of support, but won’t necessarily carry the rural areas or get delegates in as many places as some of the others,” she said. “He may win the numbers game, but not the delegate game.”

Maggie Astor contributed reporting.

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US ratifies 15th Amendment: This Day in History

On this day in history, in 1870, the U.S. Congress ratified the 15th Amendment, which granted African American men the right to vote.

Spearheaded by Republicans in Congress, the 15th Amendment was ratified in 1869, four years after the end of the American Civil War.

Westlake Legal Group A000EF0E-1DD8-B71B-0B58B13F84D84D74 US ratifies 15th Amendment: This Day in History fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc d86b045b-a6d1-51b0-b99b-cccfefaa0e1e Bradford Betz article

President Lyndon Johnson signing the Voting Rights Act which enforced the 15th Amendment.  (nps.gov)

It followed the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery in the United States, and the 14th Amendment, which granted citizenship to African Americans.

Though the trio of amendments appeared to signify a promise of equal rights to African Americans, it represented the beginning of a new struggle that has lasted for more than a century.

Jim Crow laws, which ensured a system of segregation based on race, were enacted throughout the South and remained in place until the 1960s. Under these laws, African Americans were reduced to second-class citizens.

FLORIDA SUPREME COURT SIDES WITH DESANTIS, RULES CONVICTED FELONS MUST PAY OFF FINES BEFORE VOTING

In 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson urged Congress to pass legislation that would enforce the 15th Amendment. He told Congress: “We cannot have government for all the people until we first make certain it is government of and by all the people.”

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President Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act into law on Aug. 6, 1965. The Act outlawed discriminatory voting practices, like literacy tests and grandfather clauses, that had been in place since the Civil War. Congress extended the law in 1970, 1975 and 1982.

Westlake Legal Group A000EF0E-1DD8-B71B-0B58B13F84D84D74 US ratifies 15th Amendment: This Day in History fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc d86b045b-a6d1-51b0-b99b-cccfefaa0e1e Bradford Betz article   Westlake Legal Group A000EF0E-1DD8-B71B-0B58B13F84D84D74 US ratifies 15th Amendment: This Day in History fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc d86b045b-a6d1-51b0-b99b-cccfefaa0e1e Bradford Betz article

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Vatican responds to coronavirus outbreak by giving China hundreds of thousands of masks

Westlake Legal Group AP20034140118001 Vatican responds to coronavirus outbreak by giving China hundreds of thousands of masks Louis Casiano fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/religion/vatican fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/health fnc article 8e5d9f35-14ea-5961-a826-ac8ed95b8bcd

The Vatican has sent hundreds of thousands of protective masks to China amid the coronavirus outbreak that has killed hundreds and sent Chinese officials scrambling to contain the illness.

The Catholic News Service reported that the Vatican has sent up to 700,000 masks to China beginning last month.

“The masks are destined to the provinces of Hubei, Zhejiang and Fujian,” the press office told the CNS. “It is a joint initiative of the Office of Papal Charities and the Chinese Church in Italy, in collaboration with the Vatican pharmacy.”

HOW DANGEROUS IS CORONAVIRUS?

Some of the masks were sent to Hubei, the province that has become the epicenter of the coronavirus, the Vatican News reported. More than 360 people have died from the illness and 17,000 people have been sickened worldwide as of Monday.

China has responded by issuing widespread quarantines, quickly building hospitals and enacting travel restrictions. The United States has confirmed 11 coronavirus cases.

Last week, some pharmacies across the U.S. reportedly sold out of masks as the coronavirus was in the midst of spreading beyond China’s borders.

Nearly 200 Americans were evacuated from Wuhan, the city where the virus began, last week. Evacuees are subject to a 14-day quarantine where they will be monitored for symptoms.

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U.S. officials last week declared a public health emergency and said some travelers would be temporarily banned from entering the country.

Westlake Legal Group AP20034140118001 Vatican responds to coronavirus outbreak by giving China hundreds of thousands of masks Louis Casiano fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/religion/vatican fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/health fnc article 8e5d9f35-14ea-5961-a826-ac8ed95b8bcd   Westlake Legal Group AP20034140118001 Vatican responds to coronavirus outbreak by giving China hundreds of thousands of masks Louis Casiano fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/religion/vatican fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/health fnc article 8e5d9f35-14ea-5961-a826-ac8ed95b8bcd

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House Threatens to Subpoena Betsy DeVos for Attending Trump Re-Election Events Instead of Testifying

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Lou Diamond Phillips recalls Ritchie Valens’ sister breaking down on the set of ‘La Bamba’

Lou Diamond Phillips can still vividly recall the one moment filming “La Bamba” that forever changed his life.

The biopic, released in 1987, tells the story of singer Ritchie Valens who died in a small plane crash near Clear Lake, Iowa, on Feb. 3, 1959, alongside Buddy Holly and J.P. “The Big Bopper” Richardson. Through Don McLean’s 1971 hit song “American Pie,” that tragic date would become known as “The Day the Music Died.”

Valens, who was 17 at the time, was a rock ‘n’ roll pioneer who captivated teens with songs like “Donna” and “La Bamba.” Phillips played the late star, a role many fans still recognize him for.

Phillips, now 57, told Fox News it was crucial to get the final moments of Valens’ life “right” for the big screen.

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“The scene of Ritchie getting on the plane was probably the one event that really brought it all home,” he explained. “His sister Connie [Lemos], who I’m still in contact with, came to the set that day. Our producer warned her not to do that because it would probably be too emotional for her. And it was. But she wanted to be there.

“She came up to me on set and said, ‘Can I say something to you, Lou?’” Phillips recalled. “It was interesting because we had been shooting for weeks and [his family] never called me Lou. They always called me Ritchie. I thought, ‘Oh my, there must be something wrong because she’s calling me Lou, not Ritchie.’ I thought maybe I had done something to offend her. But I said, ‘Of course, Connie.’”

At the time, Phillips was still getting touched up in the makeup chair before filming the emotional scene. And once he got up, Lemos completely broke down.

“Connie just fell apart,” he said. “She started weeping and then collapsed into me. She kept saying over and over again, ‘Why did you go? Why did you have to go?’ It was this moment, this catharsis for her that was, I don’t know, 30 years in the making. She was 12 years old, so therefore she was fully capable of understanding what had happened to her brother and felt the full impact of his loss. She carried that lack of closure for 30 years.”

FORMER TEEN IDOL LEIF GARRETT EXPLAINS DESCENT INTO HARD DRUGS: ‘THERE HAS ALWAYS BEEN MORE TO MY STORY’

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-74002026 Lou Diamond Phillips recalls Ritchie Valens’ sister breaking down on the set of ‘La Bamba’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/rock fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 04b2d442-c1d8-509f-af02-e2687e834178

Ritchie Valens (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

RONNIE WOOD’S EX-WIFE JO WOOD RECALLS PHOTOGRAPHING THE ROLLING STONES OVER THE YEARS: ‘THEY DIDN’T NOTICE’

“At that moment, I realized this isn’t just another role,” he continued. “This is something that meant something and continues to mean something for his family. And maybe that’s why people still love the film and are still affected by it. Because it really, really goes straight to the heart.”

The Winter Dance Party tour, which kicked off on Jan. 24, 1959, had opened the previous night at George Devine’s Ballroom in Milwaukee. Despite a successful encore performance in Kenosha, the grueling, nonstop tour was plagued with freezing temperatures and broken-down buses.

The final straw was when a bus stalled in Duluth, Minn. Holly’s drummer, Carl Bunch, was hospitalized due to frostbite on his feet.

An exhausted and frustrated Holly refused to step foot on another bus. The bands rocked the Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake, Iowa, before Holly, then 22, booked the next flight he could find to the tour’s next stop in Moorhead, Minn.

HUMPHREY BOGART’S EX-WIFE MAYO METHOT STRUGGLED TO BOUNCE BACK IN HOLLYWOOD AFTER DIVORCE, BOOK CLAIMS

Westlake Legal Group DayMusicDied020320 Lou Diamond Phillips recalls Ritchie Valens’ sister breaking down on the set of ‘La Bamba’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/rock fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 04b2d442-c1d8-509f-af02-e2687e834178

In this Friday, Jan. 9, 2009 file photo, flowers adorn a memorial at the spot where the plane carrying Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J.P. “The Big Bopper” Richardson crashed, killing all aboard on Feb. 3, 1959, near Clear Lake, Iowa. The three young singers were in a single-engine aircraft flying in a light snowstorm in 1959 when the pilot apparently lost control. Holly decided to fly because his tour bus was having heating problems. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)

DEAN MARTIN’S DAUGHTER DEANA RECALLS GROWING UP WITH ‘THE KING OF COOL,’ THE RAT PACK AND JERRY LEWIS

Tommy Allsup, a member of Holly’s band, flipped a coin to see whether he or Valens would get a seat on the plane. He lost and took a bus to the next stop on the tour.

The chartered plane, which carried Holly, Valens, Richardson, 28, as well as pilot Roger Peterson, crashed shortly after takeoff, killing all four people aboard.

Phillips said he’s grateful longtime fans still praise the film, as well as Valens’ legacy, and that new, curious visitors are discovering it all for the first time decades later.

“I will never resent the amount of love that ‘La Bamba’ gets,” he said. “It put me on the map. It was my Cinderella story. Even though it’s an ‘80s film set in the ‘50s, it still feels timeless. People are rediscovering it all the time. It’s a true story. Therefore, it touches people’s hearts in a way that a lot of fictionalized stories don’t. It hasn’t gone away — not that I would ever want it to go away. People who saw the film at ages 18, 19 are now showing it to their kids. It’s replayed on television all the time. It’s a film that will never go away. People are continuing to love it. And I’m grateful it gave me this opportunity to meet Valens’ family.”

LIBERACE TOLD ELVIS PRESLEY HE NEEDED ‘MORE GLITZ’ IN HIS SHOWS BEFORE LAS VEGAS TRANSFORMATION, BOOK CLAIMS

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1124548134 Lou Diamond Phillips recalls Ritchie Valens’ sister breaking down on the set of ‘La Bamba’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/rock fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 04b2d442-c1d8-509f-af02-e2687e834178

Rock ‘n’ roll singer Ritchie Valens poses for a photo during the filming of ‘Go, Johnny, Go!’ on January 20, 1959, in Los Angeles, California. ((Photo by Richard C. Miller/Donaldson Collection/Getty Images)

JANIS JOPLIN ENJOYED ‘THE MANY PLEASURES THAT CAME HER WAY’ TO COPE WITH INSECURITIES, BOOK CLAIMS

Back in 2017, Lemos told LA Weekly Valens’ family has become devoted to keeping his legacy alive.

“He was a big brother,” she said. “He teased you, he chased you and he watched over you. But since my mom worked, he was also a father figure; he fed us, he entertained us, watched over us.”

And as a budding star, Valens not only remained loyal to his family, but he was eager to give them a better life as his success grew. According to the outlet, Valens wrote 22 of the 33 songs he recorded in his brief lifetime.

‘30S STAR THELMA TODD ‘WAS BECOMING’ TIRED ‘OF HOLLYWOOD’ BEFORE HER MYSTERIOUS DEATH, BOOK CLAIMS

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-74299591 Lou Diamond Phillips recalls Ritchie Valens’ sister breaking down on the set of ‘La Bamba’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/rock fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 04b2d442-c1d8-509f-af02-e2687e834178

Ritchie Valens (Richard Steven Valenzuela) and president of Del-Fi Records Bob Keane on a TV show in 1958 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

MARY TYLER MOORE WAS ‘DEVASTATED,’ PLAGUED WITH GUILT OVER HER SON’S TRAGIC DEATH, BOOK CLAIMS

“When he bought us the house, we all drove up, parked outside, and I couldn’t believe it,” she recalled at the time. “It was monumental, for people in our position. I said, ‘We are going to live here? It’s like a castle!’ That was the happiest day in my mom’s life, but it also was the saddest, because she really couldn’t live there after he died. She’d rather have him alive, with us.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-129090576 Lou Diamond Phillips recalls Ritchie Valens’ sister breaking down on the set of ‘La Bamba’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/rock fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 04b2d442-c1d8-509f-af02-e2687e834178   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-129090576 Lou Diamond Phillips recalls Ritchie Valens’ sister breaking down on the set of ‘La Bamba’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/rock fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 04b2d442-c1d8-509f-af02-e2687e834178

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Lou Diamond Phillips recalls Ritchie Valens’ sister breaking down on the set of ‘La Bamba’

Lou Diamond Phillips can still vividly recall the one moment filming “La Bamba” that forever changed his life.

The biopic, released in 1987, tells the story of singer Ritchie Valens who died in a small plane crash near Clear Lake, Iowa, on Feb. 3, 1959, alongside Buddy Holly and J.P. “The Big Bopper” Richardson. Through Don McLean’s 1971 hit song “American Pie,” that tragic date would become known as “The Day the Music Died.”

Valens, who was 17 at the time, was a rock ‘n’ roll pioneer who captivated teens with songs like “Donna” and “La Bamba.” Phillips played the late star, a role many fans still recognize him for.

Phillips, now 57, told Fox News it was crucial to get the final moments of Valens’ life “right” for the big screen.

ANNA NICOLE SMITH’S EX-BOYFRIEND LARRY BIRKHEAD RECALLS LAST TIME HE SPOKE TO LATE PLAYMATE

‘REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE’ STAR SAL MINEO WAS ‘ON A GOOD ROAD’ BEFORE HORRIFIC MURDER, AUTHOR SAYS

“The scene of Ritchie getting on the plane was probably the one event that really brought it all home,” he explained. “His sister Connie [Lemos], who I’m still in contact with, came to the set that day. Our producer warned her not to do that because it would probably be too emotional for her. And it was. But she wanted to be there.

“She came up to me on set and said, ‘Can I say something to you, Lou?’” Phillips recalled. “It was interesting because we had been shooting for weeks and [his family] never called me Lou. They always called me Ritchie. I thought, ‘Oh my, there must be something wrong because she’s calling me Lou, not Ritchie.’ I thought maybe I had done something to offend her. But I said, ‘Of course, Connie.’”

At the time, Phillips was still getting touched up in the makeup chair before filming the emotional scene. And once he got up, Lemos completely broke down.

“Connie just fell apart,” he said. “She started weeping and then collapsed into me. She kept saying over and over again, ‘Why did you go? Why did you have to go?’ It was this moment, this catharsis for her that was, I don’t know, 30 years in the making. She was 12 years old, so therefore she was fully capable of understanding what had happened to her brother and felt the full impact of his loss. She carried that lack of closure for 30 years.”

FORMER TEEN IDOL LEIF GARRETT EXPLAINS DESCENT INTO HARD DRUGS: ‘THERE HAS ALWAYS BEEN MORE TO MY STORY’

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-74002026 Lou Diamond Phillips recalls Ritchie Valens’ sister breaking down on the set of ‘La Bamba’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/rock fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 04b2d442-c1d8-509f-af02-e2687e834178

Ritchie Valens (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

RONNIE WOOD’S EX-WIFE JO WOOD RECALLS PHOTOGRAPHING THE ROLLING STONES OVER THE YEARS: ‘THEY DIDN’T NOTICE’

“At that moment, I realized this isn’t just another role,” he continued. “This is something that meant something and continues to mean something for his family. And maybe that’s why people still love the film and are still affected by it. Because it really, really goes straight to the heart.”

The Winter Dance Party tour, which kicked off on Jan. 24, 1959, had opened the previous night at George Devine’s Ballroom in Milwaukee. Despite a successful encore performance in Kenosha, the grueling, nonstop tour was plagued with freezing temperatures and broken-down buses.

The final straw was when a bus stalled in Duluth, Minn. Holly’s drummer, Carl Bunch, was hospitalized due to frostbite on his feet.

An exhausted and frustrated Holly refused to step foot on another bus. The bands rocked the Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake, Iowa, before Holly, then 22, booked the next flight he could find to the tour’s next stop in Moorhead, Minn.

HUMPHREY BOGART’S EX-WIFE MAYO METHOT STRUGGLED TO BOUNCE BACK IN HOLLYWOOD AFTER DIVORCE, BOOK CLAIMS

Westlake Legal Group DayMusicDied020320 Lou Diamond Phillips recalls Ritchie Valens’ sister breaking down on the set of ‘La Bamba’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/rock fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 04b2d442-c1d8-509f-af02-e2687e834178

In this Friday, Jan. 9, 2009 file photo, flowers adorn a memorial at the spot where the plane carrying Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J.P. “The Big Bopper” Richardson crashed, killing all aboard on Feb. 3, 1959, near Clear Lake, Iowa. The three young singers were in a single-engine aircraft flying in a light snowstorm in 1959 when the pilot apparently lost control. Holly decided to fly because his tour bus was having heating problems. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)

DEAN MARTIN’S DAUGHTER DEANA RECALLS GROWING UP WITH ‘THE KING OF COOL,’ THE RAT PACK AND JERRY LEWIS

Tommy Allsup, a member of Holly’s band, flipped a coin to see whether he or Valens would get a seat on the plane. He lost and took a bus to the next stop on the tour.

The chartered plane, which carried Holly, Valens, Richardson, 28, as well as pilot Roger Peterson, crashed shortly after takeoff, killing all four people aboard.

Phillips said he’s grateful longtime fans still praise the film, as well as Valens’ legacy, and that new, curious visitors are discovering it all for the first time decades later.

“I will never resent the amount of love that ‘La Bamba’ gets,” he said. “It put me on the map. It was my Cinderella story. Even though it’s an ‘80s film set in the ‘50s, it still feels timeless. People are rediscovering it all the time. It’s a true story. Therefore, it touches people’s hearts in a way that a lot of fictionalized stories don’t. It hasn’t gone away — not that I would ever want it to go away. People who saw the film at ages 18, 19 are now showing it to their kids. It’s replayed on television all the time. It’s a film that will never go away. People are continuing to love it. And I’m grateful it gave me this opportunity to meet Valens’ family.”

LIBERACE TOLD ELVIS PRESLEY HE NEEDED ‘MORE GLITZ’ IN HIS SHOWS BEFORE LAS VEGAS TRANSFORMATION, BOOK CLAIMS

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1124548134 Lou Diamond Phillips recalls Ritchie Valens’ sister breaking down on the set of ‘La Bamba’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/rock fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 04b2d442-c1d8-509f-af02-e2687e834178

Rock ‘n’ roll singer Ritchie Valens poses for a photo during the filming of ‘Go, Johnny, Go!’ on January 20, 1959, in Los Angeles, California. ((Photo by Richard C. Miller/Donaldson Collection/Getty Images)

JANIS JOPLIN ENJOYED ‘THE MANY PLEASURES THAT CAME HER WAY’ TO COPE WITH INSECURITIES, BOOK CLAIMS

Back in 2017, Lemos told LA Weekly Valens’ family has become devoted to keeping his legacy alive.

“He was a big brother,” she said. “He teased you, he chased you and he watched over you. But since my mom worked, he was also a father figure; he fed us, he entertained us, watched over us.”

And as a budding star, Valens not only remained loyal to his family, but he was eager to give them a better life as his success grew. According to the outlet, Valens wrote 22 of the 33 songs he recorded in his brief lifetime.

‘30S STAR THELMA TODD ‘WAS BECOMING’ TIRED ‘OF HOLLYWOOD’ BEFORE HER MYSTERIOUS DEATH, BOOK CLAIMS

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-74299591 Lou Diamond Phillips recalls Ritchie Valens’ sister breaking down on the set of ‘La Bamba’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/rock fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 04b2d442-c1d8-509f-af02-e2687e834178

Ritchie Valens (Richard Steven Valenzuela) and president of Del-Fi Records Bob Keane on a TV show in 1958 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

MARY TYLER MOORE WAS ‘DEVASTATED,’ PLAGUED WITH GUILT OVER HER SON’S TRAGIC DEATH, BOOK CLAIMS

“When he bought us the house, we all drove up, parked outside, and I couldn’t believe it,” she recalled at the time. “It was monumental, for people in our position. I said, ‘We are going to live here? It’s like a castle!’ That was the happiest day in my mom’s life, but it also was the saddest, because she really couldn’t live there after he died. She’d rather have him alive, with us.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-129090576 Lou Diamond Phillips recalls Ritchie Valens’ sister breaking down on the set of ‘La Bamba’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/rock fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 04b2d442-c1d8-509f-af02-e2687e834178   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-129090576 Lou Diamond Phillips recalls Ritchie Valens’ sister breaking down on the set of ‘La Bamba’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/rock fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 04b2d442-c1d8-509f-af02-e2687e834178

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Jesse Watters ‘can’t stop thinking about the box’ at center of Trump-Bloomberg feud

Westlake Legal Group Trump-Bloomberg_AP Jesse Watters 'can't stop thinking about the box' at center of Trump-Bloomberg feud Yael Halon fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 3a382e2c-5603-58a7-b8f4-6015cffa25f7

The Five” hosts responded to the ongoing feud between President Trump and former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg Monday after Trump mocked the Democratic candidate’s height during a Super Bowl LIV pregame interview with Sean Hannity.

“I do not think there is a box, but I can’t stop thinking about the box. Is it wood? Is it steel?” co-host Jesse Watters joked in reference to Trump’s claim that Bloomberg had requested to stand on a box if he qualifies for the next Democratic debate.

TRUMP, BLOOMBERG FIGHT HEATS UP

“The thing is,” Watters continued,” [is] that Trump just started a rumor … and the media just runs with it. They are doing the dirty work for him. This is what he does. He accuses [his] opponent of having a shortcoming and the media reports about the … shortcoming and then the opponent denies he has a shortcoming, but the whole time we are talking about the shortcoming.”

Trump went after Bloomberg in a series of tweets over the weekend, calling him “Mini Mike” and claiming that he requested to “stand on boxes, or a lift, during the debates.” In his interview with Hannity Sunday, Trump doubled down on his attacks on the billionaire’s height, questioning whether allowing him a platform to stand on would be fair to the other candidates.

TRUMP WARNS 2020 DEMS THAT BLOOMBERG WILL TURN HIS BACK ON THEM

“You know, now he wants a box for the debates to stand on. OK? It’s OK, there’s nothing wrong,” Trump said. “You can be short. Why should he get a box to stand on, OK? He wants a box for the debates. Why should he be entitled to that? Really. Does that mean everyone else gets a box?”

Bloomberg fired back Sunday night denying Trump’s claims, saying he “stands twice as tall as he does on the stage that matters.” He also called Trump a “pathological liar who lies about his fake hair, obesity and spray-on tan.”

“There’s something brilliant about the fact that the question isn’t ‘Is there a box?’ the question is, ‘Is it fair that he has a box and other people don’t?” Greg Gutfeld said.

Gutfeld offered one of his popular analogies, saying Trump utilizes the media “like a T-shirt cannon.”

“He puts this visual message on the shirt, Bloomberg on a box and he fires it into the media and you have half the media, [like] CNN who falls for it and writes, ‘There is no box.’

“They get all freaked out,” he continued, “while we are sitting here laughing at it because we know that this is how the show works and getting the media riled up … is all he is trying to do.”

TRUMP PLAYS WORD ASSOCIATION WITH HANNITY IN SUPER BOWL INTERVIEW

Co-host Juan Williams said the president’s “punching down” of Bloomberg may actually help the Democratic hopeful and give his candidacy “more oxygen.”

“I do see that the president is punching down at Michael Bloomberg and unintentionally elevating Mike Bloomberg,” he explained.

“Are you calling Mike Bloomberg short?” guest host Katie Pavlich cut in.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“That’s an easy retort, but that’s not what I meant,” Williams fired back. “He’s the president of the United States and Mike Bloomberg is not even in Iowa. He’s not running ads in Iowa, and the president’s attention is giving more oxygen to Mike Bloomberg’s candidacy.”

Westlake Legal Group Trump-Bloomberg_AP Jesse Watters 'can't stop thinking about the box' at center of Trump-Bloomberg feud Yael Halon fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 3a382e2c-5603-58a7-b8f4-6015cffa25f7   Westlake Legal Group Trump-Bloomberg_AP Jesse Watters 'can't stop thinking about the box' at center of Trump-Bloomberg feud Yael Halon fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 3a382e2c-5603-58a7-b8f4-6015cffa25f7

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LIVE UPDATES: Iowa Debacle Drags On

Westlake Legal Group 5e38a60b220000560723e4d8 LIVE UPDATES: Iowa Debacle Drags On

The Iowa caucuses took place Monday, marking the first major test for 2020 presidential hopefuls.

Democrats who are competitive in Iowa include former Vice President Joe Biden; former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg; entrepreneur Andrew Yang; billionaire activist Tom Steyer; and Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Elizabeth Warren (Mass.) and Amy Klobuchar (Minn.).

But Tuesday morning ― hours after the caucuses ended ― there still were no results. The Iowa Democratic Party said the system to report results hadn’t worked, and officials expected to have “numbers to report” later in the day. 

President Donald Trump won the Republican caucuses mostly unopposed.

Read more on how the caucuses work here

Read live updates from the caucuses below:

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