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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 50)

YouTuber NikkieTutorials: ‘There’s Never The Perfect Timing’ To Come Out As Transgender

Westlake Legal Group 5e28631a2100007802ffff7b YouTuber NikkieTutorials: ‘There’s Never The Perfect Timing’ To Come Out As Transgender

In her first televised interview since speaking publicly about her gender identity, NikkieTutorials said she’d like to use her experience to inspire other LGBTQ youth. 

The Dutch YouTuber and makeup artist, whose real name is Nikkie de Jager, appeared on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” Wednesday, recalling the troubling events that prompted her to open up about her journey as a trans woman in a 17-minute video last week. 

“A couple of weeks ago, I got emails from a certain person and he was not OK with the fact that I was ‘lying’ and wanted to expose that,” de Jager told the host. “He had a very pressuring tone of voice and he was like, ‘If we don’t get an answer by tomorrow, it’s out.’ And I feel like his entire goal with this was to destroy my life. But plot twist: that didn’t happen!”

Instead, the cosmetics guru chose to “take back her power” by posting the video, which had been viewed more than 32 million times as of Wednesday afternoon. The response to the clip, she said, has been “unreal.” 

“I always wanted to come out with it, but it is such a delicate thing,” she explained. “There’s never the perfect timing. In a way … I am thankful that it happened now. Now I get to be free.”

She also credited her fiancé, Dylan, with encouraging her to post the video, and thanked others in the trans community for helping to break down barriers for people like herself. Ultimately, she’d like to pay it forward simply by living as her authentic self. 

“As long as I get to be myself and inspire little Nikkies to be [themselves], that’s all I can do,” she said. 

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Pompeii shocker: Vitrified brains from volcano victim discovered

Archaeologists in the ancient city of Pompeii have discovered ancient brain matter that was turned into glass as a result of the volcanic eruption that devastated the city in 79 A.D.

The research, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, notes that a victim from the Vesuvius explosion was discovered in the 1960s at the Collegium Augustalium in Herculaneum. The body was found “lying on a wooden bed, buried by volcanic ash.” It wasn’t until years later, when the victim’s skull was examined, that researchers discovered the brain remains were vitrified, rather than saponified.

“The preservation of ancient brain remains is an extremely rare find, but this is the first-ever discovery of ancient human brain remains, vitrified by heat at about [950 degrees Fahrenheit] produced by a volcanic eruption,” the study’s lead author, Pier Paolo Petrone, said in an email to Fox News.

Westlake Legal Group pier-paolo-image-1 Pompeii shocker: Vitrified brains from volcano victim discovered fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-rome fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article a899d475-b493-5a2e-9efb-f9421916c9ba

The temperature at the Collegium may have reached a maximum of 968 degrees Fahrenheit (520 degrees Celsius), based on charred wood that was found at the site. (Pier Paolo Petrone)

MOUNT VESUVIUS CAUSED VICTIMS’ HEADS TO EXPLODE, BLOOD TO BOIL: STUDY

Vitrification is the process by which “tissue … has been burned at high heat and turned into glass or a glaze,” according to the New England Journal of Medicine article. Although rare to find, cerebral tissues found in archaeological discoveries have saponified, the process by which triglycerides turn into glycerol and fatty acid salts, or soap.

The temperature at the Collegium may have reached a maximum of 968 degrees Fahrenheit (520 degrees Celsius), based on charred wood that was found at the site.

In addition to the vitrified brain, a solidified spongy mass that entrapped the chest bones of the victim was discovered. Petrone said this meant that the volcanic clouds from Vesuvius were hot enough to “to burn body fat and vaporize soft tissues.”

Westlake Legal Group pier-paolo-image-2 Pompeii shocker: Vitrified brains from volcano victim discovered fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-rome fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article a899d475-b493-5a2e-9efb-f9421916c9ba

No other victims who died at the site were found to have vitrified brains or a spongy mass entrapping their chest. (Pier Paolo Petrone)

No other victims who died at the site were found to have vitrified brains or a spongy mass entrapping their chest, suggesting the victim was “unique” to the disaster, the article noted.

Petrone, who has worked on the Herculaneum site since the mid-1990s when he excavated 80 victims, told Fox News he first spotted the vitrified brain “many years later.”

Westlake Legal Group HerculaneumHouseGetty2019 Pompeii shocker: Vitrified brains from volcano victim discovered fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-rome fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article a899d475-b493-5a2e-9efb-f9421916c9ba

The archaeological site of Herculaneum in Ercolano, near Naples, with the Mount Vesuvius volcano in the background, on Oct. 23, 2019. (Photo by ANDREAS SOLARO/AFP via Getty Images)

TRAGIC REMAINS OF POMPEII CHILD WHO TRIED TO SHELTER FROM VOLCANO FOUND AT ‘GRAND BATHS’

“Looking carefully at the remains of this victim, the last one still remaining on the site, I noticed that something dark was shining inside the head,” Petrone, 59, explained, adding that the inner part of the skull was exposed because of the explosion.

“So I realized that these were small black fragments with a glassy appearance, something like obsidian in appearance, but definitely more fragile,” Petrone continued. “This material was preserved exclusively in the victim’s skull. Then, it had to be the remains of the brain, somehow vitrified. But it had to be proved beyond a reasonable doubt.”

Since their discovery in the 16th century, the Pompeii ruins have given researchers great insight into what life was like before Mount Vesuvius erupted and wiped out the entire city in 79 A.D. Recently, there has been some dispute about whether the volcano erupted in August or October of that year.

Westlake Legal Group pier-paolo-image-4 Pompeii shocker: Vitrified brains from volcano victim discovered fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-rome fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article a899d475-b493-5a2e-9efb-f9421916c9ba

(Credit: Pier Paolo Petrone)

In April 2019, an ancient eatery known as a thermopolium (akin to a modern-day snack bar), where patrons could get drinks and hot food, was discovered among the city’s ruins. Researchers have also found a fresco depicting a sensual scene involving the Roman god Jupiter and Leda and the remains of a petrified horse recently.

Westlake Legal Group Pompeii-shutterstock Pompeii shocker: Vitrified brains from volcano victim discovered fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-rome fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article a899d475-b493-5a2e-9efb-f9421916c9ba

A victim who perished in Pompeii after Mount Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79. (Shutterstock)

A “sorcerer’s treasure trove” of items, including bones, skull charms and gems used for rituals was also recently discovered.

DRAMATIC VOLCANO DEATH: HUGE FLYING STONE CRUSHED MAN IN POMPEII, ARCHAEOLOGISTS DISCOVER

When Mount Vesuvius erupted, the explosion caused such extreme heat that victims’ skulls exploded, their blood boiled and their muscles, flesh and brains were replaced with ash, according to a study published in 2018.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Westlake Legal Group HerculaneumHouseGetty2019 Pompeii shocker: Vitrified brains from volcano victim discovered fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-rome fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article a899d475-b493-5a2e-9efb-f9421916c9ba   Westlake Legal Group HerculaneumHouseGetty2019 Pompeii shocker: Vitrified brains from volcano victim discovered fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-rome fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article a899d475-b493-5a2e-9efb-f9421916c9ba

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New York Mets working on deal with Luis Rojas to become new manager, GM says

Westlake Legal Group Luis-Rojas New York Mets working on deal with Luis Rojas to become new manager, GM says Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/mlb/new-york-mets fox-news/sports/mlb fox-news/person/pete-alonso fox-news/person/marcus-stroman fox news fnc/sports fnc article 1fe39bb3-0e5f-55c2-b9bb-095e1ba90f08

The New York Mets picked quality control coach Luis Rojas to replace Carlos Beltran as manager and are working on a multiyear agreement with him, general manager Brodie Van Wagenen said Wednesday.

Rojas, 38, will replace Beltran, who stepped down from the job in wake of the fallout from the Houston Astros sign-stealing discipline. Beltran was the only player, former or otherwise, named in the ruling handed down by Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred.

BREWERS HOME BALLPARK TO BE RENAMED AMERICAN FAMILY FIELD

“I think it’s the fit. It’s where the team is. I think it’s the culture we’re trying to create,” Van Wagenen said. “He has a good finger on the pulse of this team.”

Rojas is the brother of former major leaguer Moises Alou and the son of ex-manager Felipe Alou. He played minor league baseball in the Baltimore Orioles, Miami Marlins and Washington Nationals/Montreal Expos’ organizations but never made it above the rookie league.

SCHILLING THE ONE TO WATCH IN NEXT HALL OF FAME VOTE

He was the Mets’ coach in the Dominican Summer League in 2007 and was named to the Mets’ Gulf Coast League team in 2011. He also had roles in the organization’s Class-A and Double-A teams.

Pete Alonso and Marcus Stroman appeared to be ecstatic about the move.

“Loved having Luis in ‘17 and ’18 as my AA manager!” the National League Rookie of the Year tweeted. “It’s awesome playing under him and having him on staff last year as well!!! Super pumped to have him as the Jeffe. Also he throws some damn good bp.”

Stroman added: “LUIS ROJAS! Love love love it. Loved being around him on the bench last year. Always teaching and full of knowledge. Super laid back and brings nothing but great vibes each and every day. Beyond even keel. Excited even more for the year!”

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

New York finished third in the National League East last season with an 86-76 record.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Luis-Rojas New York Mets working on deal with Luis Rojas to become new manager, GM says Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/mlb/new-york-mets fox-news/sports/mlb fox-news/person/pete-alonso fox-news/person/marcus-stroman fox news fnc/sports fnc article 1fe39bb3-0e5f-55c2-b9bb-095e1ba90f08   Westlake Legal Group Luis-Rojas New York Mets working on deal with Luis Rojas to become new manager, GM says Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/mlb/new-york-mets fox-news/sports/mlb fox-news/person/pete-alonso fox-news/person/marcus-stroman fox news fnc/sports fnc article 1fe39bb3-0e5f-55c2-b9bb-095e1ba90f08

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North Carolina animal rescue posts brutally honest cat adoption ad: ‘She’s just a jerk’

Westlake Legal Group Worlds-worst-cat North Carolina animal rescue posts brutally honest cat adoption ad: 'She's just a jerk' Michael Hollan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/north-carolina fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e897807b-343c-58bd-b251-bd1ea2ac91cd article

This seems … catty.

A truly unique animal adoption notice recently appeared on Facebook. While most posts like this try to be positive and cheerful, this particular one can only be described as brutally honest.

The Mitchell County Animal Rescue in North Carolina introduced social media to Perdita, who can apparently only be described as a “jerk.” That’s not a description coming from an upset user, that’s the official statement coming from the animal shelter.

According to the post, the rescue thought Perdita “was sick, turns out she’s just a jerk.”

Along with photos of the cat, the post states, “Meet Perdita, not for the faint of heart. LIKES: staring into your soul until you feel as if you may never be cheerful again; the song Cat Scratch Fever, the movie ‘Pet Cemetery’ (Church is her hero), jump scares (her specialty), lurking in dark corners, being queen of her domicile, fooling shelter staff into thinking she’s sick (vet agrees… she’s just a jerk).”

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That impressive list of likes is followed by Perdita’s dislikes, which reportedly include, “the color pink, kittens (yuk they are so chipper), dogs, children, the Dixie Chicks, Disney movies, Christmas and last but NOT least…HUGS. She’s single and ready to be socially awkward with a socially awkward human who understands personal space.”

The Mitchell County Animal Rescue confirmed to Fox News that while the post has received plenty of attention, they haven’t gotten any offers to adopt the cat yet.

The post concludes by stating that Perdita is a free adoption, which seems fair, as no one should have to pay to live a jerk.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

According to the post, she’s been identified as a jerk by a veterinarian, which seems pretty official.

Westlake Legal Group Worlds-worst-cat North Carolina animal rescue posts brutally honest cat adoption ad: 'She's just a jerk' Michael Hollan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/north-carolina fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e897807b-343c-58bd-b251-bd1ea2ac91cd article   Westlake Legal Group Worlds-worst-cat North Carolina animal rescue posts brutally honest cat adoption ad: 'She's just a jerk' Michael Hollan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/north-carolina fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e897807b-343c-58bd-b251-bd1ea2ac91cd article

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The Trade War, Paused for Now, Is Still Wreaking Damage

Westlake Legal Group 00trade-damage1-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 The Trade War, Paused for Now, Is Still Wreaking Damage United States International Relations United States Economy Trump, Donald J Trucks and Trucking Recession and Depression Railroads Ports Labor and Jobs International Trade and World Market Factories and Manufacturing Customs (Tariff) China

The trade war is de-escalating, at least for now. But the economic damage it caused could be far from over.

Two years of tit-for-tat tariffs and on-again-off-again trade talks have left American farmers reeling. The manufacturing sector is in a recession, albeit a relatively mild one, and factory employment declined in December after rising slowly for most of last year. And in recent months, there have been signs that the damage is spreading: Railroads and trucking companies have been cutting jobs, and consumers — at least in the parts of the country most affected by the trade disputes — may be pulling back as well.

“Even if manufacturing started to recover, there’s still going to be some continuing cutbacks in nonmanufacturing industries as they start to respond,” said Michael Hicks, an economist at Ball State University in Indiana. “The full effect of the layoffs hasn’t really been transmitted to the full economy yet.”

Events last week in Washington signaled a shift from confrontation to conciliation. President Trump signed a preliminary trade deal with China that, if fully carried out, would increase American exports and prevent new tariffs, though it will not remove most duties already in place. And the Senate approved an overhaul of the North American Free Trade Agreement, which now awaits Mr. Trump’s signature.

Experts said the agreements should help restore confidence among business leaders after months of trade-related uncertainty. But even if those deals hold, the ripple effects of the trade war could take time to dissipate.

Other factors are also hurting manufacturing. A global economic slowdown — caused partly, but not entirely, by trade tensions — has curbed demand for American products abroad. Falling energy prices have led to a pullback in oil drilling and reduced the need for oil field equipment. Boeing’s recent decision to halt production of its troubled 737 Max aircraft has sent shock waves through the company’s vast supply chain; economists at Moody’s Analytics estimate that the shutdown could shave half a percentage point off first-quarter economic growth.

But economists say there is little doubt that trade has been the driving force of the industrial slowdown, with implications for the rest of the economy. The spillover effects are clearest in the transportation sector, where business slowed for railroads and trucking companies as trade slumped last year.

Freight volumes fell 7.9 percent in December from a year earlier, the greatest year-over-year decline since the recession a decade ago, according to data from Cass Information Systems. More than 10,000 jobs were cut by transportation and warehouse employers in December, the biggest drop in nearly four years.

Job growth has slowed sharply — from an annual rate of 2.6 percent at the start of 2019 to 1.3 percent at the end — in so-called middle wage sectors that include mining, construction and transportation, according to calculations by Nick Bunker, an economist at the Indeed Hiring Lab. That slowdown is driving the deceleration of job growth across the American economy.

Railroads have been hit particularly hard, analysts said. Ian Jefferies, president of the Association of American Railroads, said the slowdown in trade had led to lower rail volumes in grains and industrial equipment in particular.

“Trade uncertainty has played a pretty large role” in the rail slowdown, Mr. Jefferies said. The recent deals, he added, should “provide some much-needed certainty back into the system.”

To Kevin Luke, who transports goods from the Port of Long Beach near Los Angeles to local distribution centers, the effect of the trade war has been clear and pronounced.

Business was brisk in 2018, with Mr. Luke’s company, KNL Luxury, collecting about $250,000 in revenue, prompting an investment in a second truck. But the slowdown in imports meant the demand he had expected never materialized. In the end, he collected only slightly more revenue in 2019 — just shy of $290,000 — despite having doubled his capacity.

“I tried to invest in the future, I tried to be ready for opportunity,” said Mr. Luke, who has seven children ranging in age from 7 to 19.

If conditions don’t improve, Mr. Luke may have to take up long-haul trucking, which would keep him away from home for long stretches.

The trade war hit the trucking industry at a vulnerable moment, said Aaron Terrazas, director of economic research at Convoy, a shipping-focused technology company. Trucking companies expanded aggressively in recent years, adding trucks and drivers more quickly than demand was growing. The resulting glut pushed down prices, just as the slowdown in trade began eating into demand.

“There was almost this one-two punch where we were having this normal supply correction in the market and subsequently we got hit by the trade war,” Mr. Terrazas said.

Mr. Trump and his allies have said the trade deals will deliver a jolt to the economy and lead to faster growth this year. But economists are skeptical. Wall Street analysts expect growth, which is already cooling, to slow further in early 2020, and few have marked up their estimates in response to the trade announcements.

“I think we’re seeing the bottom, but we’re going to bounce around for a period of time before we really see any noticeable growth,” said Eric Starks, chief executive of FTR, a freight research firm. “That is assuming that there are no outside shocks and it seems like every other day a new shock keeps happening.”

Economists said the agreements should help shore up the struggling manufacturing sector and prevent further damage to the economy. But they won’t necessarily heal the damage that has already been done. Companies that shifted supply chains away from China in response to the trade war won’t necessarily move them back now that tensions have cooled, for example. And companies may be hesitant to commit to long-term investments until they see evidence that the trade deals will last.

“How much can we really go back to the way things were before this tiff?” Mr. Terrazas asked rhetorically. “Are they going to go back quickly to the way things were before, or are companies going to say this new uncertainty is going to be a feature of the global trade picture for the years ahead?”

Manufacturing is a relatively small part of the American economy, and there is little risk that even a sustained slump in manufacturing could, on its own, push the country into a recession. Consumer spending remains robust, and the fears of a downturn that gripped financial markets over the summer have eased.

Still, the factory sector remains the centerpiece of Mr. Trump’s economic appeal to voters, especially in the industrial states that lifted him to the White House in 2016. “This is a blue-collar boom,” Mr. Trump said on Tuesday in a speech in Davos, Switzerland. “We have created 1.2 million manufacturing and construction jobs — a number also unthinkable.”

Only 197,000 of those jobs were created last year, however, a sharp deceleration from the first two years of his administration. The United States created 1.1 million manufacturing and construction jobs in the three years before he took office.

There are signs that in the places most exposed to the trade war — particularly Wisconsin and other Midwestern states — those effects have spread beyond the industrial sector and begun to affect consumers. In a recent working paper, Michael E. Waugh, an economist at New York University, found that automobile sales were growing significantly more slowly in the counties most affected by the tariffs than in the rest of the country. Those places have also seen slower job growth in their retail sectors.

“Things are spilling over in these communities that are relatively more affected,” Mr. Waugh said. “New York is all fine. But there are places in the U.S. that are really struggling.”

The Midwest went through a similar economic soft patch in 2015 and 2016, when falling oil prices and other factors caused a mini-recession in the industrial sector. Mr. Waugh said he saw parallels — although it isn’t clear how they will play out given that this time Mr. Trump is the incumbent.

“Those places slowed down” in 2016, Mr. Waugh said. “Those places influenced the election. And now what do you have today? You have those same places slowing down, and they’re looking pivotal in the election again.”

While some of the effects of the trade war could soon be reversed, others may last longer.

“A lot of customers moved their production out of Asia to Europe and some of them moved their production from Asia to Mexico, so there’s a migration,” said Lidia Yan, the chief executive and co-founder of Next Trucking, a start-up that matches shippers and truckers.

Even in cases where production has been shifted from China to other parts of Asia, including Vietnam and India, West Coast ports may be losers, as exports from the more southerly Asian countries tend to be shipped to the East Coast.

“It’s early days,” said Gene Seroka, the executive director of the Port of Los Angeles. “But it’s enough to notice at this point in time, and we’re watching it very closely.”

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Adam Schiff’s brilliant presentation is knocking down excuses to acquit

Westlake Legal Group Q7z4HNPBsHrdnuJ-9X6r-1in8rA4Jb5W5mb2HBk5Yug Adam Schiff’s brilliant presentation is knocking down excuses to acquit r/politics

Americans have a very outdated idea of what Kings are like. European Kings and the emperor of Japan have political power ranging from limited to none. They’re not even allowed to express a political opinion, they aren’t allowed to vote. Generally they have to do exactly what their elected government says, and nothing beyond that.

Thirty years ago, the king of Belgium refused to sign a law (legalizing abortion iirc), and the Belgian parliament temporarily removed him from office and signed it for him.

If Don Junior inherits the position, then the president is king, completely unrelated to what kind of power he inherits.

For those who wonder what the point is of a head of state without political power: you need to realize it isn’t a political role but a ceremonial one. There isn’t a realistic way to have an elected but still non political head of state.

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Lisa Boothe: Bernie Sanders still in a strong position to win Democratic nomination

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2020-01-22-at-3.04.33-PM Lisa Boothe: Bernie Sanders still in a strong position to win Democratic nomination Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/outnumbered fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc f63c994b-2626-5e8c-98f5-75bbdf042877 article

Fox News’ “Outnumbered” panelist Lisa Boothe said on Wednesday that the strength of Sen. Bernie Sanders’ bid to defeat frontrunner Joe Biden in the Democratic primaries is being underestimated.

“I think people are underestimating Bernie Sanders. He almost won the Iowa caucuses in 2016, he won New Hampshire by double digits,” said Boothe. “I think the challenge for Joe Biden [is] if he loses the Iowa caucuses, he loses New Hampshire and the core premise of his argument is that I’m the most electable candidate.

GABBARD, YANG, OTHER DEMOCRATS SLAM CLINTON REMARKS ON SANDERS AS PETULANT, DIVISIVE

“Can you wait till Nevada, can you wait till South Carolina to prove that point?” Boothe asked. “Or do you get abandoned after losing Iowa and New Hampshire? So, I think people are underestimating Bernie Sanders and I think he’s in a solid position to potentially win the Iowa caucuses.”

The Real Clear Politics average of Iowa polls shows Sanders, I-Vt., clearly in second place behind Biden in the Hawkeye State and leading fellow Democratic contenders Elizabeth Warren and Pete Buttigieg.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Earlier this week, The Hollywood Reporter reported that 2016 Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton made disparaging comments about Sanders in a forthcoming docuseries, saying that  “nobody likes him” and that “nobody wants to work with him, he got nothing done.”

Boothe’s co-panelist and Fox News contributor Marie Harf explained that a lot of Democrats still share Clinton’s bitterness toward Sanders because “they feel like Bernie didn’t do enough to bring together his folks with her folks to help her win.”

Fox News’ Dom Calicchio contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2020-01-22-at-3.04.33-PM Lisa Boothe: Bernie Sanders still in a strong position to win Democratic nomination Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/outnumbered fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc f63c994b-2626-5e8c-98f5-75bbdf042877 article   Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2020-01-22-at-3.04.33-PM Lisa Boothe: Bernie Sanders still in a strong position to win Democratic nomination Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/outnumbered fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc f63c994b-2626-5e8c-98f5-75bbdf042877 article

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The Trade War, Paused for Now, Is Still Wreaking Damage

Westlake Legal Group 00trade-damage1-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 The Trade War, Paused for Now, Is Still Wreaking Damage United States International Relations United States Economy Trump, Donald J Trucks and Trucking Recession and Depression Railroads Ports Labor and Jobs International Trade and World Market Factories and Manufacturing Customs (Tariff) China

The trade war is de-escalating, at least for now. But the economic damage it caused could be far from over.

Two years of tit-for-tat tariffs and on-again-off-again trade talks have left American farmers reeling. The manufacturing sector is in a recession, albeit a relatively mild one, and factory employment declined in December after rising slowly for most of last year. And in recent months, there have been signs that the damage is spreading: Railroads and trucking companies have been cutting jobs, and consumers — at least in the parts of the country most affected by the trade disputes — may be pulling back as well.

“Even if manufacturing started to recover, there’s still going to be some continuing cutbacks in nonmanufacturing industries as they start to respond,” said Michael Hicks, an economist at Ball State University in Indiana. “The full effect of the layoffs hasn’t really been transmitted to the full economy yet.”

Events last week in Washington signaled a shift from confrontation to conciliation. President Trump signed a preliminary trade deal with China that, if fully carried out, would increase American exports and prevent new tariffs, though it will not remove most duties already in place. And the Senate approved an overhaul of the North American Free Trade Agreement, which now awaits Mr. Trump’s signature.

Experts said the agreements should help restore confidence among business leaders after months of trade-related uncertainty. But even if those deals hold, the ripple effects of the trade war could take time to dissipate.

Other factors are also hurting manufacturing. A global economic slowdown — caused partly, but not entirely, by trade tensions — has curbed demand for American products abroad. Falling energy prices have led to a pullback in oil drilling and reduced the need for oil field equipment. Boeing’s recent decision to halt production of its troubled 737 Max aircraft has sent shock waves through the company’s vast supply chain; economists at Moody’s Analytics estimate that the shutdown could shave half a percentage point off first-quarter economic growth.

But economists say there is little doubt that trade has been the driving force of the industrial slowdown, with implications for the rest of the economy. The spillover effects are clearest in the transportation sector, where business slowed for railroads and trucking companies as trade slumped last year.

Freight volumes fell 7.9 percent in December from a year earlier, the greatest year-over-year decline since the recession a decade ago, according to data from Cass Information Systems. More than 10,000 jobs were cut by transportation and warehouse employers in December, the biggest drop in nearly four years.

Job growth has slowed sharply — from an annual rate of 2.6 percent at the start of 2019 to 1.3 percent at the end — in so-called middle wage sectors that include mining, construction and transportation, according to calculations by Nick Bunker, an economist at the Indeed Hiring Lab. That slowdown is driving the deceleration of job growth across the American economy.

Railroads have been hit particularly hard, analysts said. Ian Jefferies, president of the Association of American Railroads, said the slowdown in trade had led to lower rail volumes in grains and industrial equipment in particular.

“Trade uncertainty has played a pretty large role” in the rail slowdown, Mr. Jefferies said. The recent deals, he added, should “provide some much-needed certainty back into the system.”

To Kevin Luke, who transports goods from the Port of Long Beach near Los Angeles to local distribution centers, the effect of the trade war has been clear and pronounced.

Business was brisk in 2018, with Mr. Luke’s company, KNL Luxury, collecting about $250,000 in revenue, prompting an investment in a second truck. But the slowdown in imports meant the demand he had expected never materialized. In the end, he collected only slightly more revenue in 2019 — just shy of $290,000 — despite having doubled his capacity.

“I tried to invest in the future, I tried to be ready for opportunity,” said Mr. Luke, who has seven children ranging in age from 7 to 19.

If conditions don’t improve, Mr. Luke may have to take up long-haul trucking, which would keep him away from home for long stretches.

The trade war hit the trucking industry at a vulnerable moment, said Aaron Terrazas, director of economic research at Convoy, a shipping-focused technology company. Trucking companies expanded aggressively in recent years, adding trucks and drivers more quickly than demand was growing. The resulting glut pushed down prices, just as the slowdown in trade began eating into demand.

“There was almost this one-two punch where we were having this normal supply correction in the market and subsequently we got hit by the trade war,” Mr. Terrazas said.

Mr. Trump and his allies have said the trade deals will deliver a jolt to the economy and lead to faster growth this year. But economists are skeptical. Wall Street analysts expect growth, which is already cooling, to slow further in early 2020, and few have marked up their estimates in response to the trade announcements.

“I think we’re seeing the bottom, but we’re going to bounce around for a period of time before we really see any noticeable growth,” said Eric Starks, chief executive of FTR, a freight research firm. “That is assuming that there are no outside shocks and it seems like every other day a new shock keeps happening.”

Economists said the agreements should help shore up the struggling manufacturing sector and prevent further damage to the economy. But they won’t necessarily heal the damage that has already been done. Companies that shifted supply chains away from China in response to the trade war won’t necessarily move them back now that tensions have cooled, for example. And companies may be hesitant to commit to long-term investments until they see evidence that the trade deals will last.

“How much can we really go back to the way things were before this tiff?” Mr. Terrazas asked rhetorically. “Are they going to go back quickly to the way things were before, or are companies going to say this new uncertainty is going to be a feature of the global trade picture for the years ahead?”

Manufacturing is a relatively small part of the American economy, and there is little risk that even a sustained slump in manufacturing could, on its own, push the country into a recession. Consumer spending remains robust, and the fears of a downturn that gripped financial markets over the summer have eased.

Still, the factory sector remains the centerpiece of Mr. Trump’s economic appeal to voters, especially in the industrial states that lifted him to the White House in 2016. “This is a blue-collar boom,” Mr. Trump said on Tuesday in a speech in Davos, Switzerland. “We have created 1.2 million manufacturing and construction jobs — a number also unthinkable.”

Only 197,000 of those jobs were created last year, however, a sharp deceleration from the first two years of his administration. The United States created 1.1 million manufacturing and construction jobs in the three years before he took office.

There are signs that in the places most exposed to the trade war — particularly Wisconsin and other Midwestern states — those effects have spread beyond the industrial sector and begun to affect consumers. In a recent working paper, Michael E. Waugh, an economist at New York University, found that automobile sales were growing significantly more slowly in the counties most affected by the tariffs than in the rest of the country. Those places have also seen slower job growth in their retail sectors.

“Things are spilling over in these communities that are relatively more affected,” Mr. Waugh said. “New York is all fine. But there are places in the U.S. that are really struggling.”

The Midwest went through a similar economic soft patch in 2015 and 2016, when falling oil prices and other factors caused a mini-recession in the industrial sector. Mr. Waugh said he saw parallels — although it isn’t clear how they will play out given that this time Mr. Trump is the incumbent.

“Those places slowed down” in 2016, Mr. Waugh said. “Those places influenced the election. And now what do you have today? You have those same places slowing down, and they’re looking pivotal in the election again.”

While some of the effects of the trade war could soon be reversed, others may last longer.

“A lot of customers moved their production out of Asia to Europe and some of them moved their production from Asia to Mexico, so there’s a migration,” said Lidia Yan, the chief executive and co-founder of Next Trucking, a start-up that matches shippers and truckers.

Even in cases where production has been shifted from China to other parts of Asia, including Vietnam and India, West Coast ports may be losers, as exports from the more southerly Asian countries tend to be shipped to the East Coast.

“It’s early days,” said Gene Seroka, the executive director of the Port of Los Angeles. “But it’s enough to notice at this point in time, and we’re watching it very closely.”

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China Silences Critics Over Coronavirus Outbreak

The SARS disaster was supposed to drag China into a new era of openness and responsibility. The deadly disease rippled across the world 17 years ago, abetted by a Chinese government that covered up its spread. As the scope of it became clear, China’s journalists, intellectuals and other critics helped shame Beijing into opening up about the problem.

“SARS has been our country’s 9/11,” said Xu Zhiyuan, then a young newspaper columnist and a fierce critic of the government’s handling of SARS, in a 2003 interview with The New York Times. “It has forced us to pay attention to the real meaning of globalization.”

Today, China faces the spread of another mysterious disease, a coronavirus, which so far has killed 17 people and infected more than 540. And while Beijing’s response has improved in some ways, it has regressed in others. It is censoring criticism. It is detaining people for spreading what it calls “rumors.” It is suppressing information it deems alarming.

Though China’s censors are busily scrubbing the Chinese internet, the country’s online community is registering its disappointment and alarm over Beijing’s handling of the new virus that has spread since December from the city of Wuhan to other countries, even the United States.

“I thought SARS would force China to rethink its governance model,” Mr. Xu, now a video talk show host, wrote on social media on Tuesday, also posting a screenshot of his 2003 quote in The Times. “I was too naïve.”

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Maps: Where the Wuhan Coronavirus Has Spread

The virus has sickened more than 540 people in Asia and one person in the United States.

In many ways, China has changed for the better since the SARS epidemic. Its economy has grown eightfold. It has built more skyscrapers, subways and high-speed rail lines than any other country. Its tech companies rival Silicon Valley’s giants. A more responsive bureaucracy provides more people with health care, social services and even quality-of-life improvements like parks.

When it comes to handling diseases, the public health system has greatly improved. Wuhan, the epicenter of the outbreak, is also home to one of the most advanced epidemic disease research laboratories in the world.

Those improvements have come at a price. The government has tightened its grip on the internet, the media and civil society. It has deeper pockets and a greater ability to control the flow of information across the country.

As a result, many of the media outlets, advocacy groups, activists and others who held the government accountable in 2003 have been silenced or sidelined.

“The system is successful in that it destroyed the people with integrity, the institutions with credibility and a society capable of narrating its own stories,” Mr. Xu said on social media. “What’s left is an arrogant power, a bunch of messy information and many fragile, isolated and angry individuals.”

Even as the new virus spread through Wuhan, the government took pains to keep up appearances.

The first case was reported Dec. 8. As the disease spread, Wuhan officials insisted that it was controlled and treatable. The police questioned eight people who posted on social media about the virus, saying they had spread “rumors.”

On Saturday, two days before Wuhan told the world about the severity of the outbreak, it hosted a potluck banquet attended by more than 40,000 families so the city could apply for a world record for most dishes served at an event. On the day it broke the news to the world, it also announced that it was distributing 200,000 free tickets to residents for festival activities during the Lunar New Year holiday, which begins this Saturday.

The central government backed Wuhan’s officials. Wang Guangfa, a prominent government respiratory expert, told the state broadcaster China Central Television on Jan. 10 that the Wuhan pneumonia was “under control” and mostly a “mild condition.” Eleven days later, he confirmed to Chinese media that he might have contracted the virus himself during an inspection in Wuhan.

Recognizing an outbreak can take time, and China is not the first government caught flat footed by a disease.

But the choices made by government officials had an impact on a major commercial and transportation hub. Wuhan is a city of 11 million people, including nearly one million college students from across the country. By the time it disclosed the seriousness of the outbreak, the 40-day Lunar New Year travel season, when Chinese people take an estimated three billion trips combined, had already begun.

People might have made different decisions had websites and headlines described growing worries. Instead, they traveled. On Tuesday, all five confirmed cases in Beijing were people who had traveled to Wuhan in January for business, study or leisure.

Until a week ago, some people in China called it the “patriotic virus.” Cases appeared in Hong Kong, Thailand, Vietnam, Japan and elsewhere in Asia. No other Chinese city but Wuhan reported infection cases. It was not until the Hong Kong news media reported over the weekend that the virus had been found in other cities did officials elsewhere come forward.

Some critics see parallels to SARS. In 2003, the Guangzhou newspaper Southern Metropolis Daily first reported the SARS outbreak. A military doctor, Jiang Yanyong, came forward with what he knew. Only then did officials act.

“The way this virus came into the public view is the same as that of SARS 17 years ago,” said Rose Luqiu, an assistant journalism professor who covered SARS as a reporter for the Hong Kong-based Phoenix Television.

Many of those brave voices in 2003 are gone. Like almost all Chinese media outlets that were active in the 1990s and 2000s, the Southern Metropolis Daily has lost its freedom to pursue coverage that holds local governments, if not Beijing, accountable. Only a few mainland news media outlets are covering the current crisis critically, and then only with an analytical tone.

In 2003, Phoenix Television called Ms. Luqiu, then a star reporter, back from Iraq to report on SARS in Beijing. She shadowed the newly appointed Beijing mayor, Wang Qishan, for a week to cover how the government dealt with the crisis. Mr. Wang later became the vice president of China.

That kind of openness is unimaginable now. Last week, when a group of Hong Kong journalists went to the Wuhan hospital that took in most coronavirus patients, the police detained them for a few hours. They were asked to delete their TV footage and hand in their phones and cameras for inspection.

On Tuesday, Ms. Luqiu wrote an article for qq.com, the news site owned by the internet giant Tencent, about the measures the Hong Kong government has taken in dealing with the virus. The article was deleted 10 hours later.

Dr. Jiang, the military doctor who became a whistle-blower in 2003, has been put under periodic house arrest and forbidden to visit the United States to collect a human rights award. He is also portrayed as a bad role model. A multiple-choice question posed by a test-prep school in 2017 asked about Dr. Jiang’s decision. The correct answer was B: It was wrong because it harmed the interests of the nation, the society and the community and should be subject to legal punishment.

China’s disclosures have improved in many ways since SARS. The government admitted the problem faster. Beijing officials have shown determination to be more transparent. A top party committee said on Tuesday that it would not tolerate any efforts to hide infections.

“Whoever deliberately delays or conceals reporting for the sake of their own interests will be forever nailed to history’s pillar of shame,” the committee said in a post on WeChat. The post was later deleted.

But when the government is the only source of information, wise advice and valuable clues can be lost. A police bureau in eastern Shandong Province posted on the Twitter-like social media platform Weibo on Wednesday that it had detained four residents who spread rumors that there was a suspected coronavirus patient in the district. In that environment, others dare not speak out.

“The authorities are sending a signal, which is that only the government agencies can talk about the epidemic,” Yu Ping, a former Southern Metropolis Daily reporter, wrote on his personal blog. “All other people should just shut up.”

“It’s not public disclosure,” Mr. Yu added. “It’s a naked information monopoly.”

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Live Updates: Impeachment Trial Stream

Video

Westlake Legal Group 22dc-livevid-sub-videoSixteenByNine3000-v2 Live Updates: Impeachment Trial Stream washington dc United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Senate Schiff, Adam B Roberts, John G Jr Republican Party Nadler, Jerrold impeachment Foreign Aid Ethics and Official Misconduct Democratic Party Cipollone, Pat A

Each of the seven House managers will present different elements of their case against President Trump.CreditCredit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

Here’s what you need to know:

Representative Adam B. Schiff, the lead prosecutor, opened oral arguments in the case to convict and remove President Trump from office, accusing him of subverting the power of his position to leverage foreign aid to win an election.

“President Trump solicited foreign interference in our democratic elections, abusing the power of his office to seek help from abroad to improve his re-election prospects at home,” Mr. Schiff, a California Democrat, said from the well of the Senate. “President Trump,” he added, “withheld hundreds of millions of dollars in military aid to a strategic partner at war with Russia to secure foreign help with his re-election. In other words, to cheat.”

While the Senate has so far refused to allow witnesses, Mr. Schiff in effect brought a few to the floor anyway by playing video clips from current and former officials like Fiona Hill, Gordon D. Sondland, William B. Taylor Jr. and David Holmes, who testified before Mr. Schiff’s House Intelligence Committee last year. And he played a few from Mr. Trump himself, showing the president in 2016 publicly calling on Russia to hack Hillary Clinton’s email and last year publicly calling on Ukraine and even China to investigate former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_167584080_dd4e6921-55bc-478e-8d3a-a15fab41fa16-articleLarge Live Updates: Impeachment Trial Stream washington dc United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Senate Schiff, Adam B Roberts, John G Jr Republican Party Nadler, Jerrold impeachment Foreign Aid Ethics and Official Misconduct Democratic Party Cipollone, Pat A

Representative Adam B. Schiff, chairman of the Intelligence Committee, and other House impeachment managers speaking to reporters on Wednesday before the trial.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

Mr. Schiff previewed the presentation his team of seven House impeachment managers will make over the next three days. They started by laying out the case in narrative form, how the president and his associates sought to pressure Ukraine to announce investigations of Mr. Biden and Democrats while withholding $391 million in American aid. Then he said the managers will explore the constitutional ramifications of the case.

“If not remedied by his conviction in the Senate and removal from office,” Mr. Schiff said, “President Trump’s abuse of his office and obstruction of Congress will permanently alter the balance of power among the branches of government, inviting future presidents to operate as if they are also beyond the reach of accountability, congressional oversight and the law.”

Mr. Schiff went on to reject the notion that impeachment is outdated and therefore no longer a viable instrument to hold a president accountable. “If it is a relic,” he said, “I wonder how much longer our republic can succeed.”

For Mr. Trump and Republicans, the next three days may prove uncomfortable as the House Democrats have exclusive access to the microphone.

Unlike the procedural arguments on Tuesday in which both sides went back and forth offering their points, the trial rules now provide the House managers with 24 hours over three days to make their case uninterrupted by the other side or any of the senators.

For hour after hour, the president’s lawyers and their Republican allies are being forced to sit silent in their seats, listening to the most nefarious interpretations of Mr. Trump’s actions without any ability to rebut the points except during breaks in front of television cameras in the hallways.

But it may also be the first time that some senators have heard the totality of the evidence presented in a sustained way. Always on the move, constantly running from one meeting to another, senators almost never have hours on end, much less three days straight, to focus on a single subject. Few if any of them are likely to have watched all of the House hearings that led to the impeachment.

The White House team will get its turn, though, and the House managers will be the ones having to sit quiet as the president’s lawyers present their case uninterrupted and unrebutted.

On Tuesday, House managers repeatedly criticized the Republican senators who will decide Mr. Trump’s fate, with one manager accusing them of “treacherous” behavior. By Wednesday morning, it was clear that the tone did not go over very well.

Republicans laced into Representative Jerrold Nadler, Democrat of New York and the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, whose aggressive tone toward senators — and accusation of treachery — during his remarks after midnight were too much for some in the chamber.

“What Chairman Nadler said and how he conducted himself was outrageous and an insult to the Senate,” said Senator John Cornyn, Republican of Texas. “We don’t need to continue the clown circus that started over in the House.”

Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, lashed out at the managers for suggesting that Republican senators were part of a cover-up by not voting in support of subpoenaing additional documents and witnesses. “You can say what you want about me but I’m covering up nothing,” Mr. Graham told reporters.

Even some Democrats offered some mild criticism. Senator Jon Tester of Montana told reporters that Mr. Nadler “could have chosen better words” and Senator Chris Coons of Delaware told CNN that “frankly, several of those folks who were making arguments in the chamber took an aggressive tone. The tone in the Senate has always been and tries to remain measured and civil.”

All of which may explain why Mr. Schiff opened Wednesday’s presentation with an olive branch to the senators, heaping praise on them for their forbearance. “I want to begin today by thanking you for the conduct of the proceedings yesterday,” he told the senators. “And for inviting your patience as we go forward.”

Michael D. Shear

The White House passed up a chance to force a vote to dismiss the impeachment charges against Mr. Trump before arguments get underway.

Both the president’s defense lawyers and the House Democratic impeachment managers had until 9 a.m. to offer motions related to the trial, except for ones that would call for witnesses and new evidence, issues that will be dealt with next week. Neither side did so, aides in both parties said.

The White House’s silence was more significant. Though Republican leaders have been discouraging the president’s team from seeking a swift dismissal, Mr. Trump had endorsed the idea and his conservative allies said the Senate ought to vote promptly to do so. A dismissal vote this week would almost certainly have failed to attract a majority of senators, dividing Republicans and dealing Mr. Trump an early symbolic defeat.

A motion to dismiss could still be offered later in the trial. For now, Republican congressional leaders have counseled the White House that it is better politically for the trial to run its course and deliver a full acquittal of the president, rather than cutting it short and enabling Democrats to argue the result is illegitimate.

Nicholas Fandos

Mr. Trump was halfway around the world as he faced trial but he weighed in from afar, hurling insults at two of the House managers, calling Representative Jerrold Nadler of New York, the Judiciary Committee chairman, a “sleaze bag” and branding Mr. Schiff a “con job” and a “corrupt politician.”

Mr. Trump said he would love to attend the trial — something no other president has done and his lawyers have advised against — so he could “sit right in the front row and stare into their corrupt faces.” But he praised his lawyers for their performance on Tuesday.

“We’re doing very well,” he said. “I got to watch enough. I thought our team did a very good job. But honestly, we have all the material. They don’t have the material.”

The last comment about the material immediately provoked criticism from Democrats, who called it a boast about his success at withholding documents and evidence from Congress. But it was unclear from the context whether he was instead saying, however inartfully, that his side had the stronger argument.

Mr. Trump defended his refusal to authorize current or former aides to testify, especially John R. Bolton, his former national security adviser who opposed the pressure campaign on Ukraine and has said he would testify if the Senate subpoenas him. Mr. Trump said allowing Mr. Bolton to testify would interfere with his ability to conduct foreign policy.

“He knows some of my thoughts, he knows what I think about leaders,” Mr. Trump said. “What happens if he reveals what I think about a certain leader, and it’s not very positive? And then I have to deal on behalf of the country?” He added that he would be reluctant to agree to Mr. Bolton testifying because he left the administration on bad terms, “due to me — not due to him.”

In addition to the news conference, Mr. Trump was active on Twitter, posting or reposting roughly 100 messages overnight and into the morning. He left Davos after the news conference and was scheduled to land at Joint Base Andrews outside Washington at 4:50 p.m.

Tuesday night’s Senate floor brawl was not the end of the haggling over potential witnesses at the impeachment trial. Democrats are still demanding to hear from current and former White House officials including Mr. Bolton.

And Republicans are increasingly answering with a provocative demand of their own: “Where’s Hunter?” as the Republican National Committee put it in an email to reporters on Wednesday.

The reference is to Hunter Biden, the son of former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. The younger Mr. Biden served on the board of a Ukrainian energy company while his father was in office, and in a July phone call, Mr. Trump asked the president of Ukraine to do him “a favor” and investigate both men, a request that is now at the heart of the impeachment charges.

Democratic leaders regard the idea of calling the younger Mr. Biden as a nonstarter, arguing that he is not relevant to the case, and senior aides say there are no serious conversations about calling him. On Wednesday, Mr. Schiff said senators should not agree to it.

“This isn’t like some fantasy football trade,” he told reporters before beginning arguments against Mr. Trump. “Trials aren’t trades for witnesses.”

The former vice president’s many allies in the Senate have been particularly insistent on the point.

“The president is on trial here, not anyone with the last name Biden,” Senator Chris Coons, Democrat of Delaware and a close ally of the elder Mr. Biden, said in a tweet Tuesday night. “VP Biden and Hunter Biden are not relevant witnesses.”

Yet some Republicans, including Senator Ted Cruz of Texas are pressing the idea of “witness reciprocity,” that their side might be open to calling someone like Mr. Bolton if Democrats would agree to summon a figure like Hunter Biden.

At least one Democrat, Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio, indicated in recent days he would be open to such a trade. But most Democrats dismiss the idea.

Republican leaders told Mr. Trump weeks ago they did not have the votes on their side to call the younger Mr. Biden, and senior Democratic aides say discussing a swap now makes little sense given that. But things could change in what promises to be a lively Senate negotiation that will culminate next week over whether to hear from witnesses — and if so, which ones.

Nicholas Fandos

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transcript

Chief Justice Admonishes Impeachment Managers and President’s Counsel

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. had a warning for the House impeachment managers and the president’s lawyers as both sides debated the proposed trial rules.

I think it is appropriate, at this point, for me to admonish both the House managers and the president’s counsel in equal terms to remember that they are addressing the world’s greatest deliberative body. One reason it has earned that title is because its members avoid speaking in a manner and using language that is not conducive to civil discourse. In the 1905 Swain trial, a senator objected when one of the managers used the word pettifogging — and the presiding officer said the word ought not to have been used. I don’t think we need to aspire to that high a standard, but I do think those addressing the Senate should remember where they are.

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Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. had a warning for the House impeachment managers and the president’s lawyers as both sides debated the proposed trial rules.CreditCredit…Senate Television, via Associated Press

The only liquids allowed on the Senate floor during the trial are water and milk, but Chief Justice Roberts could be forgiven for wishing for a good jolt of coffee.

After presiding over the Senate trial until nearly 2 a.m., the chief justice reported to his day job for oral arguments at the Supreme Court at 10 a.m. before then returning to the Senate chamber for the session that started at 1 p.m.

The arguments at the Supreme Court focused on a different issue than the one at stake on the Senate floor but one that has been hotly disputed nonetheless. The case, Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, focuses on a since-disbanded voucher program in Montana that provided tax breaks for donors to scholarships for private schools, including religious schools.

After running the oral arguments at the court in the morning, the chief justice resumed his temporary assignment as presiding officer at the Senate proceeding, a role that so far has been essentially ministerial with the exception of his late-night chiding of both sides to keep civil.

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