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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 6)

‘Hustlers’ star Lili Reinhart says she loved playing a character who ‘didn’t have all their s— together’

Westlake Legal Group Lily-Reinhart3 ‘Hustlers’ star Lili Reinhart says she loved playing a character who ‘didn’t have all their s--- together’ Julius Young fox-news/entertainment/movies fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 64f1b5dd-d2a5-5488-9857-b3eaa4cb9cc5

Lili Reinhart was excited to ditch Riverdale to become a stripper.

The actress showcased her dancing chops as Annabelle in the late-summer blockbuster “Hustlers” and said she had more fun than ever encompassing her role as an exotic dancer looking to find her way.

‘RIVERDALE’ STAR LILI REINHART WARNS FANS ABOUT RIDESHARE IMPOSTERS AFTER SCARY AIRPORT INCIDENT

“It was fun to play someone who doesn’t have their s— together,” Reinhart told Wonderful Magazine during a photo shoot for the publication on Friday. “I was like, ‘This is a great opportunity to be a part of a film with a bunch of women who are experienced that I can look up to and a big feature film that I can play this naive, clueless girl.’”

In preparing for the role, Reinhart, 22, said she had the opportunity to visit the famed Playboy Club. However, she found the place a “little too loud” for her liking.

The “Riverdale” star opened up about moving from Los Angeles to Vancouver in order to shoot the teen drama — she said that a part of her felt like she was taking a step back, considering the works she had put in to make it to Hollywood.

“I was just so in awe of the entertainment industry and how so much seems to be happening in that city,” Reinhart explained. “It was where the big movies were made, where the movie stars lived, where such history was, and film and television.”

JENNIFER LOPEZ IN TALKS FOR SUPER BOWL HALFTIME SHOW: REPORT

“It was a hard pill to swallow when I knew that I had to move to Vancouver to be on ‘Riverdale’ because I had worked so hard and so long to make it to LA,” added Reinhart.

Moviegoers showed their interest in the swanky film about New York City strip-club performers who swindle unsuspecting Wall Street stockbrokers during the 2008 recession. The film brought in more than $13 million on its opening night and was projected to make it rain to the tune of about $32 million in ticket sales by the end of its first weekend showing, according to Variety.

In addition to Reinhart, the star-studded film includes singer Jennifer Lopez, rappers Cardi B and Lizzo, as well as actors Constance Wu, Julis Stiles and Keke Palmer.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Fox News’ Dom Calicchio contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Lily-Reinhart3 ‘Hustlers’ star Lili Reinhart says she loved playing a character who ‘didn’t have all their s--- together’ Julius Young fox-news/entertainment/movies fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 64f1b5dd-d2a5-5488-9857-b3eaa4cb9cc5   Westlake Legal Group Lily-Reinhart3 ‘Hustlers’ star Lili Reinhart says she loved playing a character who ‘didn’t have all their s--- together’ Julius Young fox-news/entertainment/movies fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 64f1b5dd-d2a5-5488-9857-b3eaa4cb9cc5

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Texas Cities Try To Assess Scope Of Damage In Imelda’s Aftermath

Westlake Legal Group imelda1_wide-9ed0c5dd77cdeafc808c1838c696da7acd465f42-s1100-c15 Texas Cities Try To Assess Scope Of Damage In Imelda's Aftermath

A school bus makes its way through a flooded section of Hopper Road in Houston on Thursday. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has declared much of southeast Texas disaster areas after heavy rain and flooding from the remnants of Tropical Depression Imelda. Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Texas Cities Try To Assess Scope Of Damage In Imelda's Aftermath

A school bus makes its way through a flooded section of Hopper Road in Houston on Thursday. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has declared much of southeast Texas disaster areas after heavy rain and flooding from the remnants of Tropical Depression Imelda.

Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images

Large areas of southeast Texas remain flooded Friday as officials work to get a broader sense of the damage left by Tropical Depression Imelda — a catastrophic weather event that swamped hundreds of cars and homes and claimed the lives of at least two people.

The storm has dropped massive amounts of rain, drawing comparisons to the devastation wreaked by Hurricane Harvey two years ago.

The National Weather Service in Houston said in a tweet that the amount of rainfall in Houston and Galveston on Thursday was “one for the record books.” It said Galveston had gotten 17.77 inches of rain just in the past four days.

Some areas saw as much as 20 to 40 inches of rain — North Fork Taylors Bayou near Port Arthur, Texas, topped more than 43 inches of rain as of Friday morning.

While Imelda has dissipated, the National Weather Service says “remnants will still bring heavy rain and possible flash flooding” to portion as far away as the Texas-Arkansas-Louisiana border.

Authorities are grappling with just how much destruction the storm caused.

Westlake Legal Group ap_19262778490491-1-_wide-d08f49bff69b4ab491e0528e5c1a82c8dcefa4ab-s1100-c15 Texas Cities Try To Assess Scope Of Damage In Imelda's Aftermath

In this photo provided by the Chambers County Sheriff’s Office, floodwaters surround a home in Winnie, Texas, after Imelda raked the area. Brian Hawthorne/AP hide caption

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Brian Hawthorne/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Texas Cities Try To Assess Scope Of Damage In Imelda's Aftermath

In this photo provided by the Chambers County Sheriff’s Office, floodwaters surround a home in Winnie, Texas, after Imelda raked the area.

Brian Hawthorne/AP

“The damage assessments are going on,” Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo tells NPR’s Here & Now. “I know in the city itself [Houston], we’re going to have upwards of 200 structures [destroyed], which compared to Harvey is negligible. But as we spread out from the the city of Houston and go east … to Beaumont, that count is going to be much much higher.”

The U.S. Coast Guard says surging currents caused nine barges to break away from their moorings in the San Jacinto River. At least two barges crashed into a bridge over the river, shutting down a major east-west highway just east of Houston.

“The bridge is off limits until highway officials determine the bridge is safe for traffic,” Joseph Leahy of member station KUT reports. “Several other stretches of [Interstate-10] and other local highways are impassable this morning due to flooding. Flash flood warnings remain in effect across the region as high water from the storm moves downstream.”

At least two deaths have been attributed to the storm.

Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez says a man in a his 40s or 50s drowned Thursday when he attempted to drive his vehicle though floodwaters that some 8 feet deep near Houston’s George Bush Intercontinental Airport.

“According to witnesses for some unknown reason, he just punched it and tried to drive through it some more,” Gonzalez told reporters. “They did try to go into water to see if they could pull him out to no avail.”

A second man was electrocuted and drowned while trying to move his horse, according to a message from the family of the 19-year-old victim, Hunter Morrison, that was shared by the Jefferson County’s Sheriff’s Office.

“Right now my family and I are going through one of the most horrific times in our lives with losing Hunter,” the family message said.

The Houston Fire Department says its crews performed more than 900 water rescues on Thursday and were dispatched to nearly 1,800 emergency calls.

On Friday, the U.S. Coast Guard tweeted out a short video of people being helped off a helicopter, adding that crews in Houston and New Orleans have “completed multiple medevacs and rescues”

“USGC Air Station Houston and Air Station New Orleans have completed multiple medevacs and rescues in the Beaumont area due to flooding caused by Tropical Depression #Imelda,” it said.

Westlake Legal Group imelda2_wide-19dc069fc7d9d8e1bee8d2529be203eac6fdd0bd-s1100-c15 Texas Cities Try To Assess Scope Of Damage In Imelda's Aftermath

People in Houston navigate the floodwaters on Thursday. The city got more than 9 inches of rain on that day alone, according to the National Weather Service in Houston. Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Texas Cities Try To Assess Scope Of Damage In Imelda's Aftermath

People in Houston navigate the floodwaters on Thursday. The city got more than 9 inches of rain on that day alone, according to the National Weather Service in Houston.

Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Michelle Carter, who encouraged boyfriend to kill himself, denied early release from prison

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Michelle Carter, who encouraged boyfriend to kill himself, denied early release from prison

BOSTON — Michelle Carter, the Massachusetts woman serving 15 months in prison for encouraging her boyfriend through text messages to kill himself, was denied early release by the state’s parole board Friday. 

Two members of the Massachusetts Parole Board wrote the decision for the seven-member panel, saying “the (board) is troubled that Ms. Carter not only encouraged Mr. Conrad to take his own life, she actively prevented others from intervening in his suicide.”

Carter, 22, appeared before the board Thursday to ask for early release in the high-profile case that stems from the 2014 suicide death of Conrad Roy III, then 18 years old. She’s been in prison since February after being convicted of involuntary manslaughter in 2017. 

“Ms. Carter’s self-serving statements and behavior, leading up to and after his suicide, appear to be irrational and lacked sincerity,” the one-page decision reads. “Ms. Carter needs to further address her causative factors that led to the governing offense. Release does not meet the legal standard.”

Read this: ‘Conrad’s Law’ proposed in Massachusetts in response to Michelle Carter suicide texting case

Carter was 17 at the time of Roy’s death in Fairhaven, Massachusetts. She pressured him incessantly by text messages to kill himself leading up to his death, which was caused by inhaling fumes in a generator that he put inside a truck. Roy had attempted suicide multiple times and had struggled with depression and mental illness. 

Carter, of Plainville, Massachusetts, had a lengthy phone call with Roy when he was parked in a K-Mart parking lot, where the death occurred, and later texted a friend that she told him to “get back in” the vehicle after he had stepped out.

“Given subject’s behavior in facilitating victim’s death, release not compatible with best interest of society,” wrote one of the parole board members, whose name was unidentified. “Did not provide sufficient insight into reason for lack of empathy at time of crime and surrounding time period.”

Members of Roy’s family attended Thursday’s parole hearing, which was not open to the public. 

“At the time of sentencing, we recommended a much more severe sentence due to the egregious nature of the crime and the defendant’s refusal to acknowledge the gravity of the crime she committed,” Gregg Miliote, spokesman for the Bristol County District Attorney’s Office in Massachusetts, said in a statement on the board’s decision.   

“It’s unfortunate that in the five years since Conrad’s death, the Parole Board found she still does not have sufficient insight into her crime and lacks empathy.  As always, our concern is for the Roy family and the public’s safety.”

Carter has filed an appeal with the U.S. Supreme Court seeking to overturn her 2017 involuntary manslaughter conviction by a state court. It was upheld by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in February. 

Joseph Cataldo, Carter’s attorney, said the board’s decision was “obviously premised on an incorrect and dangerous prior legal ruling of the Supreme Judicial Court. To that end, we have filed an appeal with the U.S. Supreme Court.

“Additionally, it is never in society’s best interest to incarcerate anyone for the content of their speech where there wasn’t a specific statute criminalizing such speech at the time the speech was made.”

Suicide prevention experts: What you say (and don’t say) could save a person’s life

The troubling case reentered the spotlight this summer with HBO’s release of a two-part HBO documentary, “I Love You, Now Die: The Commonwealth v. Michelle Carter.”

With the backing of Roy’s mother, Lynn Roy, Massachusetts state lawmakers are considering legislation, dubbed “Conrad’s Law,” that would would criminalize suicide coercion in the commonwealth.

Massachusetts is one of 10 sates that lack laws that explicitly punish individuals who induce others to kill themselves. Rather than being subject to manslaughter, like Carter, the bill would impose a new criminal liability specifically for a person who intentionally “encourages or coerces” a suicide or suicide attempt.

Reach Joey Garrison on Twitter @joeygarrison.

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/09/20/michelle-carter-guilty-boyfriend-suicide-denied-early-release/2386100001/

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Three veterans died in three days at a VA hospital under the same suspicious circumstances. What happened?

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Three veterans died in three days at a VA hospital under the same suspicious circumstances. What happened?

George Nelson Shaw Sr. died at a VA hospital in West Virginia in 2018. His death was ruled a homicide by an Armed Forces medical examiner. It’s one of 10 under investigation by authorities. Jack Gruber, USA TODAY

William Alfred Holloway’s health was improving – at least, that’s what his family was told by staff at the Veterans Affairs hospital in Clarksburg, West Virginia.

“The nurse told us, his numbers are great,” his daughter, Karen Holloway, said.

But the next morning, the 96-year-old Army veteran was dead.

Holloway’s death, which has not been previously reported, was the first of three suspicious deaths in three days. All the patients had stayed in the same third-floor unit of the Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center, according to their families. All died after unexplained drops in their blood sugar levels.

Authorities are investigating about 10 suspicious deaths at the hospital amid concerns the veterans were targeted. Five victims have now been publicly identified, including two that have been ruled homicides.

Two other deaths have been ruled undetermined. In the other case, the veteran was cremated before a medical examiner could examine the body.

Though it can be hard to detect a pattern across a hospital, the deaths of three patients in three days – all of whom had stayed in unit 3A – is “a huge red flag,” said Beatrice Yorker, a nurse andcriminal justice professor at California State University, Los Angeles. She has written extensively on serial killingsin the healthcare industry.

A string of suspicious deaths: What we know about veterans who died at the Clarksburg VA

The string of deaths has gripped this small town in north-central West Virginia and drawn the attention of lawmakers on Capitol Hill.

Everyone has the same question: How could this happen?

“The concentration and frequency of death is really deeply, stunningly disturbing,” said Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Connecticut. “It indicates a pattern reflecting premeditation.”

Blumenthal, a member of the Veterans Affairs committee, told USA TODAY that Senate hearings may be convened to determine whether a hospital employee was responsible for the deaths and whether the Department of Veterans Affairs failed to protect patients.

He stressed that no crimes have been proven but noted investigators have identified a “person of interest.”

The VA has said only that the person of interest was “removed from their position in Clarksburg,” and it’s not a current employee.

“There is a need for accountability not only for the individual culprit who may have been responsible,” Blumenthal said. “But also for the VA. It has to provide an explanation. We will seek an explanation.”

Clarksburg VA spokesman Wesley Walls reiterated an earlier statement that hospital leadership notified authorities “immediately upon discovering these serious allegations,” and they put “safeguards in place to ensure the safety of each and every one of our patients.”

Walls referred further questions to the VA Office of Inspector General, which is working with the FBI and Department of Justice on the investigation. Spokespeople for the Inspector General and Justice Department did not provide any updates.

‘He didn’t just die a normal death’

Karen Holloway said she couldn’t remember why her father was admitted to the hospital in April 2018. She only remembers feeling relieved the night before he died, when a nurse told her he was doing better. 

For months, Holloway’s family believed he had died of sepsis, a life-threatening condition caused by the body’s response to an infection. But in fall 2018, federal investigators told the family several patients had died under suspicious circumstances – and Holloway was one of them. 

Karen Holloway said the agents told her they had received an anonymous tip “that someone was injecting these soldiers” with insulin. They showed the family a chart of Holloway’s insulin level just before he died, his daughter recalled.

“It was off the charts. More than what he needed,” Karen Holloway said. “He didn’t just die a normal death.”

Though some diabetics rely on insulin to control their blood sugar, an unneeded injection can lower it to a dangerous, even fatal, level.

Holloway died on April 8, 2018. The next day, another patient who had stayed in unit 3A, Felix Kirk McDermott, died after his blood sugar suddenly dropped. He had been admitted to the hospital three days earlier and was getting better, his family said.

On April 10, George Nelson Shaw succumbed two weeks after his blood sugar plummeted to a dangerously low level without explanation.

“It started going back up and then it crashed again,” his wife, Norma Shaw, said. “After that, he just went downhill.”

The first victim: Authorities investigating 10 suspicious deaths at VA hospital, including one ruled a homicide

McDermott and Shaw’s bodies were exhumed and examined at Dover Air Force Base. A medical examiner discovered insulin injection sites on both bodies. Neither man was diabetic.

Their deaths were ruled homicides.

Holloway was a diabetic, and he did take insulin to control his blood sugar, his daughter said. His autopsy revealed several injection sites consistent with his treatment.

But the medical examiner noted that before Holloway died, he suffered a “prolonged episode” of severe low blood sugar that lasted for 30 hours.

“There is no natural cause” that would explain why Holloway’s blood sugar dropped so severely and didn’t respond to treatment, the medical examiner wrote. “This episode is strongly suspicious” for unprescribed administration of insulin, he concluded.

He ruled the death “undetermined.”

When should hospitals investigate patient deaths?

Investigators have made no arrest in the Clarksburg case and divulged no evidence. So it is unclear why none of the early insulin deaths triggered a review that might have identified a pattern of possible homicides.

An Inspector General review of the hospital, conducted in May 2018, found that hospital officials had reported no major incidents of patient harm or danger during the previous 20 months, which includes the time period of the deaths now under investigation. 

The hospital apparently started looking into the deaths in June 2018, according to a timeline provided by the office of Sen. Joe Manchin, D-West Virginia. That’s when VA doctors informed the hospital’s quality management team that eight patients had experienced unexplained, dangerously low blood sugar.

Most healthcare systems have strict policies designed to identify and review incidents where patients are harmed or die unexpectedly. In the VA, so-called “sentinel events” require an analysis by medical experts, who report their findings to headquarters in Washington, D.C.

Yorker and other experts contend that medical serial killers are a known phenomenon in the healthcare industry and require systems to detect and prevent harm.

Yorker co-authored a study identifying 131 cases worldwide since 1970 in which medical providers were prosecuted for murder or assault on patients, mostly in hospitals using medications.

That includes Orville Lynn Majors, who was convicted in 1999 of murdering six patients at an Indiana hospital and is suspected in dozens of other deaths. 

In 2004, Charles Cullen, a nurse, pleaded guilty to killing 29 patients at medical facilities in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. 

In those cases and others, hospitals were sued by victims’ families for wrongful deaths and were sanctioned by state regulators, according to published reports.

Elizabeth Yardley, a criminology professor at Birmingham City University in England, has studied cases in which patients were killed in hospital settings. She said it’s common for killers to become more brazen as time passes from their first killing.

“The killings will get closer together toward the end,” Yardley told USA TODAY. “You will often find there is a large gap between the first and the second murder. A slightly smaller gap between the second and the third … When they are caught, it is to such an extent that it can’t be ignored.”

‘They killed my father, didn’t they?’

Two weeks before Holloway died, on March 26, 2018, another veteran who had stayed in the same unit succumbed in similar circumstances. 

His name was Archie Edgell, an 84-year-old Army veteran. He was admitted to the hospital because of problems associated with his dementia.

He also was diabetic, though he had been given insulin by relatives at home and was not prescribed insulin at the hospital, said Dino Colombo, his family’s attorney.

Within 48 hours of being admitted, Edgell’s blood sugar level plummeted. Hospital staff gave him glucose to try to bring it up.

Hypoglycemia requires immediate treatment when someone’s blood sugar drop to 70 mg/dL, according to the Mayo Clinic. Two days before Edgell died, his blood sugar was 25 mg/dL, Colombo said.

“There’s no reason for his blood sugar level to have dropped like that,” Colombo said. “He had a number of health issues, but there was nothing that should have killed him.”

Investigators with the VA’s Office of Inspector General showed up at the home of Edgell’s son in West Virginia in fall 2018, around the same time they contacted Holloway’s family.

Colombo recounted Steve Edgell’s reaction: “They killed my father, didn’t they?” 

An autopsy conducted in December 2018 found four injection sites on Edgell’s arms and thighs that tested positive for insulin. 

“These findings are strongly suspicious for unprescribed … insulin administration during his hospitalization,” the medical examiner wrote. The manner of death was ruled “undetermined.”

Edgell, whose death was first reported Thursday by MetroNews in West Virginia, served during the Korean War and was stationed in Germany. He worked as a mechanic while in the Army. After his service, he worked as a water commissioner in a small town near Clarksburg for 20 years.

His wife of more than 60 years, Kathleen, died in April without knowing what happened to her husband.

Holloway spoke little of his service

William Holloway served in the Army during World War II, but he often changed the subject when questions about his service came up, Karen Holloway said.

After he was discharged, he lived with his wife, Malinda, in Fairmont, West Virginia, where he worked for the U.S. Postal Service. They raised two daughters and had three grandchildren. Malinda Holloway died in 2011.

As a postal worker, Holloway was credited by police for preventing an elderly woman from being scammed out of her savings. William Holloway recounted the decades-old incident to a local newspaper reporter in 2015.

He was on his route when a woman told him she’d been directed by a bank official to withdraw money from her account to help catch bank employees who had been stealing from customers.

“I could see through that story right away,” William Holloway told the paper. “I called the police.”

Two men were arrested for trying to defraud the woman.

William Holloway loved to hunt, fish and golf. Karen Holloway, the older of the two daughters, went with him on fishing trips when she was a child even though she hated it. “I just wanted to be with Daddy,” she said.

Karen Holloway said she was just beginning to accept her father’s death when investigators contacted her and asked if they could dig up his body. It was a tough decision.

“Is this the right thing to do?” she remembered asking herself. “And then I thought he would be saying, ‘You better fight and exhume me.’ He would’ve gone through with it.”

Holloway was reburied after another military funeral.

“We’ve had two funerals for Daddy,” Karen Holloway said, her voice trembling. “Two funerals.”

Contributing: Ken Alltucker, Tom Vanden Brook and Dennis Wagner

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/09/20/veterans-affairs-hospital-deaths-clarksburg-west-virginia-case-red-flag/2287257001/

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Sylvester Stallone admits he ‘hated’ Dolph Lundgren during the making of ‘Rocky IV’

Sometimes it’s not all love between co-stars.

Sylvester Stallone stopped by “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” on Thursday to chat about his new “Rambo” movie but the late-night host couldn’t help but ask about his iconic movie franchise, “Rocky.”

The 73-year-old admitted that casting Rocky Balboa’s nemesis, Ivan Drago, in “Rocky IV” was a tough process until he found Dolph Lundgren.

SYLVESTER STALLONE HAS ‘ZERO OWNERSHIP’ OF ‘ROCKY’ FRANCHISE

“In ‘Rocky IV’ I really wanted a big, horrible, vicious guy,” Stallone admitted. “Like a primitive. And I couldn’t find him. I’m finding giant wrestlers and football players and that. And then all of a sudden the door opened, the smoke came in, there’s light. [He had a] proceeding hairline, shoulders this wide, everything was perfect.”

“Even his calves were coming through his clothing. Just muscular,” he added. “Blue eyes are staring into my soul. He was the real Terminator, and I was like, ‘I hate this guy. He’s too perfect. And if I loathe him, I’m sure the world will.’ He’s not really, but he looks like something from a thousand years into the future.”

DOLPH LUNDGREN NEARLY KILLED SYLVESTER STALLONE WHILE FILMING ‘ROCKY IV’

Stallone and Lundgren are good friends in real life, and have been for many years.

Westlake Legal Group stallone Sylvester Stallone admits he 'hated' Dolph Lundgren during the making of 'Rocky IV' Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/sylvester-stallone fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/late-night fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 75958ad0-99a1-5f73-97df-e6fc74f9ddfa

Sylvester Stallone, left, and Dolph Lundgren attend the premiere of Warner Bros. Pictures’ “Creed”  (Todd Williamson/Getty Images)

“There’s an idea we’ve come up with called ‘The International,’” he explained. “It deals with the UN but it’s a different kind of UN, a little hardcore. There’s a lot of action in it but it also really feeds into who Dolph is, because he is international. He’s incredibly intelligent, so he’s going to bring a different spin to the whole thing.”

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They recently starred together in the 2018 boxing drama “Creed II” in which they both reprised their “Rocky” characters from the 1985 movie.

Westlake Legal Group stallone Sylvester Stallone admits he 'hated' Dolph Lundgren during the making of 'Rocky IV' Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/sylvester-stallone fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/late-night fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 75958ad0-99a1-5f73-97df-e6fc74f9ddfa   Westlake Legal Group stallone Sylvester Stallone admits he 'hated' Dolph Lundgren during the making of 'Rocky IV' Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/sylvester-stallone fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/late-night fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 75958ad0-99a1-5f73-97df-e6fc74f9ddfa

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Sylvester Stallone admits he ‘hated’ Dolph Lundgren during the making of ‘Rocky IV’

Sometimes it’s not all love between co-stars.

Sylvester Stallone stopped by “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” on Thursday to chat about his new “Rambo” movie but the late-night host couldn’t help but ask about his iconic movie franchise, “Rocky.”

The 73-year-old admitted that casting Rocky Balboa’s nemesis, Ivan Drago, in “Rocky IV” was a tough process until he found Dolph Lundgren.

SYLVESTER STALLONE HAS ‘ZERO OWNERSHIP’ OF ‘ROCKY’ FRANCHISE

“In ‘Rocky IV’ I really wanted a big, horrible, vicious guy,” Stallone admitted. “Like a primitive. And I couldn’t find him. I’m finding giant wrestlers and football players and that. And then all of a sudden the door opened, the smoke came in, there’s light. [He had a] proceeding hairline, shoulders this wide, everything was perfect.”

“Even his calves were coming through his clothing. Just muscular,” he added. “Blue eyes are staring into my soul. He was the real Terminator, and I was like, ‘I hate this guy. He’s too perfect. And if I loathe him, I’m sure the world will.’ He’s not really, but he looks like something from a thousand years into the future.”

DOLPH LUNDGREN NEARLY KILLED SYLVESTER STALLONE WHILE FILMING ‘ROCKY IV’

Stallone and Lundgren are good friends in real life, and have been for many years.

Westlake Legal Group stallone Sylvester Stallone admits he 'hated' Dolph Lundgren during the making of 'Rocky IV' Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/sylvester-stallone fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/late-night fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 75958ad0-99a1-5f73-97df-e6fc74f9ddfa

Sylvester Stallone, left, and Dolph Lundgren attend the premiere of Warner Bros. Pictures’ “Creed”  (Todd Williamson/Getty Images)

“There’s an idea we’ve come up with called ‘The International,’” he explained. “It deals with the UN but it’s a different kind of UN, a little hardcore. There’s a lot of action in it but it also really feeds into who Dolph is, because he is international. He’s incredibly intelligent, so he’s going to bring a different spin to the whole thing.”

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

They recently starred together in the 2018 boxing drama “Creed II” in which they both reprised their “Rocky” characters from the 1985 movie.

Westlake Legal Group stallone Sylvester Stallone admits he 'hated' Dolph Lundgren during the making of 'Rocky IV' Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/sylvester-stallone fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/late-night fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 75958ad0-99a1-5f73-97df-e6fc74f9ddfa   Westlake Legal Group stallone Sylvester Stallone admits he 'hated' Dolph Lundgren during the making of 'Rocky IV' Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/sylvester-stallone fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/late-night fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 75958ad0-99a1-5f73-97df-e6fc74f9ddfa

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

United States to Sign Asylum Agreement With El Salvador, Official Says

Westlake Legal Group 20dc-immig-facebookJumbo United States to Sign Asylum Agreement With El Salvador, Official Says United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J McAleenan, Kevin K Immigration and Emigration Illegal Immigration Homeland Security Department El Salvador Asylum, Right of

WASHINGTON — The United States is expected Friday to sign an asylum agreement with the government of El Salvador to prevent certain migrants who pass through the violent and dangerous country from seeking refuge in the United States, according to an administration official.

The agreement is similar to one that President Trump’s administration negotiated with Guatemala in an ongoing effort to prevent migrants from crossing the border with Mexico and seeking asylum in the United States.

Kevin McAleenan, the acting secretary of homeland security, will announce the agreement at a news conference on Friday afternoon, according to the official, who requested anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the agreement before it is formally announced.

Mr. McAleenan has said that such agreements will help to slow the flow into the United States of migrants fleeing corruption and persecution in their home countries because it will force them to seek protection elsewhere.

But critics have said it makes no sense to ask the migrants to seek protection in those countries, because they are among the most dangerous, gang-ridden places in the world. The agreement with Guatemala requires migrants who pass through there to apply for asylum — and be rejected — before they are eligible to apply for asylum in the United States.

Immigrant advocacy organizations, who say the policies are orchestrated by Stephen Miller, the president’s top immigration architect, and are driven by ill will toward immigrants, have taken legal action to stop them.

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Ukraine Pressured on U.S. Political Investigations

MOSCOW — Months before a whistle-blower’s complaint came to light this week, raising alarms over dealings between the Trump administration and Ukraine, the issue was roiling politics in Kiev.

The whistle-blower’s specific allegations remain cloaked in mystery, but they involve at least one instance of President Trump making an unspecified commitment to a foreign leader along with other actions, according to news reports in Washington. At least part of the allegation deals with Ukraine, the reports say.

But for months now in Kiev, the Ukrainian capital, the government of the neophyte president, Volodymyr Zelensky, has been grappling with unwelcome political pressure by associates of Mr. Trump. Rudolph W. Giuliani, Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer, said in an interview Thursday night on CNN that he had pressed Ukrainian officials to pursue investigations into Mr. Trump’s political opponents, including former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and his family.

Mr. Zelensky took office in May, but even before then, Mr. Giuliani has said he sought a meeting with the president to investigate a natural gas company, Burisma, where Mr. Biden’s son, Hunter Biden, had served on the board of directors.

Mr. Zelensky’s transition team, not wanting to be seen as taking sides in United States politics, rebuffed the request, a former adviser to Mr. Zelensky, Serhiy Leshchenko, said in an interview.

“It was clear that the Zelensky team doesn’t want to interfere in American politics,” Mr. Leshchenko said. “They were very angry about this issue.”

Mr. Leshchenko and two other Ukrainians, all of them young, Western-leaning politicians and veterans of the 2014 revolution, said in interviews that Mr. Giuliani’s efforts created the impression that the Trump administration’s willingness to back Mr. Zelensky was linked to his government’s readiness to pursue the investigations sought by Mr. Trump’s allies.

When it became clear that he would not be granted an audience with the incoming Ukrainian president, Mr. Giuliani asserted in an interview on Fox News that Mr. Zelensky was being advised by “people who are the enemies” of Mr. Trump, including Mr. Leshchenko.

Mr. Giuliani seemed to be referring to Mr. Leshchenko’s role in helping to draw attention to reports about the “black ledger” book that detailed $12.7 million in off-the-books payments to Paul J. Manafort, the former Trump campaign chairman, who did extensive work in Ukraine for Viktor F. Yanukovych, the disgraced former president.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_159327390_4bdc416a-1487-42c9-93eb-e6a12cce946b-articleLarge Ukraine Pressured on U.S. Political Investigations Zelensky, Volodymyr Whistle-Blowers United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Ukraine Trump, Donald J Politics and Government Defense and Military Forces Corruption (Institutional) Biden, Joseph R Jr Biden, Hunter

Rudolph W. Giuliani at a rally for President Trump in Manchester, N.H., last week.CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

After Mr. Giuliani’s appearance on Fox News, the incoming chief of staff for Mr. Zelensky told Mr. Leshchenko he would not be considered for a position in the new government, Mr. Leshchenko said.

Ukrainian officials and intermediaries in touch with the Ukrainian government and Mr. Giuliani tried to find some way to mollify Mr. Giuliani and the Trump administration with an informal meeting or a phone call, Mr. Leshchenko said, but Mr. Zelensky vetoed all their proposals.

Eventually, a State Department official, Kurt D. Volker, the American envoy to settlement talks in the Ukraine war, arranged a meeting between Mr. Giuliani and a senior Ukrainian official in Madrid where the investigations were discussed.

The two presidents spoke by phone on July 25. In the call, Mr. Trump told Mr. Zelensky that Ukraine could improve its reputation and “interaction” with the United States by investigating corruption, according to a Ukrainian government summary.

It is not clear whether Mr. Trump specifically linked United States aid to Ukraine to political help in next year’s election in the United States by investigating his political opponents. Several weeks after the call it was reported that the Trump administration had put a hold on $250 million in Pentagon funding.

“For me, it’s crystal clear” that the Trump administration was seeking to trade military aid for Ukraine’s war against Russian-backed separatists for political favors, Daria M. Kaleniuk, the executive director of the Anti-Corruption Action Center in Kiev, said in an interview.

The hold on the aid was lifted on Sept. 12, after three congressional committees opened investigations into whether the Trump administration had misappropriated foreign policy tools to try to help the president politically. Those investigations were started in response to reporting on Mr. Giuliani’s activities in Ukraine.

Much was at stake in the delayed military assistance. More than 13,000 people, most of them civilians, have been killed in Ukraine’s five-year war with Russian-backed separatists, Europe’s only active military conflict.

Mr. Trump has suggested he would like Attorney General William P. Barr to look into material gathered by the Ukrainian prosecutors. But under a bilateral legal assistance agreement, American law enforcement can only ask for evidence if a criminal investigation is underway in the United States, which is not the case.

“It is a very unfortunate situation for Zelensky,” Svitlana Zalishchuk, a former member of the foreign affairs committee in Ukraine’s Parliament, said in a telephone interview. “Obviously, he wants to build good relations with the American administration. At the same time, he doesn’t want to play American politics.”

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Meghan McCain Walks Off ‘The View’ Set After Clash With Ana Navarro

Westlake Legal Group 5d8500c92300005700d00f56 Meghan McCain Walks Off ‘The View’ Set After Clash With Ana Navarro

Meghan McCain and Ana Navarro were at odds on Friday’s episode of “The View,” leading to McCain walking off set after being told not to “scream” at Navarro.

During a discussion on the whistleblower complaint against President Donald Trump, the show’s hosts were unpacking whether the way the administration exchanges information with a foreign power could constitute impeachment. Earlier this week, the Washington Post reported that an intelligence official approached Intelligence Community Inspector General Michael Atkinson “with claims that Trump had made troubling ‘promises’ during communication with a foreign leader.”

Both Abby Huntsman and McCain argued that this anonymous whistleblower is like WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange because the individual “put people’s lives in danger.

McCain said that she thinks any interference in an election by a foreign country is bad and should be condemned, adding that she’s mad that “people on the left” defend Assange for publishing secret military and diplomatic documents.

Huntsman added that Assange’s leaks, like releasing Hillary Clinton’s emails, are “just as dangerous as what the president is being charged with doing or people are assuming that he did” and that it’s putting people in danger.

The group then began talking over one another causing McCain to exclaim: “Excuse me, maybe I was clumsy in the way that I said it.”

Navarro responded by telling McCain, “I’m two feet away, I don’t need you to scream at me this way.”

McCain replied that she didn’t “know what you just said,” leading Navarro to repeat: “I said, don’t scream at me. I’m two feet away.”

Host Joy Behar moved the group to a commercial break as McCain is heard in the background calling Navarro “so rude” before eventually walking off the stage. 

McCain came back after the break and didn’t miss any of the show. Her reps report that she is “offering no comment” on the episode. HuffPost has reached out to representatives for Navarro.

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Texas Cities Try To Assess Scope Of Damage In Imelda’s Wake

Westlake Legal Group imelda1_wide-9ed0c5dd77cdeafc808c1838c696da7acd465f42-s1100-c15 Texas Cities Try To Assess Scope Of Damage In Imelda's Wake

A school bus makes its way through a flooded section of Hopper Road in Houston on Thursday. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has declared much of southeast Texas disaster areas after heavy rain and flooding from the remnants of Tropical Depression Imelda. Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  Texas Cities Try To Assess Scope Of Damage In Imelda's Wake

A school bus makes its way through a flooded section of Hopper Road in Houston on Thursday. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has declared much of southeast Texas disaster areas after heavy rain and flooding from the remnants of Tropical Depression Imelda.

Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images

Large areas of southeast Texas remain flooded Friday as officials work to get a broader sense of the damage left by Tropical Depression Imelda — a catastrophic weather event that swamped hundreds of cars and homes and claimed the lives of at least two people.

The storm has dropped massive amounts of rain, drawing comparisons to the devastation wreaked by Hurricane Harvey two years ago.

The National Weather Service in Houston said in a tweet that the amount of rainfall in Houston and Galveston on Thursday was “one for the record books.” It said Galveston had gotten 17.77 inches of rain just in the past four days.

Some areas saw as much as 20 to 40 inches of rain — North Fork Taylors Bayou near Port Arthur, Texas, topped more than 43 inches of rain as of Friday morning.

While Imelda has dissipated, the National Weather Service says “remnants will still bring heavy rain and possible flash flooding” to portion as far away as the Texas-Arkansas-Louisiana border.

Authorities are grappling with just how much destruction the storm caused.

Westlake Legal Group ap_19262778490491-1-_wide-d08f49bff69b4ab491e0528e5c1a82c8dcefa4ab-s1100-c15 Texas Cities Try To Assess Scope Of Damage In Imelda's Wake

In this photo provided by the Chambers County Sheriff’s Office, floodwaters surround a home in Winnie, Texas, after Imelda raked the area. Brian Hawthorne/AP hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  Texas Cities Try To Assess Scope Of Damage In Imelda's Wake

In this photo provided by the Chambers County Sheriff’s Office, floodwaters surround a home in Winnie, Texas, after Imelda raked the area.

Brian Hawthorne/AP

“The damage assessments are going on,” Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo tells NPR’s Here & Now. “I know in the city itself [Houston], we’re going to have upwards of 200 structures [destroyed], which compared to Harvey is negligible. But as we spread out from the the city of Houston and go east … to Beaumont, that count is going to be much much higher.”

The U.S. Coast Guard says surging currents caused nine barges to break away from their moorings in the San Jacinto River. At least two barges crashed into a bridge over the river, shutting down a major east-west highway just east of Houston.

“The bridge is off limits until highway officials determine the bridge is safe for traffic,” Joseph Leahy of member station KUT reports. “Several other stretches of [Interstate-10] and other local highways are impassable this morning due to flooding. Flash flood warnings remain in effect across the region as high water from the storm moves downstream.”

At least two deaths have been attributed to the storm.

Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez says a man in a his 40s or 50s drowned Thursday when he attempted to drive his vehicle though floodwaters that some 8 feet deep near Houston’s George Bush Intercontinental Airport.

“According to witnesses for some unknown reason, he just punched it and tried to drive through it some more,” Gonzalez told reporters. “They did try to go into water to see if they could pull him out to no avail.”

A second man was electrocuted and drowned while trying to move his horse, according to a message from the family of the 19-year-old victim, Hunter Morrison, that was shared by the Jefferson County’s Sheriff’s Office.

“Right now my family and I are going through one of the most horrific times in our lives with losing Hunter,” the family message said.

The Houston Fire Department says its crews performed more than 900 water rescues on Thursday and were dispatched to nearly 1,800 emergency calls.

On Friday, the U.S. Coast Guard tweeted out a short video of people being helped off a helicopter, adding that crews in Houston and New Orleans have “completed multiple medevacs and rescues”

“USGC Air Station Houston and Air Station New Orleans have completed multiple medevacs and rescues in the Beaumont area due to flooding caused by Tropical Depression #Imelda,” it said.

Westlake Legal Group imelda2_wide-19dc069fc7d9d8e1bee8d2529be203eac6fdd0bd-s1100-c15 Texas Cities Try To Assess Scope Of Damage In Imelda's Wake

People in Houston navigate the floodwaters on Thursday. The city got more than 9 inches of rain on that day alone, according to the National Weather Service in Houston. Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Texas Cities Try To Assess Scope Of Damage In Imelda's Wake

People in Houston navigate the floodwaters on Thursday. The city got more than 9 inches of rain on that day alone, according to the National Weather Service in Houston.

Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images

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