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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 39)

Tonight’s Democratic Debate: What Time Is It and How to Watch

Westlake Legal Group 12WHATTOWATCH-facebookJumbo Tonight’s Democratic Debate: What Time Is It and How to Watch Yang, Andrew (1975- ) Warren, Elizabeth Sanders, Bernard Presidential Election of 2020 Klobuchar, Amy Houston (Tex) Harris, Kamala D Democratic Party Debates (Political) Castro, Julian Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Booker, Cory A Biden, Joseph R Jr ABC Inc
  • The debate is 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Eastern, and you can watch it on ABC and Univision. It is being held in Houston and will also be available on streaming services.

  • Ten Democratic candidates will debate: Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., Senator Elizabeth Warren, Senator Bernie Sanders, Senator Kamala Harris, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, the entrepreneur Andrew Yang, Senator Cory Booker, former Representative Beto O’Rourke, Senator Amy Klobuchar and former housing secretary Julián Castro.

  • The candidates will have 60-second opening statements, followed by 60 seconds to answer questions from the four moderators: George Stephanopoulos, David Muir, Linsey Davis and Jorge Ramos. There will be no closing statements.

  • The New York Times will have extensive debate coverage, including a live analysis throughout the event by Peter Baker, Maggie Haberman, Astead W. Herndon, Annie Karni, Sydney Ember, all hosted by Lisa Lerer.

Join us for live analysis on debate night. Subscribe to “On Politics,” and we’ll send you a link.

Quick, name the most substantive discussion of foreign policy you have heard during the nearly 10 hours of debates so far. Struggling? Yes, foreign affairs has played a minimal role so far in the Democratic primary debates but that could change on Thursday night.

In particular, Mr. Sanders has suggested that he wants to differentiate himself on international matters from Mr. Biden, a former chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, especially focusing on Mr. Biden’s initial support for the Iraq War in 2003.

But there are plenty of international developments for the candidates to weigh in on:

  • President Trump’s plan to invite Taliban leaders to Camp David, before their secret Afghanistan peace talks collapsed.

  • The ouster of John Bolton, the former national security adviser.

  • The turmoil in the British Parliament over Brexit.

  • The pledge by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel to annex nearly a third of the occupied West Bank.

  • Turkey returning refugees to Syria, and refugees from the Bahamas arriving in Florida.

Like on so many matters, Mr. Biden’s long record leaves openings for his rivals to pick over. But it could also give him gravitas in the eyes of many voters, and an ability to position himself as a steady hand at a moment of turbulence.

Disagreements within the field over what to do on health care — the issue that most Democratic strategists believe propelled the party’s gains in the 2018 midterms — offer some of the clearest fissures in the race.

They are likely to be a major issue of debate on Thursday. One reason for that? Multiple campaigns see political advantage in highlighting their differences.

For Mr. Sanders, whose campaign has adopted the “no middle ground” mantra, his uncompromising push for “Medicare for all” is almost definitional. Of the 10 candidates onstage, only two have unequivocally stated that they support phasing out private insurers from the American marketplace as part of their plan to implement a “Medicare for all” system: Mr. Sanders and Ms. Warren.

Advisers to other campaigns have seen that as politically treacherous — possibly ceding the party’s advantage on the issue back to the Republican Party.

Mr. Biden has portrayed his health care plan as building upon the Affordable Care Act, while positioning his pro-“Medicare for all” rivals as undermining that achievement.

As Mr. Biden said in a recent television ad, “Obamacare is personal to me. When I see the president try to tear it down, and others propose to replace it and start over, that’s personal to me, too. You’ve got to build on what we did.”

Our colleague Zolan Kanno-Youngs had a story on Wednesday looking at the immigration plans — or lack thereof — of the Democratic hopefuls. The story began:

One Democratic candidate would post asylum officers at the border to decide immigration cases on the spot. Others would create an entirely new court system outside the Justice Department. Some have suggested reinstating a program that would allow Central American minors to apply for refugee status in their home countries.

The Democrats running for the White House do not lack ideas on the hot-button issues of immigration and border control. But as they prepare to take the stage on Thursday for their debate in Houston, most would rather talk about the hard-line policies of the man they seek to replace, President Trump.

The candidates have disagreements: whether to repeal a statute that makes crossing the border without permission a criminal offense, for instance, and whether to provide undocumented immigrants with taxpayer-subsidized health care. And there are also a lot of unknowns about what the candidates favor in terms of who to deport and other areas of immigration that may be unpopular with some Democrats. The debate could bring additional clarity to one of the most hotly discussed and intensely felt issues facing Americans.

Ever since they sparred from across a Senate hearing room in 2005, Mr. Biden and Ms. Warren have represented the Democratic Party’s poles on economic policy. Now they will meet on a debate stage for the first time Thursday, an encounter that many Democrats have been eagerly awaiting.

There has been relatively little sword-crossing between the two on the campaign trail. Ms. Warren had a lone quip about Mr. Biden previously being “on the side of the credit card companies.” Mr. Biden pooh-poohs Ms. Warren’s plans without mentioning her name.

But pressed by Thursday night’s moderators and, perhaps, their fellow candidates, there will be little room for Mr. Biden and Ms. Warren to hide from the fight — one that Ms. Warren appears far more eager to re-enact than does Mr. Biden, who Ms. Warren told The Boston Globe in 2012, once referred to her as “that woman who cleaned my clock.”

With so much anticipation toward and attention to the Biden-Warren showdown, the big question is how long the moderators wait to tee up the confrontation. In the first two sets of debates, NBC and CNN spent the first 30 minutes focusing the candidates on health care policy. Mr. Biden and Ms. Warren differ there, too, but for two candidates hoping to focus on the future, real fireworks may come when they discuss the past.

Once upon a time — in 2015 — Ms. Warren and Ms. Harris were very close. Ms. Warren was among the first to endorse Ms. Harris’s Senate run, sending a fund-raising solicitation the day her senate campaign began.

The two were ideological partners, having worked together when Ms. Harris, as California’s attorney general, sued the big banks over her state’s mortgage crisis.

But in the 2020 campaign they have taken different paths while competing for the same set of Democratic voters — those with college degrees, especially women. Ms. Warren’s rise over the last four months has come as Ms. Harris has fallen.

Now they will appear on a debate stage for the first time Thursday night in Houston. Ms. Harris has edged away from the firebrand liberalism Ms. Warren espouses. She’s hedged on her support for a single-payer, “Medicare for all” health care system and stumbled when talking about policy specifics, both areas in the Warren wheelhouse.

Ms. Warren, far ahead of Ms. Harris in public polling, is unlikely to go on the attack first, but she is certain to be ready if Ms. Harris seeks to draw a contrast between them or declares that Ms. Warren’s politics are too risky for a general electorate.

For Ms. Harris, who has shown great skill at made-for-social media moments, the stakes are much higher. Having seen her debate moment with Mr. Biden dissipate over the summer, she must find a way to strike a permanent vision in voters’ minds in Houston. That may mean taking a bite out of Ms. Warren’s popularity.

It spotlights the key candidate pairings and political dynamics onstage, assessing how the top-tier Democrats are likely to engage and how the rest of the contenders will try to find breakout moments. Read the guide here.

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Biden campaign rejects moderate label, swipes at plan-obsessed rivals ahead of debate

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085464898001_6085458059001-vs Biden campaign rejects moderate label, swipes at plan-obsessed rivals ahead of debate fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc f5807759-48a7-5c59-bc58-ebc079cbc4be Brooke Singman article

The Biden campaign previewed its debate strategy for Thursday night by making clear at least two things clear: The onetime vice president will reject efforts to cast him as an incremental moderate. And he’ll call on his rivals to do more than just wave around an arsenal of policy proposals.

“The vice president will argue we need more than just plans — we need action. We need progress,” a senior Biden campaign official said Thursday. “This race is not just about plans, it’s about getting things done for people.”

TRUMP CAMPAIGN FLIES ANTI-SOCIALISM BANNER OVER DEBATE SITE

The comments came during a briefing with reporters on the sidelines of the debate in Houston, and they amounted to an implicit swipe at surging Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who is best known for her reams of plans. The Massachusetts senator published yet another of those plans on Thursday morning, focused on Social Security.

The dynamic between the two rivals could be the main attraction, as this is the first time Warren has been on the same stage with Biden in this Democratic primary cycle. With the criteria tightened for this, the third debate matchup among the Dem candidates, only the 10 top-polling contenders will appear, as opposed to the field being split in half for two consecutive nights of debates.

The debate is a clear opportunity for Warren to build on the momentum her campaign has experienced in recent weeks. But Biden, grappling with sustained critical media coverage over a string of verbal flubs and a narrative from his left flank that he’s not progressive enough, is determined to convince voters there’s more to his candidacy than just the “electability” factor.

According to the campaign, he’ll talk about the “meaningful change” he helped pursue while vice president under Barack Obama, and his plans to build on that success.

“He’ll talk about his substantive record,” the official said, touting his victories against the National Rifle Association (NRA) and support for the Violence Against Women Act.

“Joe Biden has been at the forefront of progressive change,” the official said.

WARREN UNVEILS SOCIAL SECURITY PLAN

The campaign also said Biden will “reject the premise that the ideas he is putting forward are incremental.”

“We believe there is a false dichotomy in this race between candidates who are supposedly the liberal revolutionaries and those who are for incremental change,” another official said.

As for his strategy for the debate stage, the campaign made clear that Biden “is not in this race to attack other Democrats.”

“He’s been very clear about that,” one official said. “Our hope and aim is that this will be a substantive policy discussion.”

The official added, though, that Biden “has not shied away from drawing a contrast between his health care plan and Medicare-for-all — specifically the cost, in another apparent swipe at Warren and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.

“He’s not in the race to attack other Democrats but he is not going to shy away from having a meaningful conversation,” the official said.

Despite being the consistent frontrunner in the crowded Democratic primary field, Biden has grappled with critical media coverage and general frustration with his candidacy from the left. His campaign appearances have also been marred by some verbal slips in recent weeks, while some top Democrats have questioned his handling of his own record.

Former Obama adviser David Axelrod recently accused him of distorting his record on the Iraq War.

Biden famously weathered a rhetorical broadside from Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., during the first primary debate, in connection with his past stance on desegregation busing.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085464898001_6085458059001-vs Biden campaign rejects moderate label, swipes at plan-obsessed rivals ahead of debate fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc f5807759-48a7-5c59-bc58-ebc079cbc4be Brooke Singman article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085464898001_6085458059001-vs Biden campaign rejects moderate label, swipes at plan-obsessed rivals ahead of debate fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc f5807759-48a7-5c59-bc58-ebc079cbc4be Brooke Singman article

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ABC Tells Democrats to Keep Debate Clean. Looking at You, Beto.

Westlake Legal Group 15orourke-1-sub-facebookJumbo ABC Tells Democrats to Keep Debate Clean. Looking at You, Beto. United States Politics and Government Television Presidential Elections (US) Presidential Election of 2020 O'Rourke, Beto News and News Media Indecency, Obscenity and Profanity Democratic Party Debates (Political) ABC News

There was a time in American history when candidates for president did not need to be reminded to avoid using obscene and inappropriate language in front of millions of people.

That time is not now.

Faced with profligate profanities on the campaign trail — and at least one candidate who publicly threatened to work blue on its airwaves (ahem, Beto O’Rourke) — ABC News issued a warning this week to the 10 Democrats appearing on the debate stage in Houston on Thursday: Keep it clean, folks.

“We wanted to take this opportunity to remind you that, as the debate will air on the ABC broadcast network, we are governed by Federal Communications Commission indecency rules,” Rick Klein, the network’s political director, wrote in a memo forwarded to campaigns by the Democratic Party.

“Candidates should therefore avoid cursing or expletives in accordance with federal law,” Mr. Klein added, presumably sighing deeply.

There will be no delay on Thursday’s broadcast, leaving ABC censors helpless to bleep any blurted profanities. And the fact that the debate will be carried on regular broadcast airwaves — rather than the more libertine environment of cable — means the network could face penalties from federal regulators if obscenities are transmitted into Americans’ living rooms.

Concerns about uncouth language may seem quaint in an era when President Trump regularly indulges in all kinds of locker-room talk, peppering his social media and rally speeches with oaths once considered unspeakable (publicly, anyway) for a commander in chief.

But Democratic candidates, several of whom have denounced Mr. Trump’s degradation of political discourse, are increasingly dipping into dirty words themselves.

Mr. O’Rourke, the former Texas congressman, has dropped the F-word in numerous recent interviews while describing his anger about the spread of gun violence. A T-shirt available for sale on Mr. O’Rourke’s campaign website features the word in question spelled out six times. (In a nod to modesty, one letter is replaced by an asterisk.)

Obscenities, Mr. O’Rourke argues, are an appropriate response to the nation’s recent spate of gun massacres, including a mass shooting at an El Paso Walmart in the district he represented. Asked in New Hampshire over the weekend if he planned to swear on the debate stage, the candidate replied: “Maybe.”

Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey has casually used an obscene word for feces on his Twitter account, and Julián Castro, the former housing secretary, has indulged in a similar obscenity in live interviews. Coarse words like “pissed” or “hell” have also shown up in candidates’ statements.

Still, the ABC memo, first reported by CNN, was widely seen as an implicit warning toward Mr. O’Rourke. (The sponsors of this year’s two previous Democratic debates, NBC News and CNN, did not feel the need to circulate a similar warning against expletives.) ABC declined to comment, and the O’Rourke campaign did not respond to questions.

For television news executives, censoring curse words is typically a no-brainer. But sometimes the swear itself is newsworthy, a predicament that cropped up last year after Mr. Trump used a vulgar term to describe African nations and Haiti during a White House meeting with lawmakers.

The word appeared on cable news chyrons and in some news outlets’ smartphone alerts. Broadcast networks, governed by stricter rules, were more circumspect: Of the major network newscasts, only Lester Holt of NBC News uttered the offending word. On “ABC World News Tonight,” the anchor David Muir, who is serving as one of Thursday’s debate moderators, said Mr. Trump used “a profanity we won’t repeat.”

Technically, the F.C.C. prohibition on “grossly offensive” language on television expires at 10 p.m., so Democrats could hold off on their curses until then. There will still be an entire hour of debating left to go.

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Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax Files $400 Million Lawsuit Against CBS

Westlake Legal Group ap_19255541410533-1ef8c34f7b1bac6dc7fb680f73454e2ffdbe5b4f-s1100-c15 Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax Files $400 Million Lawsuit Against CBS

Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax is suing CBS, alleging the network didn’t fully vet his accusers’ claims and omitted information that would exonerate him. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax Files $400 Million Lawsuit Against CBS

Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax is suing CBS, alleging the network didn’t fully vet his accusers’ claims and omitted information that would exonerate him.

Steve Helber/AP

Attorneys for Virginia’s Democratic lieutenant governor, Justin Fairfax, filed a $400 million defamation lawsuit against CBS on Thursday, accusing the network of amplifying sexual assault claims Fairfax says are “false, defamatory and politically-motivated.”

The lawsuit centers on CBS This Morning‘s airing of two interviews with Meredith Watson and Vanessa Tyson, who in February accused Fairfax of separate incidents of sexual assault.

Fairfax’s attorneys allege the network didn’t fully vet the accusers’ claims and omitted information that would exonerate him. The suit repeats Fairfax’s claims that the women “unambiguously” expressed their consent. The suit also alleges that a CBS lawyer who knew Fairfax from college knew the encounter with Watson was consensual because he was told about it by an eyewitness.

In a statement, CBS News said: “We stand by our reporting and we will vigorously defend this lawsuit.”

Tyson’s attorneys, Debra Katz and Lisa Banks, called the lawsuit “yet another desperate stunt by Mr. Fairfax to preserve his political career at the expense of survivors of sexual assault.”

Nancy Erika Smith, an attorney for Watson, said in a statement that “we look forward to everyone testifying under oath now that this matter is in court.”

Watson says Fairfax raped her in 2000, while they were students at Duke University. Tyson said Fairfax forced her to perform oral sex during an encounter in a Boston hotel room at the 2004 Democratic National Convention.

The women told their stories in tearful interviews with Gayle King that aired April 1 and April 2.

Watson and Tyson have asked that Virginia’s General Assembly hold bipartisan hearings into their accounts. Democrats have so far blocked Republican efforts to do that, saying the body isn’t equipped to handle proceedings.

The allegations came forward days after a racist yearbook photo surfaced on Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam’s 1984 medical school yearbook page. That revelation and the governor’s bungled response led to calls for Northam’s resignation, seemingly creating an opening for Fairfax to assume the top post.

Instead, Northam withstood the calls to step down as Tyson and then Watson came forward with their stories — proof, Fairfax says, of an orchestrated campaign against him. The complaint says that effort is led by supporters of Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney, whom Fairfax claims threatened to blackmail him last year by publicly releasing the Tyson allegations.

Stoney spokesman Jim Nolan called the claims “100 percent untrue” and offensive.

The suit seeks damages caused by “the intentional and reckless publishing and propagation by CBS of patently false allegations.” The complaint notes that Fairfax lost his job with a prestigious law firm “at which he would have earned millions of dollars over the years.”

University of Richmond law professor Carl Tobias said courts have set high bars for defamation cases out of deference to the First Amendment. Fairfax’s attorneys will have to prove CBS acted out of malice.

“There are allegations to that effect, but they may be difficult to prove,” Tobias said.

The suit elaborates on some of Fairfax’s past defenses. It says Fairfax’s encounter with Watson occurred in the room of a fraternity brother, whom he claims was present throughout the encounter, and observed an “entirely consensual encounter.” The eyewitness repeated that claim with friends after it occurred, according to the complaint.

One of those friends today is a CBS attorney. He was a fraternity brother of Fairfax and the eyewitness at Duke, according to the suit, and previously dated Watson. The complaint, which does not name the attorney, says the lawyer knew about the eyewitness’s story, but was either unwilling or unable to stop the Gayle King interviews from airing.

The network “failed to interview other individuals who may have been able to confirm or contradict the allegations,” according to the complaint.

The suit also reiterates Fairfax’s claims that Tyson contacted him after their encounter, and never mentioned the assault in public appearances.

Tyson, who is an associate professor of politics at Scripps College in California, has said the alleged assault caused humiliation that she struggled to overcome.

“I (like most survivors) suppressed those memories and emotions as a necessary means to continue my studies, and to pursue my goal of building a successful career as an academic,” Tyson wrote in a statement in February.

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This is why Tulsi Gabbard and Marianne Williamson won't be in tonight's Democratic debate

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close This is why Tulsi Gabbard and Marianne Williamson won't be in tonight's Democratic debate

If you have ever wondered about the gray streak in Rep. Tulsi Gabbard’s hair, the Hawaiian Congresswoman shares the truth behind her strands. Buzz60

WASHINGTON – Only 10 Democratic presidential candidates made it to Thursday’s primary debates.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard and author Marianne Williamson — the two candidates who dominate search results during or after the debates — are not part of that group. Gabbard and Williamson are two of the now five women running for president. 

Williamson, who was on the first night of July’s debates, was the most googled candidate that night, which spiked after her use of the phrase “dark psychic force.” Gabbard, who was on the second night of July’s debate, was the most googled candidate during that night’s event, as well as June’s debates. 

But search results have not translated to polling for the two candidates, and therefore the two did not make the September debate stage. Candidates needed to hit 2% in four qualifying polls and tally at least 130,000 individual donors, according to the Democratic National Comittee guidance.

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Thursday’s debate is being held at Texas Southern University in Houston between 8 to 11 p.m. ET. ABC News is hosting the debate in partnership with Univision.

The two women have repeatedly struggled to get ahead in polling. Gabbard is at an average of 1.3%, according to RealClearPolitics. She has qualified in three out of four polls to make it to October’s debate. Williamson is at an average of 0.3%, according to RealClearPolitics.

Williamson, however, isn’t going to be stopped from trying to speak to a national audience.

Can Democrats win Texas?: Houston debate put Lone Star politics at the forefront

The author is going to offer post-debate commentary Thursday evening at 8 p.m. PT. 

“This Thursday, September 12, the DNC will host its third presidential debate. I won’t be there, but directly afterwards, live in Los Angeles and via livestream, I will offer my own take on the issues,” she wrote in a tweet.

Gabbard, however, has yet to announce whether she will hold an event to counter Thursday’s debate.

The Hawaii Congresswoman has been open about her frustrations with the DNC and not making the debate.

Late last month, Gabbard during an interview with Fox News’ Tucker Carlson claimed that the DNC’s process of who makes the debate “lacks transparency.” The DNC first announced the criteria for the September debate in May, including which polls would be qualifying. 

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Gabbard has also filed a lawsuit against Google, claiming they tried to sensor her during the height of her being the most searched candidate after the last debate. 

“We filed this lawsuit not just because of what happened there, but because of the kind of power Google has as this giant tech monopoly to interfere in our public discourse and really how they can impact our fair elections,” she said during an interview with “Rubin Report” host Dave Rubin.

It is unclear what Gabbard will be doing on the day of the debate. There are no scheduled events on her Facebook page nor formal events listed on her campaign website.

Gabbard’s campaign did not answer several requests from USA TODAY about the congresswomen’s schedule during Thursday’s debate.

In a press released announcing the third qualifying poll, Gabbard’s campaign noted the congresswoman has “emphasized her campaign is not focused on the debates and is instead spending her time on the ground campaigning, talking to the American people directly — without the ridiculous 60-second time constraints of the debate stage.”

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/elections/2019/09/12/democratic-debate-why-tulsi-gabbard-and-marianne-williamson-out/2274422001/

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Tropical storm warnings issued in the Bahamas as system cranks up

Tropical storm warnings have been issued for several islands in the Bahamas thanks to a “potential tropical cyclone” that’s formed nearby, the National Hurricane Center said. 

Tropical storm winds of at least 39 mph are expected in the northwest Bahamas by late Friday, and the the system is expected to produce total rain accumulations of 2 to 4 inches through Sunday over the Bahamas. 

This includes Grand Bahama Island and the Abacos, the islands most devastated by Hurricane Dorian. People in the Bahamas, as well as the Turks and Caicos, should be prepared for flooding from heavy rain, gusty winds from squalls and building surf conditions, AccuWeather said.

As of 5 p.m. EDT Thursday, the center of the system was about 235 miles southeast of Great Abaco Island with maximum sustained winds of 30 mph. 

“Conditions are becoming favorable for a tropical depression or a tropical storm to form within the next day or so as the system moves toward the northwest through the northwestern Bahamas and toward the Florida Peninsula,” the center said. 

The hurricane center gives the system an 80% chance of becoming a tropical depression or storm within the next two days. If the system’s winds reach 39 mph, it would be called Tropical Storm Humberto. 

Up close with a hurricane:Hurricane Dorian survivor films storm’s terrifying wrath in Bahamas as it pounds against his home

What happens next is anyone’s guess, as some computer models show the system intensifying into a hurricane off the Southeast coast by early next week while others show it sliding across Florida into the Gulf of Mexico. 

Westlake Legal Group  Tropical storm warnings issued in the Bahamas as system cranks up

“Until the feature actually develops, there are multiple possibilities with the track ranging from the Gulf of Mexico to the Florida Peninsula and the nearby Atlantic,” AccuWeather meteorologist Dan Kottlowski said.

Meteorological monsters:Are Category 5 hurricanes such as Dorian the ‘new normal’?

Desperate situation:15,000 people in the Bahamas are without food or shelter after Hurricane Dorian

Forecasters are keeping an eye on another system far out in the central Atlantic Ocean. Though not a threat to land at this time, the hurricane center gives the system a 40% chance of developing into a depression within the next five days. “Conditions appear conducive for development, and a tropical depression could form early next week while the system moves westward over the tropical Atlantic,” the hurricane center said.

If this system is the next one to attain tropical storm status, it would be called Imelda. 

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What It’s Like Being The Lawyer Of A #MeToo Survivor

What It’s Like Being The Lawyer Of A #MeToo Survivor | HuffPost

BREAKING NEWS

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Genie Harrison, who represents some of the sexual assault cases against Kevin Spacey, sits down with Caroline to discuss why she’s hopeful, why she’s angry and why she refuses to be intimidated by powerful men.

Subscribe to The Morning Email.

Wake up to the day’s most important news.

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Westlake Legal Group p?c1=2&c2=6723616&c3=&c4=&c5=&c6=&c15=&cj=1 What It’s Like Being The Lawyer Of A #MeToo Survivor

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What It’s Like Being The Lawyer Of A #MeToo Survivor

What It’s Like Being The Lawyer Of A #MeToo Survivor | HuffPost

BREAKING NEWS

NOW PLAYING

Genie Harrison, who represents some of the sexual assault cases against Kevin Spacey, sits down with Caroline to discuss why she’s hopeful, why she’s angry and why she refuses to be intimidated by powerful men.

Subscribe to The Morning Email.

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Body wrapped in carpet found outside New York City Starbucks, police say

Westlake Legal Group NYPD Body wrapped in carpet found outside New York City Starbucks, police say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 503cf62a-ea46-5b6c-84e9-3e842abb86b8

The New York City Police Department is investigating after a man’s body was found rolled up in a carpet, just his feet sticking out, on a Manhattan sidewalk.

A pedestrian called police after spotting the carpet and exposed feet outside a Starbucks on 145th Street and Frederick Douglass Boulevard in Harlem about 6 a.m. Tuesday, according to investigators.

Police told Fox News the body was also wrapped in cardboard.

MISSING CIPRIANI HEAD CHEF’S BODY FOUND AT NEW YORK HOSTEL, POLICE SAY

The man, who has not yet been identified, appeared to be in his 20s or 30s, police said, adding that he was fully clothed and may have sustained wounds to his head.

Police told Fox News it is unknown how long the body had been outside the coffee shop or how it got there.

WABC-TV reported that a red shopping cart located nearby is of interest, adding that investigators believe it may have been used to carry the body to the spot where it was dumped.

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The medical examiner will determine the cause of death.

Police said they will be examining surveillance video of the area.

Westlake Legal Group NYPD Body wrapped in carpet found outside New York City Starbucks, police say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 503cf62a-ea46-5b6c-84e9-3e842abb86b8   Westlake Legal Group NYPD Body wrapped in carpet found outside New York City Starbucks, police say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 503cf62a-ea46-5b6c-84e9-3e842abb86b8

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Top 2020 Democratic Contenders Prepare To Clash On Same Debate Stage

Westlake Legal Group 5d7aaf212400002e2a78c4c4 Top 2020 Democratic Contenders Prepare To Clash On Same Debate Stage

HOUSTON (AP) — Progressive Democrats Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders will share the debate stage for the first time with establishment favorite Joe Biden Thursday night in a prime-time showdown displaying sharply opposing notions of electability in the party’s presidential nomination fight.

Biden’s remarkably steady lead in the crowded contest is built upon the idea that the former vice president is best suited to defeat President Donald Trump next year — a contention based on ideology, experience and perhaps gender. Sanders and Warren, meanwhile, have repeatedly criticized Biden’s measured approach, at least indirectly, by arguing that only bold action on key issues like health care, the economy and climate change can build the coalition needed to win in 2020.

The top-tier meeting at center stage has dominated the pre-event talk, yet each of the other seven candidates hopes for a breakout moment with the attention of the nation beginning to increase less than five months before the first primary votes are cast.

“For a complete junkie or someone in the business, you already have an impression of everyone,” said Howard Dean, who ran for president in 2004 and later chaired the Democratic National Committee. “But now you are going to see increasing scrutiny with other people coming in to take a closer look.”

The ABC News debate is the first limited to one night after several candidates dropped out and others failed to meet new qualification standards. A handful more candidates qualified for next month’s debate, which will again be divided over two nights.

If nothing else, viewers will see the diversity of the modern Democratic Party. The debate, held on the campus of historically black Texas Southern University, includes women, people of color and a gay man, a striking contrast to the Republicans. It will unfold in a rapidly changing state that Democrats hope to eventually bring into their column.

Perhaps the biggest question is how directly the candidates will attack one another. Some fights that were predicted in previous debates failed to materialize with candidates like Sanders and Warren in July joining forces.

The White House hopefuls and their campaigns are sending mixed messages about how eager they are to make frontal attacks on anyone other than Trump.

That could mean the first meeting between Warren, the rising progressive calling for “big, structural change,” and Biden, the more cautious but still ambitious establishmentarian, doesn’t define the night. Or that Kamala Harris, the California senator, and Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, look to reclaim lost momentum not by punching rivals but by reemphasizing their own visions for America.

Biden, who has led most national and early state polls since he joined the field in April, is downplaying the prospects of a clash with Warren, despite their policy differences on health care, taxes and financial regulation.

“I’m just going to be me, and she’ll be her, and let people make their judgments. I have great respect for her,” Biden said recently as he campaigned in South Carolina.

Warren says consistently that she has no interest in going after Democratic opponents. Yet both campaigns are also clear that they don’t consider it a personal attack to draw sharp policy contrasts.

Warren, who as a Harvard law professor once challenged then-Sen. Biden in a Capitol Hill hearing on bankruptcy law, has noted repeatedly that they have sharply diverging viewpoints. Her standard campaign pitch doesn’t mention Biden but is built around an assertion that the “time for small ideas is over,” an implicit criticism of more moderate Democrats who want, for example, a public option health care plan instead of single-payer or who want to repeal Trump’s 2017 tax cuts but not necessarily raise taxes further.

Biden, likewise, doesn’t often mention Warren or Sanders. But he regularly contrasts the price tag of his public option insurance proposal to the single-payer system that Warren and Sanders back.

Ahead of the debate, the Biden campaign emphasized that he’s released more than two decades of tax returns, in contrast to the president. That’s a longer period than Warren, and it could reach back into part of her pre-Senate career when she did legal work that included some corporate law.

There are indirect avenues to chipping away at Biden’s advantages, said Democratic consultant Karen Finney, who advised Hillary Clinton in 2016. Finney noted Biden’s consistent polling advantages on the question of which Democrat can defeat Trump.

A Washington Post-ABC poll this week found that among Democrats and Democratic-leaning voters, 45% thought Biden had the best chance to beat Trump, though just 24% identified him as the “best president for the country” among the primary field.

“That puts pressure on the others to explain how they can beat Trump,” Finney said.

Voters, she said, “want to see presidents on that stage,” and Biden, as a known quantity, already reaches that threshold. “If you’re going to beat him, you have to make your case.”

Harris, said spokesman Ian Sams, will “make the connection between (Trump’s) hatred and division and our inability to get things done for the country.”

Buttigieg, meanwhile, will have an opportunity to use his argument for generational change as an indirect attack on the top tier. The mayor is 37. Biden, Sanders and Warren are 76, 78 and 70, respectively — hardly a contrast to the 73-year-old Trump.

There’s also potential home state drama with two Texans in the race. Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke and former Obama Housing Secretary Julian Castro clashed in an earlier debate over immigration. Castro has led the left flank on the issue with a proposal to decriminalize border crossings.

For O’Rourke, it will be the first debate since a massacre in his hometown of El Paso prompted him to overhaul his campaign into a forceful call for sweeping gun restrictions.

O’Rourke has recently used the F-word in cable television interviews. He’s given no indication whether he’ll bring that rhetorical flourish to broadcast television.

Peoples reported from Washington.

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