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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 62)

Jane Fonda plans move to Washington – to get arrested: report

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5839198768001_5839184862001-vs Jane Fonda plans move to Washington – to get arrested: report fox-news/person/jane-fonda fox-news/organization/netflix fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc Dom Calicchio cdaec082-f10a-58dd-8a65-b3b65064dba1 article

Lock her up?

Jane Fonda, a liberal Hollywood celebrity long known for activism and outspokenness – soon plans to leave Tinseltown and relocate to the nation’s capital, at least temporarily.

And according to the Los Angeles Times, the 81-year-old actress (who’ll turn 82 in December) even has a goal in mind: to get arrested.

SARAH FERGUSON GETSCANDID ON USING BOTOX, LASER FACELIFTS AND STEM CELL THERAPY FOR HER FEET

Fonda told the newspaper she plans to spend about four months in Washington for a series of sit-ins and rallies – after getting an OK from Netflix to take time off from her series “Grace and Frankie” with Lily Tomlin.

She claims to have drawn inspiration from Greta Thunberg, the teenage climate-change activist from Sweden.

“She read the read the [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change] report and she realized that the crisis was barreling straight at us, like a train,” Fonda said, “and looked around and people weren’t behaving appropriately.

“It so traumatized her that she stopped eating. I hadn’t realized that she stopped eating and speaking for almost a year. And that really hit me.”

Fonda, forever known as “Hanoi Jane” to those who took offense to her stand against the Vietnam War, criticized Democrats for failing to advance the left’s climate agenda.

When [former California Gov. Jerry Brown] came in, in the ’70s, it was great,” she told the L.A. Times. “Suddenly, you could afford solar panels and all these kinds of windmills. … But … right to the day he left, he didn’t pay too much attention to the fact that oil companies are drilling all over California next to communities and next to schools and everything.”

But despite her lefty credentials, Fonda told Politico in 2018 that while she opposes President Trump’s policies, she doesn’t hate him as a person.

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“I feel that I understand a little bit — this is a man who was traumatized as a child by his father, who had a mother that didn’t protect him,” she told the outlet. “And the behavior is the language of the wounded.”

In August, Fonda’s younger brother, actor Peter Fonda, died at age 79 after suffering respiratory failure due to lung cancer.

“I am very sad. He was my sweet-hearted baby brother. The talker of the family,” she told Variety at the time.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5839198768001_5839184862001-vs Jane Fonda plans move to Washington – to get arrested: report fox-news/person/jane-fonda fox-news/organization/netflix fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc Dom Calicchio cdaec082-f10a-58dd-8a65-b3b65064dba1 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5839198768001_5839184862001-vs Jane Fonda plans move to Washington – to get arrested: report fox-news/person/jane-fonda fox-news/organization/netflix fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc Dom Calicchio cdaec082-f10a-58dd-8a65-b3b65064dba1 article

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Cuomo Bombs With Gender Pronoun Joke At LGBTQ Town Hall, Immediately Apologizes

Westlake Legal Group 5da04e0a210000c3073442be Cuomo Bombs With Gender Pronoun Joke At LGBTQ Town Hall, Immediately Apologizes

CNN’s Chris Cuomo quickly apologized on Twitter after he made an inappropriate joke about preferred gender pronouns during the network’s televised LGBTQ town hall for Democratic 2020 candidates on Thursday night.

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) walked onto the stage and immediately declared her pronouns as “she, her and hers.”

“She, her and hers? Mine too,” Cuomo responded, eliciting what appeared to be some groans from the studio audience.

“Alright,” Harris replied after a moment’s silence.

Check out the exchange here:

Cuomo tweeted an apology soon after, saying he “should not have” responded in the way he did. “I am an ally of the LGBTQ community, and I am sorry because I am committed to helping us achieve equality,” he wrote.

The backlash was swift on Twitter, however, where LGBTQ advocacy groups called out the prime time anchor. GLAAD tweeted “it was so disappointing” for Cuomo to mock Harris’ declaration “on such a major stage.”

The National Center for Lesbian Rights, meanwhile, tweeted that “people’s pronouns are not a punchline.”

“In a year where LGBTQ Americans are finally being recognized on the national Presidential stage, making jokes about gender pronouns is beneath your dignity. Please do better in the future,” the organization added.

Others called Cuomo’s comment “UNACCEPTABLE,” “not okay” and “super gross.”

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Deutsche Bank may have destroyed copies of Trump’s tax returns, cleansed servers: Report

Westlake Legal Group HAMdUVIVArleBJ98-_EjGGt_DwRDuQYdSZQpV-VQbBQ Deutsche Bank may have destroyed copies of Trump's tax returns, cleansed servers: Report r/politics

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Conservatives Troll Trump With ‘Photograph’ Of Him And Arrested Giuliani Pals

Westlake Legal Group 5da0360e20000058074ffeaf Conservatives Troll Trump With ‘Photograph’ Of Him And Arrested Giuliani Pals

That didn’t take long. 

And it came from the right, not the left.

Conservative website The Bulwark, which often features anti-Trump commentary from the right, shared this clip from senior video editor Barry Rubin

The clip, of course, was a reference to a tweet Trump posted last week taunting former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden. That photo showed the Bidens with someone identified as a “Ukrainian gas exec,” but was actually Hunter Biden’s longtime business partner Devon Archer. Archer and the former vice president’s son were on the board of the Ukrainian company Burisma Holdings.

Trump’s tweet was removed when Nickelback filed a copyright complaint. 

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Ethiopian PM wins Nobel Peace Prize for efforts to end Eritrea conflict

Westlake Legal Group ethiopian-PM- Ethiopian PM wins Nobel Peace Prize for efforts to end Eritrea conflict fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fnc/world fnc e1d2343d-5eaf-5d08-b4d5-a06e75c9eb0b Associated Press article

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 2019 in recognition of his efforts to end his country’s long-running border conflict with Eritrea.

NOBEL PEACE PRIZE LAUREATES WEIGH IN ON TRUMP’S CHANCE OF WINNING

The Norwegian Nobel Institute on Friday also praised the “important reforms” that Abiy, Ethiopia’s leader since April 2018, has launched at home.

Chairwoman Berit Reiss-Andersen said some people may consider it too early to give him the prize, but “it is now that Abiy Ahmed’s efforts need recognition and deserve encouragement.”

Abiy, 43, took office after widespread protests pressured the longtime ruling coalition and hurt one of the world’s fastest growing economies. Africa’s youngest leader quickly announced dramatic reforms and “Abiymania” began.

In a move that caused surprise in the long-turbulent Horn of Africa region, he said Ethiopia would accept a peace agreement with Eritrea, ending one of Africa’s longest-running conflicts.

Within weeks, Eritrea’s longtime leader, visibly moved, visited Addis Ababa and communications and transport links were restored. For the first time in two decades people could, long-divided families made tearful reunions.

The improving relations led to the lifting of United Nations sanctions on Eritrea, one of the world’s most reclusive nations. But Ethiopia’s reforms appear not to have inspired any in Eritrea, which has since closed border posts with its neighbor.

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At home, Abiy offered one political surprise after another. He released tens of thousands of prisoners, welcomed home once-banned opposition groups and acknowledged past abuses. People expressed themselves freely on social media, and he announced that Ethiopia would hold free and fair elections in 2020. The country has one of the world’s few “gender-balanced” Cabinets and a female president, a rarity in Africa.

And for the first time Ethiopia had no journalists in prison, media groups noted last year. The new prime minister also announced the opening-up of Ethiopia’s tightly controlled economy, saying private investment would be welcome in major state-owned sectors — a process that continues slowly.

Westlake Legal Group ethiopian-PM- Ethiopian PM wins Nobel Peace Prize for efforts to end Eritrea conflict fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fnc/world fnc e1d2343d-5eaf-5d08-b4d5-a06e75c9eb0b Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ethiopian-PM- Ethiopian PM wins Nobel Peace Prize for efforts to end Eritrea conflict fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fnc/world fnc e1d2343d-5eaf-5d08-b4d5-a06e75c9eb0b Associated Press article

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Trump’s Fights With GOP Over Syria Come At The ‘Worst Possible Moment’

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1175097159_slide-83bb8ffc791791e1bca6f5d2812e86fdf2349e95-s1100-c15 Trump's Fights With GOP Over Syria Come At The 'Worst Possible Moment'

Smoke rises from the Syrian town of Tal Abyad,on Oct. 10, 2019 on the second day of Turkey’s military operation against Kurdish forces. President Trump’s decision to pull back U.S. forces from the area has been viewed as giving Turkey a green light for the operation and opened him up to condemnation from within the GOP. Bulent Kilic /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic /AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Trump's Fights With GOP Over Syria Come At The 'Worst Possible Moment'

Smoke rises from the Syrian town of Tal Abyad,on Oct. 10, 2019 on the second day of Turkey’s military operation against Kurdish forces. President Trump’s decision to pull back U.S. forces from the area has been viewed as giving Turkey a green light for the operation and opened him up to condemnation from within the GOP.

Bulent Kilic /AFP via Getty Images

The growing divide between President Trump and many of his fellow Republicans over his decision to move U.S. troops in Syria out of the way of a Turkish incursion threatens his delicate alliance with the congressional GOP at a time when he needs their support more than ever, party strategists say.

Some of Trump’s closest allies, however, say the division may ultimately help him with an impeachment fight.

“No president likes to have his own party argue with him,” said former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, who’s also an informal Trump adviser. He said Republicans have legitimate concerns with Trump about the decision, including the lack of advance notice.

But by disagreeing with Trump over Syria, “they’re proving they are independent” of him, said Gingrich. “They’re proving that they’re not automatically going to do what Trump wants,” said Gingrich, who led the 1998 investigation to impeach former President Bill Clinton.

On Wednesday, Turkey launched airstrikes against allied Kurdish fighters in northern Syria just days after Trump said he would remove U.S. troops from the immediate area. Trump justified the decision by arguing it was time to end the United States’ involvement in “endless wars.”

“The worst mistake that the United States has ever made in my opinion was going into the Middle East,” Trump said.

Loyal allies like Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., blasted Trump’s decision and said it “will be the biggest mistake of his presidency” if not reversed.

At least one Republican went a step further with his criticism of Trump.

Illinois Rep. John Shimkus, who is retiring from Congress, called the president’s decision to leave Syrian Kurds to fend for themselves “terrible and despicable.”

“In fact, I called my chief of staff in D.C. I said pull my name off the ‘I support Donald Trump list.’ I mean, we have just stabbed our allies in the back,” he told local radio station KMOX.

Trump’s decision has also been criticized by many evangelical pastors, who are often among his strongest allies.

Trump’s differences with the GOP over foreign policy are not necessarily new although this chasm comes at a time when he’s seeking support from the public and congressional Republicans as the House impeachment inquiry gains steam.

“That is now being exaggerated at the worst possible moment for him,” said Alex Conant, former communications director for Sen. Marco Rubio’s 2016 presidential campaign. “He’s now facing two battles one with House Democrats on the impeachment issue and the other with Senate Republicans on the Syria issue. Both are full-time jobs. And neither leaves him much room to maneuver.”

Former Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., who chose not to seek re-election last year, said the Senate is unlikely to entirely turn on Trump but added the divisions reflect the lack of respect between the two ends of Pennsylvania Avenue.

“There’s a lot of fear of the president and his control of the base. But there’s not a lot of love lost,” said Flake, who has been one of the few outspoken critics of Trump in the Republican party. “This will be another reminder as to why it wouldn’t be too bad if the president were to not be president.”

During a stop in his district on Wednesday, Idaho Sen. Jim Risch tried to avoid Trump’s increasing controversies while participating in a forum organized by the National Women’s Business Council.

Risch, who is chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, abruptly ended an interview with Boise State Public Radio when asked about Syria and Ukraine.

“I’m not going there. If you want to have an interview with me about the business center, please do so,” Risch said, before walking away. “Don’t do that again.”

Trump’s decision on Syria should not be a complete shock. He called for a complete withdrawal from Syria in December before reversing himself amid a similar backlash from Congress and military leaders.

Republicans are very aware of his campaign promise to withdraw troops from the Middle East.

Nonetheless, he faced a barrage of criticism from once loyal defenders, including Graham and Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming, who called the withdrawal “a catastrophic mistake.”

On Thursday, Cheney and most of the House GOP leadership introduced a bill that would impose sanctions on Turkey for launching the offensive.

One of Trump’s few Capitol Hill allies on the issue is Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, who accused Graham and Cheney of being part of a “neocon War Caucus.”

Republican strategist Ryan Williams warned the divisions are not something Trump should take lightly. Some of his biggest supporters see the impeachment inquiry as a threat to his presidency.

“There should be a completely unified party trying to push back against the Democrats’ attacks and the onslaught from the House,” said Williams, who served as spokesman for now-Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, when he ran for president in 2012. “And this is a major distraction. They have to now focus on defending the president at the same time criticizing him on a rash foreign policy decision that was made really at just the drop of a hat.”

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Advocates Try To Help Migrants Navigate Trump’s Public Charge Rule

Westlake Legal Group ap_19283760164561-71a4e41ec12ffc24401fd5b6ba01650d76f30ec6-s1100-c15 Advocates Try To Help Migrants Navigate Trump's Public Charge Rule

Multiple groups are trying to delay — and ultimately block — the Trump administration’s public charge rule. The new rule makes it more difficult for immigrants to get green cards if it seems they might need public assistance. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Advocates Try To Help Migrants Navigate Trump's Public Charge Rule

Multiple groups are trying to delay — and ultimately block — the Trump administration’s public charge rule. The new rule makes it more difficult for immigrants to get green cards if it seems they might need public assistance.

Patrick Semansky/AP

The Trump administration’s new public charge rule, which makes it more difficult for immigrants to get green cards if it looks like they might need public assistance, is set to go into effect on Oct. 15. Multiple groups, including several states and immigrants’ rights advocates, are in court trying to delay the rule and ultimately block it.

But there’s already widespread confusion over how the rule would work, leading many immigrants to drop benefits unnecessarily. Advocacy groups are now trying to get the message out about what the rule actually requires so people don’t go without needed medical, housing and nutrition assistance.

The administration says the rule is needed to ensure that those who get green cards will be self-sufficient. One factor that immigration officials will consider in deciding whether someone might become a public charge is whether the individual already uses public benefits.

Casa de Maryland, a nonprofit immigrant advocacy group, is among those challenging the new test. Member Monica Camacho Perez is a plaintiff in the case. The 25-year-old Baltimore resident was brought into the country illegally as a child and is now a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipient. Camacho is worried about how the public charge rule might affect her ability to someday become a citizen.

“You never know with this government. Everything can be used against you,” she says.

But like many other people, Camacho is not exactly sure how that would work. For example, she’d like to go to college full time but is reluctant to take out a student loan for fear it will hurt her future immigration status. In fact, under the new rule, student loans aren’t supposed to be held against someone applying for a green card.

Such misunderstandings are widespread. Camacho says she has relatives who have stopped getting food stamps for their children, who are U.S. citizens, even though use of such benefits by their children wouldn’t count.

George Escobar, chief of programs and services at Casa, says about a third of the group’s members have raised concerns about how using benefits such as food stamps and Medicaid might affect their legal status. Many want to drop out of these programs just to be safe. Escobar says he tries to dissuade families from doing so.

“The number of people that are actually being impacted by the public charge rule is actually very limited, but the chilling impact is what’s much more concerning,” he says.

There are some estimates that nationwide, millions of people aren’t getting nutrition and health assistance because they’re so worried. Many live in mixed-status families, which include citizens and noncitizens. In reality, so few noncitizens are eligible for the safety net programs covered by the rule that the number who would be affected is estimated to be in the low tens of thousands.

“What we’re trying to do with our community right now, and what we’ve done, is provide culturally proficient education material, engage people, use every opportunity we can to engage people and educate them about what the public charge rule is and what it is not,” Escobar says.

Casa is part of a national network of groups trying to get the information out. They’ve printed up brochures, conducted training for social service providers and set up multiple websites that provide details on how the rule will work. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services has also provided detailed explanations of the changes.

But efforts to clear up the confusion have been complicated by uncertainty over the fate of the legal challenges and by the administration’s multiple actions to limit both legal and illegal immigration. For example, the White House issued a new order on Oct. 4 that requires foreigners seeking visas to enter the U.S. to show they have health insurance or enough money to cover “reasonably foreseeable medical costs.”

Sonya Schwartz, an attorney with the National Immigration Law Center, says there are a few key points for immigrants to remember.

“I think the first thing that’s really helpful for people to know is that the public charge test does not apply to everyone,” she says, noting that refugees, asylum-seekers and most current green card holders are exempt.

She adds that only benefits used by green card applicants themselves, not those used by family members, are taken into account. The list of benefits considered is also generally limited to food stamps, housing subsidies and cash assistance.

“Medicaid is also on the list, but there are so many exceptions about Medicaid that it doesn’t affect a lot of people. So kids’ use of Medicaid doesn’t count. Use of Medicaid in schools doesn’t count. Emergency Medicaid doesn’t count,” says Schwartz.

Use of school nutrition programs, child care assistance and Medicare are also not supposed to be held against a green card applicant.

Schwartz also points out that use of public benefits alone will not make someone a public charge. She says immigration officials weigh many things in determining whether an immigrant will be able to support themselves, including whether the immigrant earns enough money or can speak English. These are tighter standards than in the past and could mean that use of benefits is the least of an immigrant’s worries.

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Nobel Peace Prize for 2019 awarded to Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Nobel Peace Prize for 2019 awarded to Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed

Ethiopia Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has won the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize for “for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation, and in particular for his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighboring Eritrea.” 

The Nobel committee said during its announcement Friday that the coveted prize was also meant to recognize all the stakeholders working for peace and reconciliation in Ethiopia and in the East and Northeast African regions.

Ahmed clinched a peace deal with Eritrea President Isaias Afwerki last year that ended 20 years of the “no peace, no war” stalemate between the two countries.

According to TIME, at least 70,000 people were killed since the border disputes began in 1998, five years after Eritrea gained independence from Ethiopia.

Nobel literature prizes: Polish novelist Olga Tokarczuk, Austrian author Peter Handke win

Although thousands of political prisoners have been freed since Ahmed took office in April 2018, Ethiopia’s internal issues still divide the country. 

The Nobel committee acknowledged this in its announcement saying that even if much work remains in the unstable country, Ahmed had initiated important reforms that give “many citizens hope for a better life and a brighter future.” 

The African country faces elections next year. 

The Norwegian Nobel Institute said they still haven’t been able to get a hold of the Ethiopian leader.

The committee received nominations for 223 individuals and 78 organizations for the Swedish 9-million kronor, or $918,000, award. The list is kept secret for 50 years.

Last year’s winners were Congolese doctor Denis Mukwege and Yazidi Kurdish activist Nadia Murad for “their efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict.”

Although the list can’t be confirmed for another five decades, teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern were also predicted frontrunners for the prize.

President Donald Trump was also nominated for the 2019 prize by U.S. Republican congressional members for his efforts at securing denuclearization on the Korean Peninsula.

Past winners who came under criticism include former U.S. President Barack Obama, who won in 2009 after less than a year in office for his “extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples.” Critics interpreted his win as a political repudiation of George W. Bush’s presidency.

Contributing: Kim Hjelmgaard, USA TODAY; Associated Press. Follow Adrianna Rodriguez on Twitter: @AdriannaUSAT.

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Nobel Peace Prize Goes To Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1158934775-77bde96fec009862a970f24fa04d96c532d7f059-s1100-c15 Nobel Peace Prize Goes To Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed

Prime Minister of Ethiopia, Abiy Ahmed speaks during a news conference on general elections in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in August. Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Nobel Peace Prize Goes To Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed

Prime Minister of Ethiopia, Abiy Ahmed speaks during a news conference on general elections in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in August.

Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Updated at 5:20 a.m. ET

The Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed “for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation” in resolving the border conflict with neighboring Eritrea, the Norwegian Nobel Committee in Oslo said Friday.

Berit Reiss-Andersen, the chairwoman of the five-member committee that made the award, credited Ahmed with a peace initiative aimed at ending two decades of conflict between the two east-African neighbors that began over border disputes in 1998 only a few years after Eritrea gained independence.

“When Abiy Ahmed became prime minster in April 2018, he made it clear he wishes to resume pace talks with Eritrea,” she said. “In close cooperation with the president of Eritrea, Abiy Ahmed quickly worked out the principles for a peace agreement to end the long no peace stalemate between the two countries.

When Ahmed took office, he freed political prisoners and managed in the same year to sign a peace deal with the Eritrean leader, Isaias Afwerki — agreeing in the process to cede disputed land to his country’s erstwhile enemy.

“Peace does not arise from the actions of one party alone,” Reiss-Andersen said. “When Prime Minister Abiy reached out his hand, President Afwerki grasped it, and helped to formalize the peace process between the two countries.”

“Additionally, Abiy Ahmed has sought to mediate between Kenya and Somalia in their protracted conflict over rights to a disputed marine area. There is now hope for a resolution to this conflict,” she said.

“In Sudan, the military regime and the opposition have returned to the negotiating table. On the 17th of August, they released a joint draft of a new constitution intended to secure a peaceful transition to civil rule in the country. Prime Minister Abiy played a key role in the process that led to the agreement,” Reiss-Andersen added.

As NPR’s Eyder Peralta noted in December, “Seemingly overnight, [Ahmed] opened up a democratic space — allowing foes, allies and regular Ethiopians a chance to speak their minds — after decades of authoritarian rule.”

Several names were considered top contenders for this years prize, including Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old Swedish climate activist. German Chancellor Angela Merkel and pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong were also under consideration.

The selection committee consists of five people selected by Norway’s parliament.

Since 1901, there have been 99 Nobel Peace Prizes awarded to individuals and 24 have gone to organizations.

So far this week, 11 Nobel laureates have been named, of whom 10 are men.

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Five feel-good stories from this week you don’t want to miss

Grab the tissues.

Here are some good stories of surprises, inspiration, and giving back that we could all use this week.

1. STOP! IT’S BIRTHDAY TIME!

Community surprises crossing guard for this 80th birthday

Crossing guard Alec Childress got a big surprise Thursday when he showed up to the corner of 9th and Lake streets in Wilmette, Ill., where he greets children with a smile and the phrase, “Peace, I gotcha!”

But after 14 years of doing this job after retiring, the man who always has something to say was left speechless.

“It was awesome!” Childress told Fox News of the community surprise. “All the kids, the parents…It’s beyond comprehension. I told somebody I need to sit down before I fall down.”

Read the full story here.

2. GIVING BACK

Cured patient returns to hospital as employee

Westlake Legal Group back-to-hospita-421587 Five feel-good stories from this week you don't want to miss fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/faith-values fnc Caleb Parke article 293e1ed5-5558-5c35-8f10-4a71227660c2

Cancer survivor Katy Payne, 21, has just graduated as a nurse – and is set to work as a children’s nurse at the hospital where she was diagnosed with leukemia aged two. 

A nurse returns to work at the same hospital she was treated for leukemia as a child.

Katy Payne, 21, is a cancer survivor who grew up to become a pediatric nurse, starting her work at Colchester Hospital in Essex, in southeast England, as the newest employee.

“I remember patches of my time in hospital and some of the highs and lows,” Payne told SWNS of her cancer treatment. “The things I experienced have made me stronger, and I have always said I would like to give something back to the hospital, the doctors and the nurses, and everyone that’s been part of my journey.”

Read the full story here.

3. ‘EXCEPTIONAL COMMUNITY’ 

California ‘team of junior detectives’ find missing woman, 97, with dementia

Westlake Legal Group RosevilleKids1 Five feel-good stories from this week you don't want to miss fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/faith-values fnc Caleb Parke article 293e1ed5-5558-5c35-8f10-4a71227660c2

The search party that helped located the 97-year-old woman. (City of Roseville, California Police Department)

A group of young neighborhood sleuths surprised the Roseville Police Department when they called 9-1-1 in response to a missing woman’s notice.

Glenneta Belford, 97, who suffers from dementia and is non-verbal, was found just a few hours after police posted her missing online.

Logan Hultman, Kashton Claiborne and Makenna Rogers, who are all 10, and 11-year-old Hope Claiborne set out and eventually found Belford, several hours after she was reported missing, hiding in bushes a few blocks away from their homes.

“This is a great example of our exceptional community coming together to lend a helping hand. This proves a great point, age is just a number and anyone can help out in a time of need,” police said in a Facebook post.

Read the full story here.

4. ‘JUST ANOTHER DAY’

Chick-fil-A employee climbs into storm drain to help customer

Westlake Legal Group shauna-hill-chick-fil-a Five feel-good stories from this week you don't want to miss fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/faith-values fnc Caleb Parke article 293e1ed5-5558-5c35-8f10-4a71227660c2

Chick-fil-A has been voted America’s favorite, cleanest and most polite fast-food chain — and now, it might have clinched another victory as the most helpful.

Shauna Hall was visiting the restaurant in Stafford, Va., last week with her son, but as soon as Hall got out of her van, she dropped her iPhone into a storm drain and she was especially upset because she “just paid off” the phone and had purchased a new Otterbox phone case only days before.

Seth, a Chick-fil-A employee, offered to help.

“Not only did he slice his finger and was filthy from laying on the ground and climbing in the hole, I find out he had actually just gotten off shift and was still willing to help me,” Hall said. “Service with a smile. Just another day at Chick-fil-A.”

Read the full story here.

5. FAITH ON THE FIELD

Students across the nation celebrate faith on football fields

Over 250,000 students participated in the Fellowship of Christian Athletes’ student-led “Fields of Faith” event, tackling tough issues like suicide and depression and giving students the opportunity to “open up their life to Christ.”

Julianna Braniecki, president of the FCA chapter at her university, Huddle at Hofstra, shared on “Fox & Friends” Thursday how students had speakers, musicians (including rappers), and student testimonies during the “Fields of Faith” events.

“Last night at Hofstra, we had the pleasure of hosting our first Fields of Faith event…It was really a powerful experience,” she added. “My faith is something that is very important to me, and through my experience with FCA, that has greatly increased that and grown in my love for Christ.”

Read the full story here.

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Westlake Legal Group AlecChildress Five feel-good stories from this week you don't want to miss fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/faith-values fnc Caleb Parke article 293e1ed5-5558-5c35-8f10-4a71227660c2   Westlake Legal Group AlecChildress Five feel-good stories from this week you don't want to miss fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/faith-values fnc Caleb Parke article 293e1ed5-5558-5c35-8f10-4a71227660c2

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