web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 53)

California Approves Statewide Rent Control to Ease Housing Crisis

California lawmakers approved a statewide rent cap on Wednesday covering millions of tenants, the biggest step yet in a surge of initiatives to address an affordable-housing crunch nationwide.

The bill limits annual rent increases to 5 percent after inflation and offers new barriers to eviction, providing a bit of housing security in a state with the nation’s highest housing prices and a swelling homeless population.

Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat who has made tenant protection a priority in his first year in office, led negotiations to strengthen the legislation. He has said he would sign the bill, approved as part of a flurry of activity in the final week of the legislative session.

The measure, affecting an estimated eight million residents of rental homes and apartments, was heavily pushed by tenants’ groups. In an indication of how dire housing problems have become, it also garnered the support of the California Business Roundtable, representing leading employers, and was unopposed by the state’s biggest landlords’ group.

That dynamic reflected a momentous political swing. For a quarter-century, California law has sharply curbed the ability of localities to impose rent control. Now, the state itself has taken that step.

“The housing crisis is reaching every corner of America, where you’re seeing high home prices, high rents, evictions and homelessness that we’re all struggling to grapple with,” said Assemblyman David Chiu, a San Francisco Democrat who was the bill’s author. “Protecting tenants is a critical and obvious component of any strategy to address this.”

A greater share of households nationwide are renting than at any point in a half-century. But only four states — California, Maryland, New Jersey and New York — have localities with some type of rent control, along with the District of Columbia. A coalition of tenants’ organizations, propelled by rising housing costs and fears of displacement, is trying to change that.

In February, Oregon lawmakers became the first to pass statewide rent control, limiting increases to 7 percent annually plus inflation. New York, with Democrats newly in control of the State Legislature, strengthened rent regulations governing almost one million apartments in New York City.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160578480_4e66f72d-f9f7-4bf5-9f06-a8705d4ce907-articleLarge California Approves Statewide Rent Control to Ease Housing Crisis State Legislatures Renting and Leasing (Real Estate) Rent Control and Stabilization Regulation and Deregulation of Industry Real Estate and Housing (Residential) Politics and Government Newsom, Gavin Law and Legislation Landlords Homeless Persons gentrification California Affordable Housing

Assemblyman David Chiu, a San Francisco Democrat, was the bill’s author. “The housing crisis is reaching every corner of America,” he said.CreditRich Pedroncelli/Associated Press

Measures were recently introduced in Massachusetts and Florida to allow rent regulation in cities with a housing crunch — like Boston, Miami and Orlando.

Nationally, about a quarter of tenants pay more than half their income in rent, according to the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University. And California’s challenges are particularly acute. After an adjustment for housing costs, it has the highest state poverty rate, 18.2 percent, about five percentage points above the national average, according to a Census Bureau report published Tuesday.

Homelessness has come to dominate the state’s political conversation and prompted voters to approve several multibillion-dollar programs to build shelters and subsidized housing with services for people coming off the streets.

Despite those efforts, San Francisco’s homeless population has grown by 17 percent since 2017, while the count in Los Angeles has increased by 16 percent since 2018. Over all, the state accounts for about half of the country’s unsheltered homeless population of roughly 200,000.

That bleak picture — combined with three-hour commutes, cries for teacher housing and the sight of police officers sleeping in cars — is prompting legislators and organizers to propose ever more far-reaching steps.

State Senator Scott Wiener, a San Francisco Democrat, offered a bill that would essentially override local zoning to allow multiple-unit housing around transit stops and in suburbs where single-family homes are considered sacrosanct. The bill was shelved in its final committee hearing this year, but Mr. Wiener has vowed to keep pushing the idea.

Economists from both the left and the right have a well-established aversion to rent control, arguing that such policies ignore the message of rising prices, which is to build more housing. Studies in San Francisco and elsewhere show that price caps often prompt landlords to abandon the rental business by converting their units to owner-occupied homes. And since rent controls typically have no income threshold, they have been faulted for benefiting high-income tenants.

“Rent control is definitely having a moment across the country,” said Jim Lapides, a vice president at the National Multifamily Housing Council, which opposes such restrictions. “But we’re seeing folks turn to really shortsighted policy that will end up making the very problem worse.”

But many of the same studies show that rent-control policies have been effective at shielding tenants from evictions and sudden rent increases, particularly the lower-income and older tenants who are at a high risk of becoming homeless. Also, many of the newer policies — which supporters prefer to call rent caps — are considerably less stringent than those in effect in places like New York and San Francisco for decades.

“Caps on rent increases, like the one proposed in California or the one recently passed in Oregon, are part of a new generation of rent-regulation policies that are trying to thread the needle by offering some form of protection against egregious rent hikes for vulnerable renters without stymieing much-needed new housing construction,” said Elizabeth Kneebone, research director at the Terner Center for Housing Innovation at the University of California.

Supporters of rent control marched in Sacramento last year. After adjusting for housing costs, California has the highest state poverty rate.CreditRich Pedroncelli/Associated Press

Mr. Chiu’s bill is technically an anti-gouging provision, with a 10-year limit, modeled on the typically short-term price caps instituted after disasters like floods and fires. It exempts dwellings less than 15 years old, to avoid discouraging construction, as well as most single-family homes. But it covers tenants of corporations like Invitation Homes, which built nationwide rental portfolios encompassing tens of thousands of properties that had been lost to foreclosure after the housing bust a decade ago.

According to the online real-estate marketplace Zillow, only about 7 percent of the California properties listed last year saw rent increases larger than allowed under the bill. But there could be a big effect in rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods like Boyle Heights in Los Angeles, where typical rents on apartments not covered by the city’s rent regulations have jumped more than 40 percent since 2016.

By limiting the steepest and most abrupt rent increases, the bill is also likely to reduce the incentive for hedge funds and other investors to buy buildings where they see a prospective payoff in replacing working-class occupants with tenants paying higher rents.

Sandra Zamora, a 27-year-old preschool teacher, lives in a one-bedroom apartment in Menlo Park, Calif., a short drive from Facebook’s expanding headquarters. A year ago, Ms. Zamora’s building got a new owner, and the rent jumped to $1,900 from $1,100, a rise of over 70 percent. Most of her neighbors left. Ms. Zamora stayed, adding a roommate to the 600-square-foot space and taking a weekend job as a barista.

“Having an $800 increase at once was really shocking,” she said. “It just keeps me thinking every month: ‘O.K., when is it going to happen? How much am I going to get increased the next month?’ It’s just a constant worry.”

Even as more states begin to experiment with rent control, it has long existed in places like New York City, which intervened to address a housing shortage post-World War II, and San Francisco, where it was adopted in 1979.

Today it is common in many towns across New Jersey and in several cities in California, including Berkeley and Oakland, although the form differs by jurisdiction. Regulated apartments in New York City are mostly subject to rent caps even after a change in tenants, for example, while rent control in the Bay Area has no such provision.

In New York City, where almost half of the rental stock is regulated, a board determines the maximum rent increases each year; this year it approved a 1.5 percent cap on one-year leases, considerably lower than the limits passed in Oregon and California.

Cea Weaver, campaign coordinator of Housing Justice for All, a coalition of New York tenants that pushed for new rent laws, welcomed the outcome in California.

“Any victory helps to build a groundswell,” she said. “There is a younger generation of people who see themselves as permanent renters, and they’re demanding that our public policy catches up to that economic reality.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

California Approves Statewide Rent Control to Ease Housing Crisis

California lawmakers approved a statewide rent cap on Wednesday covering millions of tenants, the biggest step yet in a surge of initiatives to address an affordable-housing crunch nationwide.

The bill limits annual rent increases to 5 percent after inflation and offers new barriers to eviction, providing a bit of housing security in a state with the nation’s highest housing prices and a swelling homeless population.

Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat who has made tenant protection a priority in his first year in office, led negotiations to strengthen the legislation. He has said he would sign the bill, approved as part of a flurry of activity in the final week of the legislative session.

The measure, affecting an estimated eight million residents of rental homes and apartments, was heavily pushed by tenants’ groups. In an indication of how dire housing problems have become, it also garnered the support of the California Business Roundtable, representing leading employers, and was unopposed by the state’s biggest landlords’ group.

That dynamic reflected a momentous political swing. For a quarter-century, California law has sharply curbed the ability of localities to impose rent control. Now, the state itself has taken that step.

“The housing crisis is reaching every corner of America, where you’re seeing high home prices, high rents, evictions and homelessness that we’re all struggling to grapple with,” said Assemblyman David Chiu, a San Francisco Democrat who was the bill’s author. “Protecting tenants is a critical and obvious component of any strategy to address this.”

A greater share of households nationwide are renting than at any point in a half-century. But only four states — California, Maryland, New Jersey and New York — have localities with some type of rent control, along with the District of Columbia. A coalition of tenants’ organizations, propelled by rising housing costs and fears of displacement, is trying to change that.

In February, Oregon lawmakers became the first to pass statewide rent control, limiting increases to 7 percent annually plus inflation. New York, with Democrats newly in control of the State Legislature, strengthened rent regulations governing almost one million apartments in New York City.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160578480_4e66f72d-f9f7-4bf5-9f06-a8705d4ce907-articleLarge California Approves Statewide Rent Control to Ease Housing Crisis State Legislatures Renting and Leasing (Real Estate) Rent Control and Stabilization Regulation and Deregulation of Industry Real Estate and Housing (Residential) Politics and Government Newsom, Gavin Law and Legislation Landlords Homeless Persons gentrification California Affordable Housing

Assemblyman David Chiu, a San Francisco Democrat, was the bill’s author. “The housing crisis is reaching every corner of America,” he said.CreditRich Pedroncelli/Associated Press

Measures were recently introduced in Massachusetts and Florida to allow rent regulation in cities with a housing crunch — like Boston, Miami and Orlando.

Nationally, about a quarter of tenants pay more than half their income in rent, according to the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University. And California’s challenges are particularly acute. After an adjustment for housing costs, it has the highest state poverty rate, 18.2 percent, about five percentage points above the national average, according to a Census Bureau report published Tuesday.

Homelessness has come to dominate the state’s political conversation and prompted voters to approve several multibillion-dollar programs to build shelters and subsidized housing with services for people coming off the streets.

Despite those efforts, San Francisco’s homeless population has grown by 17 percent since 2017, while the count in Los Angeles has increased by 16 percent since 2018. Over all, the state accounts for about half of the country’s unsheltered homeless population of roughly 200,000.

That bleak picture — combined with three-hour commutes, cries for teacher housing and the sight of police officers sleeping in cars — is prompting legislators and organizers to propose ever more far-reaching steps.

State Senator Scott Wiener, a San Francisco Democrat, offered a bill that would essentially override local zoning to allow multiple-unit housing around transit stops and in suburbs where single-family homes are considered sacrosanct. The bill was shelved in its final committee hearing this year, but Mr. Wiener has vowed to keep pushing the idea.

Economists from both the left and the right have a well-established aversion to rent control, arguing that such policies ignore the message of rising prices, which is to build more housing. Studies in San Francisco and elsewhere show that price caps often prompt landlords to abandon the rental business by converting their units to owner-occupied homes. And since rent controls typically have no income threshold, they have been faulted for benefiting high-income tenants.

“Rent control is definitely having a moment across the country,” said Jim Lapides, a vice president at the National Multifamily Housing Council, which opposes such restrictions. “But we’re seeing folks turn to really shortsighted policy that will end up making the very problem worse.”

But many of the same studies show that rent-control policies have been effective at shielding tenants from evictions and sudden rent increases, particularly the lower-income and older tenants who are at a high risk of becoming homeless. Also, many of the newer policies — which supporters prefer to call rent caps — are considerably less stringent than those in effect in places like New York and San Francisco for decades.

“Caps on rent increases, like the one proposed in California or the one recently passed in Oregon, are part of a new generation of rent-regulation policies that are trying to thread the needle by offering some form of protection against egregious rent hikes for vulnerable renters without stymieing much-needed new housing construction,” said Elizabeth Kneebone, research director at the Terner Center for Housing Innovation at the University of California.

Supporters of rent control marched in Sacramento last year. After adjusting for housing costs, California has the highest state poverty rate.CreditRich Pedroncelli/Associated Press

Mr. Chiu’s bill is technically an anti-gouging provision, with a 10-year limit, modeled on the typically short-term price caps instituted after disasters like floods and fires. It exempts dwellings less than 15 years old, to avoid discouraging construction, as well as most single-family homes. But it covers tenants of corporations like Invitation Homes, which built nationwide rental portfolios encompassing tens of thousands of properties that had been lost to foreclosure after the housing bust a decade ago.

According to the online real-estate marketplace Zillow, only about 7 percent of the California properties listed last year saw rent increases larger than allowed under the bill. But there could be a big effect in rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods like Boyle Heights in Los Angeles, where typical rents on apartments not covered by the city’s rent regulations have jumped more than 40 percent since 2016.

By limiting the steepest and most abrupt rent increases, the bill is also likely to reduce the incentive for hedge funds and other investors to buy buildings where they see a prospective payoff in replacing working-class occupants with tenants paying higher rents.

Sandra Zamora, a 27-year-old preschool teacher, lives in a one-bedroom apartment in Menlo Park, Calif., a short drive from Facebook’s expanding headquarters. A year ago, Ms. Zamora’s building got a new owner, and the rent jumped to $1,900 from $1,100, a rise of over 70 percent. Most of her neighbors left. Ms. Zamora stayed, adding a roommate to the 600-square-foot space and taking a weekend job as a barista.

“Having an $800 increase at once was really shocking,” she said. “It just keeps me thinking every month: ‘O.K., when is it going to happen? How much am I going to get increased the next month?’ It’s just a constant worry.”

Even as more states begin to experiment with rent control, it has long existed in places like New York City, which intervened to address a housing shortage post-World War II, and San Francisco, where it was adopted in 1979.

Today it is common in many towns across New Jersey and in several cities in California, including Berkeley and Oakland, although the form differs by jurisdiction. Regulated apartments in New York City are mostly subject to rent caps even after a change in tenants, for example, while rent control in the Bay Area has no such provision.

In New York City, where almost half of the rental stock is regulated, a board determines the maximum rent increases each year; this year it approved a 1.5 percent cap on one-year leases, considerably lower than the limits passed in Oregon and California.

Cea Weaver, campaign coordinator of Housing Justice for All, a coalition of New York tenants that pushed for new rent laws, welcomed the outcome in California.

“Any victory helps to build a groundswell,” she said. “There is a younger generation of people who see themselves as permanent renters, and they’re demanding that our public policy catches up to that economic reality.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Kevin Hart released from hospital after car crash: reports

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-baad59daec704fe79e8cd80f9832ff57 Kevin Hart released from hospital after car crash: reports Mariah Haas fox-news/entertainment/genres/comedy fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 61e97c4b-59a6-5da6-99ee-ca48b0f883b7

Kevin Hart has been discharged from a Los Angeles hospital following a Sept. 1 car crash in which he sustained major back injuries, according to multiple reports.

People magazine, citing a source, reported that Hart left the hospital on Wednesday and is now at a rehabilitation facility.

Hart will spend roughly one week at the facility — where he is set to undergo physical therapy — with the ultimate goal of getting him back home so he can start outpatient care, sources told TMZ.

KEVIN HART SUFFERS ‘MAJOR BACK INJURIES’ IN MALIBU HILLS CAR CRASH: REPORT

Police sources told TMZ that a Plymouth Barracuda belonging to Hart veered off the road on the Mulholland Highway in the Malibu Hills. Hart and the driver of the vehicle, Jared Black, suffered “major back injuries,” per a California Highway Patrol collision report.

According to TMZ, Hart fractured his spine in three places and he had to have a spinal fusion procedure. A female passenger, Rebecca Broxterman, was unhurt, the site reported.

911 AUDIO FROM KEVIN HART’S CAR CRASH RELEASED

The vehicle ended up in a ditch about 10 feet off the side of the winding road after it smashed through a wooden fence. The roof of the Barracuda was almost completely crushed in the crash.

Per TMZ, the driver was not drinking.

KEVIN HART BUYS HIMSELF A CUSTOM PLYMOUTH BARRACUDA FOR HIS BIRTHDAY

Hart’s wife, Eniko, gave an update on the star’s condition one day after the crash, telling TMZ, “He’s great. … Yup, he’s going to be just fine.”

Hart, an in-demand comic and film star, bought the car as a 40th birthday present for himself in July.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP 

A rep for Hart did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

Fox News’ Sasha Savitsky and Julius Young contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-baad59daec704fe79e8cd80f9832ff57 Kevin Hart released from hospital after car crash: reports Mariah Haas fox-news/entertainment/genres/comedy fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 61e97c4b-59a6-5da6-99ee-ca48b0f883b7   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-baad59daec704fe79e8cd80f9832ff57 Kevin Hart released from hospital after car crash: reports Mariah Haas fox-news/entertainment/genres/comedy fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 61e97c4b-59a6-5da6-99ee-ca48b0f883b7

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Uber Says It Won’t Reclassify Drivers As Employees Despite New Law

After California lawmakers passed legislation on Wednesday seeking to reclassify many “gig economy” workers from independent contractors to employees ― with additional benefits and protections ― Uber said it still does not plan to consider its drivers full employees.

The ride-hailing company told reporters Wednesday that its drivers will not be reclassified as employees, even if Assembly Bill 5 is signed into law as widely expected. Tony West, Uber’s chief legal representative, said the drivers will still be considered independent contractors because “drivers’ work is outside the usual course of Uber’s business.”

West described the company’s business as “serving as a technology platform for several different types of digital marketplaces.” 

Under the legislation ― which the state Assembly approved on Wednesday and which Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) is expected to sign ― many gig-economy workers stand to gain new labor protections and benefits, like a minimum wage, unemployment and disability insurance, and the right to form a union.

The legislation clarifies the conditions under which a worker should be considered an employee. It says workers should be treated as independent contractors only if (a) they are “free from the control and direction” of the company that hired them, (b) their work falls outside the usual business of the company and (c) they are engaged in work in an independent business of the same type as the company’s.

Uber is claiming that its drivers “pass” that test and can thus be considered independent contractors. 

Westlake Legal Group 5d684357250000bf07894578 Uber Says It Won’t Reclassify Drivers As Employees Despite New Law

Justin Sullivan via Getty Images Drivers hold signs during a protest outside Uber headquarters in support of California Assembly Bill 5, Aug. 27, 2019, in San Francisco.

Uber, Lyft and other big tech companies lobbied extensively against the legislation. Their companies’ bottom lines would be dramatically affected if thousands of drivers were reclassified as employees for whom they’d then have to pay additional benefits.

Meanwhile, hundreds of Uber and Lyft drivers with the organizing group Gig Workers Rising protested throughout California last month, demanding AB5’s passage and a union for drivers.

One driver and organizer, Mostafa Maklad, told HuffPost in May that he drove between 40 and 50 hours a week with Uber and Lyft ― and that after taxes he was making less than minimum wage.

Uber and Lyft have repeatedly suggested that drivers wouldn’t enjoy as much flexibility if they were made full employees. The companies have said they could meet some of the workers’ demands by establishing a drivers association and working with lawmakers to commit to things like minimum pay.

Gig Workers Rising called the tech leaders’ proposals “a watered-down version” of the demands drivers have been making for months.

With AB5 now expected to become law, Uber said Wednesday that it is pursuing “several legal and political options,” including a statewide ballot initiative in 2020.

Newsom’s office did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Uber’s remarks.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Fans upset with Nick Jonas for partaking in cigar magazine cover story

Westlake Legal Group cb2f6d44-jonas Fans upset with Nick Jonas for partaking in cigar magazine cover story Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 2048b7f8-f820-5e3d-be84-a56d787d99fb

Nick Jonas is facing a backlash from his fans for a recent cover story.

The 26-year-old musician was called “gross” and “irresponsible” for posing on the cover of Cigar Aficionado magazine with a stogy in his hand.

Jonas shared his cover-man news on social media, writing, “First person under 30 to hold a cigar on the cover of one of my favorite magazines. So pumped about this one! Thank you @CigarAficMag! Issue on newsstands September 24th.”

NICK JONAS SAYS HE WAS ‘DONE’ WITH MULTIPLE CEREMONIES TO PRIYANKA CHOPRA AFTER LOOKING AT PRICEY BILL

But fans of the Disney star-turned-rocker weren’t so happy with his branding choice.

“Gross and irresponsible as a singer and a human raised knowing the health risks but okay,” wrote one user.

“Since when is it an achievement to smoke under 30? Sad,” said another.

“What about your lungs?” inquired someone else.

“I love you but smoking kills and it’d be smarter from you to not promote such a thing and make it look cool, cus [sic] it’s not,” tweeted a fan.

NICK JONAS SAYS JONAS BROTHERS ‘SPENT A YEAR BASICALLY DOING THERAPY’ BEFORE GETTING BACK TOGETHER

Meanwhile, “View” co-hosts came to Jonas’ defense while discussing his cover on their show on Wednesday.

“Well, I put a picture of myself smoking a cigar a week ago, and I didn’t know any of this was going on, and people really have a problem with people posting cigars and my answer is John Boehner’s answer,” quipped Meghan McCain.

“I’m a grown woman, he’s a grown a** man. Leave them alone. And I’m sorry, Am I supposed to give up all vices all the time, anymore?” she added. “No one’s ever allowed to do any, no drinking, no smoking cigars, no fun. It’s Trump’s America. Leave him alone. He’s married to Priyanka Chopra living his best life.”

Sunny Hostin argued that people “look up to them as role models, and then when they do something that they don’t feel is role model-appropriate, then they come and they crash on them, and then they want to cancel them due to this cancel culture we all talk about.”

“They’re disgusting,” mused Joy Behar about cigars. “They pollute the air around you.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“As a former smoker, I think people need to just relax,” said Whoopi Goldberg. “Because, you know, listen. I know that, you know, smoke is not good for me. People find out for themselves what works for them, and you have got to let folks walk. You have got to let them do it. You can’t live life for them.”

Other celebrities who have graced the cover of the magazine include Robert De Niro, Jack Nicholson, Arnold Schwarzenegger and NBA star Michael Jordan.

A rep for Jonas did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

Westlake Legal Group cb2f6d44-jonas Fans upset with Nick Jonas for partaking in cigar magazine cover story Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 2048b7f8-f820-5e3d-be84-a56d787d99fb   Westlake Legal Group cb2f6d44-jonas Fans upset with Nick Jonas for partaking in cigar magazine cover story Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 2048b7f8-f820-5e3d-be84-a56d787d99fb

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

WaPo, NYT Move to Unseal Names on Deutsche Bank’s Redacted Letter

Westlake Legal Group tmvRKj4YJOGfvYcBDq0OWBV4x1k1RWuOqQizLBiQbQM WaPo, NYT Move to Unseal Names on Deutsche Bank’s Redacted Letter r/politics

As a reminder, this subreddit is for civil discussion.

In general, be courteous to others. Debate/discuss/argue the merits of ideas, don’t attack people. Personal insults, shill or troll accusations, hate speech, any advocating or wishing death/physical harm, and other rule violations can result in a permanent ban.

If you see comments in violation of our rules, please report them.


I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Delays Planned Tariff Increase in ‘Gesture of Goodwill’ to China

WASHINGTON — President Trump said Wednesday night that the United States would delay its next planned tariff increase on China by two weeks, as “a gesture of goodwill” that may help to mend the seriously damaged ties between the world’s two biggest economies.

The United States would delay a planned increase in its 25 percent tariff on $250 billion of Chinese goods from Oct. 1 to Oct. 15, a move that was made “at the request of the Vice Premier of China, Liu He, and due to the fact that the People’s Republic of China will be celebrating their 70th Anniversary on October 1st,” the president said in a tweet.

The move comes as trade talks between the United States and China have stagnated, leading to stock market volatility and consternation among businesses that have paid higher prices to import and export goods. Despite months of talks, negotiators still appear far from a comprehensive trade deal that would resolve the Trump administration’s concerns about Chinese economic practices, including its infringement on American intellectual property.

The president’s announcement will delay talks by only two weeks. But it could allow negotiators to meet ahead of the next round of tariffs, raising the potential for that increase to be averted.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 11DC-TRADE--1-articleLarge Trump Delays Planned Tariff Increase in ‘Gesture of Goodwill’ to China United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Postal Service (US) International Trade and World Market fentanyl Executive Orders and Memorandums Economic Conditions and Trends Counterfeit Merchandise China

The executive order drafted by the Trump administration would increase inspections of packages mailed through the United States Postal Service but would not apply to private companies like FedEx or UPS.CreditChristopher Lee/Bloomberg

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

North Carolina Election Shows How Political Lines Are Drawn. And They Are Fixed.

ROCKINGHAM, N.C. — The red is getting redder and the blue is getting bluer.

The special congressional election in North Carolina may have involved just about 190,000 voters, but it showed that the class, racial and regional divides among voters have only hardened since that demographic chasm helped drive President Trump’s election in 2016 and the Democratic rebound in the House in 2018.

Dan Bishop, a Republican state lawmaker, eked out a two-point victory in a historically conservative seat because he improved on his party’s performance with working-class whites in more lightly populated parts of the district. And even though Democrats nominated a Marine veteran, Dan McCready, who highlighted his baptism while serving in Iraq, his gains in Charlotte, the state’s biggest city, were not enough to offset the drop-off he suffered across several hundred miles of sprawling farms and small towns.

The bracing takeaway for Republicans is that their tightening embrace of Mr. Trump and his often demagogic politics is further alienating the upper middle-class voters — many in cities and their suburbs— who once were central to their base. At the same time, the Democrats are continuing to struggle with the working-class whites who once represented a pillar of their own coalition.

The results here in a district stretching from Charlotte to Fayetteville presage a brutal, national campaign that seems destined to become the political equivalent of trench warfare, with the two parties rallying their supporters but clashing over a vanishingly small slice of contested electoral terrain.

Such a contest could prove difficult for Mr. Trump, who helped deliver Mr. Bishop a victory by mobilizing their shared base of working-class whites at an election-eve rally, because his core support could well be insufficient to win him a second term without improving his standing with the suburbanites and women who reluctantly backed him in 2016.

Even as the president and his top aides crowed over their role in securing Mr. Bishop a two-point win in a seat Mr. Trump carried by 12 points, their next-day glow was jarred by a new Washington Post-ABC poll that delivered grim tidings. Mr. Trump would lose to a handful of the Democratic candidates, the survey indicated, and a trial heat between the president and Joseph R. Biden Jr. showed Mr. Biden thrashing Mr. Trump 55-40 among registered voters.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160520535_e23f50ea-e8f6-4c7a-8384-72e7dddf8b33-articleLarge North Carolina Election Shows How Political Lines Are Drawn. And They Are Fixed. Trump, Donald J Robeson County (NC) Republican Party Presidential Election of 2020 Parscale, Brad (1976- ) North Carolina Midterm Elections (2018) McCready, Dan Lumberton (NC) House of Representatives Fayetteville (NC) Elections, House of Representatives Democratic Party Bishop, Dan

Dan Bishop, right, won the election by two points in a district President Trump carried by 12 points in 2016.CreditJim Watson/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

But Republicans note that the election will not be held this week and they believe Mr. Trump can pull out another Electoral College victory if the Democrats veer out of the political mainstream next year and send just enough of those political moderates scrambling back to the G.O.P.

“Their run to the left is the great opportunity for us to get back the majority and for the president to get re-elected,” said Representative Patrick McHenry of North Carolina, pointing to how many more House seats are now held by Democrats in districts won by Mr. Trump than by Republicans in seats Hillary Clinton carried.

More striking than Mr. McHenry’s rosy assessment is what he and other political veterans from both parties are now willing to acknowledge: that new lines of demarcation are making Democrats out of college-educated voters tooling around Charlotte in BMWs and Republicans out of blue-collar workers further out on Tobacco Road. And those lines are now fixed.

“We are living in, to take an old John Edwards term, Two Americas,” Mr. McHenry said, alluding to the former North Carolina senator. He added that “the view of the president is cemented in voters’ minds” and conceded that Mr. Trump can only improve his standing in the suburbs “along the margins.”

The gains Dan McCready, the Democratic candidate, made in Charlotte were not enough to offset the drop-off he suffered across sprawling farms and small towns of rural North Carolina.CreditLogan R. Cyrus for The New York Times

Former Representative Brad Miller, a longtime North Carolina Democrat with ancestral roots in this district, was just as blunt.

“It does grieve me greatly that the areas where my family was from have gone so Republican,” said Mr. Miller, noting that many of the voters who cast Republican ballots Tuesday “probably had grandparents with pictures of F.D.R. up in their living room.”

But Mr. Miller said the implications from Tuesday’s special election and last year’s midterms were undeniable if demoralizing in some ways.

“Democrats have a clear advantage in 2020, but there is no way to break into a lot of the folks who are for Trump. They’re just not going to vote for a Democrat, doesn’t matter who it is,” he said. “So Democrats can still win and probably will win but we’re going to be a very divided nation.”

Those divisions were easy to detect Wednesday in Rockingham, a county seat community well east of Charlotte best known for its famed Nascar track. Mr. McCready won the surrounding county by 2.5 percent last year but on Tuesday Mr. Bishop carried it by 5 percent.

Standing behind the counter at Iconic Wellness CBD, and surrounded by tasteful posters extolling the benefits of legal cannabis products, Pam Mizzell said she voted for Mr. Bishop in part because he had the strong backing of Mr. Trump.

Ms. Mizzell, who is white, said she wanted more Republicans in Washington supporting the president’s agenda. She accused former President Barack Obama of pitting “one race against the other race” (she did not cite any examples) and said she hoped that the Trump administration would help bring about an era of racial healing.

Diane McDonald, a school cafeteria worker who is African-American, offered a markedly different viewpoint, saying she was worried that Mr. Trump is promoting racism. “And they’re letting him get away with it,” Ms. McDonald said of Washington Republicans. “I thought McCready would make a difference.”

In Charlotte, it was not difficult to find white, Republican-leaning voters who also backed Mr. McCready.

Chris Daleus, a salesman, said he backed the Democrat Tuesday even though he supported Mr. Trump three years ago. “He seems to have embarrassed us in a lot of ways,” Mr. Daleus said of the president.

National Democrats took heart in such sentiments, believing their narrow defeat in a district they have not held since the 1960s foreshadows how a Trumpified Republican Party will run into the same suburban wall in 2020 as they did last year.

“There are 34 seats held by Republicans that are better pick-up opportunities for Democrats than this seat,” said Lucinda Guinn, a Democratic strategist. “Democrats can grow their majority.”

The more pressing matter for Democrats, though, may be whether they can improve their performance with working-class whites to reclaim the Senate and presidency in 2020, a question that will turn in part on whether they can defeat the North Carolina Republican Senator Thom Tillis and reclaim this state from Mr. Trump, who won here by 3.6 points in 2016.

“Back in the 80s and 90s, North Carolina Democrats who bucked party affiliation were called Jessecrats,” said Doug Heye, a North Carolina-reared Republican consultant, referring to the late Senator Jesse Helms. “Now we may have to called them Trumpocrats. And if Democrats want North Carolina to truly be in play, they have to figure out how to appeal to these voters.”

Mr. Bishop’s campaign correctly determined that these mostly rural Democrats would hold the key to their success, even though their candidate’s state senate district includes parts of Charlotte. Jim Blaine, one of Mr. Bishop’s top aides, said that 75 to 80 percent of their paid advertising was directed toward the eastern, and more sparsely-populated, part of the district.

“It was focused on the core, long-standing, working-class Democratic constituency that makes up a huge piece of the population in those counties,” said Mr. Blaine, adding: “We had to persuade them not that Dan Bishop is the Republican, but the guy who would look out for them.”

He said their job was made easier in part because of the national Democratic Party’s drift left, but also because Mr. McCready did not make any major break from party orthodoxy that would have allowed him to present himself as a different sort of Democrat.

Mr. Trump’s high command, not surprisingly, had their own theory of why Republicans won here: Mr. Trump.

Brad Parscale, the president’s campaign manager, told reporters on a conference call Wednesday that the president’s election eve rally in Fayetteville was pivotal to Mr. Bishop’s success in energizing Election Day voters, after the Democrats mobilized many of their supporters to cast early ballots.

“There’s no question that he is the congressman-elect this morning because of the personal efforts of President Trump,” Mr. Parscale said of Mr. Bishop.

More Coverage of the Special Election
Dan Bishop, North Carolina Republican, Wins Special Election

Sept. 10, 2019

North Carolina Special Election Results: Ninth House District

Sept. 10, 2019

North Carolina Politics
Read more about the special election.
North Carolina Special Election Results: Ninth House District

Sept. 10, 2019

Westlake Legal Group results-north-carolina-house-district-9-special-general-election-1568140508937-threeByTwoSmallAt2X North Carolina Election Shows How Political Lines Are Drawn. And They Are Fixed. Trump, Donald J Robeson County (NC) Republican Party Presidential Election of 2020 Parscale, Brad (1976- ) North Carolina Midterm Elections (2018) McCready, Dan Lumberton (NC) House of Representatives Fayetteville (NC) Elections, House of Representatives Democratic Party Bishop, Dan
With the Faithful at Trump’s North Carolina Rally: ‘He Speaks Like Me’

Sept. 10, 2019

Westlake Legal Group merlin_160520076_b90154dd-663a-4e83-b77c-df30cc81e5b0-threeByTwoSmallAt2X North Carolina Election Shows How Political Lines Are Drawn. And They Are Fixed. Trump, Donald J Robeson County (NC) Republican Party Presidential Election of 2020 Parscale, Brad (1976- ) North Carolina Midterm Elections (2018) McCready, Dan Lumberton (NC) House of Representatives Fayetteville (NC) Elections, House of Representatives Democratic Party Bishop, Dan
North Carolina’s ‘Guru of Elections’: Can-Do Operator Who May Have Done Too Much

Dec. 8, 2018

Westlake Legal Group 09carolina1-threeByTwoSmallAt2X North Carolina Election Shows How Political Lines Are Drawn. And They Are Fixed. Trump, Donald J Robeson County (NC) Republican Party Presidential Election of 2020 Parscale, Brad (1976- ) North Carolina Midterm Elections (2018) McCready, Dan Lumberton (NC) House of Representatives Fayetteville (NC) Elections, House of Representatives Democratic Party Bishop, Dan

Richard Fausset reported from Charlotte, and Jonathan Martin and Maggie Haberman from Washington.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Delays Planned Tariff Increase in ‘Gesture of Goodwill’ to China

WASHINGTON — President Trump said Wednesday night that the United States would delay its next planned tariff increase on China by two weeks, as “a gesture of goodwill” that may help to mend the seriously damaged ties between the world’s two biggest economies.

The United States would delay a planned increase in its 25 percent tariff on $250 billion of Chinese goods from Oct. 1 to Oct. 15, a move that was made “at the request of the Vice Premier of China, Liu He, and due to the fact that the People’s Republic of China will be celebrating their 70th Anniversary on October 1st,” the president said in a tweet.

The move comes as trade talks between the United States and China have stagnated, leading to stock market volatility and consternation among businesses that have paid higher prices to import and export goods. Despite months of talks, negotiators still appear far from a comprehensive trade deal that would resolve the Trump administration’s concerns about Chinese economic practices, including its infringement on American intellectual property.

The president’s announcement will delay talks by only two weeks. But it could allow negotiators to meet ahead of the next round of tariffs, raising the potential for that increase to be averted.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 11DC-TRADE--1-articleLarge Trump Delays Planned Tariff Increase in ‘Gesture of Goodwill’ to China United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Postal Service (US) International Trade and World Market fentanyl Executive Orders and Memorandums Economic Conditions and Trends Counterfeit Merchandise China

The executive order drafted by the Trump administration would increase inspections of packages mailed through the United States Postal Service but would not apply to private companies like FedEx or UPS.CreditChristopher Lee/Bloomberg

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

DNA leads to identity of suspect in 1972 murder of California girl, 11

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085456898001_6085452362001-vs DNA leads to identity of suspect in 1972 murder of California girl, 11 Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime/cold-case fox news fnc/us fnc article 8b1866c5-bb20-5b21-ad11-8bdd6b9df279

DNA testing and genetic genealogy helped police in Southern California crack a 47-year-old cold case wide open and identify the man who raped and murdered an 11-year-old girl who was taken from her home on Thanksgiving Day.

The body of Terri Lynn Hollis was found naked except for a T-shirt on a cliff below the Pacific Coast Highway in Oxnard on Nov. 24, 1972. Terri was last seen leaving her home in Torrance to go on a bike ride.

Hollis had been strangled and sexually assaulted, Torrance Police Chief Eve Irvine said during a press conference Wednesday.

DECEASED RAPIST IDENTIFIED IN 1981 COLORADO COLD-CASE MURDER OF TEENAGE GIRL, POLIC SAY

Despite an extensive investigation by authorities at the time, including 2,000 interviews and DNA searches, attempts to find Hollis’ killer were unsuccessful.

More than four decades later, the Ventura County Sheriff’s Department submitted DNA found at the crime scene to Virginia-based Parabon NanoLabs Inc., which conducted a genetic genealogy analysis of public databases and helped authorities track down a relative of the match, Jake Edward Brown.

Brown had already died in 2003 in Arizona, but authorities exhumed his body and confirmed that his DNA was a match to the evidence, Irvine said.

“DNA Labs International was successful in extracting DNA evidence from the bones collected by the detectives and they were able to confirm that the bone remains of Jake Edward Brown were a one in 20 septillion match to the evidence collected from Terri Lynn Hollis,” Irvine said.

Brown, who was 36 years old at the time of Hollis’ murder, had previously been arrested in connection with two rape cases that occurred after her death.

Irvine said Brown “had prior arrests for narcotics, robbery and two rapes that occurred after the murder of Terri Lynn. The first rape occurred in 1973 and the second in 1974. Under these very unfortunate circumstances, we are still proud to say that this case has been solved, but detectives will continue to investigate to see if he was involved in any other unsolved crimes.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“This crime is what nightmares are made of, and no family should ever have to go through such a tragedy,” Irvine added.

Hollis’ brother, Randy, who was 16 years old at the time of Terri’s death, described the findings as “amazing” and said, “I only wish that my parents were still alive to see this.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085456898001_6085452362001-vs DNA leads to identity of suspect in 1972 murder of California girl, 11 Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime/cold-case fox news fnc/us fnc article 8b1866c5-bb20-5b21-ad11-8bdd6b9df279   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085456898001_6085452362001-vs DNA leads to identity of suspect in 1972 murder of California girl, 11 Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime/cold-case fox news fnc/us fnc article 8b1866c5-bb20-5b21-ad11-8bdd6b9df279

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com