web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 38)

It’s 2019. Time to Stop Making Excuses for Trump Supporters.

Westlake Legal Group DusqsabxDHKtKeZPkQwyAkny6AETWlg71taSuHQvnRA It’s 2019. Time to Stop Making Excuses for Trump Supporters. r/politics

“The word is ‘Nazi.'”

There was a time, not so long ago, when we could credibly argue that the modern GOP, led by a white supremacist, did not yet sink to the level of nazis. This piece implies that we have passed that point. Everyone who supports Trump or his republican sycophants has now earned the opprobrium that comes from openly supporting racism and must accept responsibility for their choices and for their continued support. They have put us on a path to evil. They reject American values of open debate, free speech, freedom of association, and freedom of religion. They threaten Americans with violence and oppression.

We must respond with courage and conviction. We must use all of the rhetorical tools at our disposal to reanimate American values of individual liberty and collective freedom from oppression of political ideologies.

Fascism, a minority view, must not be allowed to erase the progress we have made toward establishing representative democracy as the best hope for humanity.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Original ringtones, trouble-shooting bluetooth, saving water-damaged phones, and more: Tech Q&A

Make Ringtones

Q: Is it possible to make your own ringtone? I want to know it’s my phone ringing and not a co-worker’s phone. Annoying!

A: The short answer is yes, you can make a custom ringtone. This makes perfect sense, since the ringtone file is so small, and sound manipulation is straightforward in a digital setting. But most of us don’t customize our own; maybe it’s because many people don’t use ringtones, preferring to let the phone vibrate to announce an incoming call. Still, making your own ringtone is a really fun and creative idea, and you’re right about distinguishing your phone from all others. Tap or click here to create custom ringtones with a great and totally-free program.

Moving Videos

Q: I loved when you spoke to the little girl with the robotic arms on your TV show. I want to share that inspirational interview with my family.

A: I am so glad you enjoyed that episode. It was particularly special to my staff and me as well. I’m so pleased to be able to bring inspirational stories like that to light; to answer your question, you can find Tilly on my YouTube channel. Meanwhile, the best way to keep up with my TV appearances is to subscribe to this channel; you can even set alerts for when new videos are posted. Tilly is just one of many remarkable people we’ve had the chance to meet, and there’s a lot of exciting content on the horizon. Tap or click here to see the Tilly video and also subscribe to my YouTube channel.

Pair Bluetooth

Q: Sometimes my phone pairs but frequently not. How can I fix the Bluetooth, so it always works?
A: Bluetooth is definitely its own animal. Unlike Wi-Fi and cell phone data, Bluetooth has a comparatively weak signal, and its connectivity can be a little unpredictable. Don’t get me wrong, Bluetooth is very effective, and most compatible devices will work on the first try. But there are a lot of things that could go wrong: You may forget to activate Bluetooth on both devices, or you may not have updated to the latest software. Incredibly, something as simple as a garage door opener could interfere with your Bluetooth signal. To troubleshoot your Bluetooth problems, there are many helpful techniques. Tap or click here for 15 ways to fix Bluetooth pairing issues.

Revive Wet Phones

Q: I heard you say that rice isn’t the best to use after your phone gets wet. What is it then?

A: That’s right. Sticking your phone in a bag of rice has been the prevailing wisdom for years, and many people swear by this technique. But the rice trick is quickly becoming an old wive’s tale; it doesn’t work as well as, say, silica gel. No matter how you do it, drying out your phone can be a days-long process, and you may ultimately find yourself investing in a new one, anyway. The good news is that phones are becoming increasingly water-resistant, and the latest iPhone models, for example, boast the ability to be submerged in water for several minutes before risking serious damage. That doesn’t mean that they are invulnerable, only that your next phone is far less likely to need emergency drying, with rice or anything else. Tap or click here for my best advice on water-damaged phones.

Accelerate Windows

Q: My Windows PC is so slow. I cannot afford a new one. How can I speed the old grey mare up?

A: Windows-based computers have always been versatile, but they are also infamous for slowing down over time. Usually, this is due to cluttered files and forgotten background tasks that eat up your memory. You can probably dig into your hard drive and manually remove programs that you know you’ll never use. But you also run the risk of illuminating files that seem useless but are required for your computer to run. What you need is a separate program, preferably free, that can analyze your computer and recommend files and programs that are ripe for deletion. Luckily, it exists, and its name is UninstallView. And it doesn’t cost you anything. Tap or click here to learn more about UninstallView.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch the Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2019, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group istock-183992313 Original ringtones, trouble-shooting bluetooth, saving water-damaged phones, and more: Tech Q&A The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 320d9fba-c9ae-5dae-a38d-efe9de6b2f88   Westlake Legal Group istock-183992313 Original ringtones, trouble-shooting bluetooth, saving water-damaged phones, and more: Tech Q&A The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 320d9fba-c9ae-5dae-a38d-efe9de6b2f88

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

9-year-old girl dies after bounce house blown into power lines

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 9-year-old girl dies after bounce house blown into power lines

RENO, Nev. — Hundreds of people lined the hallways of Renown Regional Medical Center  to honor the 9-year-old girl who died after being injured in a bounce house incident earlier this week. 

Lizzy Hammond died after a bounce house blew into power lines in South Reno near Bartley Ranch on Sunday. Two other children were also injured in the incident. 

“It is with heavy hearts that the Hammond family must officially announce the death of our beloved Elizabeth ‘Lizzy’ Hammond,” the family said in a statement Friday.  

“Our precious Lizzy was a beautiful, intelligent, silly, vibrant little girl who was full of life. She was a daughter, granddaughter, sister, cousin, teammate and beloved friend.” 

The family said they were planning to donate the girl’s organs “to help upwards of 80-100 children nationwide,” adding: “We believe that her beautiful spirit will carry on within those individuals that she helps.”

Washoe County Sheriff’s spokesman Bob Harmon told The Associated Press on Friday the accident remains under investigation but that he had no new information to report. Authorities told KOLO-TV the bounce house seemed to be secured to the ground but was caught by an especially strong gust of wind.

Sheriff Darin Balaam said Friday the girl’s death has affected everyone involved.

“We are truly heartbroken for the family,” he said in a statement. “I speak on behalf of every deputy, firefighter, trooper, dispatcher, and medic who responded to this incident as well as all area first responders when I say to the family ‘our prayers are with you, our thoughts are with you and we are here to help in any way that we can.'”

Full statement from Hammond family

“It is with heavy hearts that the Hammond Family must officially announce the death of our beloved Elizabeth ‘Lizzy’ Hammond. Lizzy was 9 years old at the time of the horrific incident that took place on Sunday, July 14th involving a bounce house.

Our precious Lizzy was a beautiful, intelligent, silly, vibrant little girl who was full of life. She was a daughter, granddaughter, sister, cousin, teammate, and beloved friend. She was an active volunteer in the local community where she enjoyed feeding the homeless, shopping with the Sheriff, building care packages for local soldiers deployed overseas, and providing school supplies to less-fortunate children in the area. Lizzy was a confirmed Catholic and an active member of her church, St. Alberts. 

Lizzy loves all first responders. She was extremely patriotic and wholeheartedly supported the U.S. military, as well as her local police, sheriff, and fire departments. She was a warm, kind, and selfless girl who loved everyone and everything. Given Lizzy’s generous spirit, she will be donating her organs which will allow her to help upwards of 80-100 children nationwide. We believe from the bottom of our hearts that giving the gift of life to others would have been her wishes. 

Lizzy’s Honor Walk will be held on July 19 at 10 a.m. after which she will transcend from her physical form into the guardian angel that she is. We believe that her beautiful spirt will carry on within those individuals that she helps. 

We want to sincerely thank members of the Nevada National Guard, Truckee Meadows Fire Protection District, Reno Fire Department, REMSA, Washoe County SHeriff’s OFfice and the wonderful nurses and doctors that helped and supported Lizzy through her final days with us. 

Respectfully,

The Hammond Family” 

Contributing: Associated Press

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/07/20/girl-bounce-house-nevada/1784819001/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Republicans Prep for Mueller Showdown and Counsel a Light Touch

WASHINGTON — House Republicans have tried to chip away at the credibility of Robert S. Mueller III’s inquiry into Russia’s 2016 election interference since shortly after it began, savaging members of his investigative team as “angry Democrats,” and calling into question his impartiality.

But as they prepare to meet Mr. Mueller, the former special counsel, face to face on Wednesday at two high-stakes congressional hearings, some of the Republican Party’s loudest voices are urging caution against an aggressive confrontation. Victory, they say, could come with a light touch as much as pointed questioning.

“The obvious first question will be, ‘When did you know there was no coordination and no conspiracy?’” said Representative Jim Jordan of Ohio, one of the Republicans’ most recognizable attack dogs. He now sees Mr. Mueller as the ideal mouthpiece to deliver the conclusion that the investigation found insufficient evidence to charge anyone with conspiring with Russia to influence the 2016 election.

Not every Republican is on board with a gentler approach. Representative Louie Gohmert of Texas rejected any suggestion he might pull his punches. “I can’t wait,” he said. Representative Matt Gaetz, a firebrand from Florida, pledged a pointed discussion of bias, which he has long maintained corrupted the investigation.

His goal for the hearing? “We are going to re-elect the president,” he said.

But with public opinion tilted against impeachment and Democrats’ investigations plodding along, many Republicans on the House Judiciary and Intelligence Committees are contemplating a “do no harm” approach rather than putting a match to Mr. Mueller’s image. Better to try to look reasonable next to committee Democrats, who they believe will struggle to knock Mr. Mueller off his conclusions.

“He exonerated the president on the collusion issue and for anybody to go after him would seem silly to me,” said Representative Ken Buck, Republican of Colorado.

The strategy reflects two assumptions about Mr. Mueller’s appearance shared by lawmakers from both parties: first, that he will not take the bait to answer questions beyond the contents of his written report, and second, that his testimony before the House committees could be one of the most closely watched congressional performances in decades. For both parties, the hearings present an unusual chance to shape the views of a large number of Americans who have not read Mr. Mueller’s 448-page report, which was released in April.

The report did identify at least 10 episodes that could be construed as obstruction of justice, and Mr. Mueller pointedly declined to exonerate Mr. Trump. But he did not refer the president for prosecution either.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157811565_e7945543-ac9e-4b61-802d-bd8c22a502f5-articleLarge Republicans Prep for Mueller Showdown and Counsel a Light Touch United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Special Prosecutors (Independent Counsel) Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Presidential Election of 2016 Mueller, Robert S III

Representative Matt Gaetz, a Republican firebrand from Florida, pledged a pointed discussion of bias that he says corrupted the investigation.CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

For Republicans, the hearings mean introducing a new audience to passages of the report more favorable to Mr. Trump, as well as to accusations that have become accepted truth on the right: Mr. Trump was the target of an unfair and rules-breaking investigation by law enforcement officials intent on upending first his campaign, then his presidency.

They are likely to question Mr. Mueller about inflammatory anti-Trump texts exchanged by two F.B.I. officials, Peter Strzok and Lisa Page, who helped start the bureau’s investigation of the Trump campaign and later joined Mr. Mueller’s team before the messages were discovered. Republicans intend to ask Mr. Mueller about the F.B.I.’s use of a salacious but unverified dossier of Trump-Russia connections to obtain a surveillance warrant on a former Trump campaign aide in 2016.

And they want to know why Mr. Mueller deviated from Justice Department regulations governing his work in declining to reach a decision on obstruction of justice but included unflattering information on Mr. Trump anyway.

What many Republicans want to try to avoid is making matters personal — the fewer “witch hunts” and incendiary accusations of a coup d’état by the so-called deep state, the better.

Representative Doug Collins of Georgia, the top Republican on the Judiciary Committee, promised “honest, pointed straightforward” questions for the special counsel but paused at the word “aggressive.”

Others cautioned against spending too much time fishing for Mr. Mueller to validate their concerns when he is unlikely to engage, or worse, could offer a convincing defense of his team.

“To me, it is not a question about whether or not we need those answers; it is whether this will be the proper forum or not,” said Representative Mike Johnson, Republican of Louisiana. “Strategically, can we get Mr. Mueller to address those issues in this forum? I have some doubts about that.”

Republican lawmakers and aides stressed that their approach to the questioning was still in flux and could shift based on Mr. Mueller’s responsiveness. Democrats negotiated both sessions directly with Mr. Mueller’s associates, and though Republicans have mostly supported calling Mr. Mueller, they have had little role in determining the length of his appearances or the procedures governing the hearings.

At least one question appears to be settled: Given the limited time for questioning, several people involved in the Republican strategy sessions said it was unlikely they would try to deploy parliamentary high jinks of the sort often used by the minority party to run out the clock. Better to fight it out on the merits, they have reasoned.

Representative Doug Collins of Georgia, the top Republican on the Judiciary Committee, promised “honest, pointed straightforward” questions for the special counsel but paused at the word “aggressive.”CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

The rest, it seems, may be sorted out in real time between more temperamentally moderate members and firebrands like Mr. Gaetz and Mr. Gohmert.

“The quicker this all goes away the better,” said Representative Mike Conaway, Republican of Texas, who played a key role in leading the Intelligence Committee’s own Russia investigation last term. “People are weary of it. When I talk to people back home, the independents are weary about this.”

Representative Chris Stewart, Republican of Utah on the Intelligence Committee, said he wanted to ask Mr. Mueller if he was aware of the political views of investigators on his team when he hired them. As for ad hominem attacks, he said, “I don’t think it benefits anyone.”

Julian Epstein, who was the chief counsel to Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee during President Bill Clinton’s impeachment, said his party took a two-toned approach to questioning the independent counsel in that case, Ken Starr, and found it worked well.

“We had the bomb-thrower caucus and the moderate caucus — and both played usefully to different audiences,” he said.

In this case, he said, Republicans needed only to play defense and “maintain the public opinion status quo.”

“The Republican playbook is pretty obvious,” Mr. Epstein said. “All they have to say is, ‘Mr. Mueller, can you repeat again that you believe there was no underlying criminal conspiracy by the Trump campaign on Russian interference? And did you say that while a reasonable prosecutor could prosecute on obstruction, a reasonable prosecutor might also decline to prosecute?’”

Republicans have been drawing up a litany of other questions to put to Mr. Mueller.

Mr. Stewart suggested that the Intelligence Committee would take aim at the F.B.I.’s use of the dossier — an uncorroborated document drafted by a former British spy and funded in part by Democrats — to obtain a secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act warrant to spy on a Trump campaign associate, Carter Page, after he left the campaign in 2016. Republicans say that action was an abuse of power by senior law enforcement officials intent on targeting Mr. Trump’s campaign.

“They are questions that deserve answers,” Mr. Stewart said. “The whole FISA process is extraordinarily concerning to me.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Mueller Hearings on Wednesday Present Make-or-Break Moment for Democrats

WASHINGTON — For more than two years, Democrats have hoped that Robert S. Mueller III would show the nation that President Trump is unfit for office — or at the very least, severely damage his re-election prospects. On Wednesday, in back-to-back hearings with the former special counsel, that wish could face its final make-or-break moment.

Lawmakers choreographing the hearings before the House Judiciary and Intelligence Committees warn that bombshell disclosures are unlikely. But over about five hours of nationally televised testimony, they hope to use Mr. Mueller, the enigmatic and widely respected former F.B.I. director, to refashion his legalistic 448-page report into a vivid, compelling narrative of Russia’s attempts to undermine American democracy, the Trump campaign’s willingness to accept Kremlin assistance and the president’s repeated and legally dubious efforts to thwart investigators.

For a party divided over how to confront Mr. Trump — liberals versus moderates, supporters of impeachment versus staunch opponents — the stakes could scarcely be higher.

“One way or the other, the Mueller hearing will be a turning point with respect to the effort to hold Donald Trump accountable for his reckless, degenerate, aberrant and possibly criminal behavior,” said Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York, the House Democratic Caucus chairman and a member of the Judiciary Committee. “After the hearing, we will be able to have a better understanding of the pathway forward concerning our oversight responsibilities and the constitutional tools that are available to us.”

Partisans in both parties may already have made up their minds, but Democrats are counting on Mr. Mueller’s testimony to focus the broader public’s attention on the findings of his 22-month investigation — either to jumpstart a stalled impeachment push or electrify the campaign to make Mr. Trump a one-term president.

Even Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who has been a voice of caution on impeachment for much of the year, has tied the testimony to Democrats’ broader political prospects.

“This coming election, it is really an election that the fate of this country is riding on,” she told House Democrats at a private meeting recently, according to an aide who was there. “This presidency is an existential threat to our democracy and our country as we know it.”

Democratic hopes are rising on an unlikely horse. Mr. Mueller has made his reluctance to testify widely known, and his appearance could easily backfire. If the hearings fail to sizzle, the viewing public could be left agreeing with the president that it is time to move on.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_155599239_f8f98b70-b3a7-452b-8f87-11114f3c019d-articleLarge Mueller Hearings on Wednesday Present Make-or-Break Moment for Democrats United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Special Prosecutors (Independent Counsel) Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Mueller, Robert S III impeachment

Mr. Mueller has made his reluctance to testify widely known.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

“A lot of public attitudes have hardened on the subject of Trump and Russia,” said Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the chairman of the Intelligence Committee. “So I’m realistic about the impact of any one hearing on public attitudes.”

No matter what happens, House investigators say their inquiries into possible obstruction of justice by Mr. Trump and other accusations of administration malfeasance will go on, and those inquiries could yet inflict political damage on the president’s re-election prospects or even re-energize impeachment talk.

But perhaps no other witness can command the authority of Mr. Mueller, who conducted his work in silence, above the political maw of Washington, and delivered it this spring with a modicum of words and drama.

Mr. Mueller is unlikely to level new charges on Wednesday against the president. Unlike Leon Jaworski, the Watergate prosecutor who persuaded a grand jury to name President Richard M. Nixon as an unindicted co-conspirator, or Ken Starr, the independent counsel who made a convincing case for President Bill Clinton’s impeachment, Mr. Mueller has left a more ambiguous trail.

His report detailed dozens of contacts between the Trump campaign and Russia, painting a portrait of a campaign willing to accept foreign assistance. But it did not find enough evidence to charge anyone with conspiring with the Russians. And though Mr. Mueller pointedly declined to exonerate Mr. Trump from obstructing his investigation, he took the view that Justice Department policies prevented him from even considering whether to charge.

Mr. Mueller, 74, is unlikely to change course now — particularly after he used his lone public appearance in May to clarify that any testimony he delivered would not stray from his report.

“We go in eyes wide open,” said Representative Peter Welch, a Vermont Democrat on the Intelligence Committee. “His style under the most effusive of circumstances is almost monosyllabic.”

Knowing that Mr. Mueller is unlikely to take the bait on more explosive questions, Democrats see their role as coaxing him through some of the most damaging passages of his report.

Democrats on the Judiciary Committee will have the first opportunity, and they intend to dwell heavily on five of the most glaring episodes of possible obstruction of justice that Mr. Mueller documented in the second volume of his report. They include Mr. Trump’s direction to the former White House counsel Donald F. McGahn II to fire Mr. Mueller and then publicly lie about it; his request that Corey Lewandowski, a former campaign chief, ask Attorney General Jeff Sessions to reassert control of the investigation and limit its scope; and possible witness tampering to discourage two aides, Paul Manafort and Michael D. Cohen, from cooperating with investigators.

Many lawmakers, including Representative Jerrold Nadler of New York, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, view the behavior in at least some of those episodes as reaching the threshold of high crimes and misdemeanors, established in the Constitution as grounds for impeachment. They will try to solicit Mr. Mueller’s views — tacitly or explicitly.

“A lot of public attitudes have hardened on the subject of Trump and Russia,” said Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the chairman of the Intelligence Committee. “So I’m realistic about the impact of any one hearing on public attitudes.”CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

“The overwhelming majority of the American people are unfamiliar with the principal conclusions of the Mueller report, so that will be a starting point,” Mr. Jeffries said. “To the extent that Bob Mueller can explain his conclusions, particularly as it relates to possible criminal culpability of the president, that will be compelling information.”

Democrats on the Intelligence Committee will use the second hearing to highlight evidence from the report’s first volume about Russia’s social media disinformation and hacking operations during the 2016 campaign and high-profile contacts between Trump associates and Russians offering assistance to Mr. Trump’s presidential campaign.

Republicans are expressing little concern about the Democrats’ strategy. Mr. Mueller’s style and his prosecutorial conclusions will “blow up in their face,” said Representative Steve Chabot, Republican of Ohio, who helped prosecute the impeachment case against Mr. Clinton.

“Back then, Starr came out pretty clearly and said that he felt there were impeachable offenses that had been committed,” Mr. Chabot said. “Now we have a special counsel who, at this point, is saying no. We invested so much time and money and taxpayer dollars in this that we should give considerable weight in that.”

Time is not on the side of impeachment advocates. Congress’s six-week August recess is at hand. A fiscal deadline is likely to dominate Congress when it returns, and with the Iowa caucuses on Feb. 3, the nation’s attention is likely to shift toward the 2020 presidential campaign. A recent NBC/Wall Street Journal poll found that support for opening impeachment hearings based on current evidence had dropped among registered voters from June to July, to just 21 percent. Fifty percent said it was time for the country to move on.

Support in the House is somewhat higher and continues to grow with every fresh outrage Mr. Trump provides the Democrats, including an across-the-board refusal to comply with the House’s investigations and comments that four liberal congresswomen of color should “go back” to their own countries. A handful of House Democrats this week announced their support for impeachment, pushing the total toward 90, according to a New York Times tally.

And Mr. Nadler formally acknowledged for the first time this month that impeachment articles were “under consideration as part of the committee’s investigation, although no final determination has been made.”

But the announced support is still far short of the 218 needed to impeach the president and send charges to the Senate for a trial, and moderate Democrats from Republican-leaning districts have quietly fumed at the position they are being put in.

As the most powerful Democrat against impeachment, Ms. Pelosi fears an attempt to oust Mr. Trump would backfire on Democrats and further divide the country unless her party can build broader support. She has counseled lawmakers “to have a level of calmness, no drama” about the questioning at the Mueller hearing, according to a senior aide, and she and her deputies will be watching how or if public sentiment shifts after Wednesday.

No need to “hype it,” she has advised — Mr. Mueller’s words will carry power.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Bernie Sanders defends campaign staff salaries after accusations of ‘poverty wages’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6061762553001_6061760433001-vs Bernie Sanders defends campaign staff salaries after accusations of 'poverty wages' fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson article 6c363c62-e383-5e10-893f-c0368de41bbe

Bernie Sanders defended his campaign’s treatment of staffers and said he was “very proud” to lead the first U.S. presidential campaign to have unionized workers — one day after The Washington Post reported the campaign’s field staff were complaining about receiving “poverty wages.”

“We have a historic contract agreement that provides unprecedented protections and benefits,” Sanders said in a statement Friday. “Through that framework, we are committed to addressing concerns in good faith through the bargaining process.”

The contract with staffers “not only provides pay of at least $15 an hour, it also provides, I think, the best health care benefits that any employer can provide for our field organizers,”  he told The Des Moines Register.

BERNIE SANDERS’ CAMPAIGN WORKERS COMPLAINING, FLEEING OVER ‘POVERTY WAGES’: REPORT

The presidential candidate — an independent U.S. senator from Vermont who is seeking the Democratic Party’s 2020 nomination — has been advocating for a $15-an-hour national minimum wage but his staffers have complained they make less than that because they work so many hours, according to The Post.

“Given our campaign’s commitment to fighting for a living wage of at least $15.00 an hour we believe it is only fair that the campaign would carry through this commitment to its own field team,” a letter to campaign manager Faiz Shakir read.

“Many field staffers are barely managing to survive financially,” the letter says, “which is severely impacting our team’s productivity and morale” It also says some staffers have already left the campaign for that reason.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Sanders also expressed frustration that his staffers had aired their salary complaints to the media, according to The Register. “It is really not what labor negotiations are about, and it’s improper,” he said.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6061762553001_6061760433001-vs Bernie Sanders defends campaign staff salaries after accusations of 'poverty wages' fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson article 6c363c62-e383-5e10-893f-c0368de41bbe   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6061762553001_6061760433001-vs Bernie Sanders defends campaign staff salaries after accusations of 'poverty wages' fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson article 6c363c62-e383-5e10-893f-c0368de41bbe

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Mueller Hearings on Wednesday Present Make-or-Break Moment for Democrats

WASHINGTON — For more than two years, Democrats have hoped that Robert S. Mueller III would show the nation that President Trump is unfit for office — or at the very least, severely damage his re-election prospects. On Wednesday, in back-to-back hearings with the former special counsel, that wish could face its final make-or-break moment.

Lawmakers choreographing the hearings before the House Judiciary and Intelligence Committees warn that bombshell disclosures are unlikely. But over about five hours of nationally televised testimony, they hope to use Mr. Mueller, the enigmatic and widely respected former F.B.I. director, to refashion his legalistic 448-page report into a vivid, compelling narrative of Russia’s attempts to undermine American democracy, the Trump campaign’s willingness to accept Kremlin assistance and the president’s repeated and legally dubious efforts to thwart investigators.

For a party divided over how to confront Mr. Trump — liberals versus moderates, supporters of impeachment versus staunch opponents — the stakes could scarcely be higher.

“One way or the other, the Mueller hearing will be a turning point with respect to the effort to hold Donald Trump accountable for his reckless, degenerate, aberrant and possibly criminal behavior,” said Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York, the House Democratic Caucus chairman and a member of the Judiciary Committee. “After the hearing, we will be able to have a better understanding of the pathway forward concerning our oversight responsibilities and the constitutional tools that are available to us.”

Partisans in both parties may already have made up their minds, but Democrats are counting on Mr. Mueller’s testimony to focus the broader public’s attention on the findings of his 22-month investigation — either to jumpstart a stalled impeachment push or electrify the campaign to make Mr. Trump a one-term president.

Even Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who has been a voice of caution on impeachment for much of the year, has tied the testimony to Democrats’ broader political prospects.

“This coming election, it is really an election that the fate of this country is riding on,” she told House Democrats at a private meeting recently, according to an aide who was there. “This presidency is an existential threat to our democracy and our country as we know it.”

Democratic hopes are rising on an unlikely horse. Mr. Mueller has made his reluctance to testify widely known, and his appearance could easily backfire. If the hearings fail to sizzle, the viewing public could be left agreeing with the president that it is time to move on.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_155599239_f8f98b70-b3a7-452b-8f87-11114f3c019d-articleLarge Mueller Hearings on Wednesday Present Make-or-Break Moment for Democrats United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Special Prosecutors (Independent Counsel) Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Mueller, Robert S III impeachment

Mr. Mueller has made his reluctance to testify widely known.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

“A lot of public attitudes have hardened on the subject of Trump and Russia,” said Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the chairman of the Intelligence Committee. “So I’m realistic about the impact of any one hearing on public attitudes.”

No matter what happens, House investigators say their inquiries into possible obstruction of justice by Mr. Trump and other accusations of administration malfeasance will go on, and those inquiries could yet inflict political damage on the president’s re-election prospects or even re-energize impeachment talk.

But perhaps no other witness can command the authority of Mr. Mueller, who conducted his work in silence, above the political maw of Washington, and delivered it this spring with a modicum of words and drama.

Mr. Mueller is unlikely to level new charges on Wednesday against the president. Unlike Leon Jaworski, the Watergate prosecutor who persuaded a grand jury to name President Richard M. Nixon as an unindicted co-conspirator, or Ken Starr, the independent counsel who made a convincing case for President Bill Clinton’s impeachment, Mr. Mueller has left a more ambiguous trail.

His report detailed dozens of contacts between the Trump campaign and Russia, painting a portrait of a campaign willing to accept foreign assistance. But it did not find enough evidence to charge anyone with conspiring with the Russians. And though Mr. Mueller pointedly declined to exonerate Mr. Trump from obstructing his investigation, he took the view that Justice Department policies prevented him from even considering whether to charge.

Mr. Mueller, 74, is unlikely to change course now — particularly after he used his lone public appearance in May to clarify that any testimony he delivered would not stray from his report.

“We go in eyes wide open,” said Representative Peter Welch, a Vermont Democrat on the Intelligence Committee. “His style under the most effusive of circumstances is almost monosyllabic.”

Knowing that Mr. Mueller is unlikely to take the bait on more explosive questions, Democrats see their role as coaxing him through some of the most damaging passages of his report.

Democrats on the Judiciary Committee will have the first opportunity, and they intend to dwell heavily on five of the most glaring episodes of possible obstruction of justice that Mr. Mueller documented in the second volume of his report. They include Mr. Trump’s direction to the former White House counsel Donald F. McGahn II to fire Mr. Mueller and then publicly lie about it; his request that Corey Lewandowski, a former campaign chief, ask Attorney General Jeff Sessions to reassert control of the investigation and limit its scope; and possible witness tampering to discourage two aides, Paul Manafort and Michael D. Cohen, from cooperating with investigators.

Many lawmakers, including Representative Jerrold Nadler of New York, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, view the behavior in at least some of those episodes as reaching the threshold of high crimes and misdemeanors, established in the Constitution as grounds for impeachment. They will try to solicit Mr. Mueller’s views — tacitly or explicitly.

“A lot of public attitudes have hardened on the subject of Trump and Russia,” said Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the chairman of the Intelligence Committee. “So I’m realistic about the impact of any one hearing on public attitudes.”CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

“The overwhelming majority of the American people are unfamiliar with the principal conclusions of the Mueller report, so that will be a starting point,” Mr. Jeffries said. “To the extent that Bob Mueller can explain his conclusions, particularly as it relates to possible criminal culpability of the president, that will be compelling information.”

Democrats on the Intelligence Committee will use the second hearing to highlight evidence from the report’s first volume about Russia’s social media disinformation and hacking operations during the 2016 campaign and high-profile contacts between Trump associates and Russians offering assistance to Mr. Trump’s presidential campaign.

Republicans are expressing little concern about the Democrats’ strategy. Mr. Mueller’s style and his prosecutorial conclusions will “blow up in their face,” said Representative Steve Chabot, Republican of Ohio, who helped prosecute the impeachment case against Mr. Clinton.

“Back then, Starr came out pretty clearly and said that he felt there were impeachable offenses that had been committed,” Mr. Chabot said. “Now we have a special counsel who, at this point, is saying no. We invested so much time and money and taxpayer dollars in this that we should give considerable weight in that.”

Time is not on the side of impeachment advocates. Congress’s six-week August recess is at hand. A fiscal deadline is likely to dominate Congress when it returns, and with the Iowa caucuses on Feb. 3, the nation’s attention is likely to shift toward the 2020 presidential campaign. A recent NBC/Wall Street Journal poll found that support for opening impeachment hearings based on current evidence had dropped among registered voters from June to July, to just 21 percent. Fifty percent said it was time for the country to move on.

Support in the House is somewhat higher and continues to grow with every fresh outrage Mr. Trump provides the Democrats, including an across-the-board refusal to comply with the House’s investigations and comments that four liberal congresswomen of color should “go back” to their own countries. A handful of House Democrats this week announced their support for impeachment, pushing the total toward 90, according to a New York Times tally.

And Mr. Nadler formally acknowledged for the first time this month that impeachment articles were “under consideration as part of the committee’s investigation, although no final determination has been made.”

But the announced support is still far short of the 218 needed to impeach the president and send charges to the Senate for a trial, and moderate Democrats from Republican-leaning districts have quietly fumed at the position they are being put in.

As the most powerful Democrat against impeachment, Ms. Pelosi fears an attempt to oust Mr. Trump would backfire on Democrats and further divide the country unless her party can build broader support. She has counseled lawmakers “to have a level of calmness, no drama” about the questioning at the Mueller hearing, according to a senior aide, and she and her deputies will be watching how or if public sentiment shifts after Wednesday.

No need to “hype it,” she has advised — Mr. Mueller’s words will carry power.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

3 times you’re most likely to get heatstroke

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6060429641001_6060433985001-vs 3 times you're most likely to get heatstroke Reader's Digest fnc/health fnc Carrie Madormo article 2df2a69b-67f1-5792-9228-1125b96ffc32

It’s summer, and you’re prepared for it all. Your beach bag is brimming with sunscreen, water bottles, bug spray, and even a floppy hat. Unfortunately, even our best efforts to stay safe in the sun are not always enough to protect us from the dangerous consequences of heatstroke.

What is heatstroke?

Heatstroke is a serious condition that occurs when our body’s temperature rises over 103 degrees Fahrenheit. It is usually the result of overexerting yourself in extreme heat and is an emergency. “With heat stroke, the body tries to lower its internal temperature by systematically shutting down organs to protect the heart and brain,” explains cardiologist Paula Montana De La Cadena, MD.

EX-NEW YORK GIANTS OFFENSIVE LINEMAN MITCH PETRUS DIES OF HEAT STROKE AGE 32

Early signs of heatstroke can include hot, red skin, dizziness, nausea, confusion, and passing out. Know the 10 signs of heatstroke and watch out for any change in mental status.

“The abnormal mental state might manifest as confusion, disorientation, impaired judgment, abnormal motor coordination, seizures, or loss of consciousness,” says David Geier, MD, orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist.

According to a study in Injury Epidemiology, each year there are about 4,100 emergency department visits for heatstroke in the United States. Heatstroke is serious and usually results in an admission to stay overnight at the hospital. Unlike heat exhaustion which can be treated by getting out of the heat and drinking cool water, heatstroke should never be treated at home.

“Untreated heatstroke can cause serious damage to the brain, heart, kidneys, and muscles and can even lead to death the longer treatment is delayed,” warns Dr. Montana De La Cadena.

200M ACROSS US BRACE FOR RECORD HEATWAVE

To help prevent heatstroke, be aware of when you’re at risk, such as in these scenarios.

Pushing yourself in sports

Exerting yourself in extreme heat is a recipe for heatstroke. This can happen to athletes who practice outside in the summer months.

“In sports, especially football, heatstroke events usually occur in July and August, when the heat and humidity are at their highest points for the year, and the athletes have not acclimatized to these conditions,” says Dr. Geier.

Working outdoors

If you find yourself working outdoors this summer, stay mindful of taking breaks and drinking cold water. Anyone who does physical work such as farming, moving heavy equipment or construction work is at risk of dehydration, heatstroke and, on a lesser level, feeling grumpy.

Becoming dehydrated

People who are more at risk of becoming dehydrated, like children or the elderly, are more at risk for heatstroke as well. If you have been diagnosed with a heart or liver condition, limit your time in the heat and always keep a water bottle with you.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“For these groups, the process of dehydration occurs much faster, as the body’s compensatory measures don’t work as efficiently,” says Dr. Montana De La Cadena. Knowing the signs and symptoms of dehydration will help prevent heatstroke.

This article originally appeared on Reader’s Digest.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6060429641001_6060433985001-vs 3 times you're most likely to get heatstroke Reader's Digest fnc/health fnc Carrie Madormo article 2df2a69b-67f1-5792-9228-1125b96ffc32   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6060429641001_6060433985001-vs 3 times you're most likely to get heatstroke Reader's Digest fnc/health fnc Carrie Madormo article 2df2a69b-67f1-5792-9228-1125b96ffc32

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Robert Charles: Moon landing showed impossible was possible as it united world

Westlake Legal Group mxMV3eZ8vJNqgyrnjrHg3B Robert Charles: Moon landing showed impossible was possible as it united world Robert Charles fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc fce0fd7c-1b60-5b59-b859-59941f475900 article

On July 16, 1969, three Americans – Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Mike Collins – sat atop a three-stage rocket, 36 stories tall, filled to the gills with fuel, headed for the moon. The journey was radical, untried and daring – the culmination of a remarkable and arguably epic national commitment.

The notion of getting three men to the moon, entering lunar orbit, descending with two in a spider-like module, and returning to Earth was more than novel. It seemed like science fiction.

Plans for the daring mission were less than a decade old. But exploring the moon was a timeless ambition, made almost believable by Jules Verne’s “From the Earth to the Moon” in 1865.

No doubt for as long as men and women have looked up at the night sky, some have wondered what it would be like to set foot on that bright object that seems so close and yet so far. On that summer day 50 years ago, humans were finally making the trip to find out.

But for better or worse, America’s race for the moon was about more than wonder and exploration. It was a race for dominance in space, and peace on Earth. America joined the race when the Soviet Union had a major lead in space, shocking the world first with its Sputnik Earth-orbiting satellite, followed by sending cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin into space.

In truth, our “space race” was more than a journey into the unknown – it was a way of proving America’s democracy was morally, politically and technologically superior to a communist and totalitarian system of government. But instead of meeting our adversary in battle to prove our dominance, we were racing to be the moon.

Apollo 11 was the ultimate test of national resolve and willingness to risk all for what was – quite literally – a high purpose.

The Apollo program pushed all kinds of engineering to the breaking point, pioneered computer sciences, forced mastery of navigation beyond Earth’s gravity, and drew on human daring.

The race to the moon was an enormously challenging test: Which society – free and open, or ruthless and controlling – could first achieve what seemed impossible? As it turned out, America did – and the Soviet Union never has.

If you happen to visit the American and Soviet space-race exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, note a riveting fact. The American and Soviet spacesuits, each impressive, stand side by side behind glass.

The Soviet one is well-trimmed, as is the American one. But the American one is different. It has dust on the knees – moon dust. That dust makes all the difference.

So on a hot day in July 1969, three brave Americans sat atop the world’s biggest powder keg, bracing for lift-off in the Saturn V – a pile of fuel and metal that held two kilotons of explosive power.

You know the rest. Apollo 11 had a flawless lift-off.

Aldrin recently said: “Launch was so smooth compared to Gemini launches that we did not know the instant of leaving the ground …. We only knew it from the instruments and voice communications …. We saw our rate of climb, altitude changing, but were comfortable in our seats. We sort of looked at each other and thought, ‘We must be on our way …what’s next?’”

That was the temperament of the Apollo astronauts, and of many Americans – both then and now. The American spirit is irrepressible, invariably returning to the question “what’s next?”

That is what carried those three Americans to the moon, where Armstrong declared setting foot on the surface “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind,” and Aldrin described the vast expanse as “magnificent desolation.” 

The astronauts set up experiments, took some photos, left a gracious plaque – “We Came in Peace for All Mankind” – and then lit their ascent engine. They called “first on the runway” and rejoined Collins in the command module.

From there, they traveled a quarter-million miles, watching Earth grow bigger as they drew near – a planet covered with one thumb from the moon’s surface, and unique in the universe.

Back on terra firma, the astronauts rejoiced. So did America. So did the world. Victory was shared.

As President Nixon noted to the two astronauts standing on the moon: “This has to be the proudest day of our lives …. Because of what you have done, the heavens have become a part of man’s world …. For one priceless moment in the whole history of man, all the people on this Earth are truly one.”

What is the real meaning of Apollo 11?  Aldrin recently noted: “Apollo showed that this nation can do whatever is required, when destiny calls on us to unify and step up. It was an honor to be a part of Apollo. That was how I felt in 1969, how I still feel. This is a blessed nation, truly blessed, and we are all lucky to be part of it. I hope we never forget how lucky we are to be Americans.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In July 1969, three Americans “lit the candle,” took America to the moon – and with them all humankind.

In 2019, 50 years later, we again turn eyes to the heavens, working on return to the moon, and then onward to Mars. And somehow that seems right. The time is right. Onward!  “What’s next?”

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY ROBERT CHARLES

Westlake Legal Group mxMV3eZ8vJNqgyrnjrHg3B Robert Charles: Moon landing showed impossible was possible as it united world Robert Charles fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc fce0fd7c-1b60-5b59-b859-59941f475900 article   Westlake Legal Group mxMV3eZ8vJNqgyrnjrHg3B Robert Charles: Moon landing showed impossible was possible as it united world Robert Charles fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc fce0fd7c-1b60-5b59-b859-59941f475900 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Britain warns Iran of 'serious consequences' if British-flagged oil tanker not released

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Britain warns Iran of 'serious consequences' if British-flagged oil tanker not released

President Trump called Iran “nothing but trouble” after saying he heard from the U.K. that tankers were seized in the Strait of Hormuz. USA TODAY

LONDON — Britain’s Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt warned Iran of “serious consequences” if it does not release a British-flagged oil tanker it seized in the strategic Strait of Hormuz waterway on Friday, although he ruled out “military options.”

The seizing of the “Stena Impero” potentially marks the most significant escalation in tensions between Iran and the West since they began rising in May, about a year after the United States pulled out of an international accord aimed at Iran’s nuclear program.

The Pentagon announced it authorized the movement of troops to Saudi Arabia as an “additional deterrent,” adding to the 1,000 troops deployed to the Middle East in June.

The showdown has caused concerns around the globe, with each maneuver bringing fear that any misunderstanding or misstep by either side could lead to war. 

“It is essential that freedom of navigation is maintained and that all ships can move safely and freely in the region,” Hunt said late Friday, ahead of an emergency government meeting. He subsequently told British media that “we’re looking at a diplomatic way to resolve the situation, but we are very clear that it must be resolved.”

About a fifth of the world’s crude oil exports passes through the Strait of Hormuz. 

Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) said Friday that the “Stena Impero” was taken to an Iranian port because it was not complying with “international maritime laws and regulations.” On Saturday, Iran’s state-run IRNA news agency reported that the “Stena Impero” collided with an Iranian fishing boat, causing it damage, and then failed to respond to calls from the smaller craft. The fishing boat informed Iran’s Ports and Maritime Organization, which notified the IRGC. The IRGC launched an investigation. 

A statement from Stena Bulk, which owns the seized tanker, said the ship had 23 crew members aboard when it was seized. They are from India, Russia, Latvia and the Philippines. There were no reports suggesting of any of them were injured.

Another British ship was briefly detained Friday before allowed to go. The owner of the Liberian-flagged, but British-owned, tanker said it was boarded by armed guards. The “Mesdar” vessel has left Iran’s territorial waters, Iran state media said. 

“This only goes to show what I’m saying about Iran: trouble,” President Donald Trump told reporters at the White House. “Nothing but trouble.”

Trump declined to say whether the moves by Iran crossed a “red line” or how the U.S. might respond. He noted the U.S. has a maritime security agreement with Britain. 

The latest incident follows a threat by Iran to seize a British oil tanker in the Persian Gulf after British Royal Marines earlier this month helped capture an Iranian tanker off Gibraltar, in the Mediterranean Sea, suspected of carrying oil to Syria in breach of European Union sanctions. Iran denied the ship was on its way to Syria. 

U.S. patrol aircraft are in the vicinity monitoring the situation in the Strait of Hormuz, and Naval Forces Central Command has been in contact with American ships in the area to ensure their safety, a Department of Defense official said. Britain has sent additional warships to the area and been escorting oil tankers in the region. 

U.S. Central Command said it in the process of developing a “multinational maritime effort,” called “Operation Sentinel,” to increase security of key Middle East waterways.

Last month, Trump abruptly canceled a planned retaliatory attack on Iran after the country downed an unmanned U.S. drone, but his administration has kept up a policy of trying to squeeze Iran’s leaders with stiff economic sanctions. Days after he pulled back the strikes on Iran, Trump threatened to use “overwhelming force” against Iran if it attacked any U.S. assets or personnel. Trump announced that the U.S. “destroyed” an Iranian drone on Thursday. Iran said there is no evidence for that. 

Contributing: Doug Stanglin, Nichola Wu, David Jackson, Donovan Slack and John Fritze, from Washington, D.C.; Associated Press

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2019/07/20/britain-warns-iran-over-seized-oil-tanker-strait-hormuz-us-iran-tensions/1784626001/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com