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How Elijah Cummings’ unexpected death could affect the impeachment inquiry

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close How Elijah Cummings' unexpected death could affect the impeachment inquiry

Democratic and Republican leaders in Washington expressed their condolences following the death of Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland. He died early Thursday at age 68. (Oct. 17) AP, AP

WASHINGTON – The unexpected death Thursday of Rep. Elijah Cummings has meant the loss of a key Democratic leader, an eloquent voice for and confidante of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi who played a central figure in the House’s ongoing impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

Cummings, who served as chairman of the powerful House Oversight and Reform Committee, will be succeeded by New York Democrat Carolyn Maloney on an acting basis. And there’s no indication that the inquiry, now in its fourth week, is slowing down amid the tragedy.

Pelosi said the House is continuing to gather evidence and talk to witnesses as it investigates efforts by Trump to pressure the Ukrainian government to provide potentially damaging information on 2020 political rival Joe Biden and his son, Hunter. 

Trump’s acting chief of staff acknowledged Thursday that financial aid to Ukraine at the center of a House impeachment inquiry was withheld because of the president’s desire for the country to engage in U.S. politics.

Mick Mulvaney’s assertion was the first time a White House official has conceded Trump set up a quid quo pro scenario in which money approved by Congress for Ukraine was used as leverage, though he defended the arrangement as standard practice. 

The son of sharecroppers, Cummings was one the earliest and most aggressive committee chairmen investigating Trump, sending requests for information while in the minority during the first two years of the president’s term and then calling hearings and demanding documents after Democrats regained control of the House in January.

He accused the administration of stonewalling his requests for documents on a variety of subjects including whether Trump was profiting unconstitutionally from his namesake business while president and why a citizenship question was proposed for the U.S. Census in 2020.

Here are some key questions about Cummings, Maloney and where the impeachment process goes from here:

Q: What was Cummings’ role in helping lead impeachment efforts?

A: As chair of a committee responsible for unearthing evidence of potential corruption, the Maryland Democrat has been at the center of the impeachment effort by leading a panel that demanded key documents and records.

In recent weeks, Cummings’ panel has issued several subpoenas to key witnesses in the investigation: Energy Secretary Rick Perry about his contacts with the Ukrainian government; to the lawyer for two Ukrainian-born business partners who helped Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, in trying to find dirt on the Bidens; and the White House itself for pertinent documents.

Latest witness: Impeachment inquiry: Trump ambassador ‘disappointed’ with Rudy Giuliani’s influence in Ukraine policy

Even before the formal impeachment inquiry, Cummings was responsible for convening the committee hearing in February when Trump’s former attorney, Michael Cohen, testified that the president encouraged him to lie to Congress and the public for Trump’s protection.

Q: How will the loss of Cummings affect impeachment?

A: The West Baltimore native (who got into a very public spat about his hometown with the president earlier this summer)  has been a forceful voice against the Trump administration on a number of issues including the cost of prescription drugs and civil rights.

Leading the Oversight and Reform Committee, Cummings was one of the three chairmen heading the impeachment (along with Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., and Foreign Affairs Eliot Engel). Cummings’ death.

But Pelosi made clear that the inquiry was still on track despite a tragedy that silenced one of Congress’ most powerful voices.

“The timeline (on impeachment) will depend on the truth line,” Pelosi told reporters Thursday morning.

Q: Who is Carolyn Maloney, the congresswoman who will take over the House and Oversight Committee on an acting basis?

A: The former New York City teacher with a first-degree black belt in Taekwondo, Maloney has a reputation as a tenacious champion for women’s rights and consumer protections over her nearly 14 terms in Congress.

Not necessary: Nancy Pelosi: No need for House to hold formal vote on impeachment inquiry already under way

She’s also been a leader on issues tied to the Sept. 11 attacks, including the creation of the commission examining the terrorist attacks and efforts to compensate first responders who developed health problems following the disaster.

Maloney, 73, has also been a vocal supporter of Trump’s impeachment, saying in September during a rally on Capitol Hill that Trump has committed “treason” by pressuring Ukraine to dig up dirt on political rival Joe Biden.

“We will get to the bottom of this,” she said at the rally. “We will not let the president get away with breaking the law.”

Q: What’s next for the impeachment process?

A: Witnesses continue to be called in front of the committee.

Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, was the latest witness, telling the House impeachment panel Thursday that he was disappointed that he had to consult with Giuliani on Ukraine policy and that withholding military aid for a political investigation would be “wrong.”

Republicans had hoped to slow, or kill, the inquiry by forcing the House to hold a formal vote on whether to authorize the inquiry that Pelosi launched last month.

But the Speaker rejected such calls Tuesday, saying it was not necessary to take the additional step on a probe that is already well underway.

“There’s no requirement that we have a vote,” Pelosi said. “We’re not here to call bluffs. We’re here to find the truth to uphold the Constitution of the United States. This is not a game for us. This is deadly serious.”

Trump has vowed not to cooperate with the inquiry unless the House holds a vote to officially launch it. Democrats, in turn, had considered holding such a vote, potentially in case the courts said such a move was necessary to compel administration officials and other potential witnesses in the investigation to provide documents and appear for testimony.

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Mulvaney Says Trump Held Back Ukraine Aid Pending Investigation of Democrats

Westlake Legal Group 17dc-impeachbriefing-mulvaney-facebookJumbo-v2 Mulvaney Says Trump Held Back Ukraine Aid Pending Investigation of Democrats United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Presidential Election of 2016 Mulvaney, Mick impeachment

WASHINGTON — Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, said Thursday that the Trump administration withheld nearly $400 million in military aid to pressure Ukraine to investigate what the president has long insisted was Kiev’s assistance to Democrats during the 2016 election.

The declaration by Mr. Mulvaney undercut Mr. Trump’s repeated denials of a quid pro quo that linked security aid for Ukraine’s battle against Russian-backed separatists to Mr. Trump’s unsubstantiated theory that a server with missing Democratic emails was being held by a company based in Ukraine.

A former White House homeland security adviser had told Mr. Trump repeatedly that the theory had been “completely debunked.” But Mr. Trump demanded Ukraine take a look, Mr. Mulvaney said.

“The look-back to what happened in 2016 certainly was part of the thing that he was worried about in corruption with that nation,” Mr. Mulvaney told reporters, referring to Mr. Trump. “And that is absolutely appropriate.”

He said that administration officials initially withheld the aid because “everybody knows this is a corrupt place,” and the president was demanding Ukraine clean up its own government. But, Mr. Mulvaney added, “Did he also mention to me in passing the corruption related to the D.N.C. server? Absolutely. No question about that.”

“But that’s it,” he concluded, “and that’s why we held up the money.”

With his defense of the president, Mr. Mulvaney, one of Mr. Trump’s most loyal lieutenants, effectively confirmed the main premise of the House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry, which is focused on a shadow diplomatic campaign to pressure Ukraine to investigate the Democrats.

“The only thing I’ll say at this point is that Mr. Mulvaney’s acknowledgment certainly indicates that things have gone from very, very bad to much, much worse,” said Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee who is leading the impeachment inquiry.

Jay Sekulow, one of Mr. Trump’s personal lawyers, said Thursday that “the president’s legal counsel was not involved in acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney’s press briefing.”

Mr. Mulvaney made his remarks on the same day that Gordon D. Sondland, the ambassador to the European Union and a wealthy donor to Mr. Trump’s campaign, implicated the president by telling lawmakers that Mr. Trump had delegated Ukraine policy to his personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani.

Mr. Sondland testified behind closed doors for more than six hours at the Capitol, the latest in a series of current and former diplomats and White House aides who have provided detailed accounts of actions by Mr. Giuliani and others related to Ukraine.

Democratic lawmakers are certain to seize on Mr. Mulvaney’s comments as crucial support of the testimony coming from other witnesses, who have accused the administration of improperly pressuring Ukraine and of sidelining veteran diplomats in favor of Mr. Trump’s political loyalists.

“We have a confession,” said Representative Eric Swalwell, Democrat of California.

In wide-ranging remarks, Mr. Mulvaney told reporters at the White House that the $391 million in military aid was initially withheld from Ukraine because the president was displeased that European countries were not as generous with their assistance. He also wanted more attention paid to Ukraine’s persistent political corruption.

Mr. Mulvaney denied that the aid for Ukraine was also contingent on its government opening an investigation into either former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., a leading Democratic candidate for president, or his younger son, Hunter Biden. Asked whether he did anything to pressure President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine to investigate the Bidens, Mr. Mulvaney said “no.”

But the president did pressure Ukraine to re-examine discredited theories that Ukraine, not Russia, had worked to sway the 2016 campaign. Mr. Mulvaney’s mention of a “D.N.C. server” was a reference to an unfounded conspiracy theory promoted by Mr. Trump that Ukraine was somehow involved in Russia’s 2016 theft of emails from the Democratic National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

Mr. Mulvaney tied the server to the Justice Department’s review of the origins of the Russia investigation, led by the United States attorney in Connecticut, John H. Durham, and closely overseen by Attorney General William P. Barr.

“That’s an ongoing investigation,” Mr. Mulvaney said. “So you’re saying the president of the United States, the chief law enforcement person, cannot ask somebody to cooperate with an ongoing public investigation into wrongdoing? That’s just bizarre to me that you would think that you can’t do that.”

But while the Justice Department said last month that Mr. Durham was examining any role that Ukraine might have played in the early stages of the Russia investigation, a department official declined on Thursday to comment on whether he was examining the server conspiracy theory.

Russian military officers hacked Democratic servers to steal thousands of emails in 2016, the intelligence community and the special counsel found, and no one has uncovered evidence of Ukrainian involvement.

Justice Department officials were confused and angry when they heard that Mr. Mulvaney said the White House froze aid to Ukraine in exchange for help with the Durham investigation, according to a person familiar with their discussions.

“If the White House was withholding aid in regards to the cooperation of any investigation at the Department of Justice, that is news to us,” a senior Justice Department official said. Mr. Durham was seen leaving the Justice Department around midday Thursday.

Mr. Mulvaney said the president had done nothing improper and had stayed in normal diplomatic channels. He blasted the current and former administration officials who have testified in the impeachment inquiry, describing them as personally opposed to the changes in foreign policy that Mr. Trump had put in place.

“What you’re seeing now, I believe, is a group of mostly career bureaucrats who are saying, ‘you know what, I don’t like President Trump’s politics, so I’m going to participate in this witch hunt that they are undertaking on the hill.’”

Mr. Mulvaney said holding up Ukraine’s aid was a normal part of foreign policy, and he compared it to the foreign aid to Central America that the administration froze until Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras agreed to adopt the immigration policies pressed by Mr. Trump.

Asked whether he had admitted to a quid pro quo, Mr. Mulvaney said: “We do that all the time with foreign policy.”

His answer ignored the distinction — raised by many of the president’s critics — between holding up foreign aid to further American interests and holding up foreign aid to further Mr. Trump’s personal interests.

Senior White House aides like Mr. Mulvaney are often largely immune from congressional subpoenas to discuss their private conversations with the president, but talking about them publicly in such an extended way could undermine that legal protection.

Democrats had already been interested in Mr. Mulvaney’s role in the Ukraine matter after several impeachment witnesses described the acting chief of staff as a central player in the effort to hold up the aid in the days before Mr. Trump pressed Ukraine’s president to investigate Mr. Biden.

They also have said they want to know whether Mr. Mulvaney helped prevent a White House meeting between Mr. Trump and Mr. Zelensky until the Ukrainian government agreed to investigate the president’s rivals, including the D.N.C. and the Bidens.

Fiona Hill, the president’s former senior director for European and Russian affairs at the National Security Council, testified that Mr. Mulvaney was part of three of Trump loyalists who conducted a rogue foreign policy operation in Ukraine.

Ms. Hill told lawmakers that John R. Bolton, then the national security adviser, instructed her in early July to advise the National Security Council’s chief lawyer about the effort by Mr. Mulvaney, Mr. Sondland and Mr. Giuliani.

“I am not part of whatever drug deal Sondland and Mulvaney are cooking up,” Mr. Bolton told Ms. Hill to tell White House lawyers, according to two people at Ms. Hill’s deposition, which took place on Monday.

In his remarks on Thursday, Mr. Mulvaney said there was nothing wrong with Mr. Trump relying on Mr. Giuliani or others outside of the diplomatic corps to conduct foreign policy.

“That’s the president’s call,” he said. “You may not like the fact that Giuliani was involved. That’s great, that’s fine. It’s not illegal, it’s not impeachable.” He added that “The president gets to set foreign policy and he gets to choose who to do so.”

Democrats are also eager to know about a May 23 meeting during which career diplomats with responsibility for Ukraine were sidelined in favor of Mr. Sondland, Kurt D. Volker, the special envoy for Ukraine, and Rick Perry, the energy secretary, one witness testified.

George P. Kent, the deputy assistant secretary in the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs, testified Tuesday that Mr. Mulvaney called the White House meeting, according to Representative Gerald E. Connolly, Democrat of Virginia, who was in the room for Mr. Kent’s testimony.

Katie Benner and Nicholas Fandos contributed reporting from Washington, and Maggie Haberman from New York.

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Mulvaney: Trump Held Back Ukraine Aid Pending Investigation of Democrats

Westlake Legal Group 17dc-impeachbriefing-mulvaney-facebookJumbo-v2 Mulvaney: Trump Held Back Ukraine Aid Pending Investigation of Democrats United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Presidential Election of 2016 Mulvaney, Mick impeachment

WASHINGTON — Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, said Thursday that the Trump administration withheld nearly $400 million in military aid to pressure Ukraine to investigate what the president has long insisted was Kiev’s assistance to Democrats during the 2016 election.

The declaration by Mr. Mulvaney undercut Mr. Trump’s repeated denials of a quid pro quo that linked security aid for Ukraine’s battle against Russian-backed separatists to Mr. Trump’s unsubstantiated theory that a server with missing Democratic emails was being held by a company based in Ukraine.

A former White House homeland security adviser had told Mr. Trump repeatedly that the theory had been “completely debunked.” But Mr. Trump demanded Ukraine take a look, Mr. Mulvaney said.

“The look-back to what happened in 2016 certainly was part of the thing that he was worried about in corruption with that nation,” Mr. Mulvaney told reporters, referring to Mr. Trump. “And that is absolutely appropriate.”

He said that administration officials initially withheld the aid because “everybody knows this is a corrupt place,” and the president was demanding Ukraine clean up its own government. But, Mr. Mulvaney added, “Did he also mention to me in passing the corruption related to the D.N.C. server? Absolutely. No question about that.”

“But that’s it,” he concluded, “and that’s why we held up the money.”

With his defense of the president, Mr. Mulvaney, one of Mr. Trump’s most loyal lieutenants, effectively confirmed the main premise of the House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry, which is focused on a shadow diplomatic campaign to pressure Ukraine to investigate the Democrats.

“The only thing I’ll say at this point is that Mr. Mulvaney’s acknowledgment certainly indicates that things have gone from very, very bad to much, much worse,” said Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee who is leading the impeachment inquiry.

Jay Sekulow, one of Mr. Trump’s personal lawyers, said Thursday that “the president’s legal counsel was not involved in acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney’s press briefing.”

Mr. Mulvaney made his remarks on the same day that Gordon D. Sondland, the ambassador to the European Union and a wealthy donor to Mr. Trump’s campaign, implicated the president by telling lawmakers that Mr. Trump had delegated Ukraine policy to his personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani.

Mr. Sondland testified behind closed doors for more than six hours at the Capitol, the latest in a series of current and former diplomats and White House aides who have provided detailed accounts of actions by Mr. Giuliani and others related to Ukraine.

Democratic lawmakers are certain to seize on Mr. Mulvaney’s comments as crucial support of the testimony coming from other witnesses, who have accused the administration of improperly pressuring Ukraine and of sidelining veteran diplomats in favor of Mr. Trump’s political loyalists.

“We have a confession,” said Representative Eric Swalwell, Democrat of California.

In wide-ranging remarks, Mr. Mulvaney told reporters at the White House that the $391 million in military aid was initially withheld from Ukraine because the president was displeased that European countries were not as generous with their assistance. He also wanted more attention paid to Ukraine’s persistent political corruption.

Mr. Mulvaney denied that the aid for Ukraine was also contingent on its government opening an investigation into either former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., a leading Democratic candidate for president, or his younger son, Hunter Biden. Asked whether he did anything to pressure President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine to investigate the Bidens, Mr. Mulvaney said “no.”

But the president did pressure Ukraine to re-examine discredited theories that Ukraine, not Russia, had worked to sway the 2016 campaign. Mr. Mulvaney’s mention of a “D.N.C. server” was a reference to an unfounded conspiracy theory promoted by Mr. Trump that Ukraine was somehow involved in Russia’s 2016 theft of emails from the Democratic National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

Mr. Mulvaney tied the server to the Justice Department’s review of the origins of the Russia investigation, led by the United States attorney in Connecticut, John H. Durham, and closely overseen by Attorney General William P. Barr.

“That’s an ongoing investigation,” Mr. Mulvaney said. “So you’re saying the president of the United States, the chief law enforcement person, cannot ask somebody to cooperate with an ongoing public investigation into wrongdoing? That’s just bizarre to me that you would think that you can’t do that.”

But while the Justice Department said last month that Mr. Durham was examining any role that Ukraine might have played in the early stages of the Russia investigation, a department official declined on Thursday to comment on whether he was examining the server conspiracy theory.

Russian military officers hacked Democratic servers to steal thousands of emails in 2016, the intelligence community and the special counsel found, and no one has uncovered evidence of Ukrainian involvement.

Justice Department officials were confused and angry when they heard that Mr. Mulvaney said the White House froze aid to Ukraine in exchange for help with the Durham investigation, according to a person familiar with their discussions.

“If the White House was withholding aid in regards to the cooperation of any investigation at the Department of Justice, that is news to us,” a senior Justice Department official said. Mr. Durham was seen leaving the Justice Department around midday Thursday.

Mr. Mulvaney said the president had done nothing improper and had stayed in normal diplomatic channels. He blasted the current and former administration officials who have testified in the impeachment inquiry, describing them as personally opposed to the changes in foreign policy that Mr. Trump had put in place.

“What you’re seeing now, I believe, is a group of mostly career bureaucrats who are saying, ‘you know what, I don’t like President Trump’s politics, so I’m going to participate in this witch hunt that they are undertaking on the hill.’”

Mr. Mulvaney said holding up Ukraine’s aid was a normal part of foreign policy, and he compared it to the foreign aid to Central America that the administration froze until Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras agreed to adopt the immigration policies pressed by Mr. Trump.

Asked whether he had admitted to a quid pro quo, Mr. Mulvaney said: “We do that all the time with foreign policy.”

His answer ignored the distinction — raised by many of the president’s critics — between holding up foreign aid to further American interests and holding up foreign aid to further Mr. Trump’s personal interests.

Senior White House aides like Mr. Mulvaney are often largely immune from congressional subpoenas to discuss their private conversations with the president, but talking about them publicly in such an extended way could undermine that legal protection.

Democrats had already been interested in Mr. Mulvaney’s role in the Ukraine matter after several impeachment witnesses described the acting chief of staff as a central player in the effort to hold up the aid in the days before Mr. Trump pressed Ukraine’s president to investigate Mr. Biden.

They also have said they want to know whether Mr. Mulvaney helped prevent a White House meeting between Mr. Trump and Mr. Zelensky until the Ukrainian government agreed to investigate the president’s rivals, including the D.N.C. and the Bidens.

Fiona Hill, the president’s former senior director for European and Russian affairs at the National Security Council, testified that Mr. Mulvaney was part of three of Trump loyalists who conducted a rogue foreign policy operation in Ukraine.

Ms. Hill told lawmakers that John R. Bolton, then the national security adviser, instructed her in early July to advise the National Security Council’s chief lawyer about the effort by Mr. Mulvaney, Mr. Sondland and Mr. Giuliani.

“I am not part of whatever drug deal Sondland and Mulvaney are cooking up,” Mr. Bolton told Ms. Hill to tell White House lawyers, according to two people at Ms. Hill’s deposition, which took place on Monday.

In his remarks on Thursday, Mr. Mulvaney said there was nothing wrong with Mr. Trump relying on Mr. Giuliani or others outside of the diplomatic corps to conduct foreign policy.

“That’s the president’s call,” he said. “You may not like the fact that Giuliani was involved. That’s great, that’s fine. It’s not illegal, it’s not impeachable.” He added that “The president gets to set foreign policy and he gets to choose who to do so.”

Democrats are also eager to know about a May 23 meeting during which career diplomats with responsibility for Ukraine were sidelined in favor of Mr. Sondland, Kurt D. Volker, the special envoy for Ukraine, and Rick Perry, the energy secretary, one witness testified.

George P. Kent, the deputy assistant secretary in the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs, testified Tuesday that Mr. Mulvaney called the White House meeting, according to Representative Gerald E. Connolly, Democrat of Virginia, who was in the room for Mr. Kent’s testimony.

Katie Benner and Nicholas Fandos contributed reporting from Washington, and Maggie Haberman from New York.

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‘Mayans M.C.’ showrunner Kurt Sutter fired after complaints about behavior on set

Mayans M.C.” showrunner Kurt Sutter has been fired.

The writer/producer/director, who has worked with FX (newly acquired by Disney in the 21st Century Fox-Disney merger) for 18 years, was dismissed after the network execs received “multiple complaints” about his behavior on the set of the biker drama series.

In a letter Sutter, 59, wrote to his cast and crew that was obtained by The Hollywood Reporter, he says he was let go for being an “abrasive d**k” to people and for the “unacceptable conditions that have been created on the set of ‘Mayans’ in Season 2.”

‘MAYANS M.C.’ STARS DISCUSS FILMING IN CALIFORNIA BORDER TOWN: ‘IT WAS EYE-OPENING’

Sutter specifies that FX CEO John Landgraf and Disney TV Studios and ABC Entertainment chairman Dana Walden were the two to fire him on Thursday morning.

“I deeply apologize if I’ve made people feel less than or unsupported. My intention was literally the opposite. But clearly I’ve not been paying attention. My arrogance and chronic distraction has created wreckage. Just know, I adore this cast and crew.”

Westlake Legal Group kurt 'Mayans M.C.' showrunner Kurt Sutter fired after complaints about behavior on set Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/tv fox news fnc/entertainment fnc fa0768fc-19df-552c-8131-662b1e75c001 article

Co-creator/executive producer/writer Kurt Sutter at a recent ‘Mayans’ press tour panel. (Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

“For those of you who wanted me gone, you win! For those of you who didn’t, you win, too. Although I will no longer be involved, I have no doubt the new team will move things forward with the same quality fans have come to expect.

“Thank you for the honor of working with all of you.

“I don’t need, nor want, replies or condolences. I know where the love is. And for those of you who have it, I’m sure our paths will cross again,” Sutter concluded.

‘SONS OF ANARCHY’ SPINOFF ‘MAYANS M.C.’ TACKLES BORDER WORLD

He indicated “Mayans” co-showrunner Elgin James will be taking over.

The show’s second season on FX debuted in September. ‘Mayans’ is a spinoff from Sutter’s popular FX series “Sons of Anarchy.”

According to THR, Sutter’s firing will apparently not affect his overall production deal with 20th Century Fox TV at this time.

Reps for the show and Kurt Sutter did not immediately return Fox News’ request for comment.

Westlake Legal Group kurt 'Mayans M.C.' showrunner Kurt Sutter fired after complaints about behavior on set Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/tv fox news fnc/entertainment fnc fa0768fc-19df-552c-8131-662b1e75c001 article   Westlake Legal Group kurt 'Mayans M.C.' showrunner Kurt Sutter fired after complaints about behavior on set Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/tv fox news fnc/entertainment fnc fa0768fc-19df-552c-8131-662b1e75c001 article

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Trump Will Host Next G7 Summit at His Doral Resort

WASHINGTON — President Trump has decided to host the Group of 7 meeting next June at Trump National Doral, his luxury resort near Miami, the White House announced Thursday, a decision that prompted immediate questions about whether it was a conflict of interest for him to choose one of his own properties for a diplomatic event.

In discussing the choice, Mick Mulvaney, the president’s acting chief of staff, said Mr. Trump had considered the possibility of “political criticism” for picking the resort. But the president chose it anyway because administration officials had considered hotels throughout the country, and concluded that it was “by far and away, far and away, the best physical facility for this meeting,” Mr. Mulvaney said.

“‘It’s almost like they built this facility to host this type of event,’” Mr. Mulvaney told reporters, quoting what he said an unnamed official told him during the planning process. And he dismissed any suggestion that the president would profit from the choice.

Mr. Mulvaney said the hotel would put on the summit “at cost,” dismissing questions about whether Mr. Trump would profit from the choice. “The president has made it clear since he’s been here that he hasn’t profited since he’s been here,” he said.

But Representative Jerrold Nadler, the New York Democrat who leads the House Judiciary Committee, said that in hosting a summit for hundreds of world leaders and their staffs, the White House had potentially violated the emoluments clauses of the Constitution, which prohibit gifts or payments from foreign government sources.

“The administration’s announcement that President Trump’s Doral Miami resort will be the site of the next G7 summit is among the most brazen examples yet of the president’s corruption,” Mr. Nadler said. “He is exploiting his office and making official U.S. government decisions for his personal financial gain. The emoluments clauses of the Constitution exist to prevent exactly this kind of corruption.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_159850590_7a0c2a6a-d1d9-4e3a-b0fc-09d5c62597d2-articleLarge Trump Will Host Next G7 Summit at His Doral Resort Trump, Donald J Trump National Doral Miami (Doral, Fla) International Relations Group of Seven Ethics and Official Misconduct Conflicts of Interest

The Trump National Doral resort near Miami has struggled financially since the Trump family bought it out of bankruptcy in 2012.CreditMichele Eve Sandberg/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Holding the event at the Doral would effectively be forcing foreign government officials to pay the Trump family to stay at his resort, said Deepak Gupta, a constitutional lawyer who is already involved in two lawsuits claiming that Mr. Trump is violating the Constitution by accepting foreign government payments at his hotels.

“This is indefensible,” Mr. Gupta said. “It is as blatant as of mixing of private interests and official action that we have seen from this president.”

Mr. Mulvaney’s announcement was hardly a surprise; the president had not made it a secret that he wanted to hold the summit at his hotel. At the Group of 7 summit this year, held in Biarritz in the south of France in August, Mr. Trump suggested the resort would be a “great place” to hold next year’s meeting.

“It’s got tremendous acreage, many hundreds of acres, so we can handle whatever happens,” Mr. Trump said. “People are really liking it, and plus it has buildings that have 50 to 70 units. And so each delegation can have its own building.”

In the past Mr. Trump has been an aggressive promoter of the hotel. When the PGA Tour announced in 2016, while Mr. Trump was running for president, that it was moving its annual golf tournament — which had brought international attention to the resort for over five decades — to Mexico City, he reacted angrily.

“They’re moving it to Mexico City which, by the way, I hope they have kidnapping insurance,” Mr. Trump said at the time, in an interview on Fox.

But the resort has struggled financially since the Trump family bought it out of bankruptcy in 2012, reportedly paying $150 million for the property. More than $100 million in loans to help finance the project came from Deutsche Bank.

Financial documents obtained by The New York Times as part of tax appeals filed by the Trump Organization showed that the property lost $2.4 million in 2014. The Trump Organization has not disclosed profits in the past several years.

Still, the resort as of last year was the single biggest moneymaking asset, among the hotels, golf courses, office buildings and other properties owned by the Trump family. It generated $75.96 million in income in 2018, up from $74.76 million in 2017. But both of those figures are overall revenue, not profits.

Since he was elected, Mr. Trump has made a habit of visiting his own resorts and hotels, with a total of 308 days since 2017 spent at one of his properties, or about a third of his days in office.

His most frequently visited spot is his Mar-a-Lago club in Florida, followed by Trump National Golf Clubs in New Jersey and Virginia. Another frequent venue has been the Trump International Hotel in Washington, which has become a magnet for Republican political events and other conferences hosted by Trump supporters.

Overall, Mr. Trump has made visits to at least 13 of his family’s revenue-generating properties since he was sworn in, including golf courses in Ireland and Scotland, according to a tally by The Times.

Previous use of Mr. Trump’s properties by the president and other federal government employees has drawn controversy, including the decision by the Air Force to send dozens of flight crews making stopovers at an airport in Scotland to the Trump Turnberry resort, where the Pentagon alone has spent $184,000 in the past two years.

The Group of 7 meeting will be held in the middle of June, the off-season for South Florida when the weather is hot and humid, and hosting a summit at the Doral will be complicated, local officials said, given the proximity of the resort to major area roads, including two right next to the resort that may need to be closed to ensure security.

“It is the middle of the metro area of Dade County,” said Rey Valdes, a Doral Police Department spokesman. “This will require a logistical feat. But with careful planning, I am confident we will be able to pull it off.”

Juan Carlos Bermudez, the mayor of Doral, did not have advance notification from the White House that the city had been picked for the Group of 7 summit. Mr. Bermudez said Thursday that he would leave questions surrounding potential conflicts of interest for the “Democrats and Republicans and pundits” to discuss.

“We are honored that it is being held here,” Mr. Bermudez said. “And the world will be able to see what Doral and South Florida are about.”

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Sanders accuses Biden of pushing insurance industry ‘talking points’ by slamming ‘Medicare-for-all’

Westlake Legal Group 990505083001_6085878827001_6085872751001-vs Sanders accuses Biden of pushing insurance industry 'talking points' by slamming 'Medicare-for-all' Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/executive/health-care fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc article 7ed15ab4-5598-546a-b2f0-6dd973a7923c

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont took aim Thursday at presidential nomination rival Joe Biden, accusing the former vice president of using insurance industry “talking points” to criticize Sanders’ plan to implement a government-run “Medicare-for-all” system.

“It is really sad that Joe Biden is using the talking points of the insurance industry to attack Medicare for All,” Sanders claimed in an email to supporters.

“Joe must know that we currently spend twice as much per capita on health care as the people of almost any other major country and that we pay, by far, the highest prices in the world for prescription drugs,” added the independent senator who’s making his second straight White House bid.

POLL: VOTERS OPPOSE ‘MEDICARE-FOR-ALL’ SYSTEM THAT ELIMINATES PRIVATE INSURANCE

Biden has opposed the “Medicare-for-all” plan championed by Sanders and supported by Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts – a co-front-runner with Biden right now in the Democrats’ primary race. The Senate bill – which Sanders authored – would eliminate private insurance. Biden, instead, has been pushing for a public option to strengthen and supplement the national health-care law better known as ObamaCare.

At Tuesday’s fourth-round presidential primary debate, Biden once again criticized “Medicare-for-all,” taking aim at its price tag.

“The plan is going to cost at least $30 trillion over 10 years. That is more on a yearly basis than the entire federal budget,” he emphasized.

He also argued that the costs would be passed on to average Americans.

“If a fireman and a schoolteacher are making $100,000 a year, their taxes are going to go up about $10,000,” Biden noted. “That is more than they will possibly save on this health-care plan.”

BIDEN TAKES AIM AT SANDERS AND WARREN OVER ‘MEDICARE-FOR-ALL’

Responding, Sanders indirectly accused Biden of failing to stand up to the health-care industry.

“I will tell you what the issue is here. The issue is whether the Democratic Party has the guts to stand up to the health-care industry, which made $100 billion in profit, whether we have the guts to stand up to the corrupt, price-fixing pharmaceutical industry, which is charging us the highest prices in the world for prescription drugs,” he stressed.

BUTTIGIEG, KLOBUCHAR, SLAM WARREN OVER ‘MEDICARE-FOR-ALL’

“If we don’t have the guts to do that, if all we can do is take their money, we should be ashamed of ourselves,” Sanders added.

Speaking to reporters Wednesday in Ohio, Biden returned fire, saying, “Bernie doesn’t pay for half his plan.”

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And, taking aim at both Sanders and Warren – who unlike Sanders has refused to acknowledge that middle-class taxes would rise to pay for “Medicare-for-all” – Biden said, “look, the last thing the Democrats should be doing is playing (President) Trump’s game and trying to con the American people to think this is easy. There’s nothing easy about it.”

The intra-party battle over implementing “Medicare-for-all” versus strengthening the nation’s health-care law – known as the Affordable Care Act – has been a leading and divisive issue in the race for the presidential nomination.

Westlake Legal Group 990505083001_6085878827001_6085872751001-vs Sanders accuses Biden of pushing insurance industry 'talking points' by slamming 'Medicare-for-all' Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/executive/health-care fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc article 7ed15ab4-5598-546a-b2f0-6dd973a7923c   Westlake Legal Group 990505083001_6085878827001_6085872751001-vs Sanders accuses Biden of pushing insurance industry 'talking points' by slamming 'Medicare-for-all' Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/executive/health-care fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc article 7ed15ab4-5598-546a-b2f0-6dd973a7923c

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‘South Park’ rips LeBron James for his China remarks in latest episode

Westlake Legal Group cartman-lebron-getty 'South Park' rips LeBron James for his China remarks in latest episode Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/world/world-regions/hong-kong fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-lakers fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/person/lebron-james fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/comedy fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 31f30556-49cb-5e9a-a745-36a4f10a6362

“South Park” took a not-so-subtle dig at NBA superstar LeBron James over his response to the league’s controversy with China in Wednesday night’s episode of the long-running animated series.

In the episode “Let Them Eat Goo,” trouble hit South Park Elementary when the school adjusted its lunch menu with healthier options to accommodate some students, which didn’t sit well with its outspoken junk food-loving fourth-grader Cartman.

In a fiery confrontation with classmates who advocated for healthier food, a vegan student told Cartman he had “a right to free speech” after Cartman complained their protest was “ruining” his lunch.

“Yes, we do have freedom of speech, but at times there are ramifications for the negative that can happen when you are not thinking about others and only thinking about yourself!” Cartman reacted.

‘SOUTH PARK’ CREATORS OFFER TONGUE-IN-CHEEK ‘APOLOGY’ TO CHINA AFTER SHOW GETS BANNED: ‘WE COOL NOW?’

Well, that was what James had told reporters word-for-word on Monday when asked about the ongoing conflict between China and the NBA, which stemmed from a tweet from Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey that expressed support for the Hong Kong protestors.

“Yes, we do have freedom of speech, but at times there are ramifications for the negative that can happen when you are not thinking about others and only thinking about yourself,” James said. “I believe [Morey] wasn’t educated on the situation at hand and he spoke, and so many people could have been harmed not only financially but physically, emotionally, spiritually.”

Not only did Carman echo James saying he was “not only financially, but physically, emotionally” and “spiritually” harmed by the new lunch menu, he also celebrated “taco Tuesday,” something the NBA all-star has done on social media.

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“South Park” received plenty of attention this season for an episode that mocked China and its influence over Hollywood and American businesses including the NBA, which aired days after the communist country’s conflict with the NBA flared up.

After the episode aired, China completely banned the show and scrubbed “South Park” from online streaming services and social media platforms.

Westlake Legal Group cartman-lebron-getty 'South Park' rips LeBron James for his China remarks in latest episode Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/world/world-regions/hong-kong fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-lakers fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/person/lebron-james fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/comedy fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 31f30556-49cb-5e9a-a745-36a4f10a6362   Westlake Legal Group cartman-lebron-getty 'South Park' rips LeBron James for his China remarks in latest episode Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/world/world-regions/hong-kong fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-lakers fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/person/lebron-james fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/comedy fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 31f30556-49cb-5e9a-a745-36a4f10a6362

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Alicia Alonso, Cuban ballet legend, is dead at 98

Alicia Alonso, the revered ballerina and choreographer whose nearly 75-year career made her an icon of artistic loyalty to Cuba’s socialist system, died Thursday at age 98.

Miguel Cabrera, an official at the National Ballet of Cuba founded by Alonso, said she died at a hospital in Havana.

As founder and director of the National Ballet of Cuba, Alonso personified the island’s arts program under Fidel Castro’s communist rule and she kept vise-like control over the troupe past her 90th birthday despite being nearly blind for decades.

‘GMA’ ANCHOR LARA SPENCER APOLOGIZES FOR ‘INSENSITIVE’ COMMENT ABOUT PRINCE GEORGE’S LOVE OF BALLET

In New York in the 1940s and ’50s, Alonso was one of the earliest members of the company that became the American Ballet Theatre, helping it develop into one of the more important ballet troupes in the U.S. She was recognized the world over for the stylized beauty of her choreography and was named prima ballerina assoluta, the rarely bestowed highest honor in dance.

The ballet company announced it would dedicate Thursday evening’s performance at Lincoln Center of the George Balanchine classic “Theme and Variations” to Alonso’s memory. Balanchine created the work for ABT and Alonso performed at its world premiere on November 25, 1947, partnered with Igor Youskevitch.

Even after she turned 90, Alonso maintained a busy travel schedule, cutting an impressive figure at ballet openings and other cultural events with her regal bearing, dark sunglasses and scarf-wrapped head always held high.

Westlake Legal Group Alicia-alonso-2 Alicia Alonso, Cuban ballet legend, is dead at 98 PETER ORSI fox-news/entertainment/genres/dance fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc fc9b0a73-e778-5152-8df5-8856cc8dcddf Associated Press article ANDREA RODRIGUEZ

Director of Cuba national ballet Alicia Alonso atends the rehearsal of “Swan Lake” in Madrid in 2009. (Photo credit PIERRE-PHILIPPE MARCOU/AFP/Getty Images)

But Alonso also drew criticism for her longtime support of Castro’s government. Defecting dancers said they were stifled by extreme discipline, a lack of artistic freedom due to her near-stranglehold over Cuban ballet and the inability to travel freely abroad.

Born Alicia Ernestina de la Caridad del Cobre Martinez Hoya on Dec. 21, 1920, in Havana, Alonso began her dance studies in 1931.

“I grabbed the barre … and I found what I liked more than anything else in the world,” Alonso told The Associated Press in 2001.

Westlake Legal Group AP19290619725143 Alicia Alonso, Cuban ballet legend, is dead at 98 PETER ORSI fox-news/entertainment/genres/dance fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc fc9b0a73-e778-5152-8df5-8856cc8dcddf Associated Press article ANDREA RODRIGUEZ

FILE – In this April 26, 1949 file photo, Alicia Alonso, Cuba’s favorite Ballet dancer is shown in her dressing room in Havana. Cuba’s national ballet has reported that Alonso has died on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019. (AP Photo, File)

At age 16, she moved to the United States, where she married a fellow Cuban dancer and choreographer, Fernando Alonso. During their 27-year marriage, which ended in divorce, the couple had one daughter, Laura. She was Alicia Alonso’s only child.

During her early years in the U.S., Alonso continued her studies with well-known ballet teachers such as Enrico Zanfretta and Alexandra Fedorova, both from the School of American Ballet in New York.

Alonso launched her professional career in 1938 on Broadway, where she performed in the musical comedies “Great Lady” and “Stars in Your Eyes.” The following year, she was part of the American Ballet Caravan, precursor of the New York City Ballet.

Alonso joined the prestigious American Ballet Theatre of New York in 1940 and remained with the company for 16 years.

Her career took off as she danced the lead roles as prima ballerina in romantic and classical performances throughout Europe and the Americas. During that time, she worked with some of the 20th century’s greatest choreographers, including George Balanchine, Mikhail Fokine and Bronislava Nijinska.

But she worried about the development of new dancers back home and in 1948 founded her own company in Havana, the Ballet Alicia Alonso. She opened an academy of the same name shortly thereafter.

Westlake Legal Group AP19290619695407 Alicia Alonso, Cuban ballet legend, is dead at 98 PETER ORSI fox-news/entertainment/genres/dance fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc fc9b0a73-e778-5152-8df5-8856cc8dcddf Associated Press article ANDREA RODRIGUEZ

FILE- In this May 17, 1953 file photo, Cuban ballet dancer Alicia Alonso is shown in London, England. Cuba’s national ballet has reported that Alonso has died on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019. (AP Photo, File)

During the rule of strongman Fulgencio Batista, Alonso issued a public letter in 1956 rejecting any government assistance for her dance school. She ultimately decided not to dance again in Cuba while Batista remained in power and traveled to the United States, where she worked for a time with the Greek Theatre of Los Angeles.

Alonso returned home after the January 1959 triumph of the Cuban Revolution and changed the name of her academy to the National Ballet of Cuba, which received enthusiastic and enduring financial backing from Castro’s government.

She remained a fervent, lifelong supporter of the revolution, reportedly even joining other city-dwelling Cubans for backbreaking sugarcane harvest campaigns ordered by Castro.

Meanwhile, her company toured Latin America, Europe and the United States, performing in 1978 at the Metropolitan Opera of New York and the Kennedy Center in Washington.

In 1960, Alonso organized the first International Ballet Festival of Havana, an event that still brings some of the world’s finest dance troupes to Cuba. The American Ballet Theatre was at the inaugural festival, though the U.S. and Cuba severed relations soon after and it would be four decades before a U.S. dance company performed on the island again, the Washington Ballet in 2000.

NYC BALLET ORDERED TO REHIRE 2 DANCERS FIRED OVER ALLEGED NUDE PHOTO-SHARING RING

To Cubans, who can be as fanatical about dance as about baseball, Alonso was simply Alicia — just like with Fidel, no last name was necessary. The state-run Suchel cosmetics company even developed a signature scent in her name.

So great was Alonso’s prestige that she was considered untouchable in a country where even the highest-placed have run afoul of the government, and she wielded that power to defend her own.

Westlake Legal Group alicia-alonso-1 Alicia Alonso, Cuban ballet legend, is dead at 98 PETER ORSI fox-news/entertainment/genres/dance fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc fc9b0a73-e778-5152-8df5-8856cc8dcddf Associated Press article ANDREA RODRIGUEZ

Ballerina Alicia Alonso executing a releve in second position. (Photo by Gjon Mili/The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty Images)

At some point during Cuba’s persecution of homosexuals in the 1960s and early ’70s, Alonso learned authorities were investigating some of her dancers, according to the book “Cuba Confidential” by longtime Cuba watcher Ann Louise Bardach. Alonso personally called Castro’s brother Raul and threatened to leave Cuba if they were harmed.

Alonso’s eyesight began to fail early in her career, and she danced many of her famous roles while partially blind, guided on stage by her partner’s placement and by the stage lights.

Although ultimately she could see only lights and shadows, she performed into her 70s, before retiring in 1995 after a performance in Italy. Even then she would occasionally put on her dance shoes and practice on stage using the stage-side lights as guides.

“Throughout history, I have been the ballerina who has danced the longest on stage,” Alonso told AP.

Offstage, she continued to devise choreography, plan tours and even design the company’s performance programs. Over the years Alonso’s schools churned out dancers who were in demand by companies worldwide, prized for their technical perfection.

But she also gained a reputation for micromanaging and for imposing total domination of Cuba’s dance world, just as Castro loomed over all things political. Detractors said artistic stagnation set in and the company was slow to pick up new trends, rigidly adhering to classical styles and the ballets that made her famous: “Giselle,” ”Carmen,” ”Swan Lake.”

Many dancers fled in search of creative freedom and the chance to earn more money. Star dancer Rolando Sarabia went to the U.S. in 2005, and as recently as 2010 five members of the National Ballet stayed behind in Toronto following a performance.

RYAN GOSLING: I REGRET QUITTING BALLET

Alonso bemoaned the desertions, emphasizing the free training they received.

“It is painful,” Alonso told reporters after five dancers defected during a U.S. tour in 2003. “They have received an education of more than nine years, being taught without cost.”

Alonso was known for having a fiery temper and the highest physical standards for her ideal of the tall, elegant, rail-thin ballerina.

Westlake Legal Group AP19290619687164 Alicia Alonso, Cuban ballet legend, is dead at 98 PETER ORSI fox-news/entertainment/genres/dance fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc fc9b0a73-e778-5152-8df5-8856cc8dcddf Associated Press article ANDREA RODRIGUEZ

FILE – In this June 1979 file photo, Alicia Alonso, director and prime ballerina of ballet Nacional de Cuba, is making its first appearance in New England, with performances on June 14, 1979 at Boston’s Music Hall. Cuba’s national ballet has reported that Alonso has died on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019. (AP Photo/Paul Benoit, File)

There were also signs of coolness in her relationship with her daughter, who started her own school and accepted many students who fell short of Alonso’s rigid ideal but went on to considerable achievements.

Alsonso was considered a national treasure, getting a standing ovation at Old Havana’s gilded Gran Teatro in 2010 when she made a regal entrance to a tribute on her 90th birthday.

A month earlier, her old troupe, the American Ballet Theatre, honored the aging icon when it performed in Havana 50 years after its last visit.

Alonso’s lifetime of work brought her Cuba’s highest honors, including an honorary doctorate from the University of Havana in 1973. Fidel Castro’s government granted her the Order of Jose Marti in 2000, and his successor, Raul, gave her the top arts teaching prize in 2010. She also received prestigious awards from Spain, France and UNESCO.

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Alonso is survived by her husband, art critic Pedro Simón Martínez; her daughter, Laura; a grandson and two great-granddaughters.

Westlake Legal Group Alicia-Alonso Alicia Alonso, Cuban ballet legend, is dead at 98 PETER ORSI fox-news/entertainment/genres/dance fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc fc9b0a73-e778-5152-8df5-8856cc8dcddf Associated Press article ANDREA RODRIGUEZ   Westlake Legal Group Alicia-Alonso Alicia Alonso, Cuban ballet legend, is dead at 98 PETER ORSI fox-news/entertainment/genres/dance fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc fc9b0a73-e778-5152-8df5-8856cc8dcddf Associated Press article ANDREA RODRIGUEZ

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Jennifer Garner partakes in Breast Cancer Awareness Month by sharing video of mammogram appointment

Jennifer Garner wants you to get your breasts checked.

This week, the 47-year-old actress posted a video of herself at her annual mammogram appointment in light of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which takes place in October.

OCTOBER IS BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH: HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

“Happy October! It’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month and it’s time for a mammogram,” she says as she appears from behind a curtain in the video.

“OK, your mammogram looks perfect,” her doctor tells her after her check is complete. He and Garner then give the camera a “thumbs up” before the “13 Going on 30” actress performs a celebratory dance.

“Every October I have a standing date. For a mammogram,” she captioned the video on Instagram. “For me, having the appointment on the books makes it routine, like the dentist. I know it’s scary, sisters, but just do it — the next best thing to an all-clear is early detection. To everyone in the thick of the battle — respect and love and strength to you.”

A screening mammogram, or an x-ray examination of a person’s breasts, is used to check for breast cancer even if the patient has no signs or symptoms of the disease, according to the National Cancer Institute.

Westlake Legal Group Jennifer-Garner-GettyImages-1020231114 Jennifer Garner partakes in Breast Cancer Awareness Month by sharing video of mammogram appointment Madeline Farber fox-news/person/jennifer-garner fox-news/health/cancer/breast-cancer fox news fnc/health fnc article 15847440-e254-592f-83c3-e3b5fe1015d7

Jennifer Garner. (Getty)

“Screening mammograms usually involve two or more x-ray pictures, or images, of each breast. The x-ray images often make it possible to detect tumors that cannot be felt. Screening mammograms can also find microcalcifications (tiny deposits of calcium) that sometimes indicate the presence of breast cancer,” it states.

OHIO DAD WITH BREAST CANCER SAYS HE’D BE ‘NOTHING’ WITHOUT GOD, FAMILY

Mammograms can also be used for diagnostic purposes after a lump is found in the breast.

The National Breast Cancer Foundation estimates 1 in 8 women will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Although rare, men can similarly be affected — as was the case for one Ohio dad.

Westlake Legal Group Jennifer-Garner-GettyImages-1020231114 Jennifer Garner partakes in Breast Cancer Awareness Month by sharing video of mammogram appointment Madeline Farber fox-news/person/jennifer-garner fox-news/health/cancer/breast-cancer fox news fnc/health fnc article 15847440-e254-592f-83c3-e3b5fe1015d7   Westlake Legal Group Jennifer-Garner-GettyImages-1020231114 Jennifer Garner partakes in Breast Cancer Awareness Month by sharing video of mammogram appointment Madeline Farber fox-news/person/jennifer-garner fox-news/health/cancer/breast-cancer fox news fnc/health fnc article 15847440-e254-592f-83c3-e3b5fe1015d7

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Meteorologist slams fat-shaming critic: ‘I like pasta, bread and cheese too much to obsess over my weight’

Westlake Legal Group weather-girl Meteorologist slams fat-shaming critic: 'I like pasta, bread and cheese too much to obsess over my weight' Michael Hollan fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 9b801c7c-5fff-58a4-805d-a169f6d1c225

This forecast calls for more carbs and less fat-shaming.

A meteorologist responded to a harsh critic on her Twitter feed, after the viewer was apparently unhappy with the meteorologist’s “stomach bulge” being visible while she was reporting the weather.

Tracy Hinson, a reporter for KSDK News in St. Louis, shared an image of the nasty message she received from a viewer earlier this month.

“Do you ever watch yourself giving the weather report?” the message begins. “Seems that you need a girdle for the stomach overhang which shortens the front of your dresses! Today was not the first time I have noticed this. Maybe you should wear a top that covers the bulge in your stomach.”

INSTAGRAM MODEL SAYS BODY-SHAMING IS AN ‘EVERYDAY’ THING: ‘IT CAN BE EXHAUSTING’

Undeterred, Hinson publicly responded to the viewer, identifying her as Mary.

“Dear Mary,” Hinson began, “Yes I do watch my airchecks. NO I will not be strapping myself into a girdle because you don’t like my belly. I like pasta, bread and cheese too much to obsess over my weight. I like my body and that’s all that really matters.”

She concluded her post with the hashtag “NoMoreFatshaming.”

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Since posting the response, Hinson’s message has received more than 21,000 likes on the social media platform.

Hinson has also received a lot of support from Twitter.

One reply: “Dear Tracy, I don’t know you, nor have I ever seen you on TV. But this tweet has spread beyond your market and I just want you to know that I hope you meant this deep inside and you change nothing. Thank you for this and props to you. I think you are beautiful. Be you.”

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“Mary, it’s really easy to criticize from behind a screen, isn’t it?” another reply read. “Perhaps you should focus on Tracy’s accurate forecast and delightful demeanor. Tracy — you are gorgeous. You eat all of the mac and cheese you want.”

Westlake Legal Group weather-girl Meteorologist slams fat-shaming critic: 'I like pasta, bread and cheese too much to obsess over my weight' Michael Hollan fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 9b801c7c-5fff-58a4-805d-a169f6d1c225   Westlake Legal Group weather-girl Meteorologist slams fat-shaming critic: 'I like pasta, bread and cheese too much to obsess over my weight' Michael Hollan fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 9b801c7c-5fff-58a4-805d-a169f6d1c225

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