web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 51)

Cornell student, 18, found dead in gorge after frat party, reports say

A top Ivy League student was found dead Saturday afternoon in a New York gorge after he left a fraternity party and disappeared Thursday night, according to reports.

Antonio Tsialas, 18, was reported missing Friday afternoon after he failed to meet up with his family for Family Weekend at Cornell University in Ithaca, the Cornell Sun reported.

The South Florida native was last seen at the Phi Kappa Psi house around 9:30 p.m the night before, the Miami Herald reported.

NEW YORK CITY MAN SHOVES WOMAN HEAD-FIRST INTO SUBWAY TRAIN, VIDEO SHOWS

“The circumstances of Tsialas’s death are still under investigation, but no foul play is suspected,” Cornell University police said in a statement.

Westlake Legal Group antonio-tsialas Cornell student, 18, found dead in gorge after frat party, reports say Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/education/college fox news fnc/us fnc article 742a9929-eeaf-52bc-80e4-39cf3f86e234

Antonio Tsialas, 18, was reported missing Friday afternoon after he failed to meet up with his family for Family Weekend at Cornell University in Ithaca, the Cornell Sun reported. (NY State Police)

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP 

He had been a star student in Florida.

Tsialas had been a varsity soccer goaltender and received an award for his high AP test scores. He also, the Herald reported, had been a member of his high school’s statistics team.

Click for more from The New York Post.

Frank Miles is a reporter and editor covering geopolitics, military, crime, technology and sports for FoxNews.com. His email is Frank.Miles@foxnews.com.

Westlake Legal Group antonio-tsialas Cornell student, 18, found dead in gorge after frat party, reports say Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/education/college fox news fnc/us fnc article 742a9929-eeaf-52bc-80e4-39cf3f86e234   Westlake Legal Group antonio-tsialas Cornell student, 18, found dead in gorge after frat party, reports say Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/education/college fox news fnc/us fnc article 742a9929-eeaf-52bc-80e4-39cf3f86e234

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Man in his 80s arrested in connection with France mosque attack

An 84-year-old man with far-right ties was arrested Monday in connection with the shooting of two people outside a mosque in France who reportedly saw him trying to set fire to the building.

Claude Sinke allegedly opened fire on two men, ages 74 and 78, who saw him trying to set fire to the door of a mosque in Bayonne, in southwestern France, Agence France-Presse reported. Bayonne Mayor Jean-Rene Etchegaray told AFP at the scene that the suspect “approached the building by car and threw an incendiary device against the side door of the mosque.”

“The two people came out, he shot at them, hitting one in the neck and the other in the chest and arm,” he added. “He then fled.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19301651967406 Man in his 80s arrested in connection with France mosque attack Louis Casiano fox-news/world/world-regions/france fox-news/travel/regions/europe fox news fnc/world fnc article 485e2820-f19f-5cf0-aaf0-e30c5ffa4c35

A police officer stands next to the entrance a mosque after an incident in Bayonne, southwestern France on Monday. French authorities say a suspect has been arrested for allegedly shooting and seriously injuring two elderly men who caught him trying to set fire to a mosque’s door. (AP Photo/Str)

The men were taken to a hospital with serious injuries, the Pyrenees-Atlantique Police said in a statement.

Sinke also tried to set fire to a car outside the mosque before fleeing, authorities said. He was later arrested at his home and admitted to being the shooter, a source close to the investigation told AFP.

French President Emmanuel Macron condemned the attack in a tweet.

“I address my thoughts to the victims,” he wrote. “The Republic will never tolerate hatred. Everything will be done to punish the perpetrators and protect our compatriots of the Muslim faith. I commit myself to it.”

The attack came hours after Macron urged Frances’ Muslim community to fight against “separatism.” This, weeks after a fatal knife attack at HQ by a Paris police employee who’d converted to Islam.

“It is a fact that a form of separatism has taken root in some places in our Republic, in other words a desire to not live together and to not be in the Republic,” the centrist leader said.

Sinke was a candidate for Marine’ Le Pen‘s National Front in 2015 in local elections, the news outlet reported. He has since left the movement, according to local media reports.

In a tweet, Interior Minister Christophe Castaner expressed his “solidarity and support to the Muslim community.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Le Pen, a former French presidential candidate who advocated hardline immigration policies, has been highly critical of Islam. She described the alleged attack as “an unspeakable act”.

Sinke’s actions were “absolutely contrary to the values of our movement,” she said.

Westlake Legal Group AP19301645177422 Man in his 80s arrested in connection with France mosque attack Louis Casiano fox-news/world/world-regions/france fox-news/travel/regions/europe fox news fnc/world fnc article 485e2820-f19f-5cf0-aaf0-e30c5ffa4c35   Westlake Legal Group AP19301645177422 Man in his 80s arrested in connection with France mosque attack Louis Casiano fox-news/world/world-regions/france fox-news/travel/regions/europe fox news fnc/world fnc article 485e2820-f19f-5cf0-aaf0-e30c5ffa4c35

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Reveals Photo Of Military Hero Dog Involved In Baghdadi Raid

Westlake Legal Group 5db75c93210000063334b4bc Trump Reveals Photo Of Military Hero Dog Involved In Baghdadi Raid

President Donald Trump on Monday released a declassified photo of a member of the U.S. military team responsible for the raid that led to the death of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of the so-called Islamic State. As it turns out, the hero is a four-legged fur ball.

An image of the dog ― whose name is being kept confidential ― was posted on Twitter along with a praiseful message from the commander in chief, who called the canine “wonderful,” crediting the dog, which appears to be a Belgian Malinois, for a job well done.

Naturally, the photo inspired Twitter users to begin “declassifying” images of their own pets, including parodies of the newly revealed pooch.

In a press conference Sunday, Trump announced that Baghdadi had died in northwestern Syria, delivering a vivid description of the operation that occurred the night before.

According to the president, American military dogs chased Baghdadi down a dead-end tunnel as he was “whimpering and crying and screaming all the way” before detonating a suicide vest and killing himself and three of his children whom he had dragged along with him. The tunnel then collapsed from the blast, Trump said.

The president told reporters a “beautiful” and “talented” dog “was injured and brought back.” On Monday, Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Mark Milley said the dog was “slightly wounded and fully recovering” but had already returned to duty.

According to New York Times correspondent Katie Rogers, the dog has a standing invitation to the White House “whenever he can get over here,” a senior official said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Katie Hill defended by ABC News analyst comparing her case to allegations against Trump, Supreme Court justices

Westlake Legal Group Matthew-Dowd-GettyImages-577703630 Katie Hill defended by ABC News analyst comparing her case to allegations against Trump, Supreme Court justices Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/state-and-local/controversies fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/politics/judiciary/confirmation-of-judge-kavanaugh fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc bffaab08-6b38-5e31-b967-a97486ac7c3b article

ABC News political analyst Matthew Dowd offered a bold defense of Katie Hill on Monday after the congresswoman announced her resignation, describing her behavior as “jaywalking” compared to the more serious, “credible” allegations of sexual assault or harassment made against President Trump and Supreme Court Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Clarence Thomas.

Dowd, who described himself as a “proud independent” on Twitter, weighed in on the sudden resignation of the California Democrat after multiple sex scandals emerged, including a reported affair with a congressional staffer that prompted a House Ethics Committee investigation.

“Katie hill resigning while we have a president and 2 Supreme Court justices all credibly accused of sexual harassment/assault is a bit like a jaywalker going to jail while al Capone roams free,” Dowd tweeted, in a reference to the notorious Chicago mob boss.

CNN, MSNBC LARGELY IGNORE DEM REP. KATIE HILL DURING PRIME TIME, 2 NIGHTS IN A ROW

Dowd offered similar rhetoric on Sunday evening in reaction to Hill’s resignation.

“There are two Supreme Court Justice and a President in DC today with credible accusations of sexual harassment/assault, and Katie Hill resigns. Ridiculous,” Dowd tweeted.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

This wasn’t the first time Dowd went after Justices Thomas and Kavanaugh. Last year, Dowd was slammed for calling Thomas a “sexual predator” as Kavanaugh was being confirmed.

Fox News’ Brian Flood contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group Matthew-Dowd-GettyImages-577703630 Katie Hill defended by ABC News analyst comparing her case to allegations against Trump, Supreme Court justices Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/state-and-local/controversies fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/politics/judiciary/confirmation-of-judge-kavanaugh fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc bffaab08-6b38-5e31-b967-a97486ac7c3b article   Westlake Legal Group Matthew-Dowd-GettyImages-577703630 Katie Hill defended by ABC News analyst comparing her case to allegations against Trump, Supreme Court justices Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/state-and-local/controversies fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/politics/judiciary/confirmation-of-judge-kavanaugh fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc bffaab08-6b38-5e31-b967-a97486ac7c3b article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Elizabeth Warren’s Days Defending Big Corporations

Westlake Legal Group merlin_162748782_831dd3f4-20da-4d8a-aea6-be33ba3ca937-facebookJumbo Elizabeth Warren’s Days Defending Big Corporations Warren, Elizabeth Presidential Election of 2020 Corporations

Elizabeth Warren had never taken on the federal government before.

But in 1995, she found herself up against the Clinton administration, representing the Cleveland-based conglomerate LTV Steel.

Even though LTV had sold off its coal mines during the 1980s, a new law required it to contribute to a health fund for retired miners.

LTV believed that it should not have to pay. Those claims, the company said, should have been handled as part of its bankruptcy reorganization.

Ms. Warren’s job was to convince the Supreme Court to hear LTV’s case.

The court declined, but for Ms. Warren, the issue would fester. Over a decade later, when she ran for the Senate from Massachusetts in 2012, the Republican incumbent, Senator Scott Brown of Massachusetts, tried to use her work for LTV against her, unleashing an ad calling her a “hired gun” who sided “against working people.” Notwithstanding the attack, Mr. Brown lost his seat to Ms. Warren.

The LTV case was part of a considerable body of legal work that Ms. Warren, one of the nation’s leading bankruptcy experts, took on while working as a law professor — moonlighting that earned her hundreds of thousands of dollars over roughly two decades beginning in the late 1980s, mostly while she was on the faculty at Harvard. Much of it involved representing big corporate clients.

Ms. Warren has ascended toward the head of the Democratic presidential pack on the strength of her populist appeal and progressive plans, which include breaking up big technology companies, free public college and a wealth tax on the richest Americans. Her political opponents, in turn, have sought to find a soft spot on issues of authenticity — chiefly Ms. Warren’s handling of her claim to Native American ancestry.

Against that backdrop, some of Ms. Warren’s critics have seized upon her bankruptcy work for LTV and other big corporations to question the depth of her progressive bona fides. How, they wonder, could someone whose reputation is built on consumer advocacy have represented a company seeking to avoid paying for retired miners’ health care?

Ms. Warren’s campaign did not make her available to discuss her outside legal work, though it did provide email responses to some questions. But over the years, Ms. Warren has twice released accounts of her practice — a partial list of cases during the 2012 Senate race and a fuller list of more than 50 cases posted to her presidential campaign website in May.

Among her corporate clients were Travelers insurance and the aircraft maker Fairchild, as well as one of America’s wealthiest families, the Hunts of Texas. She advocated for a railroad company that wanted to avoid paying for a Superfund cleanup, and advised Dow Chemical as its subsidiary Dow Corning dealt with thousands of complaints from women who said they had been harmed by its silicone breast implants.

But she also worked on a number of cases involving consumer bankruptcy and victims’ rights in asbestos litigation, served as an expert in a lawsuit against the cigarette maker Philip Morris and represented the lawyer whose battles with polluters inspired the film “A Civil Action.”

In very brief and simplified summaries, the lists cast much of her work — even for corporate clients — in terms that align with her pro-consumer narrative. Those descriptions have themselves become a focus of some contention.

But a review by The New York Times, together with interviews with several of Ms. Warren’s former compatriots in the rarefied world of self-described bankruptcy nerds, reveals a complex picture in which many cases defy simple black or white categorization. It also offers a look at a relatively unexamined aspect of her thinking.

Her work, the scholars say, should be understood primarily as an effort to preserve the right to file for bankruptcy and the integrity of the bankruptcy system.

“As far as I can tell, the kind of positions she took were positions that were completely consistent with someone who was dedicated to the value of the bankruptcy process,” said Douglas G. Baird, a University of Chicago Law School bankruptcy expert who differs philosophically from Ms. Warren on some issues in the field and says he is not a political supporter.

Indeed, in her most recent list of cases, Ms. Warren wrote that bankruptcy “inevitably pits sympathetic interests against each other — current victims against future victims, employees against retirees and small suppliers against customers who didn’t get what they were promised.” The challenge, she concluded, is “balancing all of these interests in the fairest way possible.”

Mr. Baird also suggested that in some cases, Ms. Warren was simply advocating for clients, not necessarily with an eye toward the future popularity of her positions. Lawyers, he said, are not ideologues, but are to some extent “plumbers or mechanics trying to be zealous advocates for their clients.”

Ms. Warren has acknowledged that for much of her long and varied career she was not politically engaged and had no plan to run for public office. Until 1996, she was registered as a Republican.

In taking on outside clients, Ms. Warren augmented her salary at Harvard, where she was among the most highly paid faculty members. In 1998, the Harvard Crimson reported that she was paid $192,550 in salary plus $133,450 in “other compensation.”

It is not possible to tell how much Ms. Warren made from her legal consultancy, and she declined to reveal the amount, but it was clearly more than $500,000 and probably much more. Most of the work fell outside the period when she was required to submit financial disclosure reports.

Travelers paid her more than $200,000 over several years for advice on dealing with asbestos claims against its insured, Johns Manville.

In 2010, Ms. Warren was paid $90,000 to write two expert opinions on behalf of merchants who were suing credit card companies and banks, alleging antitrust violations in processing fees. Because she was heading up the congressional panel monitoring the bank bailout at the time, Senator Richard Shelby, Republican of Alabama, raised questions about whether the work presented a conflict of interest. Some conflict-of-interest provisions had been waived, however, because members of the panel were experts who served part-time.

For her work with Caplin & Drysdale, a firm representing plaintiffs in a number of asbestos-related cases, Ms. Warren billed $675 an hour, in line with what partners in top New York firms charged at the time.

While some law professors look askance at outside work, regarding it as impure, most schools permit it, and Harvard has encouraged it, according to Randall L. Kennedy, a law professor there and former colleague of Ms. Warren.

“The idea that you would be in government, you would be consulted, you would be a big shot in the legal profession, I think that was viewed as one of the distinctive parts of the Harvard Law School ethos,” said Mr. Kennedy, who noted that some of his best-known colleagues maintained very active practices. “That’s how we roll.”

It is an unglamorous area of law, and it rarely makes news. That’s why the bankruptcy nerds who post to a blog called Credit Slips were shocked in 2012 when a decade-old bankruptcy case became a hot political topic.

“LTV has amazingly become an issue in the U.S. Senate race in Massachusetts,” wrote John A. E. Pottow, a former Harvard student of Ms. Warren who teaches bankruptcy at the University of Michigan Law School. “A bankruptcy case!”

Ms. Warren’s record in the LTV case is a textbook example of how complex legal matters can be seen in vastly different ways. Viewed through a layman’s eyes, Ms. Warren appeared to be fighting against working people. Some bankruptcy experts, however, viewed her motivations as more far-reaching — aimed at preserving a system that ultimately offers working people some measure of protection.

The origins of the 1995 case dated back to the Truman administration. To settle a coal miners strike, the federal government forged an agreement that miners would have health care coverage when they retired, provided by their last employer. Over the years, as demand for coal declined, companies closed their mines and stopped paying these benefits.

To remedy the problem, in 1992, Congress passed the Coal Industry Retiree Health Benefit Act, to provide benefits for more than 100,000 retired miners. Each company that had operated coal mines, even those no longer in the business, would be required to pay into a fund for their retirees.

LTV objected to paying into the fund. The company had filed for bankruptcy in 1986, resolving claims from thousands of employees. The Coal Act, LTV now argued, retroactively imposed new liabilities based on events that had taken place years earlier and that therefore should have been resolved during bankruptcy.

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals disagreed, ruling that LTV’s liabilities were not technically “claims” under the bankruptcy code because they had been created by a new act of Congress.

Ms. Warren’s campaign has said she engaged in outside legal work primarily when there was a larger issue at stake, which is what Mr. Baird believed she had in mind when she agreed to represent LTV in its Supreme Court petition.

“Can Congress make that law apply retroactively even to firms that have had their day of reckoning in bankruptcy?” Mr. Baird said. “If you believe in the bankruptcy system, you can argue that you shouldn’t do this retroactive second-guessing.”

In her petition asking the Supreme Court to review the decision, Ms. Warren wrote that bankruptcy “contemplates that all legal obligations of the debtor, no matter how remote or contingent, will be dealt with by the bankruptcy case.”

“The Second Circuit,” she added, “threatens to erode that concept, with serious implications for future bankruptcies.”

This year, nearly 15 years after the Supreme Court declined to review the case, Ms. Warren’s campaign described her work this way:

“In this case, Elizabeth represented a company that was asking the Supreme Court to reverse a lower court’s ruling that limited the ability of future employees, retirees and victims to receive any compensation at all from bankrupt companies.”

In bankruptcy, there is a day of reckoning, the point at which a debtor’s accounts are squared.

As with LTV, several of Ms. Warren’s more prominent cases involved questions of what happens when claims arise after that day. Such claims are regarded as potentially eroding the system and undermining the chance for a “fresh start” for companies and individuals that file bankruptcy.

Ms. Warren at one point praised how the system gave a second chance to several well-known companies, including one of Donald J. Trump’s businesses.

“General Motors, Trump Enterprises, Hershey Foods and dozens of other well-known companies all survived early bankruptcies, she wrote in 2009. “Second chances opened the way for Francis Ford Coppola, Willie Nelson and Mark Twain to leave their marks on world cinema, music and literature.”

Any development that undermines that principle is “going to create a mess in the bankruptcy system,” said Adam J. Levitin, a professor at Georgetown University Law Center who studied under Ms. Warren. He added, “If all these new liabilities start appearing, the bankruptcy system doesn’t work.”

In one case that turned on these issues, Ms. Warren found herself on the same side as Kenneth Starr, who at the time was also the independent counsel leading a long-running investigation of the Clinton White House.

The case involved a company called CMC Heartland Partners and a Superfund site near Tacoma, Wash., named one of the 10 most hazardous in the country.

CMC Heartland was the successor company to the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad Company — known colloquially as the Milwaukee Road — which had filed for bankruptcy in 1977.

Union Pacific Railroad subsequently acquired the company’s old Tacoma rail yards, where it discovered an environmental disaster of oil and other industrial waste. When CMC refused to pay for the cleanup — arguing that the claims were barred by its predecessor company’s bankruptcy — Union Pacific sued.

In 1996, after a federal appeals court ruled against CMC, Ms. Warren filed a brief asking the solicitor general to support a Supreme Court review.

The implications of allowing the lower court ruling to stand, Ms. Warren argued, would be profound “for those who are trying to put the assets of those businesses back into productive use, for those who face uncompensated injuries and for those who have other claims against the business.”

The Supreme Court declined to hear the case.

Another such case, in 1995, involved Fairchild, the aircraft manufacturer. Two years before, a well-known NASCAR driver named Alan Kulwicki and three associates had been killed when their Fairchild Merlin crashed near Blountville, Tenn.

In a lawsuit, survivors of the four dead men sought compensation from Fairchild, arguing that their death was related to a defect in the aircraft and that, even though the manufacturer had filed for bankruptcy and been taken over by a newly established company, the new company should be liable.

Ms. Warren represented the new company, arguing that it had bought Fairchild’s assets free and clear of claims and should not be responsible for ongoing liabilities of planes made by the old bankrupt company.

Her campaign has said she was trying to save the new company and its 1,000 jobs. One of the opposing lawyers, James A. Hoffman of San Antonio, put it differently. “Her position in our matter was that these people are simply out of luck,” he said.

Ms. Warren lost, but the case was later settled, and the National Transportation Safety Board ultimately ruled that the crash had not been caused by an aircraft defect.

In quite a few cases, Ms. Warren came down clearly on the side of the consumer.

Yet some of the case descriptions released by her campaign, seemingly written to portray Ms. Warren’s work for corporate clients in the most consumer- or victim-friendly light, have prompted criticism from lawyers on opposing sides.

In its responses to The New York Times, the campaign said the summaries were written in an effort to make “complicated cases accessible while maintaining accuracy.”

Among the cases whose summaries have provoked criticism was the long-running bankruptcy of Cajun Electric Power Cooperative, a large nonprofit utility based in Baton Rouge, La., that provided power to 12 member cooperatives.

When Cajun Electric filed for bankruptcy in 1994, a bidding war ensued for control of Cajun’s assets, notably Big Cajun, a coal-fired power plant worth an estimated $1 billion. One of the bidders was SWEPCO, a utility company based in Shreveport, La.

As the case went on, SWEPCO ran afoul of the court. Unknown to the other bidders, it had quietly paid $1 million in legal bills for seven of the Cajun Electric-member cooperatives supporting its bid. A federal judge ruled the payments improper, disqualifying SWEPCO’s bid.

That was when SWEPCO, desperate to remain in the bidding for Big Cajun, called Ms. Warren, who carried the day. The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans overturned the judge’s ruling, breathing new life into SWEPCO’s play.

But while she won the battle, SWEPCO ultimately did not capture the big prize. Louisiana Generating, known as LaGen, took over Big Cajun in 2000.

Matt J. Farley, a New Orleans lawyer who represented LaGen, recently said he regarded Ms. Warren as a bankruptcy “heavy hitter” who had done a good job for her client.

Mr. Farley, who describes himself as a political independent, said he saw a contradiction in 2012 when he first read her Senate campaign’s description of her work in the Cajun Electric case: “Elizabeth represented a company that offered a plan to help save a bankrupt rural power cooperative.” It is the same description given by her presidential campaign.

Ms. Warren’s client, SWEPCO, had offered lower electric rates in its proposal than the other bidders. But Mr. Farley believes that the summary is misleading.

“I can’t imagine that Warren really believes that she was helping to save a rural power cooperative,” Mr. Farley wrote in 2012 on a blog called Legal Insurrection. He added, “This was nothing more or less than high-stakes corporate litigation.”

The campaign’s synopsis of Ms. Warren’s work on the Dow Corning breast-implant case has also raised some eyebrows.

“Thanks in part to Elizabeth’s efforts, Dow Corning created a $2.35 billion fund to compensate women claiming injury,” the description said.

The exact nature of Ms. Warren’s work for Dow is not clear. Ms. Warren’s campaign said she advised Dow Chemical, the parent company, as it worked with most of the plaintiffs to defend the victims’ trust fund. Some of the plaintiffs had objected to the trust.

But Sybil Goldrich, a breast-implant victim and trustee for claimants in the 1995 bankruptcy case, has said Ms. Warren was “on the wrong side” of the litigation as the company worked to contain corporate damage related to the claims.

Other summaries released by the campaign omitted key details.

Describing Ms. Warren’s work in a 1989 Internal Revenue Service case, the summary says she worked to “help the tax court.” The summary does not specify that she was retained by one of Texas’s wealthiest families, the Hunts, in a tax dispute about how much various members owed to the I.R.S. after they tried to corner the silver market.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Israel’s UN ambassador condemns Erdogan’s support of terrorism

Israel’s Ambassador to the United Nations Danny Danon on Monday accused Turkey of being a hub for regional terrorism while saying its recent incursion into Syria has resulted in the strengthening of the Islamic State terror network.

Speaking during a United Nations Security Council debate on the Middle East, Danon said the council spent too much time on Israel and called on its members to do more to thwart the ambitions of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

“Erdogan has turned Turkey into a safe haven for Hamas (terrorists) and a financial center for funneling money to subsidize terror attacks. Erdogan’s Turkey shows no moral or human restraint towards the Kurdish people. Erdogan has turned Turkey into a regional hub for terror,” Danon said.

The quarterly open debate often has been criticized over perceived one-sided attacks against the Jewish state.

Westlake Legal Group Danon-Erdogan_Getty-AP Israel's UN ambassador condemns Erdogan's support of terrorism fox-news/world/world-regions/turkey fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/world/united-nations/security-council fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox news fnc/world fnc Ben Evansky article 7a8b0985-614d-57f0-9e32-7bdc6d5f770f

Israel’s Ambassador to the United Nations Danny Danon lashed out at Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in pointed remarks. (AP, File)

Danon complained, “As Erdogan expands his terror campaign into Syria, the U.N. Security Council focuses on Israel. It is a disgrace to this body’s mandate that this Council continues to target Israel instead of the atrocities performed by Erdogan. Recycling old arguments over and over against Israel instead of focusing on the devastation caused by Erdogan, as we sit here today, will not save the lives of the Kurdish people.”

He continued, “Israel warns against the ethnic cleansing of the Kurds, and calls upon the international community to take action and provide aid to the Kurdish people.”

Danon added, “His violence in Syria also resulted in the strengthening of ISIS. While he was busy murdering those who have helped keep the world safe from the threat of ISIS, he allowed ISIS members to break out of prison and subject the world to future attacks.”

Before the meeting, Danon would not say if Israel played an intelligence role in the mission to kill ISIS chief Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi this past Saturday, but he congratulated the Trump administration during his speech on the operation that saw the death of the terror leader.

United States U.N. Ambassador Kelly Craft told the council, “the world is a much safer place,” following the death of al-Baghdadi. She thanked “America’s fearless women and men in uniform, our intelligence community and our partners that executed this mission flawlessly, for their efforts in bringing the leader of ISIS to justice.” 

Craft focused the rest of her message on calling for more action against Hamas. She said the extremist group received less criticism than Israel and pointed out that its behavior had never been “seriously scrutinized by this council or the General Assembly.”

She continued, “If this institution is genuinely concerned with peace, we should be eager to examine Hamas’ behavior more closely.”

Last December, then-Ambassador Nikki Haley tried to persuade the General Assembly to condemn Hamas. Her efforts came close to success but were thwarted by a procedural move from the Kuwaitis and Bolivians which meant the U.S. resolution needed a two-thirds majority of votes.

U.N. FAILS TO ADOPT U.S. RESOLUTION CONDEMNING HAMAS TERROR

Turkey’s United Nations Ambassador Feridun Sinirlioglu responded to Danon’s earlier remarks aimed against his country and accused the Israeli government of having a “terrorist ideology.”

He told the council, “Today, once again, we have listened to our daily dosage of lies. When these lies come from the representative of terror, they are just a waste of time.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Iran’s deputy ambassador, Eshagh Al Habib, followed his Turkish counterpart in condemning Israel, accusing it of waging wars in the region. He also called on the Security Council to implement its resolutions against Israel and blamed the U.S. for shielding her closest Mideast ally.

Earlier in the day, Palestinian Ambassador to the U.N. Riyad Mansour shared a similar message. He called on the council and international community to take action against Israel if it continued to violate resolutions, saying Israel “must bear the consequences of its violations.” Mansour said they should include “sanctions and prosecution in courts.”

Westlake Legal Group Danon-Erdogan_Getty-AP Israel's UN ambassador condemns Erdogan's support of terrorism fox-news/world/world-regions/turkey fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/world/united-nations/security-council fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox news fnc/world fnc Ben Evansky article 7a8b0985-614d-57f0-9e32-7bdc6d5f770f   Westlake Legal Group Danon-Erdogan_Getty-AP Israel's UN ambassador condemns Erdogan's support of terrorism fox-news/world/world-regions/turkey fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/world/united-nations/security-council fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox news fnc/world fnc Ben Evansky article 7a8b0985-614d-57f0-9e32-7bdc6d5f770f

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Firefighters ready to fight California blaze, but fear Santa Ana winds could drastically worsen conditions

Westlake Legal Group payne-lajeunesse Firefighters ready to fight California blaze, but fear Santa Ana winds could drastically worsen conditions fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/los-angeles fox-news/shows/your-world fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 67b81d55-02db-505e-bb83-95c075059986

Conditions have been improving as a wildfire continues to burn in Southern California, but weather patterns could make things worse later this week, according to Fox News correspondent William La Jeunesse.

The blaze caused a temporary shutdown of Interstate 405 until firefighters could beat back some of the flames, but potentially dangerous Santa Ana winds are expected to kick up again soon — which could bring a new set of issues, La Jeunesse reported Monday on “Your World.”

“Conditions are improving, the evacuation has been lifted in certain areas and the 405 has been reopened,” he said. “The other [factor] is this is the only major fire in Southern California burning right now, so they have the firefighters and the equipment to fight it. The bad news is, we expect those Santa Anas to return Tuesday into Thursday.”

GETTY FIRE BURNS HOMES IN LOS ANGELES

The winds, which bring dry, desertlike air to the region from the east, have the potential to “turn, basically, a candle flame into a blowtorch,” La Jeunesse added.

More from Media

He said firefighters are watching forecasts closely, and are prepared to battle any windswept blazes that threaten homes and residents.

While reporting from northwest of downtown Los Angeles, La Jeunesse pointed out one of a handful of helicopters that have been treating the wildfire from the air.

According to recent reports, eight homes have been destroyed and five damaged by the blaze, known as the Getty Fire, he reported, adding that most local residents are heeding first responders’ warnings.

The fire erupted before dawn Monday on the west side of Sepulveda Pass in the Santa Monica Mountains and roared up slopes into wealthy neighborhoods, threatening thousands of homes.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Several homes could be seen burning; Los Angeles Lakers star LeBron James shared on Twitter that he and his family had to evacuate his home.

On a website set up for updates about the blaze, the Los Angeles Fire Department said the “very dynamic fire” is moving in a westward direction and has grown to over 500 acres.

Fox News’ Travis Fedschun contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group payne-lajeunesse Firefighters ready to fight California blaze, but fear Santa Ana winds could drastically worsen conditions fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/los-angeles fox-news/shows/your-world fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 67b81d55-02db-505e-bb83-95c075059986   Westlake Legal Group payne-lajeunesse Firefighters ready to fight California blaze, but fear Santa Ana winds could drastically worsen conditions fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/los-angeles fox-news/shows/your-world fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 67b81d55-02db-505e-bb83-95c075059986

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Is A Diet That’s Healthy For Us Also Better For The Planet? Most Of The Time, Yes

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-927809396_wide-d304d48a0652ebfa65c410b8887039bad67b1451-s1100-c15 Is A Diet That's Healthy For Us Also Better For The Planet? Most Of The Time, Yes
MirageC/Getty Images
Westlake Legal Group  Is A Diet That's Healthy For Us Also Better For The Planet? Most Of The Time, Yes

MirageC/Getty Images

Consider the almond.

Almonds and other nuts are often touted as healthy snacks, because they can help you maintain a healthy weight and are linked to a lower risk of heart disease and Type 2 diabetes.

But almonds are grown in drought-stricken California, and the amount of water required to produce them has come under intense scrutiny in recent years. So if you’re an environmentally minded eater who also wants to embrace a healthy diet, are almonds a responsibly green snack?

Relatively speaking, yes, says ecologist David Tilman of the University of Minnesota.

In a vast new analysis published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Tilman and his co-authors looked at the health and environmental impacts of 15 different food groups, including nuts, fruits, vegetables, red meat, dairy, eggs, fish, olive oil, legumes and sugar-sweetened beverages.

The foods were ranked relative to one another based on how they influence the risk of disease and the toll they take on the planet in terms of water and land use, greenhouse gas emissions and how they impact pollution of water and soil.

Most of the time, the researchers found that foods that promote good health also tended to be better for the planet — and vice versa. While nuts require lots of water to produce, Tilman says, water was just one factor that affected their environmental ranking.

“If water is going to be used to irrigate crops, it would seem better for it to be used to grow healthy crops,” he says. Producing a serving of nuts has about five times the negative effects on the environment compared with producing a serving of vegetables, according to the study.

That may sound like a lot, until you compare that to red meat; both processed and unprocessed, it’s “uniformly bad,” Tilman says. Producing a serving of processed red meat, the researchers found, has about 40 times the negative environmental impact of producing a serving of vegetables – and eating an extra daily serving raises the relative risk of overall mortality by 40 percent.

“That doesn’t mean you’re going to die with a 40 percent chance in a given year,” Tilman notes. “It just means whatever your chance was of dying that year for your age, [the relative risk is] about 40 percent larger.”

However, just because a food is bad for us doesn’t always mean it’s bad for the planet. Sugary beverages, for instance, have been linked to an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease and stroke, but the study found their environmental impact isn’t much more than that of growing vegetables. On the flip side, fish consumption is associated with a lower risk of several diseases, but it’s not as great for the planet as a plant-based diet.

That said, Tilman notes that how a fish is caught or grown matters a lot. Fish caught by trawlers in the open ocean have a much higher environmental impact because these boats use “lots of diesel fuel for not a lot of fish,” he says in an email. “Fish such as tuna and salmon caught on lines or with seine nets near the surface, and aquaculture fish such as salmon, steelhead, catfish and tilapia grown in ponds, lochs, fjords and ocean cages have moderate greenhouse gas emissions per serving that are about 6 times those of the typical plant-based foods.”

To reach their conclusions on diet and health, the researchers looked at 19 previous meta-analyses that followed millions of people over time, mostly in Western nations. They used that data to calculate how eating an extra serving of a given food each day affected the relative risk of colorectal cancer, coronary heart disease, stroke and Type 2 diabetes, as well as overall mortality. Data on the environmental impact of food was derived from life cycle analyses, which looked at the land, equipment and other resources required to grow or raise a food.

“This is a useful study because it aims to compare, using similar and consistent methods, how different foods influence the joint health of humans and the planet,” says Dariush Mozaffarian, the dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition at Tufts University.

And despite recent controversy over the science on red meat and health, these findings are in line with the overall body of evidence that suggests that cutting back on processed red meat is a healthy choice, he says.

Jessica Fanzo, a professor of global food and agriculture policy at Johns Hopkins University, who was not involved in the current research, says that the big takeaway message for consumers is this. “If you want to care about the environment and your own health, eating less red and processed meat is key.” And, she says, if you substitute something like fish in place of red meat, “think a little bit more about how those are sourced and how they’re raised.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Luke Perry shines in ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ deleted scene

Westlake Legal Group luke-perry Luke Perry shines in ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ deleted scene Julius Young fox-news/person/luke-perry fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox news fnc/entertainment fnc f76a3e20-c23b-5e2a-9ddc-e28b44dbefd3 article

Luke Perry delivered a stout performance as Wayne Maunder in “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” and fans are being rewarded with more from the late actor.

The “Riverdale” star shined in his role in the ninth Quentin Tarantino flick and those looking to catch more of Perry in the film will have their chance in the coming weeks as the Charles Manson-era movie is set to release on DVD/Blu-ray and streaming in December.

While the physical and digital releases of the critically acclaimed film will boast 20 minutes of additional footage, it will also include five behind-the-scenes featurettes centered on different elements from the film. These include; “Quentin Tarantino’s Love Letter to Hollywood,” “Bob Richardson — For the Love of Film,” “Shop Talk – The Cars of 1969,” “Restoring Hollywood — The Production Design of ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,’” and “The Fashion of 1969.”

LUKE PERRY’S FORTUNE TO BE SPLIT BETWEEN HIS CHILDREN

However, Perry is seen in a separate spot where he and Timothy Olyphant’s character, James Stacy, interact with young actress Julia Butters, 10, as Trudi Fraser while they meander through a Western set.

For Perry, the deleted scene sees the Emmy-winning performer cladded in a gray three-piece suit with blue accents and a top hat, his cane in tow as he walks with a limp alongside Olyphant’s character toting a saddle as the two men bicker about their relationship.

LUKE PERRY’S SON REVEALS THE ONE WRESTLER WHO LEFT HIS DAD STARSTRUCK

In May, film star Brad Pitt praised Perry and marveled at the opportunity to work with the actor, whom he considered a “legend.” Perry died in March after suffering a stroke at the age of 52.

“I remember going to the studios [years ago] and [‘Beverly Hills, 90210’] was going on and he was that icon of coolness for us, as teenagers. It was this strange burst of excitement that I had, to be able to act with him,” Pitt told Esquire in their Spring issue. “Man, he was so incredibly humble and amazing and absolutely committed. He couldn’t have been a more friendly, wonderful guy to spend time with. I got to sit down and have some wonderful conversations with him. It was really special.”

Leonardo DiCaprio also shared touching words for Perry, calling his experience with the actor a “butterfly moment.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“I remember my friend Vinny, who is in the film as well, we walked in and we both had this butterfly moment of like, ‘Oh my God, that’s Luke Perry over there!'”

 “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” will digitally available on Nov. 26 and arrives in 4K Ultra, DVD and Blu-ray on Dec. 10.

Westlake Legal Group luke-perry Luke Perry shines in ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ deleted scene Julius Young fox-news/person/luke-perry fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox news fnc/entertainment fnc f76a3e20-c23b-5e2a-9ddc-e28b44dbefd3 article   Westlake Legal Group luke-perry Luke Perry shines in ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ deleted scene Julius Young fox-news/person/luke-perry fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox news fnc/entertainment fnc f76a3e20-c23b-5e2a-9ddc-e28b44dbefd3 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

New Project Reflects on Overcoming Extremism, Charlottesville’s 2017 Unite the Right Rally

Westlake Legal Group 18892651_G New Project Reflects on Overcoming Extremism, Charlottesville's 2017 Unite the Right Rally

On Monday, the report unveiled in Washington D.C. gathered ideas from government leaders, tech executives, nonprofits and the faith community to provide ways to help prevent violent hate groups from escalating. The 60-page report and podcast series is meant to be a guide for leaders around the country.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com