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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 43)

Hi. I’m Stan Greenberg, leading pollster and adviser to many of America’s top political figures. I also have a new book out called “RIP GOP: How the New America Is Dooming the Republicans,” AMA!

Westlake Legal Group Ebe60vv-7tDc0JgF3T9cSm_BLdYkuAoZM4nqWb3qcts Hi. I'm Stan Greenberg, leading pollster and adviser to many of America's top political figures. I also have a new book out called "RIP GOP: How the New America Is Dooming the Republicans," AMA! r/politics

Hi. I’m Stan Greenberg, leading pollster and adviser to many of America’s top political figures. I also have a new book out called “RIP GOP: How the New America Is Dooming the Republicans,” which I based on insights I collected from many polls and focus groups. I’m here to talk about how the Republicans have set themselves up for a big defeat in 2020, and how those that survive the party’s demise will help open up America to a new era of renewal and progress. AMA!

Proof: https://i.redd.it/ld25xs4jyzl31.jpg

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Fugitive Couple Accused Of Murder Are Caught After Weeks On The Run

Westlake Legal Group ap_19239803301172_custom-60d8bc64eeac7543d2f8ad7c7138bf5910c43d8a-s1100-c15 Fugitive Couple Accused Of Murder Are Caught After Weeks On The Run

These undated booking photos show Blane Barksdale, 56, and his wife, Susan Barksdale, 59. The couple escaped custody on Aug. 26, after overpowering two security guards while being extradited from New York to Arizona. Tucson Police Department via AP hide caption

toggle caption

Tucson Police Department via AP

Westlake Legal Group  Fugitive Couple Accused Of Murder Are Caught After Weeks On The Run

These undated booking photos show Blane Barksdale, 56, and his wife, Susan Barksdale, 59. The couple escaped custody on Aug. 26, after overpowering two security guards while being extradited from New York to Arizona.

Tucson Police Department via AP

Husband-and-wife murder suspects who overpowered their guards as they were being extradited from New York to Arizona and then managed to elude the law for weeks have finally run out of road.

Blane Barksdale, 56 and his wife, Susan, 59, were taken into custody Wednesday evening. The Navajo County (Ariz.) Sheriff’s Office said on Facebook that it assisted the U.S. Marshals Service and that the Barksdales were apprehended “without incident.”

The couple escaped custody on Aug. 26 en route to Arizona, where they face charges including first-degree murder in connection with the death of a 72-year-old Arizona man.

The Marshals Service says the couple “overpowered and kidnapped” two security officers and another prisoner near Blanding, Utah, about 50 miles from the Utah-Arizona border. Blane Barksdale is 6-foot-5 and weighs about 260 pounds, while Susan Barksdale is 5-foot-7 and 120 pounds.

The couple drove the prison transport vehicle to Vernon, Ariz., where they got a pickup truck provided by an acquaintance, according to officials. Then they “abandoned the locked prison van with the three occupants inside.”

They were spotted driving a red GMC Sierra truck with an Arizona license plate before they seemingly vanished.

On Monday, the Marshals Service sent an alert saying the search for the couple had “intensified” and that Blane Barksdale had been added to its 15 Most Wanted List. The Marshals offered a reward of up to $25,000 for information leading directly to his arrest. A reward for up to $10,000 was offered for information on Susan Barksdale.

The Barksdales are suspected of killing a man named Frank Bligh in Tucson, Ariz. Marshals say Bligh has been missing since his home burned down April 16. Investigators determined the fire was set intentionally and discovered that more than 100 firearms had been stolen from the residence.

Evidence prompted authorities to issue homicide arrest warrants for the couple.

They also are facing charges of first-degree burglary, arson of an occupied structure, criminal damage and auto theft.

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GOP lawmaker ‘double dog dares’ House Democrats to pursue Trump impeachment inquiry

Westlake Legal Group mcclintock GOP lawmaker 'double dog dares' House Democrats to pursue Trump impeachment inquiry fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/politics fnc David Montanaro article 16236b4e-ffe4-5dc5-8696-5e3b852e7503

A House Republican issued a “double dog dare” to Democrats on the Judiciary Committee Thursday, challenging them to call a vote on the impeachment of President Donald Trump.

Rep. Tom McClintock, of California, took issue with House Democrats, who took a big step in their Trump impeachment push as they set the ground rules for a formal committee inquiry

The committee voted 24-17 to define the rules for future committee impeachment hearings. While the committee is not writing articles of impeachment and nothing is going to the floor of the House right now, the session still holds political consequences for both sides of the aisle.

IMPEACHMENT FEVER RISES AS DEMS FACE SUMMER-RECESS PRESSURE TO GO AFTER TRUMP

“The resolution before us represents the necessary next step in our investigation of corruption, obstruction, and abuse of power,” Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, of New York, said in his opening statement.

To clear confusion around the advancement of impeachment, Nadler said the panel is “engaged in an investigation as to whether to launch an impeachment investigation into President Trump.”

McClintock was apparently fed up with Democrats seemingly dancing around the issue of whether to actually pursue impeachment, arguing that they want the “illusion of impeachment without the reality.”

TRUMP PROBES ROCKET TO FRONT OF DEM AGENDA, AS PRESIDENT DISMISSES NEW ETHICS COMPLAINT

“If the majority wants to exercise the House’s power of impeachment, all you got to do is ask the House to do so,” McClintock said. “All you have to do is ask the House that it direct and authorize this committee to conduct an impeachment inquiry. That’s all you have to do.”

“Resolve that the House authorizes the Judiciary Committee to conduct an inquiry into the impeachment of the president. It’s that simple. I dare you to do it. In fact, I double dog dare you to do it. Have the House vote on those 18 words and then go at it. Why won’t you do that?”

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has long expressed her skepticism about impeachment, urging Democrats to zero in on issues such as climate change, health care and the economy instead. Last month she was heckled by unhappy protesters at a dinner in San Francisco.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

But asked by Fox News on Monday if she supported Nadler, Pelosi said: “Yes, I do.”

“I think you should characterize it for what it is, it’s a continuation of what we have been doing,” she said. “You know we all work together on these things.”

Fox News’ Adam Shaw contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group mcclintock GOP lawmaker 'double dog dares' House Democrats to pursue Trump impeachment inquiry fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/politics fnc David Montanaro article 16236b4e-ffe4-5dc5-8696-5e3b852e7503   Westlake Legal Group mcclintock GOP lawmaker 'double dog dares' House Democrats to pursue Trump impeachment inquiry fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/politics fnc David Montanaro article 16236b4e-ffe4-5dc5-8696-5e3b852e7503

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Cyprus Turkish army depot blast hurts 12, blows out windows at nearby hotel

Dozens of windows at a hotel in northern Cyprus were shattered Thursday morning after a pre-dawn explosion at a nearby army munitions depot that sent locals running.

Officials said that 12 people were slightly injured from the blast at the depot under the Turkish army’s munitions command about 4 miles east of the port town of Kyrenia. The blast occurred around 1:30 a.m. local time.

Westlake Legal Group Kyrenia-Getty Cyprus Turkish army depot blast hurts 12, blows out windows at nearby hotel Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox news fnc/world fnc article 7ca0a592-4d51-5319-8771-9b871209fc5e

Sept. 12, 2019: Shattered glass doors at the Acapulco hotel in Kyrenia (Girne) in the self-proclaimed Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC) north of the divided Cypriot capital Nicosia, after the building was damaged when a military depot exploded nearby. – (AFP/Getty)

Early reports appeared to suggest that an undetected fire that broke out in the area may have triggered the explosion.

FRYING PAN EXPLOSION AT GERMAN VILLAGE FEST KILLS 1, INJURES 14

Videos shared on social media showed powerful explosions following the initial blast, sending some bystanders scattering.

Westlake Legal Group AP19255360180832 Cyprus Turkish army depot blast hurts 12, blows out windows at nearby hotel Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox news fnc/world fnc article 7ca0a592-4d51-5319-8771-9b871209fc5e

A worker on a balcony, below right, cleans up the debris after an explosion at an army’s munitions depot near the coastal city of Kyrenia in the Turkish occupied area at northern Cyprus, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019.  (AP)

At the nearby Acapulco hotel, some tourists were treated for minor injuries after most of the hotel’s windows and sliding doors shattered as a result of the explosions. Hotel guests were later bussed to other accommodations until repairs could be completed.

Kudret Ozersay, the foreign minister, said that electricity has been cut in the vicinity of the blast while nearby homes had been evacuated. He also urged area residents to use caution as the blast hurled unexploded ordnance over a wide area.

FRANCE HEAT WAVES LEAVE NEARLY 1,500 DEAD, HEALTH MINISTER SAYS

Ersin Tatar, prime minister of the breakaway Turkish Cypriot north of the ethnically divided nation, told reporters that nine of 12 individuals who suffered minor injuries were treated and released from the hospital. The other three remain in the hospital for observation.

Investigators have already launched a probe to determine the blast’s exact cause, Turkey’s defense ministry said.

Westlake Legal Group AP19255362845873 Cyprus Turkish army depot blast hurts 12, blows out windows at nearby hotel Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox news fnc/world fnc article 7ca0a592-4d51-5319-8771-9b871209fc5e

Cyprus was split in 1974 when Turkey invaded following a coup by supporters of union with Greece. Only Turkey recognizes a Turkish Cypriot declaration of independence and keeps more than 35,000 troops in the north. (AP)

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Cyprus was split in 1974 when Turkey invaded following a coup by supporters of union with Greece. Only Turkey recognizes a Turkish Cypriot declaration of independence and keeps more than 35,000 troops in the north.

In July, Turkish Cypriot officials said that a Syrian, Russian-made S-200 anti-aircraft missile that missed its target and reached Cyprus around 120 miles away was the likely cause of an explosion outside a village in the breakaway north.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Kyrenia-Getty Cyprus Turkish army depot blast hurts 12, blows out windows at nearby hotel Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox news fnc/world fnc article 7ca0a592-4d51-5319-8771-9b871209fc5e   Westlake Legal Group Kyrenia-Getty Cyprus Turkish army depot blast hurts 12, blows out windows at nearby hotel Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox news fnc/world fnc article 7ca0a592-4d51-5319-8771-9b871209fc5e

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Cyprus Turkish army depot blast hurts 12, blows out windows at nearby hotel

Dozens of windows at a hotel in northern Cyprus were shattered Thursday morning after a pre-dawn explosion at a nearby army munitions depot that sent locals running.

Officials said that 12 people were slightly injured from the blast at the depot under the Turkish army’s munitions command about 4 miles east of the port town of Kyrenia. The blast occurred around 1:30 a.m. local time.

Westlake Legal Group Kyrenia-Getty Cyprus Turkish army depot blast hurts 12, blows out windows at nearby hotel Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox news fnc/world fnc article 7ca0a592-4d51-5319-8771-9b871209fc5e

Sept. 12, 2019: Shattered glass doors at the Acapulco hotel in Kyrenia (Girne) in the self-proclaimed Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC) north of the divided Cypriot capital Nicosia, after the building was damaged when a military depot exploded nearby. – (AFP/Getty)

Early reports appeared to suggest that an undetected fire that broke out in the area may have triggered the explosion.

FRYING PAN EXPLOSION AT GERMAN VILLAGE FEST KILLS 1, INJURES 14

Videos shared on social media showed powerful explosions following the initial blast, sending some bystanders scattering.

Westlake Legal Group AP19255360180832 Cyprus Turkish army depot blast hurts 12, blows out windows at nearby hotel Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox news fnc/world fnc article 7ca0a592-4d51-5319-8771-9b871209fc5e

A worker on a balcony, below right, cleans up the debris after an explosion at an army’s munitions depot near the coastal city of Kyrenia in the Turkish occupied area at northern Cyprus, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019.  (AP)

At the nearby Acapulco hotel, some tourists were treated for minor injuries after most of the hotel’s windows and sliding doors shattered as a result of the explosions. Hotel guests were later bussed to other accommodations until repairs could be completed.

Kudret Ozersay, the foreign minister, said that electricity has been cut in the vicinity of the blast while nearby homes had been evacuated. He also urged area residents to use caution as the blast hurled unexploded ordnance over a wide area.

FRANCE HEAT WAVES LEAVE NEARLY 1,500 DEAD, HEALTH MINISTER SAYS

Ersin Tatar, prime minister of the breakaway Turkish Cypriot north of the ethnically divided nation, told reporters that nine of 12 individuals who suffered minor injuries were treated and released from the hospital. The other three remain in the hospital for observation.

Investigators have already launched a probe to determine the blast’s exact cause, Turkey’s defense ministry said.

Westlake Legal Group AP19255362845873 Cyprus Turkish army depot blast hurts 12, blows out windows at nearby hotel Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox news fnc/world fnc article 7ca0a592-4d51-5319-8771-9b871209fc5e

Cyprus was split in 1974 when Turkey invaded following a coup by supporters of union with Greece. Only Turkey recognizes a Turkish Cypriot declaration of independence and keeps more than 35,000 troops in the north. (AP)

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Cyprus was split in 1974 when Turkey invaded following a coup by supporters of union with Greece. Only Turkey recognizes a Turkish Cypriot declaration of independence and keeps more than 35,000 troops in the north.

In July, Turkish Cypriot officials said that a Syrian, Russian-made S-200 anti-aircraft missile that missed its target and reached Cyprus around 120 miles away was the likely cause of an explosion outside a village in the breakaway north.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Kyrenia-Getty Cyprus Turkish army depot blast hurts 12, blows out windows at nearby hotel Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox news fnc/world fnc article 7ca0a592-4d51-5319-8771-9b871209fc5e   Westlake Legal Group Kyrenia-Getty Cyprus Turkish army depot blast hurts 12, blows out windows at nearby hotel Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox news fnc/world fnc article 7ca0a592-4d51-5319-8771-9b871209fc5e

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

For Mike Pompeo, a Moment of Singular Influence

WASHINGTON — It took about five minutes after John R. Bolton’s unceremonious fall from grace this week before Washington’s official whisper factory started floating a surprising suggestion for a replacement: Mike Pompeo.

Not that Mr. Pompeo would give up his post as secretary of state to succeed Mr. Bolton as national security adviser. Instead, he would take on both jobs, occupying the corner West Wing office and the Foggy Bottom diplomatic headquarters simultaneously, just as the now-legendary Henry A. Kissinger did in the 1970s.

The notion may be fanciful; it may only be the fevered dream of Mr. Pompeo’s ambitious camp. But even if it never comes to pass, just the fact that it was floated speaks volumes about how singular a figure Mr. Pompeo has become in President Trump’s factional foreign policy circle, the victor in his cage match with Mr. Bolton and the one true survivor as every other original member of the national security team has been cast aside or fled.

Unlike Mr. Bolton or other departed advisers like H.R. McMaster, Rex W. Tillerson, Jim Mattis or Dan Coats, Mr. Pompeo has navigated Mr. Trump’s choppy presidency without capsizing. While conservative like Mr. Bolton, Mr. Pompeo has learned to advance his policy goals where he can, dispense with them when he has to and keep himself in the good graces of a notoriously fickle commander in chief.

“Secretary Pompeo has figured out how to advise the president in ways the president wants,” said Kori Schake, deputy director-general of the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London and a former National Security Council official under President George W. Bush.

For now, anyway. As the last 32 months have shown, the only permanent aspect of Mr. Trump’s administration is impermanence. Next week, Mr. Pompeo could just as easily find himself on the wrong side of the president — even the talk of his potentially taking both jobs might irritate Mr. Trump.

But at the moment, no other foreign policy adviser has the president’s ear like Mr. Pompeo and Mr. Bolton’s exit gives him a chance to further enhance his influence.

Even if he does not take on twin titles, the list of apparent candidates for the national security adviser job includes a couple of Mr. Pompeo’s special envoys, Stephen E. Biegun and Brian Hook, either of whom would give Mr. Pompeo a stronger connection to the White House than he had during Mr. Bolton’s 17-month tenure.

And he already has important allies at the Defense Department — Secretary Mark T. Esper was a West Point classmate — and at the C.I.A., whose director, Gina Haspel, previously worked for Mr. Pompeo when he ran the agency at the start of Mr. Trump’s presidency.

Yet Mr. Pompeo’s own commitment to the administration has been in question lately as he flirts with a possible run for the Senate from Kansas. He has months to decide and the emergence of a new national security structure without Mr. Bolton and with his own role enhanced could tilt the odds toward him staying.

For Mr. Pompeo, 55, the rise to the top of Mr. Trump’s team is the culmination of a rocket ride from obscurity in just eight years. A backbench Republican congressman from Kansas, he made himself into a hero of conservatives and the bête noire of liberals with an aggressive performance on the committee investigating Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of state, over the 2012 attack on a diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya.

First as C.I.A. director and then as secretary of state, Mr. Pompeo has shown a knack for connecting with Mr. Trump. Widely viewed as smart and strategic, if at times testy and even bombastic, Mr. Pompeo has made loyalty to the president his first “mission set,” a phrase he uses constantly from his time at West Point and in the Army.

And while he agreed with and facilitated the president’s desire to abandon the international nuclear agreement with Iran negotiated by President Barack Obama, he also kept private any skepticism he may have had over Mr. Trump’s diplomatic outreach to North Korea and Iran.

Even the recent collapse of the proposed peace agreement with the Taliban in Afghanistan may have served Mr. Pompeo’s complicated interests. He pleased Mr. Trump by delivering a deal as requested and yet when the president canceled it over a suicide bomb attack, he was off the hook for whatever blowback the deal might have caused.

“Pompeo is a guy who on one hand wants to deliver for the president, and is often also the guy who kind of has to placate the State Department, whch often is dovish,” said James Jay Carafano, a national security scholar at the Heritage Foundation. “So there’s a lot of triangulation there.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_68977141_cf16147e-9582-4615-9861-f40e077552fd-articleLarge For Mike Pompeo, a Moment of Singular Influence United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J State Department Pompeo, Mike National Security Council Kissinger, Henry A Bolton, John R

Henry A. Kissinger, right, with President Richard M. Nixon in 1973. Mr. Kissinger was the only person to simultaneously serve as both secretary of state and national security adviser.CreditGeorge Tames/The New York Times

But putting him in dual roles like Mr. Kissinger held under Presidents Richard M. Nixon and Gerald R. Ford would be fraught with risks — some for Mr. Pompeo, and many for the national security establishment, which, in more normal times has come to view the National Security Council as a somewhat neutral arbiter among competing departments and agencies, from the Pentagon to the State Department to the intelligence agencies.

Colin Kahl, who was the top foreign policy aide for Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., noted that the national security adviser is expected to focus on the inside game, staffing the president and coordinating a collection of agencies and departments, while the secretary of state is the public face of American diplomacy.

“Given how much care and feeding Trump needs from staff, and how complex and fast moving the world is — even compared to Kissinger’s time — it is hard to imagine anyone effectively playing both roles,” Mr. Kahl said.

Yet Ms. Schake noted that Mr. Trump clearly does not want the kind of rigorous interagency process that other presidents have had and so in that sense there may be less of a problem in combining the roles. “But mainly what appointing Pompeo to both State and NSA jobs would show is that, like Nixon, President Trump doesn’t actually trust anybody else,” she said.

The prospect of being the most powerful national security figure since Mr. Kissinger would hold obvious appeal for Mr. Pompeo. As Mr. Nixon’s national security adviser, Mr. Kissinger played an outsized role and effectively overshadowed Secretary of State William P. Rogers, so that when Mr. Rogers stepped down, it made sense to formalize his expanded role.

When Mr. Nixon resigned, Mr. Ford kept Mr. Kissinger in both jobs after he became president, but ultimately the dual role came to be problematic and, in a broader reshuffling of his team, the president stripped Mr. Kissinger of his national security adviser title and left him at State.

Instead, it was his successor, Brent Scowcroft, who became known as the model national security adviser. He was known for letting agencies present their views, and not coloring them with his own. He was so successful that he was later brought back for a second stint in the job under President George Bush.

For Mr. Pompeo, the challenge would be satisfying his boss while convincing the rest of the national security establishment that he was a neutral player — and also representing the views of the State Department.

One recent former White House official said the biggest risk for Mr. Pompeo would be “proximity.” The official noted that while it was one thing to move in and out of the White House, Mr. Trump frequently tires of those who are constantly in his sight — and, eventually, seek to contain his instincts. As the former official noted, an adviser loses altitude as soon as he settles into an adjoining office.

“The biggest reason this is unworkable though is that Trump is too insecure to rest this much prestige in one adviser,” agreed John Gans, author of “White House Warriors,” a new book on the National Security Council.

He noted that Mr. Trump was reported to be upset in 2017 when, Stephen K. Bannon, then his chief strategist, landed on the cover of Time magazine. “How is he going to feel when everyone rightly calls Pompeo the most powerful foreign policy player since Kissinger?” he asked.

David Rothkopf, who has also written about the history of the National Security Council, noted other risks of giving both jobs to Mr. Pompeo. “It might seem tempting and fuss free to Trump, but it would be a big mistake,” he said. “It would be tempting because Trump is comfortable with Pompeo and he won’t have to at least attempt or pretend to introduce someone new into his inner circle.”

But Mr. Rothkopf noted that such a move would be complicated by the fact that Mr. Trump often “tweets out positions before deliberations had taken place,” forcing aides to reverse-engineer a policymaking process to justify a decision that has already been made. The result is that national security adviser “isn’t much of a role under Trump. In fact, it is both the most negligible and the most dysfunctional NSC process since the Reagan years and the debacle of Iran-contra.”

Whether he takes the second job or simply continues in the one he already has, Mr. Pompeo now has a window of opportunity to shape Mr. Trump’s foreign policy as no other adviser has been able to do.

He has shown that he may try to steer the president but will not try too hard to dissuade him from his strongest impulses. Instead, it seems, he will wait for his moments and make the most of them.

Whether that dynamic is sustainable, of course, is anyone’s guess. “Pompeo has been able to walk through the rain drops so far, but how long does that last?” said Mr. Gans. “No one else on the national security side has managed to stay dry forever.”

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People say their older iPhones stopped working as soon Apple announced iPhone 11

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close People say their older iPhones stopped working as soon Apple announced iPhone 11

On Tuesday, Apple unveiled its iPhone 11, the iPhone 11 Pro and the iPhone 11 Pro Max as well as the latest Apple Watch Series 5. Harrison Hill, USA TODAY

Apple admitted in 2017 that it deliberately slowed down older iPhones to protect aging batteries.

The tech giant addressed the issue with a software update and battery replacement program, saying in a statement that it “never – and would never – do anything to intentionally shorten the life of any Apple product.”

But people on Twitter are still skeptical. They say their older Apple devices began conveniently “acting up” soon after the tech giant announced the iPhone 11 earlier this week. 

“So, of course I’m suspicious that yesterday’s Apple announcement killed my current iPhone. It just stopped working. Awesome,” Twitter user @ZarduBen wrote.

“The new iPhone was just announced and my phone randomly stopped working,” user @secondhandcurls tweeted.

iPhone 11: Get ready to see ‘Slofies’ all over the internet

Is Apple breaking labor laws? Tech giant denies the accuracy of watchdog report

“After the iPhone 11 came out my iPhone microphone stopped working I hate you @Apple,” Twitter user @khxnfidential said.

There has been a long-held conspiracy theory that Apple creates devices that are built to die in a practice known as “planned obsolescence.” The theory suggests that after new products are released, the manufacturer intentionally messes with your device, which forces you to upgrade.

Whether Apple practices the theory or not, its latest iOS 13 update will leave some iPhones and tablets behind. The older devices will still work, but they’ll miss out on security updates, which makes them more vulnerable to hacks.

So, if you have an iPhone 6 or older, you may want to look into newer models. 

Remember Batterygate? Here’s a look back.

So, why is my phone ‘acting up?’

Apple’s website lists several reasons why your iPhone’s performance may be lagging over time, and one of the main causes is aging batteries.

“All rechargeable batteries are consumables and have a limited lifespan – eventually their capacity and performance decline so that they need to be replaced,” Apple says on its website. “As batteries age, it can contribute to changes in iPhone performance.”

Apple temporarily dropped the price of its battery replacement program in 2018 after its slowing batteries raised concerns. People say the new batteries breathed new life into their struggling older iPhones. 

We don’t need no stinkin’ new iPhone: These older-model 5S owners don’t want one

“My iPhone 6 Plus still going strong,” wrote Twitter user @Lezzley. “Just needed to replace the battery and it works like a charm.” 

If you want an updated iPhone, preorders for Apple’s newest line-up start on Sept.13,  with online and in-store availability set for Sept. 20.

Is your older iPhone being weird? Let Dalvin Brown know on Twitter: @Dalvin _Brown

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2019/09/12/iphone-11-people-say-older-iphones-have-already-started-acting-up/2298616001/

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The murder of 9-year-old Tyshawn Lee horrified Chicago. Now, gang members will stand trial

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close The murder of 9-year-old Tyshawn Lee horrified Chicago. Now, gang members will stand trial

A 22-year-old man was charged on Monday with the execution-style killing of 9-year-old Tyshawn Lee, a Chicago boy who in November was lured into an alley and shot in a grisly gang-retaliation murder, police say. USA TODAY

CHICAGO — Nearly four years after a 9-year-old boy was shot and killed in one of Chicago’s most horrific crimes, two purported gang members are set to stand trial for murder.

Jury selection is scheduled to begin Friday in the trial of two of three men charged with carrying out the November 2015 attack on Tyshawn Lee, a fourth-grader who prosecutors say was killed by gang members to send a message to his father, an alleged member of a rival gang. 

Even for a city all too familiar with gun violence, Tyshawn’s death was shocking.

“To me, it was one of the most horrendous and horrific things. I think it shook Chicago. It literally shook it — to think that we had stooped to the level of a 9-year-old being assassinated,” said the Rev. Michael Pfleger, a Roman Catholic priest who presided over the funeral Mass.

Moms were working to end shootings: Then they were fatally shot

Pfleger has held countless funerals for children — including his own foster son — over his 44 years at the Faith Community of Saint Sabina in Chicago’s Auburn Gresham neighborhood. But Pfleger said Tyshawn’s killing was a new depth of horror.

“I was chaplin at the county jail back in the early ’70s. If you had shot somebody’s mother or grandmother, you would have been killed in prison. There was a code,” Pfleger said. “I don’t know when we as a nation are going to wake up. We have to stop making children road kill in America.”

An act of revenge

After school on Nov. 2, 2015, Tyshawn Lee was sitting on a swing at the park down the street from his grandmother’s house when a man approached him, dribbled his basketball, offered to buy him a snack and then led him to an alley, where he shot the child several times at close range, prosecutors say.

When Tyshawn raised his right hand to block the bullets, part of his thumb was shot off. 

The execution-style shooting was an act of revenge. Two gang members, Dwright Boone-Doty and Corey Morgan, believed that a rival faction had killed Morgan’s 25-year-old brother and wounded his mother a month earlier. Angered by the attack, Morgan said that he “was going to kill grandmas, mamas, kids and all,” according to court documents.

Boone-Doty initially retaliated by reportedly firing into a car occupied by a rival gang member, missing the rival but killing the 19-year-old woman who was sitting beside him. Boone-Doty has pleaded not guilty in that attack.

El Paso, Dayton, Chicago: Media doesn’t treat all gun violence the same

Prosecutors say the defendants then turned their attention to getting back at Tyshawn’s father, Pierre Stokes, who was also an alleged member of the rival gang. According to prosecutors, a third man, Kevin Edwards, drove Boone-Doty and Morgan to Dawes Park on the city’s South Side and waited with Morgan in the SUV.

That’s when Boone-Doty struck up a conversation with Tyshawn and led him to the alley, prosecutors say.

“It was an act of barbarism, the assassination of a 9-year-old child as a gang retaliation to get back at his father,” said Garry McCarthy, then-head of the Chicago Police Department.

Pfleger quickly received word of the killing.

“I just remember being there that night. Right after it happened, I went over there. (People felt) anger and numbness that this happened in the community. People were horrified,” he said.

Edwards, the driver, pleaded guilty to first-degree murder in exchange for a 25-year prison sentence.

On the day Boone-Doty first appeared in court accused of killing Tyshawn, he laughed about the murder and said he was writing a rap about it. That same day, Tyshawn’s father, Stokes, opened fire on gang rivals, wounding three of them, authorities say. Stokes is in jail awaiting trial on aggravated battery and other charges related to that attack.

The trial of Boone-Doty and Morgan is set to begin Tuesday, Sept. 17, following jury selection Friday and Monday. Boone-Doty, who will represent himself, and Morgan will be tried together but before separate juries.

He dreamed of playing in the NBA

Hundreds from Chicago and beyond attended Tyshawn’s funeral service that November, including state and local politicians and artist-activist Nick Cannon. Friends and family celebrated the life of an intelligent student and joyful son.

“School was the highlight of his day,” Tyshawn’s aunt, Valencia Lee, said in her eulogy. 

Tyshawn loved playing basketball and video games, Lee said. He looked forward to outings at parks. He enjoyed getting haircuts, shopping for new clothes and snacking on Sour Patch Kids. And he dreamed of playing in the NBA.

Many in the Auburn Gresham community say Tyshawn is still deeply missed.

“The kids loved him,” said Shon Whitton, a local sports team coach who lives in the neighborhood. “They talk about him all the time.”

Whitton works with students from Tyshawn’s former school, Scott Joplin Elementary. He runs a local Teen Leadership Club, an after-school program that focuses on conflict resolution, life skills and community service.

He said people stopped going to Dawes Park after Tyshawn’s death, even though the murder didn’t happen there. 

“We’re trying to do things to bring this park back to life. We’re trying to break that stigma of what happened,” Whitton said.

Labor Day weekend gun violence: 7 fatally shot, 34 wounded in Chicago

Rey Costilla, 46, has lived in a house abutting the alley where Tyshawn was killed for more than 20 years. He and his wife raised their two sons there.

After the incident, the Costillas considered moving but decided to stay and establish a dialogue with neighbors. “We decided to stick it out and continue to help our neighbors and be aware. It’s home,” Costilla said. 

He hoped Tyshawn’s killers would receive justice.

“I hope they pay for what they’ve done to the innocent boy. I hope the legal system does the right thing and puts them in jail for a long time,” he said.

Chicago Public Schools did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Tyshawn’s mother, Karla Lee, could not be reached for comment.

Crime down in Windy City? Chicago had least violent January in 9 years

Shootings on the decline

In 2015, the year Tyshawn was killed, violence was on the uptick in Chicago. The city had 468 homicides that year — its highest number since 2012, when more than 500 people were killed, according to CPD reports.

Meanwhile, shooting victims jumped 15% to 2,981, according to the Chicago Tribune’s homicide tracker.

The gang war that took Tyshawn’s life involved as many as 15 shootings, including at least five homicides since 2011, according to the Tribune.

Things continued to worsen. At the end of November, Chicago became embroiled in controversy when police released the dash cam video of Laquan McDonald’s murder, revealing that McDonald had been walking away from the police when officer Jason Van Dyke fired 16 shots. Protests erupted across the city.

Then, 2016 saw an even greater surge of violence, with homicides jumping by 64% to 769 and the number of shootings increasing by 47% to 4,369, according to the Tribune

But even at its peak, Chicago’s homicide rate (per capita) remained lower than that of cities like Detroit, New Orleans or St. Louis, a 2016 study by the University of Chicago’s Crime Lab found. Chicago’s homicide rate also remained below its own recent peak at the height of the crack cocaine epidemic in the 1990s.

The city, however, had the highest gun homicide rate of the five largest U.S. cities in 2016. Streets and alleys proved to be the most common locations for gun homicides and shootings.

A disproportionate amount of the violence occurred in a handful of neighborhoods on the city’s South and West sides. These predominantly African-American neighborhoods suffer from high-levels of poverty, few job opportunities and often lack basic amenities like grocery stores.

While the report suggested possible causes of the surge of violence, it could not offer a definitive diagnosis.

Gun violence: Why Chicago PD can’t get more residents to identify suspects

For the past two years, shootings have declined year-over-year, and 2019 is on track to continue the trend.

The CPD announced earlier this month that August experienced its lowest number of murders and shootings since 2011. Shooting incidents fell 19% and murders fell 23% in August compared to last year, according to the CPD report.

‘Tyshawn’s death was preventable’

Following a back-and-forth on Twitter last week with Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot penned an op-ed in the Washington Post on Sunday to call for gun reform. She cited Tyshawn’s case.

“As long as people can drive from Illinois to Indiana and purchase a personal arsenal without a background check, Chicago’s gun laws will always be as weak as those of the closest permissive state,” Lightfoot wrote.

“The consequences of this situation are deadly. A gang member from Chicago bought at least seven illegal guns from someone in New Mexico. Two of those guns were used to commit homicides in the city, including the execution of a 9-year-old boy, Tyshawn Lee, in 2015. Tyshawn’s death was preventable.”

Corey Morgan’s brother Anthony directed his acquaintance in New Mexico to purchase the seven guns in four separate transactions, according to a court memo last month. Authorities tied two of those firearms to homicides, including Tyshawn’s murder.

Morgan was sentenced to four years in prison.

“This is a case study in how illegal guns flood this district and terrorize our community,” Assistant U.S. Attorney James P. Durkin argued in the government’s sentencing memorandum. “Illegal firearms are the lifeblood of violent crime in this city, and they need to be treated as such.”

To advocate for gun safety laws, the Rev. Pfleger and others in Chicago are planning to send 10 buses of people to the Nation Rally to End Gun Violence in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 25, according to a press release Wednesday.

“With the continued increase of mass shootings and the ongoing violence in Chicago, and other major cities, we are asking Congress to protect the lives of American citizens,” the release said.

Contributing: The Associated Press

Follow Grace Hauck on Twitter @grace_hauck.

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Trump Administration To Revoke Obama-Era Water Protection Rule

Westlake Legal Group 5d7a653f3b0000039fd18cfc Trump Administration To Revoke Obama-Era Water Protection Rule

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Trump administration plans to revoke an Obama-era regulation that provided federal protection to many U.S. wetlands and streams, according to two Environmental Protection Agency officials with knowledge of the plan.

The rule defined which waterways are subject to federal regulation. The administration plans to replace it with its own version, according to the officials, who were not authorized to speak publicly about the decision and spoke on the condition of anonymity.

EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler and Army for Civil Works Assistant Secretary R.D. James scheduled a news conference for later Thursday.

The action is the latest in a series of Trump administration moves to roll back environmental protections put into place under former President Barack Obama.

Farmers, homebuilders and other business interests have pushed for repeal of the clean water rule, saying it has harmed economic development and violates property rights.

But environmentalists say the move would leave millions of Americans with less safe drinking water and damage wetlands that prevent flooding.

The Natural Resources Defense Council said the Trump administration’s action would be challenged in court.

“The Clean Water Rule represented solid science and smart public policy,” it said in a statement. “Where it has been enforced, it has protected important waterways and wetlands, providing certainty to all stakeholders.”

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When Your Commander in Chief Is Also Providing Your Hotel Room

TURNBERRY, Scotland — The middle-aged golfers had finished their last single-malt whiskeys late one night this July, and the bartenders were closing up.

Then a bus pulled up to the Trump Turnberry hotel on Scotland’s west coast with a load of new guests, several staff members said. The doormen, dressed in kilts with long feathers protruding from their berets, ushered in more than 50 uniformed American military service members.

After gawking at a fountain encircled by stone horses and classical statues, the troops piled their duffel bags around the table of orchids under the crystal chandeliers of the wood-paneled lobby, checked into their rooms and headed to the bar to begin ordering some whiskey of their own.

Throughout President Trump’s term, officials said this week, the American military has been paying his money-losing Scottish golf resort to provide five-star accommodations to United States military flight crews and other personnel during refueling stops on trips to and from Southeast Asia, the Middle East and other locations.

The chairman of the House Oversight committee has questioned if the spending at Turnberry is a violation of a constitutional prohibition on government payments to the president outside of his salary — a provision known as the emoluments clause. Other House Democrats have said they expect the matter will now figure in their investigation of a possible impeachment.

But an examination of military layovers at Turnberry, including a two-day stay by a reporter at the resort, reveals a more complicated picture.

There is little evidence of a systematic scheme to enrich Mr. Trump. But the military bookings at Turnberry are the latest in a series of episodes in which the president’s private businesses have intersected with his public position in ways that he can profit from.

The pattern also raises questions about how military officials failed to anticipate the questions that would accompany a large number of American military personnel marching into the opulent halls of one of the president’s golf resorts at public expense.

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A United States Air Force plane at Glasgow Prestwick Airport on Wednesday. The bookings for American military personnel staying at the Trump resort are made by employees of the airport.CreditMary Turner for The New York Times

Mr. Trump’s defenders note that American military jets have been stopping in the region since long before Mr. Trump’s election. A decision by the Pentagon to have its flights stop more frequently at the local airport was made under the Obama administration.

The military says the vast majority of American military personnel who have passed through since 2016 have stayed at other area hotels, not Mr. Trump’s. Those who did stay there paid a discounted rate of as little as $130 a night, compared to a typical price of about $380 a night.

“To me, it was honestly just a hotel, a place to sleep,” said Nathan Wendzel, 33, a helicopter pilot, who spent a night at the Trump Turnberry last September, along with about 35 other members of his Iowa National Guard unit, on their way back to the United States from a trip to Kosovo. “It is better than a tent with no air conditioning.”

Neither Mr. Trump’s company nor the United States military has disclosed how much government money has been spent at the Trump resort. But a dozen Trump Turnberry staff members, all speaking on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals, said the military stays have been a regular occurrence and, often, encompass surprisingly large groups.

Buses like the one that arrived in July periodically turn up at midnight or 2 a.m. carrying dozens of soldiers or Marines, several hotel staff members said. Less expensive hotels, like a TraveLodge and a Premier Inn, are next to the airport — the Trump Turnberry resort is about a 40-minute drive.

The bookings for United States military personnel staying at the Trump resort are made by employees of the Glasgow Prestwick Airport, which has an incentive to curry favor with Mr. Trump. The airport has become economically reliant on the military refueling flights, creating at least the appearance of a motive to steer business to the American commander in chief.

Michael Matheson, the Scottish transport minister, told the Scottish Parliament this week that the Turnberry is one of 13 hotels the airport uses and that “Turnberry is generally booked only if other hotels are unavailable or if customers specifically request it.”

But critics say that the military stays at Trump Turnberry still underscore recurring questions that have grown out of Mr. Trump’s singular decision to remain the owner of the business that bears his name while holding high office.

Long stays by lobbyists and foreign officials at the Trump International hotel in Washington, Vice President Mike Pence’s recent stay at a Trump resort in Ireland, and the president’s highly publicized outings to his own golf clubs have all raised similar issues. At times Mr. Trump has appeared to promote his hotels at the same moment that he denies steering them government money.

Mr. Trump and his family gave a press conference during the reopening of the Turnberry resort in June 2016, while he was running for president.CreditJeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

“NOTHING TO DO WITH ME,” Mr. Trump tweeted this week in all capital letters about the military stays his Turnberry resort, before adding in parenthesis, “They have good taste!”

Even some guests at Turnberry questioned the arrangement. “It is completely inappropriate,” said Bennett Rodick, a Chicago lawyer watching the sunset from the hotel lobby with his wife. “You don’t want him commingling his business interests with his government interests.”

The United States military has been using Prestwick as a stopover since at least the World War II, in part because of the extremely long runway the airport offers, and its reputation for being largely free of fog.

Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower sometimes landed there, and after the war Scotland gave him permanent use of an apartment in a medieval castle not far from Turnberry that he frequently visited. In March 1960, Elvis Presley, then wrapping up his military service, stopped at the airport for a few hours and was mobbed by his fans.

But the last decade brought trying times to the airport. The United States military’s stopovers declined with the end of the war in Iraq and the pullback of troops from Afghanistan. And commercial air traffic shifted to the larger Glasgow International Airport. The situation got so desperate that in 2013 the Prestwick airport, deep in debt, was sold to the Scottish government for a little more than $1.

Mr. Trump entered the picture the next year, when he bought the Turnberry hotel and its storied golf course — the longtime home of the British Open — from a company owned by the emirate of Dubai, reportedly for nearly $70 million. Soon after he flew with great fanfare into Prestwick airport on his Boeing 757.

He announced that his resort was forming a cross-promotion deal with the airport. To make Turnberry “the finest resort anywhere,” he told reporters in 2014, “we need an airport.”

There would be “people coming in from New York, high level people from all over the place — a lot of private aircraft will be landing with groups and individuals and we expect to be using Prestwick quite a bit,” Mr. Trump promised.

Trump executives also began negotiating with Prestwick airport officials to try to ensure that they would refer visiting aircrews to the hotel, emails first obtained by The Guardian in 2017 show.

The town of Ayr, near Glasgow Prestwick Airport. There are less expensive hotels near the airport, while the Trump Turnberry resort is about a 40-minute drive.CreditMary Turner for The New York Times

But at least for Prestwick, almost none of Mr. Trump’s predictions came true. The majority of the resort’s customers are affluent North Americans, along with a smaller number of Asians and others who come on package golf tours. Few arrive via Prestwick.

These days its cavernous main passenger terminal is often almost deserted. The only airline that still flies into Prestwick is the discount carrier Ryanair. Only a handful of its flights come in each day, mainly from relatively small European markets. No flights arrive from London, Dublin or North America.

“Years ago we had more flights and other airlines, but it is very quiet now,” said Margaret Vincent, 57, pulling down the gates Thursday afternoon to close the empty airport bookstore next to the empty cafe, empty bar and empty foreign currency exchange desk.

But on the opposite side of the airport, the United States military has brought back at least some of the business.

The Defense Logistics Agency signed a formal refueling and aviation services contract with Prestwick in August 2016, under President Barack Obama. The contract began being used in a major way the following year, after Mr. Trump took office. Through June, federal contracting records show, it has made at least 925 fuel purchases at the airport, worth $17.3 million.

An American military jet — often a C-130 Hercules transport plane — lands or takes off almost every day, according to local airplane enthusiasts who wait by the airfield to watch them.

In part because of the refueling agreement, the level of American military air traffic has surged during the Trump presidency. After 145 stopovers in 2016, there were 257 last year and 259 in the first eight months of this year, the Pentagon said.

The number of stopovers with overnight stays, entailing booking rooms at hotels, has climbed from 75 in 2016 to 208 last year and 220 this year through August, according to the Defense Department figures.

Trump Turnberry can seen like incongruous housing for military personnel. The white walls and red roof of the main hotel stretch along a high ridge overlooking the rocky coast of the Irish Sea.

Mr. Trump arrived in a private helicopter for his 2016 visit to Turnberry. During the visit, his staff handed out “Make Turnberry Great Again” hats.CreditOli Scarff/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

The windows look out over stone steps descending through rolling hills to the golf course, with the historic Turnberry castle and lighthouse in one direction and the surreal dome of the granite Ailsa Craig protrudes from the sea in the other. Each night at sunset, a bagpiper — also in a kilt — parades past the lobby windows, right in front of the helicopter pad.

Several of the military visitors complained that the resort was not a particularly convenient place. It is far from any restaurants or even a pub. A burger costs almost $26 at current exchange rates, 21 pounds, and blended whiskey starts at nearly $10 a glass. A day ticket for hotel guests to play on the signature golf course costs $495.

Mr. Trump visited during the 2016 presidential campaign and his staff passed out baseball hats with the slogan “Make Turnberry Great Again.” Since his election, Mr. Trump and his family have also brought additional federal spending to the resort. He stayed at the hotel and played a round of golf there in July 2018, accompanied by diplomats, advisers and his Secret Service detail.

“I have arrived in Scotland and will be at Trump Turnberry for two days of meetings, calls and hopefully, some golf — my primary form of exercise!” Mr. Trump wrote on Twitter during that visit. “The weather is beautiful, and this place is incredible!”

Eric Trump, who helps oversee its operations, visits frequently, along with his own Secret Service detail. Asked Thursday about the stays by military personnel, Eric Trump declined to comment but praised his family’s property.

Records show payments of at least $64,000 to Trump Turnberry by the State Department in the last two years, although part of that money might have been refunded, the records suggest, after the trips ended. The Trump Organization said it refunds to the government any payments made to Turnberry for those visits by federal government employees after accounting for the resort’s costs, but declined to provide details.

President Trump, after he was elected, transferred ownership of his resorts, golf courses and other properties to a trust that is controlled by his sons and company executives. But Mr. Trump still benefits financially.

The resort lost $4.2 million in 2017, according to an annual filing in Britain, continuing a string of losses reported since Mr. Trump bought it.

The club had revenue of $23.4 million in 2018, according to a financial report filed in the United States, its best year since the Trumps’ ownership. The company has not filed the resort’s profit or loss statement for 2018.

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