web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 319)

Burnout linked to potentially lethal heart condition

Westlake Legal Group stressed_istock Burnout linked to potentially lethal heart condition New York Post Hannah Frishberg fox-news/health/heart-health fox-news/health/healthy-living/womens-health fnc/health fnc article 9663fcb8-3f6c-54de-b881-9fd9571a759d

Scale it back — for your heart’s sake.

Burnout is not just an inconvenience. It can lead to a critical, possibly deadly heart condition, a new study has found.

Researchers surveyed over 11,000 individuals for burnout, or “vital exhaustion,” and then tracked their development of the heart condition atrial fibrillation over the course of 25 years.

MILWAUKEE WOMAN DIES AFTER LEAVING ER DUE TO LONG WAIT, FAMILY SAYS

Those with the highest rate of burnout also had the highest rate of developing AFib, which causes an irregular, faster heartbeat and can lead to strokes, blood clots and other complications that may result in death, according to the findings published recently in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

“Vital exhaustion, commonly referred to as burnout syndrome, is typically caused by prolonged and profound stress at work or home,” study author Parveen K. Garg, of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, defines in a press release. “It differs from depression, which is characterized by low mood, guilt and poor self-esteem.”

While the concept and discomfort of burnout is well known, it received added validation last May when the World Health Organization recognized “burnout syndrome” as an official medical diagnosis for the first time.

‘FIT’ MOM SUFFERS 3 HEART ATTACKS IN A WEEK: ‘A MASSIVE SHOCK’ 

The research brings more evidence that burnout is not just a mentally debilitating state, but a physically crippling one, too.

“The results of our study further establish the harm that can be caused in people who suffer from exhaustion that goes unchecked,” says Garg.

The large study found that those with the highest vital exhaustion levels were at a 20 percent higher risk for developing AFib.

The most common form of heart arrhythmia, AFib is estimated to currently impact up to about 6 million Americans, a number expected to rise as the population ages, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2017, 166,793 death certificates mentioned the condition, which can be permanent or occur in brief episodes.

Although the study did find a link between burnout and AFib, it failed to find a connection between the heart condition and anger, anti-depressant use or poor social support.

Garg concludes his commentary on the study with a recommendation that people invest in some self-care as a preventative measure.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“The importance of avoiding exhaustion through careful attention to — and management of — personal stress levels as a way to help preserve overall cardiovascular health cannot be overstated,” he says.

Click for more from NYPost.com.

Westlake Legal Group stressed_istock Burnout linked to potentially lethal heart condition New York Post Hannah Frishberg fox-news/health/heart-health fox-news/health/healthy-living/womens-health fnc/health fnc article 9663fcb8-3f6c-54de-b881-9fd9571a759d   Westlake Legal Group stressed_istock Burnout linked to potentially lethal heart condition New York Post Hannah Frishberg fox-news/health/heart-health fox-news/health/healthy-living/womens-health fnc/health fnc article 9663fcb8-3f6c-54de-b881-9fd9571a759d

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Staffers Say Sexism Runs Deep At The Washington Post

Washington Post reporter Felicia Sonmez received death and rape threats for a tweet she sent out late last month linking to a story about sexual assault allegations against Kobe Bryant, shortly after news broke of the NBA star’s death. Someone found Sonmez’s home address and published it online. Instead of rushing to protect her from abuse or worse, her editors suspended her and suggested she go to a hotel for her safety.

The situation was different for national security reporter Shane Harris last spring. Harris also was getting harassed online, although not at the same level of intensity as his colleague. Someone discovered his home address. He told his editors.

The Post quickly dispatched a security guard to Harris’s home. The guard was armed and provided round-the-clock security for 72 hours, according to people familiar with the situation. 

The differing treatment of the two reporters is the latest example of unequal treatment of men and women at the Post, according to one former contractor and seven current and former staffers who spoke to HuffPost in the days after Sonmez was suspended. None wanted to use their names on the record for fear of retaliation from management or potential career damage for speaking out against a powerful news organization. Fears were particularly acute given what had happened to Sonmez.

The place is run by men and it creates a particular atmosphere and assigns a higher value to certain male characteristics. I’ve been a victim of it in a broad way, as most women in the newsroom have. a female staffer at The Washington Post

Some expressed a hesitancy to criticize the Post now, when the paper’s reporting and credibility is under attack by a White House hostile to the press. The delicacy of this moment makes their criticism all the more notable.

The Washington Post doesn’t value women and men in the same way, these people said. This appears literally true when it comes to pay: Women in the newsroom are paid less than men, according to a report published last year by the union that represents employees. (The paper disputed the findings at the time.) One former Post contractor told HuffPost she was let go after asking for a raise.

The disparity courses through the culture and is borne out in the paper’s coverage, where stories of sexual harassment have sometimes been held to a higher standard than other coverage, some staffers said. 

Crucially, the gender imbalance is clear in the masthead. Three of the four top editors at the Post are men. Only four of 17 department heads are women.

“The place is run by men and it creates a particular atmosphere and assigns a higher value to certain male characteristics,” said one female reporter. “I’ve been a victim of it in a broad way, as most women in the newsroom have.”

Another staffer put it this way: “It seems that there’s a blind spot when it comes to the needs of female employees. So when this incident with Felicia happened, it turned up all these other concerns and worries and long-standing issues.”

In an emailed statement, The Washington Post argued that it is a fair and unbiased place to work. “We dispute your narrative,” wrote Kristine Coratti Kelly, a spokeswoman for the newspaper. 

“The Washington Post has been equitable in its hiring, promotion and compensation for employees, in its security deployment on behalf of employees and in the high standards it applies to all stories,” she wrote.

Asked about the difference between the way Sonmez and Harris were treated, Coratti Kelly said that the paper takes security “extremely seriously” and that half of the paper’s “security deployments” were for women.

“Our process and protocols are the same for every case where one of our employees is threatened, without exception,” Coratti Kelly said, while also noting that “each case is handled based on the specific facts at play.” 

She Asked For A Raise — And Got Fired

The situation can be worse for female contract reporters, who aren’t on staff yet but often put in full-time hours, particularly in foreign bureaus.

One former contractor, a woman assigned to an outpost overseas, told HuffPost that she had been fired after asking for a pay increase. 

She first broached the subject in July at a breakfast meeting with her boss’s boss, foreign editor Doug Jehl, the woman told HuffPost, declining to be named for fear of career reprisals. She had just recently thrown her hat in the ring for a promotion to a staff position.

As a contractor, relative to her male counterparts, she was underpaid, she told Jehl, citing a conversation with the Post’s union. The subject set him off. “It was like a red flag to a bull. He got angry. He raised his voice,” she said. He told her she’d have to leave the paper if she brought up the issue again, she recalled him saying.

The next morning, sitting at a Starbucks, Jehl said her contract would not be renewed after it expired at the end of the year. “‘You want more money and job security and we can’t give that to you,’” she recalled him saying.

She decided to take up matters with leadership a few months later in September, writing an email to Martin Baron, the executive editor of the paper. HuffPost reviewed the exchange. She described how much she liked working for the Post and how disappointed she was in the way her situation was handled.

“I don’t believe the way I’ve been treated reflects the values you espouse or aspire to for the Post,” she wrote.

She provided Baron with an outline of what happened:

When I asked him for a raise, he told me to look for a job in another company. Mine wasn’t a demand. It was a statement of my own perceived value to the company and as a reporter. My sense is that you expect journalists to stand up for themselves and act professionally. I felt I did both. The next day, Doug told me my [job] application was not being considered, and my contract was not being renewed. I spoke to [managing editor] Tracy Grant about this on the same day, and she told me I could leave immediately and still get my salary through the end of the contract if I wished.

In his response, Baron said they were sticking to their decision to let her go, stating that it was part of a rethink of the entire bureau. He acknowledged the circumstances of her dismissal only slightly. “I’m disappointed to hear that you believe the changes in the bureau have not been handled properly,” he wrote. “We will have nothing other than positive things to say about you to any potential future employers.” 

The woman reached out to lawyers about the possibility of a discrimination suit, according to an email reviewed by HuffPost. But since she was a contractor, nothing could really be done, she was told.

Jehl did not respond to a request for comment. The Washington Post said it would not comment on the specifics of hiring decisions, but said other female contractors have been hired as staffers.

The former contractor is still looking for work.

Women In The Newsroom Aren’t Paid As Much As Men

Pay isn’t just a contractor problem. Women in the Post newsroom are collectively paid less than men, according to the union’s report, which examined salaries among about 500 members in the newsroom. The salaried men in the newsroom earn a median of $116,065 a year. The median for women is $95,595. The gap is widest for staffers under 40: Young men earn $95,890 compared to $84,030 for women. The report used age as a proxy for experience, which it did not expressly track.

Men also receive a higher percentage of merit-based pay raises. The union found a racial pay gap as well: The median pay for women of color is $30,000 less than it is for white men. 

The report notes that the pay gap has shrunk in recent years since billionaire Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos bought the paper. 

In interviews for the report, employees said they had learned they were paid less than co-workers doing the same job, even with the same experience. They said the hiring process favors outsiders who come from higher-paying competitors, which, the report says, “sets back women, people of color, and journalists from smaller publications,” who are underpaid.

The report contains testimonials from newsroom employees who’ve been underpaid at the paper ― including men who started as interns. One male reporter is still paid $70,000 after 20 years with the paper, according to the report.

One woman described as a “veteran reporter,” with more than 20 years experience, said that the man who held her job as a foreign bureau chief before she did earned $50,000 more despite having fewer years of experience. 

One staffer told HuffPost that women inside the Post have been asking their managers for pay increases to catch up to their male colleagues, but the pace of change has been glacial. “Quite often their direct bosses are telling them, ‘You’re right,’” she said. “Yet years can go by and unless you have an outside offer or an incredible year or whatever, it can be really difficult to catch up.”

The Post disputed the union report’s findings after it was published. Factors like “position, years of experience, and performance” weren’t taken into account, spokeswoman Coratti Kelly told the Washingtonian.  

Few Women At The Tippy Top 

It’s not that The Washington Post doesn’t have high-profile women, staffers emphasized to HuffPost. There are star female reporters at the paper. Indeed, a majority of the newsroom staff — approximately 800 employees — is female, just like the U.S. workforce generally.

However, when it comes to the most senior managerial roles at the Post, it’s still a man’s world, employees told HuffPost. Just four of the paper’s 17 department heads are women. The Post’s arguably most prestigious sections — including the national, investigative and foreign desks — are run by men. Some have female deputies. 

This is an issue other papers have struggled with, too.

“There are women when you get down four layers, great women,” said one female staffer. “You have the top leadership, all men. You just wonder how that’s impacting things. I think that whether they realize it or not, that sends a message.”

There is one powerful woman in the top section of the masthead: Tracy Grant is only the second woman to make it to managing editor at the Post and was promoted to that role in 2018 at a time when few women were on the masthead or in leadership. (At one point in 2014, the masthead was all male.) She is considered Baron’s second-in-command and holds sway in the newsroom. 

Yet two female staffers expressed dismay that Grant sends out office-wide emails that seem like tasks she should have delegated to an assistant. Over the past few months, Grant has sent out notes about issues around streaming the impeachment, an event involving snacks and HR benefit info, and cleaning out the office fridge. “Anything left there will be handled by one disgruntled managing editor,” she wrote in that email, obtained by HuffPost. These staffers said the other three top editors, all men, don’t write these kinds of emails.

Just four of the paper’s 17 department heads are women. The Post’s arguably most prestigious sections are run by men. Some have female deputies.

“Whether they realize it or not, that sends a message,” said one staffer.

“Tracy is a veteran journalist who oversees some of the most sensitive matters in the newsroom and she is an invaluable voice on all major decisions regarding the management of the newsroom,” spokeswoman Coratti Kelly wrote HuffPost. “To attempt to diminish that with a few emails (on matters outside her direct responsibilities) that she occasionally sent for the benefit of her colleagues is unfair and insulting to her stature in the company.” 

Me Too Stories Held To Higher Standard

“What Was the Washington Post Afraid Of?” That was the title of a widely read piece in New York magazine last year that described the Post’s struggles with publishing a story about sexual misconduct. 

Irin Carmon, a freelancer for the Post who is now a senior correspondent for New York magazine, described how she tried — and failed — to publish a story about sexual misconduct allegations against Jeff Fager, the executive producer of “60 Minutes.” (The New Yorker’s Ronan Farrow ultimately ran a story about Fager, who was forced out of his job.) 

Westlake Legal Group 5e360048220000510023d6b3 Staffers Say Sexism Runs Deep At The Washington Post

Taylor Hill via Getty Images Washington Post Executive Editor Marty Baron (right) with actor Liev Schreiber, who played the editor in the 2015 movie “Spotlight.”

During the editing process for the Fager story, one of The Washington Post’s male editors went to Baron and asked that female editors be included in reviewing the story, she wrote. “Baron agreed but added that all decisions about the story would be made strictly on the basis of journalism,” Carmon wrote, which seemed to suggest that Baron didn’t understand how the perspective of a woman might deepen understanding of the subject matter.

In the case of these Me Too stories, powerful male editors might empathize more with a man being accused of misconduct than a woman who’s experienced mistreatment, Carmon wrote. 

“It’s easier for a lot of us to believe that a man’s career matters more than the hypothetical losses of the women he might have harmed,” she wrote.

To be sure, The Washington Post has published some of the most important journalism on sexual misconduct in recent years. Reporter David Farenthold broke the story about the now-infamous “Access Hollywood” tape, in which Donald Trump bragged about grabbing women by their genitals. 

The Post’s reporting on Roy Moore’s pursuit of teenage girls contributed to his loss in the 2017 race for an Alabama Senate seat.

That same year, Carmon and investigative reporter Amy Brittain broke the story about Charlie Rose’s history of sexual misconduct, leading to his ouster at CBS.

Staffers inside the Post emphasized the paper’s award-winning work on these stories. But they also cited Carmon’s Fager piece as an example of how there appear to be different standards for different topics. 

“If you categorize the treatment of how sexual assault stories are sourced, compared to political stories and how they’re sourced, you see different standards,” said Nikki Usher, a media and politics professor at the University of Illinois. This isn’t just a Washington Post problem. “None of the major outlets have been able to explain this.”

That’s partly due to fears over being sued for libel or getting a story wrong, she added. But it’s also “because men don’t believe women.”

National security stories, for example, often feature unnamed sources making what can be explosive accusations. Anonymity is granted because the consequences of talking to the press are so high, while the subject matter is of the utmost importance.

However, for a story about sexual misconduct, at least in the Fager case that Carmon described, the Post insisted that the women go on record with their names. Surely, the consequences for those women were high, too — and the subject matter was important. The physical safety of anyone working with such a prominent man is at stake.

The Post disputed Carmon’s story at the time. “The suggestion that The Post’s decision-making — made in agreement by five senior editors — was influenced by anything other than established journalistic standards is baseless and reprehensible,” Coratti Kelly said in a statement to Poynter.

Journalists inside and outside the Post rallied to support Sonmez after she was suspended last month and, amid the outcry, the Post’s leaders reinstated her. Though Sonmez’s tweets were “ill-timed,” they didn’t violate any social media policy, Grant said in a Jan. 28 statement. “We regret having spoken publicly about a personnel matter,” she said.

Later in the week, Baron sent an email to the newsroom, discussing social media policy and emphasizing that the editors take security seriously. “In this environment, it’s essential that you feel safe and supported,” he said. Neither the statement nor the email contained any sort of apology or acknowledgment that Sonmez may not have felt this way.

The Washington Post has long been known for a kind of swaggering macho-brand of journalism, a la Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein in “All the President’s Men.” Like most large newspapers, it was long a man’s world. 

Ben Bradlee, the legendary executive editor who broke the Watergate story, once rejected a job candidate by saying “nothing clanks when he walks” — the implication being that he didn’t have balls of steel.

Of course, that was decades ago, but that cultural echo isn’t gone. Some of the women HuffPost spoke with described an undercurrent of male bravado.

“There’s a dweeby beta-male quotient at the Post. They’re not openly macho,” a female staffer said. “There’s an understated respectability that is secretly pernicious and sexist operating in that place.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

For Some Out-Of-Staters, Iowa Is Their Best Chance To See The Candidates

Westlake Legal Group 5e3750992400006a04ed5596 For Some Out-Of-Staters, Iowa Is Their Best Chance To See The Candidates

ANAMOSA, Iowa ― Christine and Tito Cantu do not live in Iowa, but they’re here in the Strawberry Hill Elementary School cafeteria because this might be their best chance to see Pete Buttigieg up close. 

The Cantus live in Rock Falls, Illinois, and some of the Democratic presidential candidates who are crisscrossing Iowa ahead of Monday’s caucuses might drop out of the race before Illinois holds its primary in March. And the candidates who remain will probably not be taking questions in tiny cafeterias. 

“It’s so strange how the Iowa caucus works and now it will be six weeks before we get to vote,” Christine Cantu, 45, said in an interview. “We don’t even know who we’ll get to vote for.”

Buttigieg acknowledged as much during his events on Saturday, noting that Iowa caucusgoers get to put their “thumb on the scale” in the early stages of primary voting. 

“What’s really struck me through this process is seeing how seriously Iowans take that responsibility that comes with the influence that you have,” Buttigieg said at Strawberry Hill Elementary. “You’re very mindful of the importance of really looking us over and kicking the tires and all the ideas that we’re bringing forward to you.”

Iowa’s first-in-the-nation status is controversial, as it privileges the interests of a state that is less diverse and more rural than the rest of the country as a whole and much less diverse than the Democratic Party.

What happens in the Iowa caucuses can have a huge outcome on the rest of the race, with a poor performance potentially killing a campaign. Joe Biden, for instance, dropped out of the Democratic primary in 2008 after garnering less than 1% of Iowa’s delegate count. Barack Obama’s surprise victory that year helped propel him to the White House. 

Today, the former vice president and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) are front-runners nationally, with Buttigieg, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (Minn.) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.) most in need of a strong showing here on Monday.

With such high stakes, some people come from out of state to try to influence the outcome. Barbara Nelson, a 60-year-old real estate agent from Hillsborough, Oregon, said she’s been canvassing for Buttigieg since Tuesday as part of Barnstormers for Pete, a grassroots canvassing group. 

“I knocked on doors in five different towns,” Nelson said. 

Other out-of-staters come just to get close to the candidates they admire. A packed rally in Sanders’ Iowa City field office on Saturday included a number of visitors from other Midwestern states. Krissy Haglund, a naturopathic doctor wearing a baseball hat that read “Doctors for Bernie,” and her husband Dan Wright, a database engineer, brought their two kids from Minneapolis. Hardcore Sanders supporters, they were headed to another one of his events some 90 minutes away in Newton and were also making time for an Andrew Yang rally.

“It’s fun to be here, where the candidates are making little stops and places where we can actually meet them,” Wright said. 

And people really do get to meet candidates here. Voters from Missouri and Oklahoma greeted Biden at a Friday event in Fort Madison. John  Nicks, a 67-year-old lawyer from Tulsa, said Biden thanked him for making the trip. 

Olivia Ortiz came as part of a group of political science students from Benedictine College in Atchison, Kansas, visiting events for Yang, Klobuchar, Warren, Buttigieg, Biden and even former Rep. Joe Walsh, who is hopelessly trying to wrest the GOP nomination from President Donald Trump. Ortiz, 20, called the experience exciting but also said it’s a little “odd” that Iowa goes first given its particular demographics. 

“Iowans are white and that’s great, but I haven’t seen a lot of Hispanic people. I mean there are not a ton of Black people at any of these rallies,” Ortiz said at a Buttigieg rally in Des Moines on Sunday. 

The Cantus got up early on Saturday morning in Rock Falls and made a two-hour drive across the state line to see Klobuchar in Bettendorf, then Warren in Cedar Rapids, then Buttigieg in Anamosa, before returning to Cedar Rapids to see Sanders that evening.

In the cafeteria in Anamosa, people could ask Buttigieg questions without needing a microphone, and the former South Bend, Indiana, mayor posed for selfies afterward. When candidates make their way to Illinois next month, Cantu figures they’ll hold events around Chicago that aren’t nearly as intimate. 

“It would be nice if each state was important,” she said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Staffers Say Sexism Runs Deep At The Washington Post

Washington Post reporter Felicia Sonmez received death and rape threats for a tweet she sent out late last month linking to a story about sexual assault allegations against Kobe Bryant, shortly after news broke of the NBA star’s death. Someone found Sonmez’s home address and published it online. Instead of rushing to protect her from abuse or worse, her editors suspended her and suggested she go to a hotel for her safety.

The situation was different for national security reporter Shane Harris last spring. Harris also was getting harassed online, although not at the same level of intensity as his colleague. Someone discovered his home address. He told his editors.

The Post quickly dispatched a security guard to Harris’s home. The guard was armed and provided round-the-clock security for 72 hours, according to people familiar with the situation. 

The differing treatment of the two reporters is the latest example of unequal treatment of men and women at the Post, according to one former contractor and seven current and former staffers who spoke to HuffPost in the days after Sonmez was suspended. None wanted to use their names on the record for fear of retaliation from management or potential career damage for speaking out against a powerful news organization. Fears were particularly acute given what had happened to Sonmez.

The place is run by men and it creates a particular atmosphere and assigns a higher value to certain male characteristics. I’ve been a victim of it in a broad way, as most women in the newsroom have. a female staffer at The Washington Post

Some expressed a hesitancy to criticize the Post now, when the paper’s reporting and credibility is under attack by a White House hostile to the press. The delicacy of this moment makes their criticism all the more notable.

The Washington Post doesn’t value women and men in the same way, these people said. This appears literally true when it comes to pay: Women in the newsroom are paid less than men, according to a report published last year by the union that represents employees. (The paper disputed the findings at the time.) One former Post contractor told HuffPost she was let go after asking for a raise.

The disparity courses through the culture and is borne out in the paper’s coverage, where stories of sexual harassment have sometimes been held to a higher standard than other coverage, some staffers said. 

Crucially, the gender imbalance is clear in the masthead. Three of the four top editors at the Post are men. Only four of 17 department heads are women.

“The place is run by men and it creates a particular atmosphere and assigns a higher value to certain male characteristics,” said one female reporter. “I’ve been a victim of it in a broad way, as most women in the newsroom have.”

Another staffer put it this way: “It seems that there’s a blind spot when it comes to the needs of female employees. So when this incident with Felicia happened, it turned up all these other concerns and worries and long-standing issues.”

In an emailed statement, The Washington Post argued that it is a fair and unbiased place to work. “We dispute your narrative,” wrote Kristine Coratti Kelly, a spokeswoman for the newspaper. 

“The Washington Post has been equitable in its hiring, promotion and compensation for employees, in its security deployment on behalf of employees and in the high standards it applies to all stories,” she wrote.

Asked about the difference between the way Sonmez and Harris were treated, Coratti Kelly said that the paper takes security “extremely seriously” and that half of the paper’s “security deployments” were for women.

“Our process and protocols are the same for every case where one of our employees is threatened, without exception,” Coratti Kelly said, while also noting that “each case is handled based on the specific facts at play.” 

She Asked For A Raise — And Got Fired

The situation can be worse for female contract reporters, who aren’t on staff yet but often put in full-time hours, particularly in foreign bureaus.

One former contractor, a woman assigned to an outpost overseas, told HuffPost that she had been fired after asking for a pay increase. 

She first broached the subject in July at a breakfast meeting with her boss’s boss, foreign editor Doug Jehl, the woman told HuffPost, declining to be named for fear of career reprisals. She had just recently thrown her hat in the ring for a promotion to a staff position.

As a contractor, relative to her male counterparts, she was underpaid, she told Jehl, citing a conversation with the Post’s union. The subject set him off. “It was like a red flag to a bull. He got angry. He raised his voice,” she said. He told her she’d have to leave the paper if she brought up the issue again, she recalled him saying.

The next morning, sitting at a Starbucks, Jehl said her contract would not be renewed after it expired at the end of the year. “‘You want more money and job security and we can’t give that to you,’” she recalled him saying.

She decided to take up matters with leadership a few months later in September, writing an email to Martin Baron, the executive editor of the paper. HuffPost reviewed the exchange. She described how much she liked working for the Post and how disappointed she was in the way her situation was handled.

“I don’t believe the way I’ve been treated reflects the values you espouse or aspire to for the Post,” she wrote.

She provided Baron with an outline of what happened:

When I asked him for a raise, he told me to look for a job in another company. Mine wasn’t a demand. It was a statement of my own perceived value to the company and as a reporter. My sense is that you expect journalists to stand up for themselves and act professionally. I felt I did both. The next day, Doug told me my [job] application was not being considered, and my contract was not being renewed. I spoke to [managing editor] Tracy Grant about this on the same day, and she told me I could leave immediately and still get my salary through the end of the contract if I wished.

In his response, Baron said they were sticking to their decision to let her go, stating that it was part of a rethink of the entire bureau. He acknowledged the circumstances of her dismissal only slightly. “I’m disappointed to hear that you believe the changes in the bureau have not been handled properly,” he wrote. “We will have nothing other than positive things to say about you to any potential future employers.” 

The woman reached out to lawyers about the possibility of a discrimination suit, according to an email reviewed by HuffPost. But since she was a contractor, nothing could really be done, she was told.

Jehl did not respond to a request for comment. The Washington Post said it would not comment on the specifics of hiring decisions, but said other female contractors have been hired as staffers.

The former contractor is still looking for work.

Women In The Newsroom Aren’t Paid As Much As Men

Pay isn’t just a contractor problem. Women in the Post newsroom are collectively paid less than men, according to the union’s report, which examined salaries among about 500 members in the newsroom. The salaried men in the newsroom earn a median of $116,065 a year. The median for women is $95,595. The gap is widest for staffers under 40: Young men earn $95,890 compared to $84,030 for women. The report used age as a proxy for experience, which it did not expressly track.

Men also receive a higher percentage of merit-based pay raises. The union found a racial pay gap as well: The median pay for women of color is $30,000 less than it is for white men. 

The report notes that the pay gap has shrunk in recent years since billionaire Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos bought the paper. 

In interviews for the report, employees said they had learned they were paid less than co-workers doing the same job, even with the same experience. They said the hiring process favors outsiders who come from higher-paying competitors, which, the report says, “sets back women, people of color, and journalists from smaller publications,” who are underpaid.

The report contains testimonials from newsroom employees who’ve been underpaid at the paper ― including men who started as interns. One male reporter is still paid $70,000 after 20 years with the paper, according to the report.

One woman described as a “veteran reporter,” with more than 20 years experience, said that the man who held her job as a foreign bureau chief before she did earned $50,000 more despite having fewer years of experience. 

One staffer told HuffPost that women inside the Post have been asking their managers for pay increases to catch up to their male colleagues, but the pace of change has been glacial. “Quite often their direct bosses are telling them, ‘You’re right,’” she said. “Yet years can go by and unless you have an outside offer or an incredible year or whatever, it can be really difficult to catch up.”

The Post disputed the union report’s findings after it was published. Factors like “position, years of experience, and performance” weren’t taken into account, spokeswoman Coratti Kelly told the Washingtonian.  

Few Women At The Tippy Top 

It’s not that The Washington Post doesn’t have high-profile women, staffers emphasized to HuffPost. There are star female reporters at the paper. Indeed, a majority of the newsroom staff — approximately 800 employees — is female, just like the U.S. workforce generally.

However, when it comes to the most senior managerial roles at the Post, it’s still a man’s world, employees told HuffPost. Just four of the paper’s 17 department heads are women. The Post’s arguably most prestigious sections — including the national, investigative and foreign desks — are run by men. Some have female deputies. 

This is an issue other papers have struggled with, too.

“There are women when you get down four layers, great women,” said one female staffer. “You have the top leadership, all men. You just wonder how that’s impacting things. I think that whether they realize it or not, that sends a message.”

There is one powerful woman in the top section of the masthead: Tracy Grant is only the second woman to make it to managing editor at the Post and was promoted to that role in 2018 at a time when few women were on the masthead or in leadership. (At one point in 2014, the masthead was all male.) She is considered Baron’s second-in-command and holds sway in the newsroom. 

Yet two female staffers expressed dismay that Grant sends out office-wide emails that seem like tasks she should have delegated to an assistant. Over the past few months, Grant has sent out notes about issues around streaming the impeachment, an event involving snacks and HR benefit info, and cleaning out the office fridge. “Anything left there will be handled by one disgruntled managing editor,” she wrote in that email, obtained by HuffPost. These staffers said the other three top editors, all men, don’t write these kinds of emails.

Just four of the paper’s 17 department heads are women. The Post’s arguably most prestigious sections are run by men. Some have female deputies.

“Whether they realize it or not, that sends a message,” said one staffer.

“Tracy is a veteran journalist who oversees some of the most sensitive matters in the newsroom and she is an invaluable voice on all major decisions regarding the management of the newsroom,” spokeswoman Coratti Kelly wrote HuffPost. “To attempt to diminish that with a few emails (on matters outside her direct responsibilities) that she occasionally sent for the benefit of her colleagues is unfair and insulting to her stature in the company.” 

Me Too Stories Held To Higher Standard

“What Was the Washington Post Afraid Of?” That was the title of a widely read piece in New York magazine last year that described the Post’s struggles with publishing a story about sexual misconduct. 

Irin Carmon, a freelancer for the Post who is now a senior correspondent for New York magazine, described how she tried — and failed — to publish a story about sexual misconduct allegations against Jeff Fager, the executive producer of “60 Minutes.” (The New Yorker’s Ronan Farrow ultimately ran a story about Fager, who was forced out of his job.) 

Westlake Legal Group 5e360048220000510023d6b3 Staffers Say Sexism Runs Deep At The Washington Post

Taylor Hill via Getty Images Washington Post Executive Editor Marty Baron (right) with actor Liev Schreiber, who played the editor in the 2015 movie “Spotlight.”

During the editing process for the Fager story, one of The Washington Post’s male editors went to Baron and asked that female editors be included in reviewing the story, she wrote. “Baron agreed but added that all decisions about the story would be made strictly on the basis of journalism,” Carmon wrote, which seemed to suggest that Baron didn’t understand how the perspective of a woman might deepen understanding of the subject matter.

In the case of these Me Too stories, powerful male editors might empathize more with a man being accused of misconduct than a woman who’s experienced mistreatment, Carmon wrote. 

“It’s easier for a lot of us to believe that a man’s career matters more than the hypothetical losses of the women he might have harmed,” she wrote.

To be sure, The Washington Post has published some of the most important journalism on sexual misconduct in recent years. Reporter David Farenthold broke the story about the now-infamous “Access Hollywood” tape, in which Donald Trump bragged about grabbing women by their genitals. 

The Post’s reporting on Roy Moore’s pursuit of teenage girls contributed to his loss in the 2017 race for an Alabama Senate seat.

That same year, Carmon and investigative reporter Amy Brittain broke the story about Charlie Rose’s history of sexual misconduct, leading to his ouster at CBS.

Staffers inside the Post emphasized the paper’s award-winning work on these stories. But they also cited Carmon’s Fager piece as an example of how there appear to be different standards for different topics. 

“If you categorize the treatment of how sexual assault stories are sourced, compared to political stories and how they’re sourced, you see different standards,” said Nikki Usher, a media and politics professor at the University of Illinois. This isn’t just a Washington Post problem. “None of the major outlets have been able to explain this.”

That’s partly due to fears over being sued for libel or getting a story wrong, she added. But it’s also “because men don’t believe women.”

National security stories, for example, often feature unnamed sources making what can be explosive accusations. Anonymity is granted because the consequences of talking to the press are so high, while the subject matter is of the utmost importance.

However, for a story about sexual misconduct, at least in the Fager case that Carmon described, the Post insisted that the women go on record with their names. Surely, the consequences for those women were high, too — and the subject matter was important. The physical safety of anyone working with such a prominent man is at stake.

The Post disputed Carmon’s story at the time. “The suggestion that The Post’s decision-making — made in agreement by five senior editors — was influenced by anything other than established journalistic standards is baseless and reprehensible,” Coratti Kelly said in a statement to Poynter.

Journalists inside and outside the Post rallied to support Sonmez after she was suspended last month and, amid the outcry, the Post’s leaders reinstated her. Though Sonmez’s tweets were “ill-timed,” they didn’t violate any social media policy, Grant said in a Jan. 28 statement. “We regret having spoken publicly about a personnel matter,” she said.

Later in the week, Baron sent an email to the newsroom, discussing social media policy and emphasizing that the editors take security seriously. “In this environment, it’s essential that you feel safe and supported,” he said. Neither the statement nor the email contained any sort of apology or acknowledgment that Sonmez may not have felt this way.

The Washington Post has long been known for a kind of swaggering macho-brand of journalism, a la Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein in “All the President’s Men.” Like most large newspapers, it was long a man’s world. 

Ben Bradlee, the legendary executive editor who broke the Watergate story, once rejected a job candidate by saying “nothing clanks when he walks” — the implication being that he didn’t have balls of steel.

Of course, that was decades ago, but that cultural echo isn’t gone. Some of the women HuffPost spoke with described an undercurrent of male bravado.

“There’s a dweeby beta-male quotient at the Post. They’re not openly macho,” a female staffer said. “There’s an understated respectability that is secretly pernicious and sexist operating in that place.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

For Some Out-Of-Staters, This Is Their Best Chance To See The Candidates

Westlake Legal Group 5e3750992400006a04ed5596 For Some Out-Of-Staters, This Is Their Best Chance To See The Candidates

ANAMOSA, Iowa ― Christine and Tito Cantu do not live in Iowa, but they’re here in the Strawberry Hill Elementary School cafeteria because this might be their best chance to see Pete Buttigieg up close. 

The Cantus live in Rock Falls, Illinois, and some of the Democratic presidential candidates who are crisscrossing Iowa ahead of Monday’s caucuses might drop out of the race before Illinois holds its primary in March. And the candidates who remain will probably not be taking questions in tiny cafeterias. 

“It’s so strange how the Iowa caucus works and now it will be six weeks before we get to vote,” Christine Cantu, 45, said in an interview. “We don’t even know who we’ll get to vote for.”

Buttigieg acknowledged as much during his events on Saturday, noting that Iowa caucusgoers get to put their “thumb on the scale” in the early stages of primary voting. 

“What’s really struck me through this process is seeing how seriously Iowans take that responsibility that comes with the influence that you have,” Buttigieg said at Strawberry Hill Elementary. “You’re very mindful of the importance of really looking us over and kicking the tires and all the ideas that we’re bringing forward to you.”

Iowa’s first-in-the-nation status is controversial, as it privileges the interests of a state that is less diverse and more rural than the rest of the country as a whole and much less diverse than the Democratic Party.

What happens in the Iowa caucuses can have a huge outcome on the rest of the race, with a poor performance potentially killing a campaign. Joe Biden, for instance, dropped out of the Democratic primary in 2008 after garnering less than 1% of Iowa’s delegate count. Barack Obama’s surprise victory that year helped propel him to the White House. 

Today, the former vice president and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) are front-runners nationally, with Buttigieg, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (Minn.) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.) most in need of a strong showing here on Monday.

With such high stakes, some people come from out of state to try to influence the outcome. Barbara Nelson, a 60-year-old real estate agent from Hillsborough, Oregon, said she’s been canvassing for Buttigieg since Tuesday as part of Barnstormers for Pete, a grassroots canvassing group. 

“I knocked on doors in five different towns,” Nelson said. 

Other out-of-staters come just to get close to the candidates they admire. A packed rally in Sanders’ Iowa City field office on Saturday included a number of visitors from other Midwestern states. Krissy Haglund, a naturopathic doctor wearing a baseball hat that read “Doctors for Bernie,” and her husband Dan Wright, a database engineer, brought their two kids from Minneapolis. Hardcore Sanders supporters, they were headed to another one of his events some 90 minutes away in Newton and were also making time for an Andrew Yang rally.

“It’s fun to be here, where the candidates are making little stops and places where we can actually meet them,” Wright said. 

And people really do get to meet candidates here. Voters from Missouri and Oklahoma greeted Biden at a Friday event in Fort Madison. John  Nicks, a 67-year-old lawyer from Tulsa, said Biden thanked him for making the trip. 

Olivia Ortiz came as part of a group of political science students from Benedictine College in Atchison, Kansas, visiting events for Yang, Klobuchar, Warren, Buttigieg, Biden and even former Rep. Joe Walsh, who is hopelessly trying to wrest the GOP nomination from President Donald Trump. Ortiz, 20, called the experience exciting but also said it’s a little “odd” that Iowa goes first given its particular demographics. 

“Iowans are white and that’s great, but I haven’t seen a lot of Hispanic people. I mean there are not a ton of Black people at any of these rallies,” Ortiz said at a Buttigieg rally in Des Moines on Sunday. 

The Cantus got up early on Saturday morning in Rock Falls and made a two-hour drive across the state line to see Klobuchar in Bettendorf, then Warren in Cedar Rapids, then Buttigieg in Anamosa, before returning to Cedar Rapids to see Sanders that evening.

In the cafeteria in Anamosa, people could ask Buttigieg questions without needing a microphone, and the former South Bend, Indiana, mayor posed for selfies afterward. When candidates make their way to Illinois next month, Cantu figures they’ll hold events around Chicago that aren’t nearly as intimate. 

“It would be nice if each state was important,” she said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

For Some Out-Of-Staters, This Is Their Best Chance To See The Candidates

Westlake Legal Group 5e3750992400006a04ed5596 For Some Out-Of-Staters, This Is Their Best Chance To See The Candidates

ANAMOSA, Iowa ― Christine and Tito Cantu do not live in Iowa, but they’re here in the Strawberry Hill Elementary School cafeteria because this might be their best chance to see Pete Buttigieg up close. 

The Cantus live in Rock Falls, Illinois, and some of the Democratic presidential candidates who are crisscrossing Iowa ahead of Monday’s caucuses might drop out of the race before Illinois holds its primary in March. And the candidates who remain will probably not be taking questions in tiny cafeterias. 

“It’s so strange how the Iowa caucus works and now it will be six weeks before we get to vote,” Christine Cantu, 45, said in an interview. “We don’t even know who we’ll get to vote for.”

Buttigieg acknowledged as much during his events on Saturday, noting that Iowa caucusgoers get to put their “thumb on the scale” in the early stages of primary voting. 

“What’s really struck me through this process is seeing how seriously Iowans take that responsibility that comes with the influence that you have,” Buttigieg said at Strawberry Hill Elementary. “You’re very mindful of the importance of really looking us over and kicking the tires and all the ideas that we’re bringing forward to you.”

Iowa’s first-in-the-nation status is controversial, as it privileges the interests of a state that is less diverse and more rural than the rest of the country as a whole and much less diverse than the Democratic Party.

What happens in the Iowa caucuses can have a huge outcome on the rest of the race, with a poor performance potentially killing a campaign. Joe Biden, for instance, dropped out of the Democratic primary in 2008 after garnering less than 1% of Iowa’s delegate count. Barack Obama’s surprise victory that year helped propel him to the White House. 

Today, the former vice president and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) are front-runners nationally, with Buttigieg, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (Minn.) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.) most in need of a strong showing here on Monday.

With such high stakes, some people come from out of state to try to influence the outcome. Barbara Nelson, a 60-year-old real estate agent from Hillsborough, Oregon, said she’s been canvassing for Buttigieg since Tuesday as part of Barnstormers for Pete, a grassroots canvassing group. 

“I knocked on doors in five different towns,” Nelson said. 

Other out-of-staters come just to get close to the candidates they admire. A packed rally in Sanders’ Iowa City field office on Saturday included a number of visitors from other Midwestern states. Krissy Haglund, a naturopathic doctor wearing a baseball hat that read “Doctors for Bernie,” and her husband Dan Wright, a database engineer, brought their two kids from Minneapolis. Hardcore Sanders supporters, they were headed to another one of his events some 90 minutes away in Newton and were also making time for an Andrew Yang rally.

“It’s fun to be here, where the candidates are making little stops and places where we can actually meet them,” Wright said. 

And people really do get to meet candidates here. Voters from Missouri and Oklahoma greeted Biden at a Friday event in Fort Madison. John  Nicks, a 67-year-old lawyer from Tulsa, said Biden thanked him for making the trip. 

Olivia Ortiz came as part of a group of political science students from Benedictine College in Atchison, Kansas, visiting events for Yang, Klobuchar, Warren, Buttigieg, Biden and even former Rep. Joe Walsh, who is hopelessly trying to wrest the GOP nomination from President Donald Trump. Ortiz, 20, called the experience exciting but also said it’s a little “odd” that Iowa goes first given its particular demographics. 

“Iowans are white and that’s great, but I haven’t seen a lot of Hispanic people. I mean there are not a ton of Black people at any of these rallies,” Ortiz said at a Buttigieg rally in Des Moines on Sunday. 

The Cantus got up early on Saturday morning in Rock Falls and made a two-hour drive across the state line to see Klobuchar in Bettendorf, then Warren in Cedar Rapids, then Buttigieg in Anamosa, before returning to Cedar Rapids to see Sanders that evening.

In the cafeteria in Anamosa, people could ask Buttigieg questions without needing a microphone, and the former South Bend, Indiana, mayor posed for selfies afterward. When candidates make their way to Illinois next month, Cantu figures they’ll hold events around Chicago that aren’t nearly as intimate. 

“It would be nice if each state was important,” she said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Experts worry about pandemic as coronavirus numbers increase: report

Experts believe the highly transmissible coronavirus will become a pandemic as infected numbers continue to increase in China and countries around the world, according to a startling report.

A pandemic is described as a disease that spreads across a large region, across continents and even the entire globe. The coronavirus is reportedly spreading at a similar pace to influenza compared to the slow-moving SARS and MERS, according to the New York Times.

“It’s very, very transmissible, and it almost certainly is going to be a pandemic,” Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, told the paper.

CHINA SAYS US HASN’T GIVEN ANY SIGNIFICANT HELP IN CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK, CREATED PANIC: REPORT

Westlake Legal Group AP20033372583345 Experts worry about pandemic as coronavirus numbers increase: report fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/us fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/health fnc David Aaro article 03e10d19-f598-5694-9178-3fdf3a36e55d

The Huoshenshan temporary field hospital under construction is seen as it nears completion in Wuhan in central China’s Hubei Province, Sunday, Feb. 2, 2020. (Chinatopix via AP)

There are now 11 confirmed cases in the U.S.

As of Monday morning, there are six in California, one in Arizona, one in Washington state, one in Massachusetts and two in Illinois. No deaths have been reported in the U.S. and 99 percent of cases still remain in China.

Three more people were announced to have been infected in California on Sunday.

“I understand that people are concerned, but based on what we know today, the risk to [the] general public remains low,” said Dr. Sara Cody, Santa Clara County’s health officer. “A second case is not unexpected. With our large population and the amount of travel to China for both personal and business reasons, we will likely see more cases.”

The U.S. announced Sunday that Americans who traveled to China within the last 14 days would be sent to designated airports for enhanced screenings. Foreign nationals who recently went to China would be denied entry, other than the immediate family of American citizens and permanent residents.

FORMER HHS SECRETARY TOM PRICE, M.D.: CORONAVIRUS – THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY

China’s Foreign Ministry said on Monday that the U.S. hasn’t given the country any substantive help in its fight against the coronavirus outbreak. They added the U.S. was contributing to the international panic surrounding the illness, according to a report by Reuters.

Three people in New York City are also being tested for the coronavirus after they made recent trips to mainland China, according to the state’s department of public health.

“We are continuing to work closely with our partners at the CDC, State, and federal government as the coronavirus situation evolves,” said Health Commissioner Dr. Oxiris Barbot. “If you have traveled to the area affected by the outbreak in the last 14 days and feel unwell, call your doctor or visit a clinic, and you will be cared for.”

2ND CASE OF CORONAVIRUS CONFIRMED IN BAY AREA, MARKING 9TH CASE IN US

Test results conducted by the CDC will take roughly 36-48 hours to determine if the three people in New York City were infected with the virus.

Weeks after China announced the outbreak of the coronavirus, the international community has increased measures to prevent a widespread epidemic.

The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak a global emergency as it spreads to countries outside of China and the number of infected patients continues to grow.

Westlake Legal Group AP20030725910500 Experts worry about pandemic as coronavirus numbers increase: report fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/us fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/health fnc David Aaro article 03e10d19-f598-5694-9178-3fdf3a36e55d

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General of the World Health Organization (WHO), talks to the media at the World Health Organization headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2020.  (Jean-Christophe Bott/Keystone via AP)

Countries around the globe have increased travel restrictions to the infected mainland China and Hubei province — with the U.S. State Department increasing its advisory to level 4: “Do Not Travel.”

STATE DEPARTMENT, CITING CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK, RAISES CHINA TRAVEL ADVISORY: ‘DO NOT TRAVEL’

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have advised travelers to avoid all nonessential travel to the country.

Westlake Legal Group AP20034140227453 Experts worry about pandemic as coronavirus numbers increase: report fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/us fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/health fnc David Aaro article 03e10d19-f598-5694-9178-3fdf3a36e55d

A man wearing a face mask stands on a subway train in Beijing, Monday, Feb. 3, 2020. Much of China officially went back to work on Monday after the Lunar New Year holiday was extended several days by the government due to a virus outbreak, but China’s capital remained largely empty as local officials strongly encouraged non-essential businesses to remain closed or work from home. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

Coronavirus has now infected more people in China than were sickened during the SARS outbreak in the early 2000s.

Here are the latest figures.

How many have been infected or have died?

The death toll from the virus has increased to 361 on Monday, with a total of 17,205 infected — an increase of nearly 20 percent in the last 24 hours.

The first death outside of China was recorded in the Philippines on Sunday. The 44-year-old Chinese man from Wuhan was hospitalized last week with a fever, cough and sore throat, and died after developing severe pneumonia, according to the Philippines health department.

The WHO said the number of cases will keep growing as tests are pending on thousands of suspected cases.

Where is the virus?

Roughly 99 percent of new cases have appeared in China with the vast majority of the cases in Hubei province and its provincial capital, Wuhan — the epicenter of the virus.

About 150 cases have been reported in at least 25 countries globally.

The United Kingdom announced on Friday it has two cases of the virus, who are reportedly members of the same family.

CORONAVIRUS MAY HAVE SPRUNG FROM ‘PERFECT MIXING POT,’ INFECTIOUS DISEASE DOCTOR SAYS

“The patients are receiving specialist NHS [National Health Service] care, and we are using tried and tested infection control procedures to prevent further spread of the virus,” said Chris Whitty, England’s Chief Medical Officer.

France — 6 cases

Russia — 2

Spain — 1

Thailand — 19

Australia — 12

Germany — 10

Canada — 4

Japan — 20

Malaysia — 8

South Korea — 15

Taiwan — 10

United Arab Emirates — 5

Vietnam — 8

Sri Lanka — 1

Philippines — 2 (1 death)

Nepal — 1

Finland –1

Cambodia — 1

India — 1

Singapore — 16

Italy — 2

Differences between coronavirus and the flu?

The flu has estimated to have killed roughly 10,000 to 25,000 people with nearly 19 to 26 million infected in the U.S. between October 1, 2019, and January 25, 2020, according to the CDC. Coronavirus has impacted a far lesser number, although it’s not yet clear how many have been infected or how widespread it is.

There have also been reports it can be spread without symptoms showing up. In respiratory illnesses, people with the most symptoms are the most contagious, the agency said. Children and those over 65 are the most likely to get sick from the flu, the CDC added.

HOW IS CORONAVIRUS TRANSMITTED?

Unlike the coronavirus, there’s a seasonal vaccine for the flu. People over six months out are advised by the agency to get it during annual vaccination, with certain rare exceptions, such as severe allergies to the shot.

No vaccine has been developed for coronavirus as of yet, which makes it dangerous in that respect.

What are the current travel restrictions?

The U.S. declared the coronavirus a public health emergency on Friday with Trump signing an order barring entry to foreign nationals who recently were in China, other than the immediate family of American citizens and permanent residents.

CHINA SLAMS TRUMP’S CORONAVIRUS TRAVEL LIMITS: ‘NOT A GESTURE OF GOODWILL’

Officials at the CDC have advised travelers to avoid all nonessential travel to the country. The U.S. State Department raised its China travel advisory to “Level 4: Do Not Travel.” The U.S. expanded the screening of travelers arriving from Wuhan from five to 20 airports.

Westlake Legal Group AP20034140856995 Experts worry about pandemic as coronavirus numbers increase: report fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/us fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/health fnc David Aaro article 03e10d19-f598-5694-9178-3fdf3a36e55d

People wearing face masks ride a mostly empty subway train during the morning rush hour in Beijing, Monday, Feb. 3, 2020.  (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

“Those currently in China should consider departing using commercial means. The Department of State has requested that all non-essential U.S. government personnel defer travel to China in light of the novel coronavirus,” The advisory said.

Vietnam stopped all flights to and from China.

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia, New Zealand, and Australia all have similar policies to the U.S. on restricting non-citizens.

Mongolia and Singapore have shut their borders.

Singapore said it would ban travelers from China’s Hubei province.

Pakistan says they’re halting all flights to and from China until Feb. 2.

CORONAVIRUS DEATH IN PHILIPPINES SADI TO BE FIRST OUTSIDE CHINA

The United Kingdom and New Zealand advised their people against nonessential travel to China.

Russia has signed an order to close the border between them and China. They also blocked tour groups from China.

China has cut off access to Wuhan, the epicenter of the outbreak, trapping more than 50 million people.

Japan bars foreign nationals who had been to Hubei province.

Carnival and Royal Carribean denying boarding of people who travel to China within 14 days.

Italy suspended all flights to China.

CHINA DEPLOYS 1,400 MILITARY DOCTORS, NURSES TO STAFF MAKESHIFT HOSPITALS IN WUHAN

South Korea urged an increase in its level of caution to “restraint” when traveling to China.

Hong Kong reduced half its flights and shut down rail service to mainland China.

Delta suspended service to China on Feb. 6.

United’s pilots, concerned for their safety, were able to drop trips to China without pay, a union memo said, according to Reuters.

American Airlines suspended L.A. flights to and from Shanghai and Beijing.

The Allied Pilots Association (APA), which represents 15,000 pilots for American Airlines filed a lawsuit to halt service with the airline, citing “serious, and in many ways still unknown, health threats posed by the coronavirus.”

“I am directing all APA pilots to cease flight operations between the United States and China,” said APA president Eric Ferguson. “Until further notice, if you are scheduled, assigned, or reassigned a pairing into China, decline the assignment by calling your Chief Pilot or IOC Duty Pilot. Inform them you are declining in accordance with the CDC and WHO declarations.”

AMERICAN AIRLINES SUED OVER CORONAVIRUS BY PLOT SEEKING TO CANCEL US-CHINA FLIGHTS

Delta suspending service on Feb 6. — last flight on Monday.

British Airways suspended all flights to and from mainland China.

Virgin Atlantic suspending operations to Shanghai for two weeks.

Lufthansa suspending flights to and from China until Feb. 9.

Air India and Seoul Air halting all flights to the country.

Egypt Air suspending all fights starting Feb. 1.

Air France suspending all flights until Feb. 9.

Finnair, Cathay Pacific, and Jetstar also stopping service.

Lion Air canceled 50 flights to China into February.

Air Canada suspending all direct flights to Beijing and Shanghai.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR THE FOX HEALTH NEWSLETTER 

Kenya Airways suspends all flights to China.

The Associated Press contributed to the report

Westlake Legal Group AP20033372583345 Experts worry about pandemic as coronavirus numbers increase: report fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/us fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/health fnc David Aaro article 03e10d19-f598-5694-9178-3fdf3a36e55d   Westlake Legal Group AP20033372583345 Experts worry about pandemic as coronavirus numbers increase: report fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/us fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/health fnc David Aaro article 03e10d19-f598-5694-9178-3fdf3a36e55d

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

WATCH LIVE: Trump Impeachment Trial Winds Down With Closing Arguments

Closing arguments in the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump kicked off on Monday.

The House managers prosecuting Trump and the president’s defense team will each get two hours to make their case one final time. Watch the proceedings live.

On Sunday, Trump repeated his oft-stated position on the abuse of power and obstruction of Congress impeachment charges pending against him in the Senate: that he is the victim of a politically motivated attempt to discredit his presidency in order to boot him from the White House.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1198370146-226f377a5deb46629d7b9d9ca7637603f13cc64c-s1100-c15 WATCH LIVE: Trump Impeachment Trial Winds Down With Closing Arguments

House impeachment managers Rep. Val Demings (D-FL) and Rep. Sylvia Garcia (L) D-TX arrive for closing statements in President Trump’s impeachment trial. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  WATCH LIVE: Trump Impeachment Trial Winds Down With Closing Arguments

House impeachment managers Rep. Val Demings (D-FL) and Rep. Sylvia Garcia (L) D-TX arrive for closing statements in President Trump’s impeachment trial.

Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

“It’s been a very, very unfair process,” Trump told Sean Hannity of Fox News in a pre-Super Bowl interview. “It should never happen to another president.”

After Monday’s session, the Senate will adjourn until 4 p.m. ET Wednesday, when senators are set to take a formal vote on the articles of impeachment. Trump’s acquittal is nearly guaranteed, as 20 Republicans would have to join the Democratic caucus to vote against the president.

The lawyers’ final pitches to senators on Monday follow a vote Friday to block witnesses and the introduction of new evidence into the trial.

News reports about bombshell allegations contained in a manuscript of former national security adviser John Bolton’s forthcoming book renewed hope for Democrats that they could recruit the four Republicans needed to bring witnesses and evidence into the trial. But the effort fell short by two Republican votes.

The lead impeachment manager, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Sunday that Democrats are considering issuing a subpoena to sit Bolton down in front of investigators in the House, where the impeachment inquiry is still open.

“Whether it’s in testimony before the House, or it’s in his book, or it’s in one form or another, the truth will come out,” Schiff said on CBS’s Face the Nation.

Prior to the House impeaching Trump, Democrats requested that Bolton appear before House lawmakers, but he refused, citing the White House’s orders that former officials close to Trump not cooperate with impeachment investigators. House lawmakers said they did not subpoena Bolton then in order to avoid a drawn-out court battle.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Impeachment Trial Winds Down With Closing Arguments

Westlake Legal Group ap_20032041701531_custom-832e8adaa220eb6ecce6ab2dc5218bf0b7ffa25c-s1100-c15 Trump Impeachment Trial Winds Down With Closing Arguments

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., gives a thumbs up as he leaves the Senate chamber during the impeachment trial of President Trump on Friday. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Steve Helber/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Trump Impeachment Trial Winds Down With Closing Arguments

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., gives a thumbs up as he leaves the Senate chamber during the impeachment trial of President Trump on Friday.

Steve Helber/AP

Monday brings closing arguments in the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump.

Starting at 11 a.m. ET, the House managers prosecuting Trump and the president’s defense team will each get two hours to make their case one final time. Watch the proceedings live when they begin.

On Sunday, Trump repeated his oft-stated position on the abuse of power and obstruction of Congress impeachment charges pending against him in the Senate: that he is the victim of a politically motivated attempt to discredit his presidency in order to boot him from the White House.

“It’s been a very, very unfair process,” Trump told Sean Hannity of Fox News in a pre-Super Bowl interview. “It should never happen to another president.”

After Monday’s session, the Senate will adjourn until 4 p.m. ET Wednesday, when senators are set to take a formal vote on the articles of impeachment. Trump’s acquittal is nearly guaranteed, as 20 Republicans would have to join the Democratic caucus to vote against the president.

The lawyers’ final pitches to senators on Monday follow a vote Friday to block witnesses and the introduction of new evidence into the trial.

News reports about bombshell allegations contained in a manuscript of former national security adviser John Bolton’s forthcoming book renewed hope for Democrats that they could recruit the four Republicans needed to bring witnesses and evidence into the trial. But the effort fell short by two Republican votes.

The lead impeachment manager, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Sunday that Democrats are considering issuing a subpoena to sit Bolton down in front of investigators in the House, where the impeachment inquiry is still open.

“Whether it’s in testimony before the House, or it’s in his book, or it’s in one form or another, the truth will come out,” Schiff said on CBS’s Face the Nation.

Prior to the House impeaching Trump, Democrats requested that Bolton appear before House lawmakers, but he refused, citing the White House’s orders that former officials close to Trump not cooperate with impeachment investigators. House lawmakers said they did not subpoena Bolton then in order to avoid a drawn-out court battle.

If the House did attempt to subpoena Bolton, the Justice Department could go to court in an attempt to block Bolton’s testimony, but it remains unclear what the administration response would be if House Democrats try to hear from Bolton.

Among the key Republicans whom Democrats hoped to sway in favor of witnesses was Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, but Murkowski said Friday ahead of the vote that she opposed prolonging a trial that had already become too partisan, in her opinion. “I don’t believe the continuation of this process will change anything,” she said.

Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, another swing Republican who voted against witnesses, said that while Trump’s actions with regard to Ukraine may have been wrong or inappropriate, using military assistance as a way to pressure a foreign country into investigating domestic rivals should not warrant removal from office.

Iowa Republican Sen. Joni Ernst conceded that the July 25 conversation between Trump and the Ukrainian president was “maybe not the ‘perfect call,’ ” as Trump has insisted.

But, she said on CNN’s State of the Union: “Whether you like what the president has done or not … does it come to the point of removing a president from office? I don’t believe this does.”

In a separate interview, Ernst reportedly made it clear that if Joe Biden were elected president, Republicans in Congress could move to impeach him over his work in Ukraine as vice president.

“I think this door of impeachable whatever has been opened,” Ernst told Bloomberg News on Sunday. “Joe Biden should be very careful what he’s asking for because, you know, we can have a situation where if it should ever be President Biden, that immediately, people, right the day after he would be elected would be saying, ‘Well, we’re going to impeach him.’ “

Ernst told Bloomberg that the basis for impeaching Biden would be “for being assigned to take on Ukrainian corruption yet turning a blind eye to [gas company] Burisma because his son was on the board making over a million dollars a year.”

There is no evidence that Biden and his son Hunter engaged in any wrongdoing when the elder Biden was vice president and his son was serving on the board of Burisma.

Meanwhile in Palm Beach, Fla., Trump spent the weekend golfing at Mar-a-Lago, tweeting that Democrats pursued impeachment as a way to destabilize the Republican Party and to improve their election odds in November.

Trump wrote: “They are playing with the people by taking it this far!”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

WATCH LIVE: Trump Impeachment Trial Winds Down With Closing Arguments

Closing arguments in the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump kicked off on Monday.

The House managers prosecuting Trump and the president’s defense team will each get two hours to make their case one final time. Watch the proceedings live.

On Sunday, Trump repeated his oft-stated position on the abuse of power and obstruction of Congress impeachment charges pending against him in the Senate: that he is the victim of a politically motivated attempt to discredit his presidency in order to boot him from the White House.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1198370146-226f377a5deb46629d7b9d9ca7637603f13cc64c-s1100-c15 WATCH LIVE: Trump Impeachment Trial Winds Down With Closing Arguments

House impeachment managers Rep. Val Demings (D-FL) and Rep. Sylvia Garcia (L) D-TX arrive for closing statements in President Trump’s impeachment trial. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  WATCH LIVE: Trump Impeachment Trial Winds Down With Closing Arguments

House impeachment managers Rep. Val Demings (D-FL) and Rep. Sylvia Garcia (L) D-TX arrive for closing statements in President Trump’s impeachment trial.

Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

“It’s been a very, very unfair process,” Trump told Sean Hannity of Fox News in a pre-Super Bowl interview. “It should never happen to another president.”

After Monday’s session, the Senate will adjourn until 4 p.m. ET Wednesday, when senators are set to take a formal vote on the articles of impeachment. Trump’s acquittal is nearly guaranteed, as 20 Republicans would have to join the Democratic caucus to vote against the president.

The lawyers’ final pitches to senators on Monday follow a vote Friday to block witnesses and the introduction of new evidence into the trial.

News reports about bombshell allegations contained in a manuscript of former national security adviser John Bolton’s forthcoming book renewed hope for Democrats that they could recruit the four Republicans needed to bring witnesses and evidence into the trial. But the effort fell short by two Republican votes.

The lead impeachment manager, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Sunday that Democrats are considering issuing a subpoena to sit Bolton down in front of investigators in the House, where the impeachment inquiry is still open.

“Whether it’s in testimony before the House, or it’s in his book, or it’s in one form or another, the truth will come out,” Schiff said on CBS’s Face the Nation.

Prior to the House impeaching Trump, Democrats requested that Bolton appear before House lawmakers, but he refused, citing the White House’s orders that former officials close to Trump not cooperate with impeachment investigators. House lawmakers said they did not subpoena Bolton then in order to avoid a drawn-out court battle.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com