web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 63)

How Much Hotter Are The Oceans? The Answer Begins With A Bucket

Westlake Legal Group bluemarble_2014089_lrg-443dac37eca3ea7e912f79fd69126f8caa3906c1-s1100-c15 How Much Hotter Are The Oceans? The Answer Begins With A Bucket
Westlake Legal Group  How Much Hotter Are The Oceans? The Answer Begins With A Bucket

Scientists are using statistics, history and computer modeling to understand exactly how much hotter the oceans are today then they were before industrialization. Harvard researchers just found a clue in shipping records digitized after WWII.

Suomi NPP — VIIRS/NASA Earth Observatory

If you want to know what climate change will look like, you need to know what Earth’s climate looked like in the past: what air temperatures were like, for example, and what ocean currents and sea levels were doing. You need to know what polar ice caps and glaciers were up to and — crucially — how hot the oceans were.

“Most of the earth is water,” explains Peter Huybers, a climate scientist at Harvard University. “If you want to understand what global temperatures have been doing, you better understand, in detail, the rates that different parts of the ocean are warming.”

Easier said than done.

In order to know how ocean temperature is changing today, scientists rely on more than a century’s worth of temperature data gathered by sailors who used buckets to gather samples of water.

It’s the best information available about how hot the oceans were before the middle of the 20th century, but it’s full of errors and biases. Making the historical data more reliable led researchers on a wild investigation that involved advanced statistics and big data, along with early 20th century shipbuilding norms and Asian maritime history.

“I sometimes joke with my friends, I’m not only a climate scientist, I’m a detective!” says Duo Chan, a graduate student who led much of the analysis for an influential study published early this year.

The underlying problem Chan and Huybers were dealing with is that different countries used buckets made of different materials, in different sizes, on different lengths of rope — all things that could change a temperature reading.

[embedded content]

YouTube

For example, the water in a mid-size canvas bucket can lose up to 0.5 degree Celsius over the course of just a couple minutes, says Chan.

“Half a degree doesn’t sound like a big deal, right? However if you look at the whole global warming, it’s only, like, 1 degree,” Chan explains. “Every 0.1 degree matters a lot.”

Loading…

He and Huybers set out to find and correct those tiny errors and biases within a massive database of historical sea surface temperature measurements maintained by researchers at the National Oceanography Centre in the United Kingdom.

The database has millions of entries from more than 100 sources, including Japanese whaling ships, Dutch naval vessels and a Norwegian Antarctic fleet. It’s difficult figure out how reliable any given measurement is.

“This is like if someone left you all their receipts that they had ever spent during their lives, and you were trying to piece together what they had been doing,” says Huybers.

“It’s a big data problem,” says Chan, a “statistical nightmare.”

They approached the nightmare from a novel angle: What if they could compare the measurements made by sailors from different countries, to see if some countries were systematically warmer or cooler in their temperature readings?

To do that, they paired up measurements that happened when ships were close to each other, so sailors were measuring the same part of the ocean at around the same time, and then looked for patterns. The most stark pattern had to do with temperatures taken by Japanese ships in the 1930s: the measurements were too cold.

But why? Chan hypothesized that bigger ships might be to blame — perhaps buckets full of water were swaying in the wind for longer as they made their way up to higher decks, losing heat in the process. He analyzed Japanese ship data, and even learned to read Japanese to do it, and found that, indeed, Japanese ships had gotten taller.

But that all ended up being a red herring. Bigger ships weren’t to blame for the erroneously low temperature measurements. The answer was even more mundane, and couldn’t be solved using complex statistics or fancy computer models. Instead, the answer was written on an old U.S. Air Force document.

While Chan and Huybers were analyzing their millions of data pairs, researchers Elizabeth Kent and David Berry at the National Oceanography Centre in the United Kingdom had been going through thousands of pages of old documents about the data as part of their ongoing work to maintain the full sea surface temperature database.

The Japanese data in question had been digitized by the U.S. military after World War II, and one day Kent emailed Chan and Huybers with a clue.

“[She] sent us an email with just one PDF attached and it was a scan of a U.S. Air Force data sheet and she had circled part of the data sheet and she said ‘hey, look at what we found here!’ “

She had circled the word “truncation.”

When the data was digitized, the U.S. military had dropped everything after the decimal point. A measurement of 15.1 degrees and a measurement of 15.9 degrees were both recorded as simply 15 degrees. Repeated over and over, those missing tenths of a degree added up to artificially cold measurements.

Kent says she had mixed feeling when she realized the data had been rounded down to the nearest degree.

“Of course it was great that we knew how the data had been handled, so we can treat it appropriately in our analyses,” she wrote in an email. “But it’s also very frustrating that we don’t have the full precision of each observation as it was recorded.”

Still, knowing what happened allows scientists to understand what they’re working with. The newly corrected data has far-reaching implications for climate science. Sea surface temperature is a big part of every major climate model, and for decades scientists have struggled to understand how the Pacific Ocean’s relatively cool temperatures in the early 20th century fit into the overall trend of a warming planet.

“Often when you find errors in data it makes your life more complicated,” says Huybers. “In this case it’s actually the opposite.”

Of course, if you zoom out, a warmer Pacific isn’t particularly great news for humanity. “If you correct for the Japanese measurements, then basically you would warm up the global trend,” says Chan. “That actually implies or suggests that maybe the human contribution is greater than what we used to think.”

But, he says, having a more accurate understanding of the past climate is important if scientists want to understand what the future holds, which will be crucial if humans hope to avoid the most catastrophic effects of climate change.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

A CBP Officer Shot An American In The Head And There’s Still No Answers

NOGALES, Ariz. ― U.S. Customs and Border Protection won’t say much about how one of its officers came to shoot Angel Mendivil Perez, a 21-year-old Americanin the head at the Dennis DeConcini border crossing here earlier this year. 

The port of entry, which straddles a multilane road in downtown Nogales, is a busy one. On a typical day, vehicles are lined up, filled with people who cross the border to work, eat, shop or visit family. Pedestrians use a walkway near the road, sometimes waiting for hours to present identification to enter the United States. Southbound travelers usually sail through. It’s not general practice for CBP to stop drivers of vehicles leaving the U.S. for Mexico unless they have a reason or they’re doing random checks. 

Around 7 p.m. on Feb. 7, Mendivil Perez tried to exit the U.S. in a pickup truck with a license plate registered to a different vehicle, according to a brief statement CBP released that month.

When Mendivil Perez, who was with a male passenger, got to the crossing, CBP officers approached the truck and questioned him. During questioning, Mendivil Perez accelerated toward Mexico, according to CBP’s statement. At this time, a CBP officer fired his gun. The officer and Mendivil Perez’s passenger were uninjured. Mendivil Perez was shot. The truck crashed into a cement barrier a few yards into Mexico. 

Westlake Legal Group 5d541ae92200003100f587f3 A CBP Officer Shot An American In The Head And There’s Still No Answers

SOPA Images via Getty Images The border crossing station in Nogales, Arizona. 

Mendivil Perez, in such critical condition that the mayor here initially told local news he was dead, was taken to a hospital in Mexico, moved across the border, and eventually airlifted to Banner – University Medical Center Tucson in Arizona. He survived. 

More than six months later, CBP,  citing the ongoing investigation, won’t name the officer who fired his gun, explain why he fired, or explicitly acknowledge that a bullet from the officer’s gun struck Mendivil Perez. The agency has not claimed Mendivil Perez or his passenger were armed — Mendivil Perez’s attorney, Bill Risner, said it’s clear Mendivil Perez and his passenger were unarmed; a CBP official wouldn’t comment — nor will the agency explain why an officer would have fired if the vehicle’s occupants were unarmed.

The mayor, who did respond to a request for comment, claimed he was told — it was unclear by whom — that Mendivil Perez attempted to run over an officer. CBP won’t say whether the truck was moving toward an officer or anyone else. And it won’t say whether it believes the officer’s decision to fire was justifiable.  

Why did this happen? What was the reason why they even shot at him in the first place? Eleonora Mendivil, sister of Angel Mendivil Perez

Things take a while “because we want to get it right,” said a CBP official who was granted anonymity because that was the only condition under which CBP would agree to a phone interview on this matter. The general investigation process includes interviewing people and looking at physical evidence, along with a review by other law enforcement entities to see whether there is a case for criminal charges. There is also a review of the agency’s policy. During that time, “we try to keep everything as evidence — and when you have evidence, you don’t want to make that public,” the official added.

Six months on, Mendivil Perez has not been charged with a crime related to the incident, according to his attorney. Mendivil Perez’s passenger, whom HuffPost has not been able to locate, was released at the scene by Mexican authorities. No federal charges were filed against either of them as of Aug. 13, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Arizona said in an email.

Louis Fidel, an attorney in Tucson who represents the officer who fired his weapon, declined to answer specific questions about the circumstances of the shooting. “There was an imminent serious threat of physical injury that was the basis of the decision to shoot,” he said.

Mendivil Perez also doesn’t have much to offer about what happened. The last thing he remembers, he said, is shopping for groceries to bring to his pregnant girlfriend, who lives in Mexico. He woke up after that in the hospital with a gunshot wound to the left side of his head, a fractured skull, and ballistic fragments remaining in his brain. 

Mendivil Perez’s mother, Nora Perez, and his 29-year-old sister, Eleonora Mendivil, also said they still don’t know much about what happened. The night of the shooting, they rushed to meet Mendivil Perez at the hospital in Mexico where he was first taken. His sister was “screaming, yelling, crying,” she said, initially only knowing that her little brother had been shot in the head. 

“There’s still that why. The por qué. Why did this happen? What was the reason why they even shot at him in the first place?” Mendivil said. 

“It’s like why, why, why, why.” 

Westlake Legal Group 5d541bad2400009a01b7d2fe A CBP Officer Shot An American In The Head And There’s Still No Answers

Ash Ponders for HuffPost Nora Perez stands behind her son Angel Mendivil Perez just outside their attorney’s offices in downtown Tucson, Arizona, on Aug. 12, 2019.

Shooting at a moving vehicle whose occupants are unarmed is usually a bad idea, many policing experts say. A growing number of law enforcement agencies have banned their officers from doing so. For years — following cases that include a plainclothes Border Patrol agent shooting a San Diego mother of five in her car in 2012, killing her — experts and advocates have urged CBP to join the trend. But the agency still does not fully prohibit the practice.

The logic behind the bans is simple: It is difficult to shoot a moving car accurately, and injuring or killing the driver isn’t likely to disable or stop the threat of the car. If a suspect is fleeing in a vehicle, shooting them may make the situation more dangerous. With an incapacitated driver, a car becomes an unguided missile that can careen into officers and innocent bystanders. 

“You could get that vehicle or you could get that individual another day, but you can’t get that life back,” said Chuck Wexler, the executive director of the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF), a police research and policy organization.

There are rare exceptions. Some city police departments, for example, have recently started allowing officers to shoot at cars used in vehicle-ramming terrorist attacks. But generally, in cases where a suspect is in an oncoming car, getting out of the way is a safer option than shooting the driver.

Most of the time, the officer can move away, said Geoffrey Alpert, a professor at the University of South Carolina who has been conducting research on high-risk police activities for more than 30 years. In most scenarios, he added, drivers are trying to escape — not intentionally run over officers.

This idea also isn’t new. In 1972, there were almost 1,000 total New York City Police Department officer shooting incidents. That year, the agency adopted a new policy prohibiting officers from shooting at a moving vehicle unless a person in the vehicle was using or threatening deadly force by means other than the vehicle itselfThat and other reforms resulted in a sharp reduction in the number of shooting incidents involving NYPD officers the following year, according to a report by PERF. That trend has continued, PERF wrote, with no negative effect on officer safety.  

Not all police departments have the same policy — and some police advocates have stopped short of supporting a complete ban on firing at moving vehicles. Officers who do it aren’t necessarily going to be charged with wrongdoing: In the U.S., law enforcement officers can legally use deadly force whenever they reasonably believe a person poses a deadly threat. This has translated into broad legal protection for cops — including when they shoot unarmed people, disproportionately people of color. Police have killed nearly 200 people who were in vehicles when they were shot since 2015, many of whom police said were “armed” only with the vehicle, according to a 2017 article in The Washington Post.

Nonetheless, for decades, the trend in police departments has been to move toward more restrictions or total bans on shooting at unarmed people in moving cars. Many major city police departments have followed the NYPD’s lead, and officials in the Obama administration’s Justice Department have promoted the policy of banning this practice.

You could get that vehicle or you could get that individual another day, but you can’t get that life back. Chuck Wexler, executive director of the Police Executive Research Forum

CBP, which has more expansive powers than other law enforcement entities, has claimed that it faces unique circumstances. It has also resisted adopting other best practices promoted by policing experts.

The agency has tested but not yet adopted the use of body cameras like modern city police departments. In the past, Border Patrol agents have shot at people allegedly throwing rocks, a practice condemned by international human rights advocates because thrown rocks don’t usually present a serious threat. And CBP is out of step with a number of other police agencies on the issue of car chases, a sweeping investigation by ProPublica and the Los Angeles Times found earlier this year. 

Years ago, advocates and experts urged CBP to adopt guidelines that more strictly limit officers’ ability to shoot at unarmed people in moving cars, as part of the larger reform efforts started under President Barack Obama’s administration

Westlake Legal Group 5d5425c12400009301b7d797 A CBP Officer Shot An American In The Head And There’s Still No Answers

John Moore via Getty Images An officer from the U.S. Office of Field Operations stands near the U.S.-Mexico border on Feb. 26, 2013, in Nogales, Arizona. Some 15,000 people cross between Mexico and the U.S. each day in Nogales, Arizona’s busiest border crossing.

Under Obama, CBP asked for a review of its officers’ and agents’ use of force, which covered January 2010 through October 2012. The resulting review, conducted by PERF and dated February 2013, identified this issue as one that needed “significant change.” Looking at 15 cases in which CBP agents fired at vehicles, PERF found that the agency appeared to allow officers to shoot at the driver of “any suspect vehicle” that came “in the direction of agents.” In many cases, agents were suspected to have moved into the exit path of a fleeing car on purpose, PERF wrote. Additionally, some agents on foot appeared to shoot at fleeing cars “out of frustration.” 

PERF recommended that CBP change its training and its policy to reflect the policies that “have proven effective in a number of large U.S. jurisdictions for over 40 years.” In May 2014, CBP announced it was revamping training and released a revised policy handbook that incorporated “law enforcement best practices,” according to the agency.

But the handbook didn’t exactly mirror PERF’s recommendation to avoid shooting at moving cars unless there’s a deadly use of force other than a moving vehicle. Instead, the new version carved out exemptions for circumstances in which the car itself is the only serious threat and noted that the hazard of an uncontrolled vehicle should be taken “into consideration.” 

Gil Kerlikowske, who served as commissioner of CBP from March 2014 to January 2017, told HuffPost that CBP didn’t adopt PERF’s recommended language because the CBP agents face different environmental conditions than city police officers. He cited a case in San Diego in which an agent fired at a vehicle on a “one-lane dirt road — so on the one side is a rock wall, on the other side is a 30- to 40-foot drop.” He added, “that land doesn’t always lend itself to being able to get out of the way, so we left that option open to the Border Patrol.” (Alpert, the professor, said city police officers also face situations where they can’t get out of the way because of the environment.) 

“There was enough of an environmental and operational change to not institute a blanket prohibition,” a CBP official confirmed. The agency would never want to cause officers or agents to make a “split-second decision involving their life or the life of another person due to a blanket prohibition in the policy,” the official added.

Looking at 15 cases in which CBP agents fired at vehicles, PERF found that the agency appeared to allow officers to shoot at the driver of ‘any suspect vehicle’ that came ‘in the direction of agents.’

In June 2015, a second group of law enforcement professionals, the Homeland Security Advisory Council’s CBP Integrity Advisory Panel, co-chaired by then-New York City Police Commissioner Bill Bratton, reviewed the handbook and still recommended CBP consider placing specific restrictions on firing at moving vehicles. 

CBP viewed this as a “blanket prohibition” as well, and instead opted to emphasize training, the CBP official said. As part of the agency’s umbrella training on safe tactics, officers are specifically told they shouldn’t use their bodies to physically block a vehicle’s path.

The agency has made some progress on the reforms started under Obama. CBP’s use-of-force incidents involving firearms have been down “pretty markedly over the years,” Kerlikowske noted.  This is reflected in CBP data, which only recorded 15 use-of-force incidents involving firearms in FY2018, compared to 55 in FY2012. Under Obama, focusing on the vehicle issue wasn’t as critical as looking at the use of deadly force overall, the agency’s policy and its antiquated training, Kerlikowske argued. “The vehicle issue with the Border Patrol was never quite as significant as it is in a city police department,” he added. 

When asked whether CBP believed it followed the best practices promoted by other police departments, a CBP official replied: “I would say that we are in line with the intent of most other policies, although we probably do not follow their policies verbatim.”

But some civil rights advocates say CBP’s policy doesn’t go far enough. The American Civil Liberties Union has seen multiple cases since 2014 that suggest CBP’s lower standard on shooting at vehicles appears to have “led to lethal force incidents by CBP personnel that would be prohibited under prevailing standards,” said Chris Rickerd, a senior policy counsel at the ACLU. 

HuffPost identified several other recent cases where CBP officers appeared to shoot at moving cars. In February 2015,  for example, a Border Patrol agent running toward a Ford Explorer saw the car “moving towards him” and attempted to move out of the way, according to a probable cause statement in a complaint filed by the U.S. government. The agent then fired to “stop the vehicle from running him over,” according to the government, and the car “narrowly missed” him and fled. In another case on March 14, 2016, CBP officers fired after a driver “failed to comply with verbal commands to stop the vehicle,” according to the brief CBP statement. (A CBP official declined to comment on these cases, citing ongoing investigations.) 

The ACLU urges CBP leadership to end its “unjustified exceptionalism” and to change the policy to adopt the recommendations from PERF and the Homeland Security Advisory Council’s CBP Integrity Advisory Panel, Rickerd said.

Speaking of the current policy, he added, “we are deeply saddened by the unnecessary suffering that it has caused.”

Westlake Legal Group 5d541cab3b0000a912db89a3 A CBP Officer Shot An American In The Head And There’s Still No Answers

ARIANA DREHSLER via Getty Images A metal fence marked with the U.S. Border Patrol insignia prevents people from getting close to the barbed/concertina wire covering the larger border fence in Nogales, Arizona, on Feb. 9, 2019.

In June, I drove with Mendivil Perez’s family more than an hour south from Tucson, past Elephant Head, a large rock formation that resembles the grizzled head of the animal. We were meeting Mendivil Perez on the Mexican side of the DeConcini crossing, within sight of the place he was shot months before.  When we got out of the car in Nogales, Arizona, to get ready to cross on foot, his sister and his mother, Nora, set up a black wheelchair for him on the sidewalk. 

Mendivil Perez’s family is small and close-knit. Nora, who had the sort of face that could be wholly consumed by a smile or a frown, was born in Tucson, Arizona, and grew up in Magdalena de Kino, Mexico. She later returned to the United States and now works as a custodian in Tucson.    

Mendivil Perez had woken up early that morning to catch a bus from Magdalena, where he was visiting his pregnant girlfriend, whom he has since married. His family had been planning a wedding for them before the shooting, but because of it, his sister told me, “we couldn’t make it a nice little wedding.” They got married through court instead. 

Mendivil Perez’s sister Eleonora hoped they might still have an opportunity to make up the celebration. “Memories mean a lot,” she said. “I would want my brother to at least experience something nice.” 

On the Mexican side of the border, when Mendivil Perez stepped out of the taxi he took from the bus station, he moved in the delicate manner of a much older man. He could move a short distance using a walker but relied on a wheelchair for longer distances. He was in rehabilitation, working to walk again and living with his mother in her mobile home. His family described him as struggling to keep his balance and forgetting conversations as he recovered from his brain injury.

When Mendivil Perez first found out he and his partner were having a girl, his sister said, he repeated himself: “Oh, did I tell you guys, I’m having a girl?” Yes, she said. “You already told us this, brother.”   

Westlake Legal Group 5d541db32200002f00f58932 A CBP Officer Shot An American In The Head And There’s Still No Answers

Ash Ponders for HuffPost Eleonora Mendivil stands beside her brother, Angel Mendivil Perez, in her home in Tucson, Arizona, on Aug. 12, 2019. “I have to be dependent on somebody, like my sister or my mother, to get from point A to point B. I just want to be independent,” says Mendivil Perez.

Mendivil Perez’s medical bills are high; an incomplete bill HuffPost viewed that included the helicopter services to transfer him to the hospital in Arizona totaled over $117,000. His family said they were getting benefits through Arizona’s Medicaid agency. Previously, Mendivil Perez held down various part-time jobs, including landscaping. But now, “I have to be dependent on somebody, like my sister or my mother, to get from point A to point B,”  he told me, his voice so soft I had to crane closer to make out the words. “I just want to be independent,” he added.

Mendivil Perez said he was focused on his baby, who’s due in August. “As long as I can get myself to walk, I’m looking forward to getting a job,” he said. “That’s another thing that’s getting complicated, because the baby needs stuff and I can’t be like, ‘Oh, I’m going to go to work.’” 

The family is planning to file a claim and proceed with a lawsuit under the Federal Tort Claims Act, said Risner, Mendivil Perez’s attorney. They had not yet received any of the reports or information they requested from CBP, he noted. A CBP official and the officer’s attorney declined to comment on the planned lawsuit. 

As Eleonora pushed her brother’s wheelchair past the packed pedestrian side of the port of entry toward the United States, the mood was a bit anxious. She had told me earlier that her brother couldn’t really have anyone behind him anymore. “He thinks that everybody has a gun. He thinks everybody wants to shoot at him,” she said.   

I remembered how she emphasized that Mendivil Perez was “a really good kid,” and “not a bad, terrible kid.” But ultimately, whether Mendivil Perez was a “good” or “bad” kid is irrelevant to the question of why the officer shot him. The investigation will instead answer the legal question of whether the officer felt his or others’ safety was sufficiently jeopardized to use a form of force that very likely could have ended the 21-year-old’s life.

And there’s a larger question, too: the question of not just what the officer was allowed to do, but what he should have done — whether he needed to fire at all.  

A CBP official emphasized that generally, the review process for use-of-force incidents involves circling back to training, tactics and procedures so CBP can learn from these cases and “become better as an agency.”

But CBP is “used to operating with impunity” and “they’re never going to admit a mistake,” argued Richard Boren, a volunteer with the Border Patrol Victims Network, which advocates on behalf of families. “To me, there’s really no question that they nearly murdered an innocent person.” 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Afghanistan vows to crush Islamic State havens after attack on wedding party

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Afghanistan’s president on Monday vowed to “eliminate” all safe havens of the Islamic State group as the country marked a subdued 100th Independence Day after a horrific wedding attack claimed by the local IS affiliate.

President Ashraf Ghani’s comments came as Afghanistan mourns at least 63 people, including children, killed in the Kabul bombing at a wedding hall late Saturday night. Close to 200 others were wounded.

Many outraged Afghans ask whether an approaching deal between the United States and the Taliban to end nearly 18 years of fighting — America’s longest war — will bring peace to long-suffering civilians. The bomber detonated his explosives in the middle of a dancing crowd, and the IS affiliate later said he had targeted a gathering of minority Shiites, whom it views as apostates deserving of death.

Both the bride and groom survived, and in an emotional interview with local broadcaster TOLOnews the distraught groom, Mirwais Alani, said their lives were devastated within seconds.

A sharply worded Taliban statement questioned why the U.S. failed to identify the attackers in advance. Another Taliban statement marking the independence day said to “leave Afghanistan to the Afghans.”

More than anything in their nearly year-long negotiations with the U.S., the Taliban want some 20,000 U.S. and allied forces to withdraw from the country. The U.S. for its part wants Taliban assurances that Afghanistan — which hosted al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden before 9/11 — will not be a launching pad for global terror attacks.

The U.S. envoy in talks with the Taliban, Zalmay Khalilzad, on Sunday said the peace process should be accelerated to help Afghanistan defeat the IS affiliate. That would include intra-Afghan talks on the country’s future.

But Ghani on Monday asserted that the Taliban, whom the U.S. now hopes will help to curb the IS affiliate’s rise, are just as much to blame for the wedding attack. His government is openly frustrated at being sidelined from the U.S. talks with the insurgent group, which regards the Afghan government as a U.S. puppet.

The Taliban “have created the platform for terrorists” with their own brutal assaults on schools, mosques and other public places over the years, the president said.

More than 32,000 civilians in Afghanistan have been killed in the past decade, the United Nations said earlier this year. More children were killed last year — 927 — than in any other over the past decade by all actors, the U.N. said, including in operations against insurgent hideouts carried out by international forces.

“We will take revenge for every civilian drop of blood,” Ghani declared. “Our struggle will continue against (IS), we will take revenge and will root them out.” He urged the international community to join those efforts.

He asserted that safe havens for militants are across the border in Pakistan, whose intelligence service has long been accused of supporting the Taliban. The IS affiliate’s claim of the wedding attack said it was carried out by a Pakistani fighter seeking martyrdom.

Ghani called on people in Pakistan “who very much want peace” to help identify militant safe havens there.

Last month after meeting with President Donald Trump, Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan insisted he will do his best to persuade the Taliban to open negotiations with the Afghan government to resolve the war.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Trump on Sunday told reporters he doesn’t want Afghanistan to be a “laboratory for terror.” He was briefed on Friday on the progress of the U.S.-Taliban talks, of which few details have emerged.

In a message marking Afghanistan’s independence and “century of resilience,” U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called the weekend wedding bombing “an attack against humanity.” It was one of many international expressions of condemnation pouring in following the attack.

Westlake Legal Group Afghan-Wedding-Blast-THUMB Afghanistan vows to crush Islamic State havens after attack on wedding party fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fnc/world fnc Associated Press article a20c7556-6b00-5c16-9248-87269e11eb87   Westlake Legal Group Afghan-Wedding-Blast-THUMB Afghanistan vows to crush Islamic State havens after attack on wedding party fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fnc/world fnc Associated Press article a20c7556-6b00-5c16-9248-87269e11eb87

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Amid Homelessness Crisis, Los Angeles Restricts Living In Vehicles

Westlake Legal Group homeless-rvs-a9caed3747d717d5edc9bc4c51e5a0dff2a619c7-s1100-c15 Amid Homelessness Crisis, Los Angeles Restricts Living In Vehicles

RVs line neighborhood streets in Los Angeles, where some 10,000 people live in vehicles. Anna Scott/KCRW hide caption

toggle caption

Anna Scott/KCRW

Westlake Legal Group  Amid Homelessness Crisis, Los Angeles Restricts Living In Vehicles

RVs line neighborhood streets in Los Angeles, where some 10,000 people live in vehicles.

Anna Scott/KCRW

Along a big, commercial street in L.A.’s North Hollywood area, near a row of empty storefronts, about a half dozen motor homes sat parked on a recent morning. Inside one of them, 67-year-old Edith Grays and her husband watched TV with the door open. Grays said they’d been there a few days, despite a two-hour parking limit.

“Thank God they’re not bothering us right now,” she said.

It’s not unusual to see clusters of campers around the city. Grays is one of nearly 10,000 people who live in vehicles inside L.A. city limits. Some take shelter in cars, others in vans or trucks, but RVs are the most visible. They’re also the most difficult to park – especially now.

L.A.’s City Council recently reinstated an ordinance that bans sleeping overnight in vehicles in residential areas. The law also forbids living in a vehicle within a block of a park, school or daycare. Tickets for violating the rules start at $25 for a first offense, $50 for the second time and $75 after that.

Neighborhoods divided

Residents who support the restrictions say vehicle encampments have caused parking shortages and sanitation issues. Critics say that without alternatives to parking on the street, the rules are inhumane.

“This is a stupid law,” said Mel Tillekeratne, executive director of a homelessness nonprofit called The Shower of Hope, during a recent public meeting. “This law…is going to directly contribute to these people being on the street.”

For Edith Grays, who ran a window-washing business with her husband until he had a series of strokes and couldn’t work, losing their motorhome is a big fear. She said they moved into it after not being able to afford rent anymore and she takes care to avoid being ticketed or towed. When asked how much of her time is spent looking for parking or planning where to park next, Grays replied: “All of it.”

“It’s very difficult,” she said. “It causes a lot of stress in my life.”

Just a couple of miles away, however, homeowner Walter Hall says RV encampments have choked major streets, and that public urination by people living in vehicles has been a problem for at least one local park. “That’s the kind of thing we would prefer not to see,” he said.

Hall supports the city having rules around vehicle dwelling, but said enforcement should be tougher. A 2018 report from the Los Angeles Police Department said that officers issued about 10 citations a month, partly because it’s difficult to confirm when people are living in vehicles.

One result, Hall said, is that the restrictions mostly just shuffle people from one location to another.

“They disappear one place only to reappear someplace else,” he said.

A national problem

Los Angeles isn’t the only city struggling to balance the rights of those with homes and the rights of those without homes. Over the past decade, municipalities around the country with large homeless populations have passed laws banning activities like panhandling or sleeping in public areas.

Ordinances limiting where people can live in vehicles are now the fastest-growing type of such restrictions, according to the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty.

For decades it was completely illegal to live in a vehicle in L.A. But in 2014, as homelessness swelled, that policy was struck down in federal court. The city then came up with the current ordinance, but it expired in July, so the city council had to vote on renewing it for another six months.

One reason it had lapsed is that it was intended to be a stop-gap while the city expanded its safe parking program, which provides after-hours lots specifically designated for overnight vehicle camping. The program also provides security and bathroom access. But that plan has lagged, partly due to budget issues, and L.A. has only about 100 safe parking spaces for more than 5,000 vehicles in which people live.

The day of the city council vote on extending the parking restrictions, dozens of opponents showed up at city hall to argue that without safe parking options, the policy is cruel.

“Several of the families at my children’s elementary school are struggling with homelessness,” said Erika Feresten. “It’s unconscionable that they would be criminalized.”

After hearing nearly an hour of solid opposition, the council voted 13-0 to reinstate the rules, prompting the crowd to start chanting, “Shame on you!”

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti says he expects to add another 200 safe parking spaces in the next few months. In the meantime, he said, the city has homeless outreach teams dedicated to finding people in vehicles and connecting them with social services.

“We want to make it easier” for people living in vehicles, Garcetti said, “but we also have to have that balance…making sure that it’s not going to be chaos out there.”

The parking restrictions will go to the city council again early next year.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

This Day in History: Aug. 19

On this day, Aug. 19 …

2004: Google begins trading on the Nasdaq Stock Market, ending the day up $15.34 at $100.34.

Also on this day:

  • 1812: The USS Constitution defeats the British frigate HMS Guerriere off Nova Scotia during the War of 1812, earning the nickname “Old Ironsides.”
  • 1848: The New York Herald reports the discovery of gold in California.
  • 1909: The first automobile races are run at the just-opened Indianapolis Motor Speedway.
  • 1934: A plebiscite in Germany approves the vesting of sole executive power in Adolf Hitler.
  • 1976: President Gerald R. Ford wins the Republican presidential nomination at the party’s convention in Kansas City.
  • 1990: Leonard Bernstein conducts what turned out to be the last concert of his career at Tanglewood in Lenox, Mass. with the Boston Symphony Orchestra; the program ends with Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7.
Westlake Legal Group Hewitt081919 This Day in History: Aug. 19 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox-news/tech fox-news/politics/regulation/business fox news fnc/us fnc fc18e78e-d50a-51a7-b7a8-7bc2c1833758 article
  • 2009: Don Hewitt, the TV news pioneer who’d created CBS’ “60 Minutes,” dies at his Long Island, N.Y., home at age 86.
  • 2014: A video released by Islamic State militants purports to show the beheading of American journalist James Foley as retribution for U.S. airstrikes in Iraq.
Westlake Legal Group Manafort031319-e1552468269688 This Day in History: Aug. 19 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox-news/tech fox-news/politics/regulation/business fox news fnc/us fnc fc18e78e-d50a-51a7-b7a8-7bc2c1833758 article

FILE – In this May 23, 2018, file photo, Paul Manafort, President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, leaves the Federal District Court after a hearing in Washington. Manafort faces his second sentencing hearing in his many weeks, with a judge expected to tack on additional prison time beyond the roughly four-year punishment he has already received. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

  • 2017: Paul Manafort resigns as campaign chairman for Donald Trump.
Westlake Legal Group 566970-google-repair-search This Day in History: Aug. 19 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox-news/tech fox-news/politics/regulation/business fox news fnc/us fnc fc18e78e-d50a-51a7-b7a8-7bc2c1833758 article   Westlake Legal Group 566970-google-repair-search This Day in History: Aug. 19 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox-news/tech fox-news/politics/regulation/business fox news fnc/us fnc fc18e78e-d50a-51a7-b7a8-7bc2c1833758 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Job Training Can Change Lives. See How San Antonio Does It.

SAN ANTONIO — The economic odds facing Avigail Rodriguez a few years ago couldn’t have been much worse. An undocumented immigrant and a single mother, she lived in a cramped apartment in a tough neighborhood in San Antonio and earned just $9 an hour working as a nurse’s assistant.

Today, Ms. Rodriguez, 26, owns her own home in a safer area, earns nearly three times as much as she did before and has secured legal residency. The key to her turnaround was a training program called Project Quest, whose own ability to beat the odds is no less striking than that of Ms. Rodriguez.

Project Quest has succeeded where many similar retraining efforts have failed, taking workers lacking in skills and successfully positioning them for jobs where they can earn double or triple what they did previously.

“This really gives employers a chance to find workers they wouldn’t otherwise have considered,” said Lawrence Katz, a labor economist at Harvard University. “At the same time, it provides opportunities to a rather disadvantaged group of workers, both younger and older.”

Not that Project Quest makes it look easy. It spends about $11,000 per trainee, offering intensive coaching and financial help.

Project Quest’s record is drawing attention far beyond San Antonio. In December, the program won a $1 million grant from the Rockefeller Foundation and the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. Even with Quest’s insecure federal funding, a study released in April showed that compared with peers who didn’t complete the program, its graduates earn far more nearly a decade later.

These developments come as the need to keep up with fast-changing technologies in the workplace becomes more urgent. Last month, Amazon said it intended to retrain about one-third of its American work force, or about 100,000 employees, by 2025. And with a tight labor market, many employers find it difficult to identify workers who have the needed skills.

However well intentioned, most training efforts show limited results, said Paul Osterman, a professor at the M.I.T. Sloan School of Management, and Project Quest is a striking exception.

“If you had a list of all the efforts that claim to be job training programs and threw a dart, whatever you hit wouldn’t match the results of Project Quest,” he said. “It is scalable, and there is no reason every city and town in America can’t have something like it.”

Data published in April are the best evidence yet of how the San Antonio program is outperforming its peers. In a nine-year trial comparing a group of people who took part in Project Quest with a group who did not, the Quest graduates ended up earning $5,000 more annually. That was especially significant since earnings gains from training programs typically fade over time, Mr. Osterman said.

“The results were stunning,” said Mark Elliott, president of the Economic Mobility Corporation, a nonprofit research group that carried out the study. “These are the largest sustained earnings impacts we’ve ever seen in a work-force development program.”

Just as Project Quest is an outlier nationally, so is the United States among Western countries. Other nations have done a better job with training programs, said Anthony Carnevale, director of the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce.

Canada has a more robust two-year college system, Mr. Carnevale said, “and they spend a lot less that we do on postsecondary education and training and get a lot better results than we do.”

In Europe, there are separate tracks for apprenticeship programs in high school, but Americans are uncomfortable with tracking students at such a young age.

“You can go to Europe, see apprenticeships are great and come back and say, eureka, I found the answer!” Mr. Carnevale said. “But 20 years later, you’re still going to be banging your head against the wall.”

Project Quest was born 27 years ago in a Hispanic neighborhood in San Antonio where poverty rates are above the citywide average. After the closing of a Levi Strauss factory there, community groups created Project Quest as a way of preparing workers for better-paying, more highly skilled jobs that were less vulnerable but still in demand.

Although returning to school is the main goal, Project Quest isn’t aimed at recent high school graduates. The average age of participants is 30. Two-thirds are women, and more than 60 percent are Hispanic. Some hear about Project Quest through job fairs, church events, employers, the public housing authority or community colleges.

“These are not the kids coming out of school looking for a job,” said David Zammiello, Project Quest’s president. “These are people looking for a second chance.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_159329592_4249ff46-97e2-4bb3-9a14-8b1b4a50ceb4-articleLarge Job Training Can Change Lives. See How San Antonio Does It. Wages and Salaries Vocational Training United States Economy San Antonio (Tex) Project Quest Labor and Jobs Hiring and Promotion Careers and Professions

David Zammiello, executive director of Project Quest. “These are not the kids coming out of school looking for a job,” he said. “These are people looking for a second chance.”CreditJoanna Kulesza for The New York Times

Project Quest doesn’t do the training itself. Instead, it places 300 to 400 students each year with local community colleges and other schools where participants can complete degrees in health care and nursing, information technology and other fields where salaries and demand is high but qualified candidates are few.

This summer, it started a pilot project to train roofers in just three weeks, guaranteeing them jobs that pay $15 an hour and include benefits. Still, the bulk of Project Quest’s students — nearly 70 percent — are in health care.

Money is part of the equation, but not all of it. Project Quest provides half the cost of tuition and also helps with rent and utilities when necessary. Nearly half of Project Quest’s enrollees have children, so there’s financial assistance for child care, too.

But just as important is what staff members call the wraparound part of the program.

Participants are required to attend weekly V.I.P. (Vision, Initiative and Perseverance) sessions with Quest coaches, where they provide progress reports on classes and go over the ups and downs they experience. There are lessons in subjects like time management as well as advice on navigating coursework and college-level classes.

“It’s not just about training people,” Mr. Osterman of M.I.T. said. “This provides real support for the people involved.”

The V.I.P. sessions also provide moments where students who are struggling can seek out support from their comrades and their coaches. Typical trainees spend 18 months in the program, and as graduation nears, they are walked through mock job interviews and learn how to prepare a résumé and pitch themselves to employers.

“It was so essential,” said Ms. Rodriguez, who was brought to the United States by her parents at the age of 4 and became a citizen in 2017. “My mom completed third grade in Mexico and she couldn’t give me pointers.”

After earning an associate degree in nursing, Ms. Rodriguez now earns $24 an hour as an emergency room nurse. She will complete her bachelor’s degree in November.

The weekly meetings were crucial for Ms. Rodriguez, but there are other things that make Project Quest different. Career coaches coordinate tutoring in math and English, which can be a major hurdle for returning students.

The headquarters of Project Quest are on the campus of Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio. It was started by community groups.CreditJoanna Kulesza for The New York Times

Small misfortunes that would barely register for more affluent people, like a broken-down car, can easily prevent poorer students from getting to school and keeping up with classes. In this case, Quest provides transportation help like bus passes for students in need.

To live on a budget, some students are encouraged to eat at home instead of going out for meals and to spend Sundays packing lunch for the week.

The coaching continues after students finish the program and start new jobs, said Lelani Mercado, deputy director of Project Quest. “We become the surrogate parent, for lack of a better term,” Ms. Mercado said. “We will not let them fail.”

None of this comes cheap. And at $11,000 per trainee, critics have questioned whether that kind of spending is justified, said Ron Nirenberg, the mayor of San Antonio.

“That intensity of effort for each pupil results in permanent change that breaks intractable cycles of poverty,” Mr. Nirenberg said. “Unless we have that level of commitment, cities will be throwing money at the problem and not getting results.”

Despite the evidence of Project Quest’s success, getting funding has been neither easy nor predictable, said Mr. Zammiello, the project’s president.

The program receives $2 million to $2.5 million annually in what Mr. Zammiello calls “foundational funding” from the city of San Antonio. Grants and donations make up the rest of Project Quest’s $5 million annual budget, but locking them down is a never-ending process.

“Every year is a period of uncertainty,” Mr. Zammiello said. “2020 isn’t totally mapped out yet. We’re laying the tracks and running the train at the same time.”

The expiration of a Labor Department grant means that Project Quest will serve 20 percent fewer people in 2019 than it did in 2017. As far as Mr. Zammiello is concerned, a better-funded Project Quest would allow it to have a much greater impact. With double the money, he said, his group could place 700 people annually instead of 350.

“People feel like we cost so much per individual,” said Dr. Todd Thames, Project Quest’s board chairman. “That’s what makes it work — child care, mentorship, transportation, tuition, bus passes. These are the barriers that prevent people from successfully completing training programs and finding meaningful employment.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

How Job Retraining Can Yield Lasting Wage Gains (It Isn’t Cheap)

SAN ANTONIO — The economic odds facing Avigail Rodriguez a few years ago couldn’t have been much worse. An undocumented immigrant and a single mother, she lived in a cramped apartment in a tough neighborhood in San Antonio and earned just $9 an hour working as a nurse’s assistant.

Today, Ms. Rodriguez, 26, owns her own home in a safer area, earns nearly three times as much as she did before and has secured legal residency. The key to her turnaround was a training program called Project Quest, whose own ability to beat the odds is no less striking than that of Ms. Rodriguez.

Project Quest has succeeded where many similar retraining efforts have failed, taking workers lacking in skills and successfully positioning them for jobs where they can earn double or triple what they did previously.

“This really gives employers a chance to find workers they wouldn’t otherwise have considered,” said Lawrence Katz, a labor economist at Harvard University. “At the same time, it provides opportunities to a rather disadvantaged group of workers, both younger and older.”

Not that Project Quest makes it look easy. It spends about $11,000 per trainee, offering intensive coaching and financial help.

Project Quest’s record is drawing attention far beyond San Antonio. In December, the program won a $1 million grant from the Rockefeller Foundation and the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. Even with Quest’s insecure federal funding, a study released in April showed that compared with peers who didn’t complete the program, its graduates earn far more nearly a decade later.

These developments come as the need to keep up with fast-changing technologies in the workplace becomes more urgent. Last month, Amazon said it intended to retrain about one-third of its American work force, or about 100,000 employees, by 2025. And with a tight labor market, many employers find it difficult to identify workers who have the needed skills.

However well intentioned, most training efforts show limited results, said Paul Osterman, a professor at the M.I.T. Sloan School of Management, and Project Quest is a striking exception.

“If you had a list of all the efforts that claim to be job training programs and threw a dart, whatever you hit wouldn’t match the results of Project Quest,” he said. “It is scalable, and there is no reason every city and town in America can’t have something like it.”

Data published in April are the best evidence yet of how the San Antonio program is outperforming its peers. In a nine-year trial comparing a group of people who took part in Project Quest with a group who did not, the Quest graduates ended up earning $5,000 more annually. That was especially significant since earnings gains from training programs typically fade over time, Mr. Osterman said.

“The results were stunning,” said Mark Elliott, president of the Economic Mobility Corporation, a nonprofit research group that carried out the study. “These are the largest sustained earnings impacts we’ve ever seen in a work-force development program.”

Just as Project Quest is an outlier nationally, so is the United States among Western countries. Other nations have done a better job with training programs, said Anthony Carnevale, director of the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce.

Canada has a more robust two-year college system, Mr. Carnevale said, “and they spend a lot less that we do on postsecondary education and training and get a lot better results than we do.”

In Europe, there are separate tracks for apprenticeship programs in high school, but Americans are uncomfortable with tracking students at such a young age.

“You can go to Europe, see apprenticeships are great and come back and say, eureka, I found the answer!” Mr. Carnevale said. “But 20 years later, you’re still going to be banging your head against the wall.”

Project Quest was born 27 years ago in a Hispanic neighborhood in San Antonio where poverty rates are above the citywide average. After the closing of a Levi Strauss factory there, community groups created Project Quest as a way of preparing workers for better-paying, more highly skilled jobs that were less vulnerable but still in demand.

Although returning to school is the main goal, Project Quest isn’t aimed at recent high school graduates. The average age of participants is 30. Two-thirds are women, and more than 60 percent are Hispanic. Some hear about Project Quest through job fairs, church events, employers, the public housing authority or community colleges.

“These are not the kids coming out of school looking for a job,” said David Zammiello, Project Quest’s president. “These are people looking for a second chance.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_159329592_4249ff46-97e2-4bb3-9a14-8b1b4a50ceb4-articleLarge How Job Retraining Can Yield Lasting Wage Gains (It Isn’t Cheap) Wages and Salaries Vocational Training United States Economy San Antonio (Tex) Project Quest Labor and Jobs Hiring and Promotion Careers and Professions

David Zammiello, executive director of Project Quest. “These are not the kids coming out of school looking for a job,” he said. “These are people looking for a second chance.”CreditJoanna Kulesza for The New York Times

Project Quest doesn’t do the training itself. Instead, it places 300 to 400 students each year with local community colleges and other schools where participants can complete degrees in health care and nursing, information technology and other fields where salaries and demand is high but qualified candidates are few.

This summer, it started a pilot project to train roofers in just three weeks, guaranteeing them jobs that pay $15 an hour and include benefits. Still, the bulk of Project Quest’s students — nearly 70 percent — are in health care.

Money is part of the equation, but not all of it. Project Quest provides half the cost of tuition and also helps with rent and utilities when necessary. Nearly half of Project Quest’s enrollees have children, so there’s financial assistance for child care, too.

But just as important is what staff members call the wraparound part of the program.

Participants are required to attend weekly V.I.P. (Vision, Initiative and Perseverance) sessions with Quest coaches, where they provide progress reports on classes and go over the ups and downs they experience. There are lessons in subjects like time management as well as advice on navigating coursework and college-level classes.

“It’s not just about training people,” Mr. Osterman of M.I.T. said. “This provides real support for the people involved.”

The V.I.P. sessions also provide moments where students who are struggling can seek out support from their comrades and their coaches. Typical trainees spend 18 months in the program, and as graduation nears, they are walked through mock job interviews and learn how to prepare a résumé and pitch themselves to employers.

“It was so essential,” said Ms. Rodriguez, who was brought to the United States by her parents at the age of 4 and became a citizen in 2017. “My mom completed third grade in Mexico and she couldn’t give me pointers.”

After earning an associate degree in nursing, Ms. Rodriguez now earns $24 an hour as an emergency room nurse. She will complete her bachelor’s degree in November.

The weekly meetings were crucial for Ms. Rodriguez, but there are other things that make Project Quest different. Career coaches coordinate tutoring in math and English, which can be a major hurdle for returning students.

The headquarters of Project Quest are on the campus of Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio. It was started by community groups.CreditJoanna Kulesza for The New York Times

Small misfortunes that would barely register for more affluent people, like a broken-down car, can easily prevent poorer students from getting to school and keeping up with classes. In this case, Quest provides transportation help like bus passes for students in need.

To live on a budget, some students are encouraged to eat at home instead of going out for meals and to spend Sundays packing lunch for the week.

The coaching continues after students finish the program and start new jobs, said Lelani Mercado, deputy director of Project Quest. “We become the surrogate parent, for lack of a better term,” Ms. Mercado said. “We will not let them fail.”

None of this comes cheap. And at $11,000 per trainee, critics have questioned whether that kind of spending is justified, said Ron Nirenberg, the mayor of San Antonio.

“That intensity of effort for each pupil results in permanent change that breaks intractable cycles of poverty,” Mr. Nirenberg said. “Unless we have that level of commitment, cities will be throwing money at the problem and not getting results.”

Despite the evidence of Project Quest’s success, getting funding has been neither easy nor predictable, said Mr. Zammiello, the project’s president.

The program receives $2 million to $2.5 million annually in what Mr. Zammiello calls “foundational funding” from the city of San Antonio. Grants and donations make up the rest of Project Quest’s $5 million annual budget, but locking them down is a never-ending process.

“Every year is a period of uncertainty,” Mr. Zammiello said. “2020 isn’t totally mapped out yet. We’re laying the tracks and running the train at the same time.”

The expiration of a Labor Department grant means that Project Quest will serve 20 percent fewer people in 2019 than it did in 2017. As far as Mr. Zammiello is concerned, a better-funded Project Quest would allow it to have a much greater impact. With double the money, he said, his group could place 700 people annually instead of 350.

“People feel like we cost so much per individual,” said Dr. Todd Thames, Project Quest’s board chairman. “That’s what makes it work — child care, mentorship, transportation, tuition, bus passes. These are the barriers that prevent people from successfully completing training programs and finding meaningful employment.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump dismisses recession worries: ‘Our economy is the best in the world’

Good morning and welcome to Fox News First. Here’s what you need to know as you start the new work week…

Trump: We’re not having a recession
President Trump offered an optimistic outlook of the economy Sunday and dismissed concerns of a looming recession after losses in financial markets last week and amid his ongoing trade war with China that some say could determine his re-election chances in 2020. “I don’t think we’re having a recession,” Trump told reporters as he returned to Washington from his New Jersey golf club. “We’re doing tremendously well.”

On Twitter, Trump tweeted the following: “Our economy is the best in the world, by far. Lowest unemployment ever within almost all categories. Poised for big growth after trade deals are completed. Import prices down, China eating Tariffs. Helping targeted Farmers from big Tariff money coming in. Great future for USA!” Larry Kudlow, director of the National Economic Council under Trump, said on “Fox News Sunday” he does not foresee a recession “at all.”

Westlake Legal Group TrumpCook081819 Trump dismisses recession worries: 'Our economy is the best in the world' fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 01ea45cd-eec7-565a-80c2-2c4bebf84100

On the trade war with China, Trump said Apple CEO Tim Cook privately made a “very compelling argument” that the administration’s tariffs on Chinese-assembled goods have made an unfair impact on the California-based tech giant, because its chief rival, Samsung, has conducted most of its manufacturing in South Korea and did not have to pay the levy. Still, the president also warned China against ‘another Tiananmen Square,’ saying there might not be an end to the trade war if the government resorts to “violence” to crush demonstrators in Hong Kong.

Westlake Legal Group df517604-AP19222471790918 Trump dismisses recession worries: 'Our economy is the best in the world' fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 01ea45cd-eec7-565a-80c2-2c4bebf84100

This March 28, 2017, file photo, provided by the New York State Sex Offender Registry shows Jeffrey Epstein. Epstein has died by suicide while awaiting trial on sex-trafficking charges, says person briefed on the matter, Saturday, Aug. 10, 2019. (New York State Sex Offender Registry via AP, File)

New York prosecutors labeled Epstein a low-level sex offender almost a decade ago: report
Manhattan prosecutors labeled Jeffrey Epstein a low-level sex offender in 2010 against the recommendation of a state panel of experts as defense attorneys sought to have the well-connected financer avoid the most burdensome sex offender requirements in New York, according to a report. The Wall Street obtained documents through public records request and reported that defense lawyers called Florida police allegations of Epstein’s sexual encounters with girls “inflammatory” and “unreliable.” They portrayed him as a benefactor with a compelling life story  who was “not in any way a typical sex offender.” In the end, Epstein exploited a loophole and was able to live his lavish lifestyle as he claimed primary residence in the Virgin Islands.

Graham: Inspector general’s report on Russia investigation will be ‘ugly and damning’ for DOJ
Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., is adamant about revealing what went on behind the scenes of the Russia investigation and is looking forward to the American people learning about what happened. Graham pointed to three investigations of the investigators that are taking place: one by his committee; one by Connecticut U.S. Attorney John Durham, who was appointed by Attorney General Bill Barr to conduct a probe; and one by Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz. “I believe the Horowitz report will be ugly and damning,” Graham told Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo on “Sunday Morning Futures.” Click on the video above to watch the interview.

Westlake Legal Group IranTanker081919 Trump dismisses recession worries: 'Our economy is the best in the world' fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 01ea45cd-eec7-565a-80c2-2c4bebf84100

Iranian supertanker heads to unknown destination
Amid a growing confrontation between Iran and the West a year after President Trump pulled Washington out of Tehran’s nuclear deal with world powers, an Iranian supertanker the U.S. has suspected to be tied to a sanctioned organization has lifted its anchor and started moving away from Gibraltar, marine traffic monitoring data showed late Sunday. The trail left by GPS data on Marinetraffic.com, a vessel-tracking service, showed the Iran-flagged Adrian Darya 1, previously known as Grace 1, moving shortly before midnight. The vessel hauling $130 million worth of light crude oil had been detained for a month in the British overseas territory for allegedly attempting to breach European Union sanctions on Syria. Its next destination was not immediately known

Trump addresses Greenland purchase rumors: ‘Essentially it’s a large real estate deal’
President Trump also spoke out Sunday on reports his administration has been looking into buying Greenland. He said Denmark has been losing money by keeping Greenland under its control. “Essentially it’s a large real estate deal. A lot of things can be done. It’s hurting Denmark very badly because they’re losing almost $700 million a year carrying it,” he said. “So, they carry it at great loss, and strategically for the United States, it would be nice. And, we’re a big ally of Denmark and we help Denmark, and we protect Denmark.” Greenland’s political leaders have said the country is not for sale.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP.

TODAY’S MUST-READS
Russia nuclear monitoring cites lost contact after mystery blast: report. 
State senator apologizes for mock Trump assassination photos.
Mama June sells belongings as report claims reality show in jeopardy over drug allegations.

MINDING YOUR BUSINESS
These five countries are teetering on the brink of a recession.
Democrats urge FCC to delay T-Mobile-Sprint merger vote.
Social Security: What happens to your benefits when you take them early.

#TheFlashback: CLICK HERE to find out what happened on “This Day in History.”

SOME PARTING WORDS

Steve Hilton says Trump haters are rooting for a recession. The real economy proves the “fake economy” over the never-Trumpers wrong.

Not signed up yet for Fox News First? Click here to find out what you’re missing.

CLICK HERE to find out what’s on Fox News today.

Fox News First is compiled by Fox News’ Bryan Robinson. Thank you for joining us! Enjoy your day! We’ll see you in your inbox first thing Tuesday morning.

Westlake Legal Group TrumpWS081919 Trump dismisses recession worries: 'Our economy is the best in the world' fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 01ea45cd-eec7-565a-80c2-2c4bebf84100   Westlake Legal Group TrumpWS081919 Trump dismisses recession worries: 'Our economy is the best in the world' fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 01ea45cd-eec7-565a-80c2-2c4bebf84100

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Judge Rosemarie Maldonado has recommended that Officer Daniel Pantaleo be fired.

Westlake Legal Group 5d5a3aed2400009a01b9ed41 Judge Rosemarie Maldonado has recommended that Officer Daniel Pantaleo be fired.

The New York City police officer who placed Eric Garner in a chokehold before his death was “untruthful” during interviews with investigators following the fatal encounter, a police administrative judge said in an opinion obtained by The New York Times.

Earlier this month, Judge Rosemarie Maldonado recommended that Daniel Pantaleo, one of the officers who attempted to arrest Garner in 2014 for allegedly selling illegal cigarettes in Staten Island, be fired from the NYPD. Maldonado determined that Pantaleo had not deliberately restricted Garner’s breathing but had used a banned chokehold on the man, whose repeated cry of “I can’t breathe” triggered national outrage and galvanized the Black Lives Matter movement.

Pantaleo was suspended from the department following Maldonado’s recommendation.

The Times published the judge’s 46-page opinion in full on Sunday. The document provides deeper insights into the reasons behind Maldonado’s recommendation that Pantaleo be dismissed. 

The judge said Pantaleo allegedly lied to investigators following Garner’s death and had “recklessly used force” against the man. When Pantaleo was asked by investigators to define a chokehold, he replied, “You take your two hands and you’re choking their throat or if you use your forearm grasped with the other hand and you pull back with your forearm onto the windpipe preventing him from breathing,” Maldonado wrote in her opinion, which was addressed to NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill.

But when investigators showed the officer a video that revealed how he wrapped his left forearm around Garner’s neck with his two hands clasped, Pantaleo denied that he’d used a chokehold in the encounter.

I found [Pantaleo’s] uncorroborated hearsay statements explaining his actions to be untruthful,” Maldonado wrote.

Maldonado also took issue with the testimonies of Pantaleo’s witnesses, fellow officers Mark Ramos and Craig Furlani, who told investigators that they could not remember where Pantaleo had placed his arms on Garner during the encounter.

“The accounts presented by [Pantaleo’s] witnesses on this point were also unhelpful or unreliable,” Maldonado wrote. “In fact, the more central the factual inquiry was, the more vague recollections became.” 

O’Neill is expected to make a decision about Pantaleo’s future by the end of the month, the Times reported.

The Justice Department said in July that it would not pursue federal civil rights charges against Pantaleo for Garner’s death. 

“The DOJ has failed us,” Garner’s mother, Gwen Carr, told reporters at the time. “Five years ago, my son said ‘I can’t breathe’ 11 times. Today we can’t breathe ― because they have let us down.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Today on Fox News, Aug. 19, 2019

STAY TUNED

On Fox News: 

Fox & Friends, 6 a.m. ET: Special guests include: Greg Laurie, author of “Johnny Cash: The Redemption of an American Icon.”

On Fox Business:

Mornings with Maria, 6 a.m. ET: Sam Stovall, CFRA chief investment strategist; Judge Andrew Napolitano, Fox News senior judicial analyst; Nick Langworthy, chair of New York State Republican Committee.

Lou Dobbs Tonight, 7 p.m. ET: Danny Danon, Israel’s Permanent Representative to the United Nations

On Fox News Radio:

The Fox News Rundown podcast: “If The Economy Sinks, Will President Trump Too?” – Recession concerns are growing, and reports suggest President Trump is worried a downturn could ruin his re-election bid. Should he be alarmed? Or could recession fears actually hurt the Democrats in 2020? Brad Blakeman, a GOP strategist and former member of President George W. Bush’s senior staff and Richard Fowler, Democratic strategist and Fox News contributor weigh in.

Election systems in all 50 states were targeted by Russia in 2016, according to the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. And there are fears it could happen again. To combat this threat, Microsoft claims it has technology that can secure future elections and ensure every vote is counted. Tom Burt, Corporate Vice President of Customer Security and Trust for Microsoft, explains how this tool will help prevent election interference.

Plus, commentary by Judge Andrew Napolitano, Fox News senior judicial analyst.

Want the Fox News Rundown sent straight to your mobile device? Subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher.

The Brian Kilmeade Show, 9 a.m. ET: Special guests include: Byron York, Washington Examiner chief political correspondent; Rachel Bovard, policy director of the Conservative Partnership Institute

The Todd Starnes Show, Noon ET: Todd speaks with Penny Nance, president and CEO of Concerned Women for America, about the backlash she received after writing about political correctness on campuses. Pastor Greg Laurie discusses his new book about Johnny Cash and some of the issues facing evangelicals today. U.S. Rep. Andy Biggs, R-Ariz., talks about what Congress will tackle when lawmakers return from their break.

Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News, Aug. 19, 2019 fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc e4c8f09a-13be-5f6a-a2ef-3462580f7f62 article   Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News, Aug. 19, 2019 fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc e4c8f09a-13be-5f6a-a2ef-3462580f7f62 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com