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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 45)

Trump’s Senate impeachment trial, Day 2: Schiff warns of Russian attack, the need to protect 2020 election

Good morning and welcome to Fox News First. Here’s what you need to know as you start your day …

Schiff warns of Russian attack on US mainland, the need to protect 2020 election in Day 2 of Trump’s Senate impeachment trial
The Russians could attack the U.S. and removing President Trump from office is necessary to preserve the integrity of the 2020 election. Those were the claims Wednesday from Democrat Adam Schiff on Wednesday during Day 2 of Trump’s Senate impeachment trial.

The lengthy arguments from Schiff and other House Democrats broke little new ground, if any. Trump’s lawyers sat by, waiting their turn, as the president blasted the proceedings from afar, jokingly threatening to face off with the Democrats by coming to “sit right in the front row and stare at their corrupt faces.”

The challenge before the House impeachment managers was clear. Democrats were given 24 hours over three days to prosecute the charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress against Trump. They must try win over not just fidgety senators sitting silently in the chamber but also an American public that’s deeply divided over the president and his impeachment in an election year.

Schiff, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, sought to keep the stakes high in his arguments. He suggested at one point that military aid to Ukraine was essential so the U.S. would not have to fight Russians at home.

“As one witness put it during our impeachment inquiry, the United States aids Ukraine and her people so that we can fight Russia over there, and we don’t have to fight Russia here,” Schiff said, drawing rebukes from commentators across the political spectrum.

Schiff attracted the most criticism, however, for later arguing that Trump must be removed from office by the Senate — rather than by voters in the 2020 election — saying it was impossible to be sure the 2020 election won’t be compromised. Click here for more on our top story

Other developments in Trump’s Senate impeachment trial:
– Biden says he won’t be part of witness deal some Democrats reportedly eyeing
– Got milk: GOP pols drink dairy on Senate floor, following strict impeachment rules
– Trump posts record-breaking number of tweets in one day

Westlake Legal Group c259916e-AP20023176892859 Trump's Senate impeachment trial, Day 2: Schiff warns of Russian attack, the need to protect 2020 election fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 6f6fec61-563b-5f20-a46e-2ad198cdcc7f

Firefighters battle the Morton Fire as it consumes a home near Bundanoon, New South Wales, Australia, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020. (AP Photo (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

3 Americans battling Australian wildfires killed in C-130 crash 
Three American firefighters died in a water tanker plane crash Thursday while battling wildfires in Australia, New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian confirmed.

Rural Fire Service officials said they had located the plane, a C-130 Hercules, that crashed in the snowy Monaro region of New South Wales state. Coulson Aviation in the U.S. state of Oregon said in a statement that one of its C-130 Lockheed large air tankers was lost after it left Richmond in New South Wales with retardant for a firebombing mission. It said the accident was “extensive” but provided few other details.

The victims were not immediately identified. Click here for more

Westlake Legal Group SchoolChoice012320 Trump's Senate impeachment trial, Day 2: Schiff warns of Russian attack, the need to protect 2020 election fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 6f6fec61-563b-5f20-a46e-2ad198cdcc7f

Kendra Espinoza of Kalispell, Montana, center, stands with her daughters Naomi and Sarah outside the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020 in Washington. (AP Photo/Jessica Gresko)

Supreme Court justices spar over major school-choice case
The Supreme Court appeared closely split during oral arguments Wednesday in a case with potentially major implications for the school choice movement, as the justices — including Chief Justice John Roberts, who presided over President Trump’s impeachment trial the previous night until 2 a.m. — sparred with the lawyers and each other.

The case, Montana Department of Revenue v. Espinoza, centers around a tax-credit scholarship program passed in May 2015 that gave Montanans up to a $150 credit for donating to private scholarship organizations, helping students pay for their choice of private schools. The state’s revenue department made a rule banning those tax-credit scholarships from going to religious schools before the state’s Supreme Court later struck down the entire law. Click here for more. 
 
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#TheFlashback: CLICK HERE to find out what happened on “This Day in History.”
 
SOME PARTING WORDS

Sean Hannity slams lead House impeachment manager Adam Schiff’s arguments at President Trump’s Senate trial, saying the California congressman “looked like a lunatic.”

Not signed up yet for Fox News First? Click here to find out what you’re missing.
 
Fox News First is compiled by Fox News’ Bryan Robinson. Thank you for making us your first choice in the morning! Enjoy your day! We’ll see you in your inbox first thing Friday morning.

Westlake Legal Group Schiff012320 Trump's Senate impeachment trial, Day 2: Schiff warns of Russian attack, the need to protect 2020 election fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 6f6fec61-563b-5f20-a46e-2ad198cdcc7f   Westlake Legal Group Schiff012320 Trump's Senate impeachment trial, Day 2: Schiff warns of Russian attack, the need to protect 2020 election fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 6f6fec61-563b-5f20-a46e-2ad198cdcc7f

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This Day in History: Jan. 23

On this day, Jan. 23 …

1962: Jackie Robinson is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. 

Also on this day:

  • 1368: China’s Ming dynasty, which would last nearly three centuries, begins as Zhu Yuanzhang is formally proclaimed emperor following the collapse of the Yuan dynasty.
  • 1789: Georgetown University is established in present-day Washington, D.C.
  • 1845: Congress decides all national elections would be held on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November.
  • 1932: New York Gov. Franklin D. Roosevelt announces his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination.
  • 1933: The 20th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, the so-called “Lame Duck Amendment,” is ratified as Missouri approves it.
  • 1950: The Israeli Knesset approves a resolution affirming Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.
  • 1962: Tony Bennett records “I Left My Heart in San Francisco” in New York for Columbia Records.
  • 1964: The 24th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, eliminating the poll tax in federal elections, is ratified as South Dakota becomes the 38th state to endorse it.
  • 1968: North Korea seizes the U.S. Navy intelligence ship USS Pueblo, commanded by Lloyd “Pete” Bucher, charging its crew with being on a spying mission; one sailor is killed and 82 are taken prisoner. (Cmdr. Bucher and his crew would be released the following December after 11 months of captivity.)
  • 1978: Rock musician Terry Kath, a key member of the group Chicago, accidentally shoots himself to death following a party in Woodland Hills, Calif.
  • 1989: Surrealist artist Salvador Dali dies in his native Figueres, Spain, at age 84.
  • 2005: Legendary “Tonight Show” host Johnny Carson dies in Los Angeles at age 79.
  • 2009: President Barack Obama quietly ends the Bush administration’s ban on giving federal money to international groups that performed abortions or provided information on the option.
  • 2009: New York Gov. David Paterson chooses Democratic Rep. Kirsten Gillibrand to fill the Senate seat vacated by Hillary Rodham Clinton, after Clinton is appointed U.S. Secretary of State by President Obama.
  • 2018: LeBron James, at 33, becomes the youngest player in NBA history to reach 30,000 career points, during the Cleveland Cavaliers’ 114-102 loss to the San Antonio Spurs.  
Westlake Legal Group JackieRobinson012320 This Day in History: Jan. 23 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc article 48b0fd72-831d-5226-bcc7-00e40f43fcf2   Westlake Legal Group JackieRobinson012320 This Day in History: Jan. 23 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc article 48b0fd72-831d-5226-bcc7-00e40f43fcf2

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Wuhan Beyond the Coronavirus: Steel, Cars and Spicy Noodles

Westlake Legal Group 23wuhan-explainer-1-facebookJumbo Wuhan Beyond the Coronavirus: Steel, Cars and Spicy Noodles Wuhan (China) Economic Conditions and Trends Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China Automobiles

If Wuhan could be compared to an American city, it might be Pittsburgh — a much bigger, much hotter Pittsburgh.

Wuhan, an industrial city in central China, straddles a river, the Yangtze. It is home to a troubled and declining steel industry. It is a university town filled with college students.

The comparisons don’t go much further. Wuhan has a population of more than 11 million people, the equivalent of 36 Pittsburghs. In terms of college students alone, roughly one million are enrolled there, according to government figures. Summer temperatures can approach 100 degrees, with heavy humidity. Its traditional dish, and one of China’s favorite noshes, is a pungent pasta concoction called reganmian, or “hot dry noodles.”

Wuhan is also the epicenter of a viral outbreak that is worrying the world. On Thursday, Chinese officials sharply limited travel to and from the city in an effort to contain a coronavirus that so far has killed 17 people and infected hundreds more. The restrictions hit the city at the peak of the travel period for the Lunar New Year holiday, meaning many residents may miss their families and loved ones this week.

Wuhan embodies China’s rise as a global economic power, in all its complexities. Disposable income per person soared more than sixfold between 2002 and 2018, according to government figures compiled by CEIC Data, an information provider. The area is home to vast automotive factories making cars for General Motors, Nissan, Honda and other global and local brands. The city has become a popular destination for foreign investment.

The Chinese government thinks so highly of the city’s image that Xi Jinping, the country’s leader, met Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India there two years ago. The two walked along the city’s East Lake, building what Chinese state-run media came to call the Wuhan spirit between the two regional rivals.

The boom has come with problems. Heavy pollution has provoked protests. Its streets are often clogged with traffic. Its steel factories, long a backbone of the local economy, have struggled along with the rest of the inefficient industry in China with overcapacity and pollution problems, leading Beijing to combine the state-owned local giant, Wuhan Steel, with another company.

Wuhan has long been a center of commerce in China thanks to its position along the Yangtze River, a major trade route, and it remains a key transportation hub, leading some in China to compare it to Chicago. It was also the site of one formative event in Chinese history: a military mutiny in 1911 that led to the collapse of the Qing dynasty and ushered in the Republic of China.

Wuhan held a special place in the heart of Mao Zedong, who famously took a swim in the Yangtze there in 1966 to show his vitality. This was at the beginning of the Cultural Revolution, which tore Wuhan apart as it did other cities.

As China took off in the modern era, local leaders tried to burnish its image and show Wuhan taking part in the country’s rise. They explored adopting a slogan and considered “Great River, Great Lake, Great Wuhan” and “River Capital of the East, Livable Wuhan,” among others.

They settled on “Wuhan, Different Everyday!”

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Tanker Plane Fighting Australia’s Bushfires Crashes, Killing Crew Of 3

Westlake Legal Group rts2xu0s-4b53a4623273df1b8b8bda3915b4133342369086-s1100-c15 Tanker Plane Fighting Australia's Bushfires Crashes, Killing Crew Of 3

An air tanker operated by Canada-based Coulson Aviation drops fire retardant on the Morton Fire burning in bushland close to homes at Penrose, south of Sydney, Australia, earlier this month. Dan Himbrechts/Dan Himbrechts/AAP Image via Reuters hide caption

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Dan Himbrechts/Dan Himbrechts/AAP Image via Reuters

Westlake Legal Group  Tanker Plane Fighting Australia's Bushfires Crashes, Killing Crew Of 3

An air tanker operated by Canada-based Coulson Aviation drops fire retardant on the Morton Fire burning in bushland close to homes at Penrose, south of Sydney, Australia, earlier this month.

Dan Himbrechts/Dan Himbrechts/AAP Image via Reuters

Three firefighters helping fight Australia’s bushfires were killed Thursday when the C-130 tanker aircraft they were operating crashed south of the capital, Canberra.

“Tragically, there appears to be no survivors as a result of the crash down in the Snowy Monaro area,” Shane Fitzsimmons, the Rural Fire Services Commissioner for New South Wales state, said at a news conference.

He said the tanker “impacted heavily with the ground and initial reports are that there was a large fireball associated with the impact of the plane as it hit the ground.”

“There is no indication at this stage of what’s caused the accident,” he added.

Fitzsimmons said all three aboard the airplane were U.S. residents, but he declined to name them pending notification of the families.

The crash, which occurred near Cooma, northeast of the Snowy Mountains, comes as Australia continues fighting massive bushfires fueled by record-setting temperatures. A fire southeast of Canberra, one of several firefighters are battling, has engulfed nearly 1,000 square miles and is considered out of control.

Westlake Legal Group ap_20023207620981-4105c4819d2d9097addfa7dfeb292dfc990305e4-s1100-c15 Tanker Plane Fighting Australia's Bushfires Crashes, Killing Crew Of 3

Flames from the Morton Fire consume a home near Bundanoon, New South Wales, Australia, on Thursday. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Tanker Plane Fighting Australia's Bushfires Crashes, Killing Crew Of 3

Flames from the Morton Fire consume a home near Bundanoon, New South Wales, Australia, on Thursday.

Noah Berger/AP

“The fire season is still far from over and today we’ve seen, again, tragic consequences, where three people have lost their lives,” New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian said.

“Our thoughts and prayers and heartfelt condolences go to their families,” she said.

Berejiklian said more than 1,700 volunteers were in the field helping fight the fires.

“We can’t thank enough people who continue, notwithstanding those conditions, to put their lives at risk,” she said.

The C-130 Hercules, a converted military transport, was operated by Canadian-based Coulson Aviation. The aircraft was on a firebombing mission.

“It’s just a ball of flames…over,” a nearby plane reportedly radioed flight control after witnessing the crash.

Coulson, which temporarily suspended its tanker flights as a mark of respect and to re-assess safety precautions, said it would send a team to the crash site to assist in the emergency operations.

“The accident is reported to be extensive and we are deeply saddened to confirm there were three fatalities,” the company said in a brief statement emailed to Reuters.

Since September, 32 people have been killed as a result of the bushfires, including more than a dozen firefighters.

The bushfires, which have scorched an area larger than the state of Pennsylvania, have also killed an estimated 1 billion animals and destroyed 2,500 homes.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

With talk of ‘sleazebags,’ impeachment debate outside Senate turns rough

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6125501109001_6125504797001-vs With talk of ‘sleazebags,’ impeachment debate outside Senate turns rough Howard Kurtz fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc e2e1a7c1-afef-5ce9-8aeb-87afae348ec7 article

It was 1 in the morning, long after most of the country had gone to sleep, that the chief justice of the United States scolded both sides in the impeachment trial.

It was time to return to “civil discourse,” John Roberts said, because “they are addressing the world’s greatest deliberative body.”

Good luck with that.

OUTRAGED SPEECHES MARK IMPEACHMENT TRIAL’S DEBUT AS MCCONNELL PARTIALLY RETREATS

The raw acrimony of the first day’s marathon hearing faded somewhat Wednesday as Adam Schiff and the Democrats made their lengthy opening statements in the Senate. But outside the chamber, plenty of people weren’t playing by Marquis of Queensbury rules.

Trump used his signature street talk when asked about impeachment during interviews and pressers at the gilded retreat in Davos.

“First of all, Jerrold Nadler,” he said, the congressman whose Judiciary committee brought the articles of impeachment. “I’ve known him a long time. He’s a sleazebag.”

Not the worst insult ever uttered in New York, where the two clashed for years over Trump’s building projects, but not the usual presidential rhetoric.

The president also went off on one of his favorite targets — the media — when asked about the trial.

“The press is so dishonest, so corrupt. I read it all the time. Stories, I don’t mind bad stories. I deserve a bad story sometimes, but when I do something great or good, let it be written about good…

“And hopefully everybody is going to sort of learn a lesson. People got Pulitzer Prizes for their coverage of me and it turned out they were totally wrong. Other people, Sean Hannity, Rush Limbaugh, a lot of great people, a lot of great writers. They got it right. They didn’t get Pulitzer Prizes, but they got it right.”

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A couple of clarifying points: Broadcasters like Hannity and Rush aren’t eligible for Pulitzers, which are awarded for print and online work. And yes, the New York Times and Washington Post were awarded such prizes for their reporting on the Russia investigation, which may have been flawed but was not fake just because the probe led to no charges against Trump and his inner circle.

But Republicans have no monopoly on trash talk.

Hillary Clinton is getting a whole lot of attention for dissing her 2016 rival, Bernie Sanders, in a forthcoming Hulu documentary. “Nobody likes him,” she said. “Nobody wants to work with him.”

The former secretary of state got some flak from her own side for such undiplomatic comments that threatens to reignite the feud between their respective followers. She had to walk back her deflection of a question on whether she’d endorse Bernie by saying of course she’ll back the eventual nominee.

Sanders, for his part, made a joke about his wife usually liking him and asking his staff to show restraint rather than getting into a likability spitting match with his former foe.

But the other man who ran against her couldn’t resist. “When Hillary says nobody likes him, nobody likes her. That’s why she lost, nobody liked her,” Trump told Maria Bartiromo.

Such is the level of 2020 campaign discourse these days.

Meanwhile, the president said he’d like John Bolton to testify at the trial — though a Washington Post piece about a Bolton-for-Hunter Biden witness trade seems to be going nowhere — before quickly walking it back.

“The problem with John is that it’s a national security problem,” Trump said. As national security adviser, he was privy to Trump’s private views of world leaders, and the president implied such testimony would breach executive privilege.

“And I don’t know if we left on the best of terms. I would say probably not, you know?” That was pretty candid; Trump is concerned that Bolton’s ouster could lead him to damaging testimony on Ukraine.

There is the impeachment debate inside the Capitol and the debate echoing through the media, and they are operating by very different rules.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6125501109001_6125504797001-vs With talk of ‘sleazebags,’ impeachment debate outside Senate turns rough Howard Kurtz fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc e2e1a7c1-afef-5ce9-8aeb-87afae348ec7 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6125501109001_6125504797001-vs With talk of ‘sleazebags,’ impeachment debate outside Senate turns rough Howard Kurtz fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc e2e1a7c1-afef-5ce9-8aeb-87afae348ec7 article

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When the Tech Backlash Turns Dangerous: Fake Calls for a SWAT Team

Westlake Legal Group 01swatting-facebookJumbo When the Tech Backlash Turns Dangerous: Fake Calls for a SWAT Team Social Media police Mosseri, Adam Krebs on Security Hoaxes and Pranks Facebook Inc Cyberharassment Computers and the Internet

SAN FRANCISCO — Over the first week of November, the police in San Francisco and New York responded to a series of telephone calls claiming that hostages were being held in the homes of Adam Mosseri, a senior Facebook executive.

The calls appeared to be coming from inside the homes. Officers arrived in force and barricaded the streets outside. Twice. But after tense, hourslong standoffs, they realized the calls were hoaxes. There were no hostages, and no one in the homes had called the police.

Mr. Mosseri was one of a number of tech executives who have been targeted recently in so-called swatting incidents. Swatting is online lingo used to describe when people call the police with false reports of a violent crime of some sort inside a home, hoping to persuade them to send a well-armed SWAT team.

These incidents have become more common in communities rich with tech companies and their billionaire executives, like the Bay Area and Seattle, according to six police departments contacted by The New York Times.

Exact numbers are unclear, the police say, because there is no central repository of information for these sorts of attacks. But as online discourse has become more combative and more personal, some in the industry aren’t surprised that tech executives — the people who decide what is posted on and who is barred from social media — have become regular targets.

Swattings have spiked at Facebook in particular, according to local police departments and security officials at the company, which in recent years has cracked down on false accounts, threatening language and other types of content that violates its rules. They spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity surrounding the attacks.

Mr. Mosseri declined to comment, and a Facebook spokesman, Anthony Harrison, said in a statement that “because these things deal with security matters and our employees, we are unable to comment.”

“Like any other type of crime, when the cost is zero and the deterrent is very low, you’ve created a perfect opportunity for people to pour time and resources into that crime,” said Brian Krebs, a swatting victim who writes a widely read blog, Krebs on Security.

The attacks have been aided by forums that have sprung up both on the public internet and on the camouflaged sites of the so-called dark web. These forums name thousands of people, from high-ranking executives to their extended families, who could be targets, providing cellphone numbers, home addresses and other information. Some even discuss techniques that can be used — like cheap, online technology that can spoof a phone number and make the police believe a 911 call is coming from a target’s home.

In the eight months since one online forum was started, nearly 3,000 people have joined.

“Who should we do next?” read one message on the forum last month. The responses included gun emojis — the symbol, in swatting forums, for an attack in which the police were successfully called to the target’s home. Many of the responses were laced with profanity, as well as suggestions for ex-girlfriends who should be swatted.

One forum names at least two dozen Facebook employees as potential targets. They range from executives to product engineers. Some forum participants said that they had been barred from Facebook or Instagram, and that Facebook employees were fair game because they “think they are god.”

On another forum, new names of potential swatting victims are added daily. With each new entry, there is — at a minimum — a home address. Some entries contain more details, including the best time of day to catch the person at home or information about the children’s school.

“Lol, sick,” read many of the replies.

Swatting started in the combative world of online gaming. It was a way to terrorize someone more famous, get even with a rival or retaliate against someone with different political views.

Provoking a heavily armed police response presents obvious risks. Last year, a 26-year-old California man was sentenced to 20 years in federal prison for calling in dozens of fake emergency calls, including one that led to the fatal police shooting of a Kansas resident, Andrew Finch.

Because few people carrying out swattings are ever caught, the police and tech companies can only guess at their motivations. They have seen, however, a correlation between removals of large numbers of accounts for threatening behavior or hate speech and what they believe to be retaliatory attacks against the executives responsible.

While more police departments are recognizing the threat, some have already found practical solutions. In Seattle, people who believe they are at risk of being swatted can include their information and that of their families on a police registry. When an emergency call about a potential threat comes in, the police check to make sure the home isn’t in the registry. If it is, they call the home first to see if they can reach someone inside, and check with neighbors to see if there are any corroborating reports of shots fired or other disturbances.

“The registry is a voluntary thing we created, and it is a small but effective step for people who know they are at risk of being targeted,” said Carmen Best, the police chief of Seattle. “Swatting is not a new thing. It’s been around for a long time, and it weaponizes our 911 system. It’s a lot more than a hoax or a prank.”

In addition to the registry, the Police Department has trained 911 operators to pick up cues to potential swatting in calls, Chief Best said. It has also begun educating officers on the importance of responding to questionable calls with a limited amount of force.

Seattle’s approach is unusual. None of the other police departments contacted by The Times had a similar registry, or had even heard of the idea, despite the recent swattings against tech executives in their jurisdictions.

Because swattings are largely organized online, the people behind them can live anywhere in the world. And despite numerous attempts to create federal legislation banning the practice, there is no specific statute that allows swatting to be investigated and prosecuted as a federal crime.

Facebook, Google and Twitter did not respond to requests for comment on measures they have taken to protect their employees from swatting. In recent months, all three companies have held discussions with employees who they believe are at risk.

They have asked those employees to take added precautions, such as not publicly giving their whereabouts or listing information about their family. The tech companies have also privately let the local police know when certain high-profile executives are at risk, according to police departments in the Silicon Valley area.

The home of Facebook’s chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg, was permanently flagged as high risk, said one Facebook security expert, who asked not to be named because of the sensitivity of the topic.

Facebook, Google and Twitter informally share information about potential swattings, giving warnings to one another if they spot a threat on their platforms, the expert said.

In an attack on another Facebook executive last year, police officers encircled the man’s home in Palo Alto, Calif., after being told that he was at risk of harming himself and his family. The incident was resolved without anyone getting hurt.

Facebook had flagged the executive as a likely target for swatting, and had taken precautions to protect him and his family. The police still sent a SWAT team.

“Anyone can be at risk of being swatted, but people who work in tech are at a particular risk,” Chief Best said. “We have to get a foothold on this, before more people get hurt.”

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Virginia man gets probation, small fine, for stealing WWII dog tags from National Archives

A Virginia National Guard sergeant — who previously faced 1 year in prison — was sentenced to 18 months of supervised probation Wednesday after being convicted of stealing World War II dog tags from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in Maryland.

Robert Rumsby, 30, admitted taking the dog tags that belonged to four U.S. airmen killed in plane crashes in 1944, according to a criminal complaint filed in federal court last May. Rumsby said his wife is the great-niece of one of the airmen killed, so he gave the dog tags to her grandmother as a gift, He said he gave another to a relative of one of the deceased airmen.

Rumsby added his mission was to give the tags to the families of the dead soldiers he met while researching a plane crash that killed his great uncle, according to Stars and Stripes.

MARYLAND MAN ALLEGEDLY FIRES NEARLY 200 ROUNDS AT LAW ENFORCEMENT IN STANDOFF, STRIKING NEIGHBOR, KILLING DOG

Westlake Legal Group national-archives-college-park Virginia man gets probation, small fine, for stealing WWII dog tags from National Archives fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maryland fox-news/us/military/national-guard fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 5273857f-c909-5e91-8fe7-13ded7e1a805

A Virginia National Guard sergeant was sentenced after stealing World War II-era dog tags from the National Archives and Records Administration in College Park, Md. (AP)

MARYLAND MAN ALLEGEDLY FIRES NEARLY 200 ROUNDS AT LAW ENFORCEMENT IN STANDOFF, STRIKING NEIGHBOR, KILLING DOG

“I think the intent was there. I think the approach was wrong. Even at the time, I knew the approach was wrong,” Rumsby told the outlet last May. “I had taken four identification tags from those record groups specifically for families I knew would treasure them.”

U.S. Magistrate Judge Thomas DiGirolamo said the sentence was given to promote respect for the law and protect “national treasures” stored at the Maryland-based National Archives.

Rumsby’s defense attorney Peter Fayne had argued his client wasn’t motivated by greed.

VIRGINIA NATIONAL GUARD SERGEANT ACCUSED OF STEALING WWII-ERA DOGTAGS FROM NATIONAL ARCHIVES

“His heart and intent were in the right place, but he accepts full responsibility for the grave mistake he made,” Fayne said.

Rumsby reportedly was holding his infant daughter in his arms during the hearing, adding that he sent a letter to National Archives officials in 2011, asking if dog tags could be released to the relatives of soldiers. He said he hadn’t heard back.

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All of the dog tags have been returned to the archives, according to Christian Naylor, NARA’s chief operating officer.

DiGirolamo also ordered Rumsby to pay a $5,000 fine.

The Associated Press contributed to the report.

Westlake Legal Group national-archives-college-park Virginia man gets probation, small fine, for stealing WWII dog tags from National Archives fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maryland fox-news/us/military/national-guard fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 5273857f-c909-5e91-8fe7-13ded7e1a805   Westlake Legal Group national-archives-college-park Virginia man gets probation, small fine, for stealing WWII dog tags from National Archives fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maryland fox-news/us/military/national-guard fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 5273857f-c909-5e91-8fe7-13ded7e1a805

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2nd California child molester dies after inmate’s cane attack, authorities say

A second convicted child molester has died following a fellow inmate’s attack with a walking cane at a central California prison, authorities said Wednesday.

The second victim was identified as Graham De Luis-Conti, 62. Authorities said he died in a hospital Sunday, three days after being struck in the head at the California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison in Corcoran, about 50 miles south of Fresno.

‘PILLOWCASE RAPIST’ WHO TERRORIZED WOMEN DECADES AGO ARRESTED IN FLORIDA, POLICE SAY

Authorities initially said the second victim remained in critical condition Monday but the information was revised Wednesday.

The suspect in the Jan. 16 beatings, inmate Jonathan Watson, 41, is also accused of killing David Bobb, 48, who died on the way to the hospital, authorities said.

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Jonathan Watson, 41, used a walking cane to cause multiple head wounds to two fellow inmates at the California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison in Corcoran, officials said. (California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation)

Bobb was also struck in the head multiple times.

Watson has served 10 years of a life sentence for first-degree murder and discharging firearm causing great bodily injury or death.

The motive of the cane attack remained under investigation, said spokeswoman Terri Hardy of the state Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

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De Luis-Conti had been imprisoned since June 2001 after receiving a life sentence for aggravated assault against a child under 14, FOX 26 of Fresno reported.

Bobb had been serving a life sentence since October 2005 after receiving a life sentence for aggravated assault against a child under 14, the station reported.

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

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Democrats Demand White House Turn Over Ukraine Testimony From Pence Aide

Westlake Legal Group 5e293269240000b403c972ed Democrats Demand White House Turn Over Ukraine Testimony From Pence Aide

Democrats on Wednesday demanded the White House declassify a document from one of Vice President Mike Pence’s aides who listened in on his call last year with the president of Ukraine, arguing that the public would be able to learn more about White House attempts to pressure the country for a political favor if the document is made public.

The party’s House impeachment managers argued Wednesday before the Senate that the document — supplemental material provided to the House by Jennifer Williams, a special adviser on Europe and Russia to Pence — should not be classified and alluded that the vice president’s office was attempting to conceal it because it was embarrassing.

“This supplemental testimony will allow the Senate to see further corroborative evidence as it considers articles of impeachment,” a Democratic official working on the Senate trial said in a statement to reporters. “If declassified, it would provide the public further understanding of the events in question.”

Pence spoke with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky on Sept. 18, and Williams testified that it was a “very positive” follow-up to a meeting the pair had earlier that month. But House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) said in December that Williams provided lawmakers additional classified evidence about the Pence phone call after that deposition. Schiff called on Pence at the time to make public the document, saying there was “no legitimate basis” for the vice president to assert it was classified.

It’s unclear what is in the document, but Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.), one of the party’s impeachment managers who has reviewed it, alluded that its contents contained damaging information about the call between Pence and the Ukrainian president.

“Now I’ve read that testimony. Now I’ll just say: A cover-up is not a proper reason to classify a document,” Lofgren said during the Democrats’ oral arguments on Wednesday. “We urge the senators to review it, and we ask again that the White House declassify it. There is no basis to keep it classified, and again, in case the White House needs a reminder, it’s improper to keep something classified just to avoid embarrassment.”

Lofgren continued to note that Pence has said he has no objection to the White House releasing the full transcript of his call with Zelensky. But despite that assertion, his office has refused multiple times to declassify Williams’s supplemental testimony about the call.

At the end of the Democrats’ first day of oral arguments, Chief Justice John Robert said a “single one-paged classified document identified by the House managers for filing with the secretary of the Senate” would be made available to all senators to review in a classified setting.

But Democrats have continued to call for its public release.

Trump’s pressure campaign was the basis for two articles of impeachment passed by the House last month charging abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. The Senate is holding a trial on those articles to determine if he should be removed from office.

As part of the House investigation, lawmakers heard from a parade of current and former White House officials who described Trump’s demand that the Ukrainian leader announce an investigation into a political rival, Joe Biden, and his son Hunter.

Williams was one of a handful of national security aides who listened in on Trump’s July 25 call with Zelensky in real time, and she told House lawmakers in closed-door testimony that she believed President Donald Trump’s pressure campaign was “unusual and inappropriate.”

“I found the specific references to be — to be more specific to the president in nature, to his personal political agenda, as opposed to a broader … foreign policy objective of the United States,” Williams told House investigators, according to a transcript from her deposition.

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Australian crews find firefighting plane that crashed, 3 dead: reports

Officials in Australia on Thursday located a water tanker plane that crashed while fighting wildfires, killing three onboard, New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian confirmed, according to multiple reports.

Rural Fire Service officials said earlier that helicopters were looking for the plane, that crashed in the Snowy Monaro region of New South Wales state, BBC reported.

There were few other initial details about the plane or the search.

Also Thursday, Canberra Airport closed because of nearby wildfires, and residents south of Australia’s capital were told to seek shelter.

The blaze started Wednesday but strong winds and high temperatures caused conditions in Canberra to deteriorate. A second fire near the airport that started on Thursday morning is at the “watch and act” level.

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Firefighters battle the Morton Fire as it consumes a home near Bundanoon, New South Wales, Australia, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020. (AP Photo (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

“Arrivals and departures are affected due to aviation firefighting operations,” the airport authority said in a tweet.

Another tweet from traffic police said “the fire is moving fast and there are multiple road closures in the area. Please avoid the area. Local road blocks in place.”

Residents in some Canberra suburbs were advised to seek shelter and others to leave immediately.

“The defense force is both assisting to a degree and looking to whether that needs to be reinforced,” Defense Minister Angus Campbell told reporters.

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“I have people who are both involved as persons who need to be moved from areas and office buildings that are potentially in danger, and also those persons who are part of the (Operation) Bushfire Assist effort,” he said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

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