web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 66)

Many Native Americans Can’t Get Clean Water, Report Finds

Westlake Legal Group watertribe2_custom-0fc3c60c18dd8dd72b2eeb21ed001dd0b2dd6ebc-s1100-c15 Many Native Americans Can't Get Clean Water, Report Finds

Darlene Yazzie typically hauls water from a windmill 5 miles from her house for her sheep. Officials tell her it’s unsafe for humans but OK for livestock. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

toggle caption

Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Westlake Legal Group  Many Native Americans Can't Get Clean Water, Report Finds

Darlene Yazzie typically hauls water from a windmill 5 miles from her house for her sheep. Officials tell her it’s unsafe for humans but OK for livestock.

Laurel Morales/KJZZ

For many people, turning on the tap or flushing the toilet is something we take for granted. But a report released Monday, called “Closing the Water Access Gap in the United States,” shows that more than 2 million Americans live without these conveniences and that Native Americans are more likely to have trouble accessing water than any other group.

The nearest water station for Darlene Yazzie is 9 miles away at the Dennehotso Chapter House — a community center — in the Four Corners region of the Navajo Nation. On Tuesday, she counted her dimes and nickels to pay for water. It costs $1.10 plus gas money to fill up two 50-gallon barrels, and she has just been told the price is going up next month.

Yazzie lugged a T-shaped key as tall as her out to the well, where she dropped it down into the hole and turned the crank to open the valve.

Water gushed into the plastic barrel. A cool mist from a leak in the hose rained over her. This is Yazzie’s drinking water. For her animals, she usually drives to a windmill, but on this day it was empty and the sheep were thirsty.

“There’s no water in the windmill,” Yazzie said. “It’s dry because it’s not blowing. The only way they have water is if it’s blowing.”

Yazzie said the windmill water isn’t safe for humans anyway. Officials told her arsenic and uranium levels are too high. Yazzie and many others give the water to their animals, even though they plan to eat them.

“A lot of people died of cancer around here,” Yazzie said. “I noticed that more are being diagnosed. I’m pretty sure it’s because of the environment and the water.”

The groundwater in some areas has been contaminated by the 521 abandoned uranium mines. The new report, by DigDeep and the U.S. Water Alliance, says gastric cancer rates doubled in the 1990s where uranium mining occurred. Unregulated drinking water sources are the greatest public health risk on the Navajo Nation, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Westlake Legal Group image_2_custom-1225d5260d567d3f0ee97d13657af871f834453d-s800-c15 Many Native Americans Can't Get Clean Water, Report Finds

Darlene Yazzie, a retired community health worker, says hauling water, firewood and trash, as well as using an outhouse, are just a few of the things that make life hard on the Navajo Nation. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

toggle caption

Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Westlake Legal Group  Many Native Americans Can't Get Clean Water, Report Finds

Darlene Yazzie, a retired community health worker, says hauling water, firewood and trash, as well as using an outhouse, are just a few of the things that make life hard on the Navajo Nation.

Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Fifty-eight out of every 1,000 Native American households lack plumbing, compared with three out of every 1,000 white people, according to the report. This disparity has implications for public health. They experience more deaths, poverty and higher unemployment rates.

“We knew the problem was much bigger, but when we went out to look at the data, it didn’t exist,” said George McGraw, the founder of DigDeep, a nonprofit that has helped build water systems on the Navajo Nation. “No one could tell us, from federal to state agencies to other nonprofits, just how many Americans still don’t have running water or a working toilet where they live.”

So McGraw commissioned experts from around the U.S. to piece together the data they did have and come up with the water gap report. What he found was that race is the strongest predictor of water and sanitation access.

A century ago, water-borne illnesses were a leading cause of death. The U.S. government invested in modern water and sanitation systems and nearly eradicated those diseases. But some communities were passed over.

“Our nations didn’t have access to funding for infrastructure in the same way that it’s federally allocated for cities and states overall,” said Mahrinah von Schlegel, an anthropologist from San Ildefonso Pueblo in New Mexico.

She said that in the Southwest, it’s expensive to build pipelines across such remote sparsely populated tribal nations.

“It’s been a struggle, one, to get the access to that infrastructure capital, and then, two, it’s really expensive to develop some of these remote areas,” von Schlegel said.

In Mexican Water, the next town over from Dennehotso, Richard Nelson helped his elderly mother haul water.

Nelson has been asking community leaders when his mom is going to get clean running water.

“A chapter official told me, ‘Yeah, we’re going to have running water,’ ” Nelson said. ” ‘We’re going to start laying the pipe.’ It took another two whole years to do the piping system. Then they said we’re going to have water in a year. And that was two years ago.”

Today federal funding for water infrastructure is a small percentage of what it once was. Across the country, 44 million people are served by water systems that recently had Safe Drinking Water Act violations. The Indian Health Service estimated that it would cost $200 million to provide basic water and sanitation access on the Navajo Nation.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Shooting at NFL-watch party leaves 4 dead; Republicans and Dems wary of key Trump impeachment witness

Good morning and welcome to Fox News First. Here’s what you need to know as you start your Monday …

Westlake Legal Group NFLWatchshooting111819 Shooting at NFL-watch party leaves 4 dead; Republicans and Dems wary of key Trump impeachment witness fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 504df7cf-87be-5875-a724-679104beca79

Police and emergency vehicles work at the scene of a shooting at a backyard party, Sunday, Nov. 17, 2019, in southeast Fresno, Calif. (Larry Valenzuela/The Fresno Bee via AP)

California shooting at NFL-watch party leaves 4 dead, 6 wounded: reports
A backyard gathering of football fans turned into a bloodbath after gunfire broke out in Fresno, Calif., on Sunday night. The shooting left four people dead and six wounded, according to police. Three of the dead were killed at the scene while a fourth victim died in a local hospital. Responding Fresno police officers were going door to door in the neighborhood, in hopes of collecting security camera footage or witness accounts, Fresno’s FOX 26 reported. They were looking for leads to help them locate “unknown suspects.” Click here for more on our top story.

Both Democrats and Republicans appear wary of upcoming testimony from EU ambassador at Trump impeachment hearing
Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union who met with President Trump several times regarding Ukraine, is scheduled to testify publicly before the House Intelligence Committee this week as part of Democrats ongoing impeachment inquiry, but lawmakers from both parties Sunday seemed hesitant to put much weight in what he will say.

Westlake Legal Group Trump111819 Shooting at NFL-watch party leaves 4 dead; Republicans and Dems wary of key Trump impeachment witness fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 504df7cf-87be-5875-a724-679104beca79

President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

That is likely because in a closed-door hearing, Sondland revised his prior testimony to say that he told a top Ukrainian official that U.S. aid would likely not resume until the country issues a corruption statement. Democrats quickly hailed the revelation as proof that Trump in a July 25 phone call tried to pressure Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky into investigating Joe Biden’s family business dealings in the country in exchange for the release of about $400 million in military aid. However, in prior testimony, Sondland said he had texted Ambassador Bill Taylor, the U.S. chargé d’affaires in Ukraine, that in September saying there was no quid pro quo.

When asked if Sondland was credible, Rep. Jim Himes, D-Conn., the No. 2 Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, told “Fox News Sunday” host Chris Wallace, “That’s a good question. I’m not going to prejudge his testimony.” House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., appeared equally noncommittal on Sondland.

Emails reviewed by The Wall Street Journal show Sondland kept several Trump administration officials informed of his effort to get Ukraine to launch investigations that Trump discussed in his call with Zelensky.

In other Trump impeachment inquiry developments: In an interview on “Life, Liberty & Levin,” Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif. and ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, told host Mark Levin that the Trump White House became involved in Ukrainian affairs to investigate a smear campaign from Democrats against the president. However, Nunes said, the fact-finding mission was twisted and used as an excuse for impeachment.

Westlake Legal Group McCarthy-Robach-ABC Shooting at NFL-watch party leaves 4 dead; Republicans and Dems wary of key Trump impeachment witness fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 504df7cf-87be-5875-a724-679104beca79

ABC News must explain why it spiked Epstein story, House Republicans say in letter
House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and two other top Republicans sent a letter to ABC News on Sunday demanding the network explain why it “quashed” ABC News anchor Amy Robach’s story that would have exposed allegations against the now-deceased sex offender Jeffrey Epstein three years ago. The letter, to ABC News President James Goldston, was first reported by Megyn Kelly, formerly of Fox News. House Foreign Affairs Committee Ranking Member Mike McCaul of Texas and House Judiciary Committee Ranking Member Doug Collins of Georgia also signed it.

Video captured Robach on a hot mic claiming higher-ups at her network killed the story. The footage was published earlier this month by Project Veritas, whose controversial founder, James O’Keefe, has described himself as a “guerrilla journalist.” Click here for more.

MAKING HEADLINES
Russian troops take over abandoned US airbase in northern Syria: report.
Plane with Hillary Clinton aboard grounded after shaking, smoking from mechanical issue: report.
ICYMI: Bloomberg apologizes for stop-frisk anti-crime policy in church speech; police union hits back
Colin Kaepernick’s workout sparks war of words between ESPN’s Stephen A. Smith and Panthers’ Eric Reid.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

TODAY’S MUST-READS
Kanye West performs free ‘Sunday Service’ concert at Joel Osteen’s Lakewood Church.
Hunter takes down 17-point buck after tracking it for six years.
Decommissioned nuclear missile silo in Arizona being sold for less than $400G

THE LATEST FROM FOX BUSINESS
WeWork to drop the job axe this week.
Ford unveils Mustang Mach E, its first all-electric SUV.
How FedEx cut its tax bill to $0.
 
#TheFlashback: CLICK HERE to find out what happened on “This Day in History.”
 
SOME PARTING WORDS

Steve Hilton says Democrats are showing true desperation by shifting their language of choice in the Trump impeachment inquiry from “quid pro quo” to “bribery.”

Not signed up yet for Fox News First? Click here to find out what you’re missing.
 
Fox News First is compiled by Fox News’ Bryan Robinson. Thank you for making us your first choice in the morning! Enjoy your day! We’ll see you in your inbox first thing Tuesday morning.

Westlake Legal Group policetape-cropped-138-am Shooting at NFL-watch party leaves 4 dead; Republicans and Dems wary of key Trump impeachment witness fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 504df7cf-87be-5875-a724-679104beca79   Westlake Legal Group policetape-cropped-138-am Shooting at NFL-watch party leaves 4 dead; Republicans and Dems wary of key Trump impeachment witness fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 504df7cf-87be-5875-a724-679104beca79

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Kacey Musgraves’ Heart-Melting Throwback Video Proves Dreams Do Come True

Westlake Legal Group 5dd24ed92500007f08d2d5f4 Kacey Musgraves’ Heart-Melting Throwback Video Proves Dreams Do Come True

Willie Nelson and Kacey Musgraves teamed up at the CMA Awards last week to perform a stirring rendition of “Rainbow Connection” from the 1979 film “The Muppet Movie.” 

Musgraves won Female Vocalist of the Year and Music Video of the Year, adding to a growing list of honors that includes six Grammy Awards. 

But her duet with Nelson was a highlight of the night ―and over the weekend, she shared an old clip that shows just how far back she goes with the song. 

The footage shows her more than 20 years ago, singing “Rainbow Connection” at the age of 9 and already with the makings of her unmistakable voice: 

Nelson has his own history with the song, performing it on his 2001 album, also titled “Rainbow Connection.” 

Musgraves summed up their duet on Twitter: 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Mary Anne Marsh: Impeachment tops Trump’s awful week – here’s how it will just get worse

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6103474216001_6103467347001-vs Mary Anne Marsh: Impeachment tops Trump's awful week – here's how it will just get worse Mary Anne Marsh fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 8c527767-e9fa-5dd4-9df4-a380cbbf4fd1

In the 147 weeks that Donald Trump has been in office, last week was the worst.

But, this week will be even worse … much worse.

Last week a parade of officials and former officials testified, under oath, in the impeachment hearings, about what House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is now calling a bribe offered to Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelensky to undertake an investigation of the Bidens in exchange for the release of military aid. Three witnesses, Ambassador Bill Taylor, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State George Kent, and former Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch, struck a common chord: If you opposed corruption and supported the rule of law in Ukraine you ran into a buzz saw of opposition from Trump.

BRADLEY BLAKEMAN: DEMS’ IMPEACHMENT OPTION — THIS IS THEIR ONLY EXIT STRATEGY

“Perhaps it was not surprising that when our anti-corruption efforts got in the way of the desire for profit or power, Ukrainians who preferred to play by the old, corrupt rules sought to remove me,” Yovanovitch testified. “What continues to amaze me is that they found Americans willing to partner with them and, working together, they apparently succeeded in orchestrating the removal of the U.S. ambassador.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER

“How could our system fail like this?” she asked. “How is it that foreign corrupt interests could manipulate our government?”

When Kent was asked why Trump wanted Yovanovitch removed as ambassador of Ukraine, he replied, “[Y]ou can’t promote principled anti-corruption action without pissing-off corrupt people.”

Indeed.

But, it was Taylor’s testimony last Wednesday that may prove most damaging to Trump. Taylor revealed that a member of his staff, David Holmes, overheard a telephone conversation between Trump and Ambassador Gordon Sondland about Ukraine pursuing investigations. According to reports of Holmes’ closed-door testimony, Holmes confirmed that Sondland told the president that Zelensky would pursue investigations.

More from Opinion

Others have testified that Sondland made it clear there was a link to military aid and an  investigation into the Bidens. It was reported that Holmes also said Sondland made clear that he was acting upon the instructions of Trump. Holmes’ testimony contradicts Sondland’s previous congressional testimony about this matter.

On Friday, more bad news. Roger Stone, a longtime confidant of Trump, was found guilty on all seven charges he faced, including witness tampering, in connection with Wikileaks’ interference in the 2016 election that many believe benefited Trump. Trump tweeted about the verdict and then also attacked Yovanovitch by tweet – while she was still testifying before the Intelligence Committee. Many are calling the attack witness tampering, the very crime Stone was convicted of, adding an additional article of impeachment.

As more witnesses testify amid Trump’s diminished political clout, Republican senators who will ultimately decide his fate – and their own – should start to see that standing with him comes at a price.

Perhaps hoping for relief from his domestic woes, that afternoon Trump hosted Turkey’s President Tayyip Erdogan, whose genocide  of Kurds in Syria continues. The fact Trump met with Erdogan in the White House as he violates the human rights of Kurds can only be seen as a desperate attempt to divert coverage of the impeachment hearings.

Not only did the meeting fail to dominate the news cycle, Erdogan also used it to mock Trump. First, Erdogan unceremoniously returned the “don’t be a fool” letter Trump had sent in an effort to deny, after the fact, that he provided a green light for Turkey’s moves against the Kurds. Then he showed an anti-Kurd propaganda video to senators attending the White House meeting. Still, Trump proclaimed himself to be a “big fan” of Erdogan.

Despite that attempt at distracting the nation, testimony in the impeachment inquiry continued on Friday and Saturday.

And still the week got worse.

Saturday night Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards, a Democrat, won re-election, despite three recent visits to the state by Trump in support of the Republican candidate. Edwards was the second Democrat to win a gubernatorial race in a red Southern state in less than two weeks.

As more witnesses testify amid Trump’s diminished political clout, Republican senators who will ultimately decide his fate – and their own – should start to see that standing with him comes at a price. After blindly supporting Trump for almost three years, the cost to the country and their political careers may be starting to outweigh any benefits. It will grow easier to oppose the president as polls show increased support for impeachment and if his candidates keep getting trounced at the polls.

All that, and next week will be even worse. Eight more witnesses are scheduled to testify in the impeachment inquiry, including Ambassador Sondland on Wednesday morning. This could be pivotal.

Sondland has already amended his previous congressional testimony, saying other witnesses had “refreshed my recollection.” As one of the few witnesses in the inquiry with access to the president, Sondland’s revised testimony could be damning.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

When Sondland was deposed before Congress four weeks ago a reporter asked if he needed to salvage his reputation. Sondland cheekily replied, “I don’t have a reputation to salvage.” Well, the stakes are now much higher. Sondland’s revised testimony could save himself but sink Trump. .

And that would make for the worst week of all for Trump … at least until the next one.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM MARY ANNE MARSH

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6103474216001_6103467347001-vs Mary Anne Marsh: Impeachment tops Trump's awful week – here's how it will just get worse Mary Anne Marsh fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 8c527767-e9fa-5dd4-9df4-a380cbbf4fd1   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6103474216001_6103467347001-vs Mary Anne Marsh: Impeachment tops Trump's awful week – here's how it will just get worse Mary Anne Marsh fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 8c527767-e9fa-5dd4-9df4-a380cbbf4fd1

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

TikTok’s Chief Is on a Mission to Prove It’s Not a Menace

Like almost everybody who runs a big tech company these days, Alex Zhu, the head of the of-the-moment video app TikTok, is worried about an image problem.

To him — and to millions of TikTok’s users — the app is a haven for creativity, earnest self-expression and silly dance videos. In almost no time, TikTok has emerged as the refreshing weirdo upstart of the American social media landscape, reconfiguring the culture in its joyful, strange wake.

But to some people in the United States government, TikTok is a menace. And one big reason is the nationality of its owner, a seven-year-old Chinese social media company called ByteDance. The fear is that TikTok is exposing America’s youth to Communist Party indoctrination and smuggling their data to Beijing’s servers.

The desire to fix this perception gap is what brought Mr. Zhu last week to a WeWork in Manhattan, where a handful of his colleagues are based. Mr. Zhu, a trim 40-year-old who speaks fluent if lightly accented English, helped found Musical.ly, a Shanghai-based lip-syncing app that ByteDance acquired in 2017 and folded into TikTok.

In an interview — his first since taking the reins at TikTok this year — Mr. Zhu denied, in unambiguous terms, several key accusations.

No, TikTok does not censor videos that displease China, he said. And no, it does not share user data with China, or even with its Beijing-based parent company. All data on TikTok users worldwide is stored in Virginia, he said, with a backup server in Singapore.

But China is a murky place for companies. Even if TikTok’s policies are clear on paper, what if Chinese authorities decided they didn’t like them and pressured ByteDance? What if China’s top leader, Xi Jinping, personally asked Mr. Zhu to take down a video or hand over user data?

“I would turn him down,” Mr. Zhu said, after barely a moment’s thought.

Washington at this moment is suspicious of Chinese tech companies to a degree that can feel like paranoia. The Trump administration’s biggest target has been Huawei, the giant supplier of smartphones and telecommunications equipment. But it has also tried kneecapping Chinese producers of microchips, surveillance gear and supercomputers.

That a lip-syncing app now finds itself in the same position shows the extent to which any Chinese advancement is seen in Washington as harmful to American interests. Over the past year, TikTok’s app has been downloaded more than 750 million times — more than Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Snapchat, according to the research firm Sensor Tower.

The weapon being wielded against TikTok is the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States. The secretive federal panel, known as CFIUS, is looking into ByteDance’s purchase of Musical.ly.

Earlier this year, the committee forced a different Chinese company to relinquish control over the dating app Grindr, which it had bought in 2016. The concern was also that Beijing might gain access to personal information.

Mr. Zhu said TikTok user data was segregated from the rest of ByteDance, and was not even used to help improve ByteDance’s artificial intelligence and other technologies.

“The data of TikTok is only being used by TikTok for TikTok users,” he said.

It is unclear how such assurances will be received in Washington.

“If Instagram or Facebook wanted to be sold to a Chinese firm in some way, I would 100 percent see the same issues at hand,” said Clark Fonda, a former congressional chief of staff and an author of a 2018 law that expanded CFIUS’s powers. “It’s about the underlying distrust of the Chinese government and what, theoretically, they could do with this data.”

In this tense time, Mr. Zhu is an unlikely peacemaker. With his long salt-and-pepper hair and light mustache and goatee, he looks more like a poet than a tech founder. He seems to relish a little artsy oddness. On his LinkedIn profile, he describes himself as a “designtrepreneur” and gives his work location as “Mars.”

“In the past, my personal focus was always design and user experience,” Mr. Zhu said. He spent a lot of time thinking about the colors of buttons.

Now as TikTok’s boss, he reports to ByteDance’s 36-year-old founder, Zhang Yiming. Mr. Zhu said dealing with TikTok’s sudden crisis had been “very interesting,” if nothing else.

“I am quite optimistic,” he said.

Mr. Zhu grew up in the landlocked Chinese province of Anhui. After studying civil engineering at Zhejiang University in eastern China, he worked in the United States at SAP, the German software company.

As he tells it, the idea for Musical.ly came to him as an epiphany. On a train once from San Francisco to Mountain View, Calif., he noticed the teenagers around him listening to music, taking selfies and passing their phones around. Why not combine all that into a single app?

Musical.ly debuted in 2014. It quickly attracted tens of millions of monthly users, and Mr. Zhu moved to Shanghai.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 17tiktok-02-articleLarge TikTok’s Chief Is on a Mission to Prove It’s Not a Menace Zhang Yiming (1983- ) Video Recordings, Downloads and Streaming TikTok (ByteDance) Social Media Musical.ly Inc Computers and the Internet Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) China Alex Zhu

“We don’t take any action on any politically sensitive content as long as it goes along with our community guidelines,” said Vanessa Pappas, general manager for TikTok in the United States.Credit…Alexander Harris for The New York Times

He went to great lengths to learn about the young — sometimes very young — Americans flocking to his platform. He registered fake Musical.ly accounts so he could comment on videos and understand their creators, he said in 2016.

Around the same time, ByteDance was storming phone screens in China with a news aggregator called Jinri Toutiao. In 2016, the company released a video app for China named Douyin; TikTok followed soon after. The platforms are similar but separate — TikTok is unavailable in mainland China and vice versa.

In late 2017, Musical.ly agreed to be taken over by ByteDance. Last year, the Musical.ly app was merged into TikTok.

Mr. Zhu stayed to help with the transition. He then took a few months off last year to rest, go clubbing in Shanghai and listen to jazz. He rejoined TikTok early this year, not long after ByteDance raised funding at a valuation of around $75 billion, making it one of the planet’s most richly valued start-ups.

TikTok surely owes some of its success to the sunny, fun-for-its-own-sake vibe it has cultivated. But that has led to suspicions that TikTok suppresses material, such as clips of the Hong Kong protests, that could be a buzzkill. The company says it previously penalized content that “promoted conflict.”

Now “we don’t take any action on any politically sensitive content as long as it goes along with our community guidelines,” said Vanessa Pappas, general manager for TikTok in the United States. Those cover things like hate speech, harassment and misleading information.

Mr. Zhu said TikTok, which makes money by selling ads, was still drawing up its content policies.

“Today, we are lucky,” he said, “because users perceive TikTok as a platform for memes, for lip-syncing, for dancing, for fashion, for animals — but not so much for political discussion.”

He acknowledged this could change. “For political content that still aligns with this creative and joyful experience, I don’t see why we should control it,” he said.

The deeper concern is that ByteDance’s vast business in China could give Beijing leverage over the company, and over TikTok. In its brief existence, ByteDance has had plenty of run-ins with Chinese authorities. This month, regulators hauled up company executives after finding search results from ByteDance’s search engine that supposedly defamed a revolutionary hero.

There are other steps ByteDance could take to try to convince Washington of TikTok’s independence, such as reorganizing TikTok as a separate company with a new board of directors.

Mr. Zhu said the company wouldn’t rule out such possibilities. But there had been no discussion about selling off TikTok’s American business, he said.

Harry Clark, a CFIUS specialist at the law firm Orrick, said that was probably what the committee would end up demanding. CFIUS might have entertained other options had the companies applied for a review before doing the deal, Mr. Clark said. Now, he said, Washington’s concerns about China and data protection are deepening.

“Three years ago, I doubt any CFIUS expert would have said it’s crucial that you go to CFIUS here,” Mr. Clark said. “Now, most would.”

Wang Yiwei contributed research.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Plane with Hillary Clinton aboard grounded after shaking, smoking from mechanical issue: report

A plane with Hillary Clinton aboard was grounded at LaGuardia Airport Sunday afternoon after suffering an unknown mechanical issue on the tarmac, a report said.

American Airlines flight 2144 to Washington DC’s Reagan Airport was forced to return to the gate about 3:15 p.m. following a mechanical issue reported by ground personnel, a law enforcement source told CNN.

MAHER RIPS HILLARY CLINTON’S 2020 TEASE: ‘SOMEONE NEEDS TO PUT XANAX IN HER HOT SAUCE’

Another source confirmed with the network that the former secretary of state was on board.

The flight’s pilots reported to authorities feeling the plane shake then saw smoke, the report said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Metal debris was later discovered in the area where the mechanical issue took place.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6103200149001_6103199999001-vs Plane with Hillary Clinton aboard grounded after shaking, smoking from mechanical issue: report New York Post Kenneth Garger fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/travel fox-news/politics/the-clintons fnc/travel fnc article 98c60372-524b-5677-90ba-a22fe0229725   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6103200149001_6103199999001-vs Plane with Hillary Clinton aboard grounded after shaking, smoking from mechanical issue: report New York Post Kenneth Garger fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/travel fox-news/politics/the-clintons fnc/travel fnc article 98c60372-524b-5677-90ba-a22fe0229725

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

How Moderates Are Seizing the Moment in the Democratic Primary

LAS VEGAS — After spending months in anxious passivity, staking their hopes on Joseph R. Biden Jr. and little else, moderate Democrats appear suddenly determined to fight for control of their party in the 2020 elections.

The shift in attitude has come in fits and starts over the last few weeks, seemingly more as an organic turn in the political season than as a product of coordinated action by party leaders. But each assertive act has seemed to build on the one before, starting with a debate-stage clash last month over “Medicare for all” and culminating in recent days with the entry of two new moderate candidates into the primary, Michael R. Bloomberg and Deval Patrick, and a gentle warning from former President Barack Obama that Democrats should not overestimate voters’ appetite for drastic change.

Most convincing to some Democrats may be the off-year elections this month in Kentucky and Louisiana, where moderate-to-conservative Democrats prevailed in governors’ races that President Trump worked strenuously to win for his party. The victories bolstered the argument, advanced by some leading Democrats, that the party could peel away some of Mr. Trump’s supporters in 2020 by avoiding “litmus test” battles and courting the political middle.

“Clearly, factually, people who voted for Trump voted for our Democratic gubernatorial candidates,” said Gov. Gina Raimondo of Rhode Island, a moderate who leads the Democratic Governors Association. She said Democrats could win those voters in 2020 with a “message of unity” and pragmatic promises on issues like health care and student debt.

For months the Democratic race was defined in terms of which candidate could promise the most daring policy reforms — a contest in which Mr. Biden, the former vice president, was struggling to keep pace with Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Bernie Sanders of Vermont. As the most liberal candidates set the agenda, many in the party establishment squirmed, anxious about alienating moderate voters.

Now the primary has become an increasingly jumbled contest, shaped by Democrats’ competing appetites for visionary ideas, tactical realism and sheer political novelty. Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., appears to be harnessing those tensions to his advantage, at least in Iowa, where for the first time he emerged as a clear front-runner in a CNN/Des Moines Register poll this weekend.

Westlake Legal Group democratic-polls-promo-1560481207024-articleLarge-v11 How Moderates Are Seizing the Moment in the Democratic Primary Warren, Elizabeth Sanders, Bernard Presidential Election of 2020 Patrick, Deval L Edwards, John Bel (1966- ) Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Bloomberg, Michael R Biden, Joseph R Jr Beshear, Andrew G (1977- )

Which Democrats Are Leading the 2020 Presidential Race?

There are 18 Democrats running for president. Here’s the latest data to track how the candidates are doing.

In Nevada, where more than a dozen candidates were gathered for the state party’s “First in the West” dinner, Representative Dina Titus was holding up the Democrats’ off-year victories as a reason for optimism heading into 2020. But Ms. Titus, who has not endorsed a candidate in the presidential race, urged the presidential field to be mindful of the “moderate Democrats in suburban districts” who flipped control of the House last year.

“We have just got to make sure that we appeal across the board,” said Ms. Titus, who introduced both Mr. Biden and Mr. Sanders at events this weekend. “We are a big-tent party.”

That proved to be true this month, at least in Louisiana and Kentucky. The Democratic victors in both states, Gov. John Bel Edwards of Louisiana and Andy Beshear, the governor-elect of Kentucky, ran on expanding health care coverage at the state level and largely avoided national issues, like impeachment. Mr. Edwards in particular positioned himself well to the right of the national Democratic Party, opposing abortion rights and new efforts to regulate firearms.

No Democratic leaders believe either state will be in play at the presidential level in 2020, and few would argue that the party should shift as far to the right as Mr. Edwards in order to compete.

But Representative Cedric Richmond of Louisiana, a leading supporter of Mr. Biden, said on Sunday that Democrats should take the election in his state as a sign that “the country is not as far to the left as people would have us believe.”

“If you look at Kentucky, if you look at Louisiana, it shows 2020 could be a very good year for Democrats,” Mr. Richmond said, “but we have to read the tea leaves right, learn the real lesson of what these races are saying.”

Many Democratic voters still appear determined to find a Goldilocks-like option in the race — a candidate who both generates excitement and soothes concern about the general election, someone who promises sweeping change but appears capable of winning Republican votes. Ms. Warren climbed in the polls for months on the strength of her reform message and a mastery of policy that conveyed reassuring competence, but her poll numbers have slipped recently amid intensive scrutiny of her health care plans.

Ms. Warren has attempted to allay voters’ reservations on that front in recent weeks by pledging not to raise middle-class taxes to pay for her plans. She also described how she would prioritize improvements to the Affordable Care Act, including the creation of an optional government health-insurance plan, before attempting to create a single-payer system.

Both Ms. Warren and Mr. Sanders remain among the best-positioned candidates in the primary election, with distinctive appeal to young people and other voters seeking a large-scale redraw of the political system — an overlapping agenda that drew roars of approval at the “First in the West” dinner.

At the dinner, both expressed disdain for incremental politics, with Mr. Sanders saying that “tinkering around the edges just won’t do what needs to be done” and Ms. Warren dismissing more modest policies as “a nibble here and a nibble there.” Both are polling at or near the top of the pack in three of the four early primary states, including Nevada.

And both are actively working to persuade voters that their approach is the better bet in a general election, including by appealing to voters who feel alienated from the political system. “If the best that Democrats can offer is business as usual after Donald Trump, then Democrats will lose,” Ms. Warren said at a campaign stop here on Sunday afternoon. “We win when we have solutions for the problems in people’s lives.”

Andrea Griffin, an elementary school nurse in Las Vegas, said she had been wary of Ms. Warren as a general-election candidate but came away feeling more confident after watching her on Sunday.

“I was a little skeptical about a plan for everything, but she has a pretty good grasp on what the major issues are and I kind of think that she might be able to get it done,” said Ms. Griffin, 56, a former independent voter who said she registered as a Democrat two weeks ago.

Ms. Griffin said she was also curious about Mr. Buttigieg, but had essentially ruled out Mr. Biden, explaining, “I think America is not ready to go back to business as usual.”

While he is consistently leading national polls, Mr. Biden’s vulnerability in the primary appears to come, at least in part, from his seeming inability to inspire Democratic voters. He is seen as a sensible and safe option, and a conventionally steady hand for the presidency.

At the Nevada Democrats’ dinner on Sunday evening, Mr. Biden urged primary voters to think cautiously: “We’d better be real careful about who we nominate,” he warned, “because the risk of nominating someone who wouldn’t beat Trump is a nation and a world that our children and our grandkids won’t want to live in.”

For a good number of primary voters, that appeal is persuasive enough: At Mr. Biden’s town hall-style event in Las Vegas the night before, Phyllis Lind, a retired health care worker who is becoming a substitute teacher, explained her thinking about the race in terms that conveyed her party’s conflicting impulses. She said she was drawn to Ms. Warren because she was “for the common person,” and to Mr. Buttigieg because he had personal charisma “like Obama.” But at the moment, Ms. Lind, 73, said she was firmly supporting Mr. Biden.

“We need to have a candidate that is going to also get the moderate Republicans,” Ms. Lind said.

At the moment, Mr. Buttigieg seems to be claiming an inchoate space that lies between Mr. Sanders’s ideological movement and Mr. Biden’s unapologetically tactical approach to the election. But his rise in the polls has been chiefly confined to the earliest primary states, Iowa and New Hampshire, and he has not generated interest among African-American and Latino voters, cornerstones of the Democratic coalition.

At the dinner in Nevada, Mr. Buttigieg repeatedly struck the theme of unity, pledging to “bring together an American majority” for Democratic policies.

His prepared remarks also included a rebuke seemingly aimed at Ms. Warren: the text circulated to reporters had Mr. Buttigieg saying that no one should be “written out of a particular political party” because of a policy disagreement — an apparent allusion to Ms. Warren’s recent barb suggesting Mr. Biden might be running in the wrong party’s primary because of his attacks on the idea of single-payer health care.

But Mr. Buttigieg did not deliver the line, instead saying he wanted support from people “whether you are a progressive or a moderate or what I like to call a future former Republican.”

Mayor John Cranley of Cincinnati, a moderate Democrat who supports Mr. Buttigieg, said he saw the shift toward Mr. Buttigieg as a function of voters’ intense concern about defeating Mr. Trump.

“I think that it’s clear Democrats are focused on winning,” Mr. Cranley said.

Pointing to neighboring Kentucky, the northern bulge of which houses the suburban bedroom communities of his own city, Mr. Cranley argued that Mr. Beshear’s victory with right-leaning voters there could be a case study for the national party.

To win there, Mr. Cranley said, “You can’t have somebody who is to the far left on some of these issues.”

Katie Glueck contributed reporting from New York.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Rams top Bears 17-7 behind RBs Gurley, Brown

LOS ANGELES — Todd Gurley and Malcolm Brown ran for touchdowns and the Los Angeles Rams were able to ground out a 17-7 victory over the Chicago Bears on Sunday night.

Gurley tied a season high with 97 yards on 25 carries, scoring on a 1-yard carry up the middle with 3:28 remaining in the first half to extend Los Angeles’ lead to 10-0.

After Tarik Cohen’s third-quarter touchdown catch brought Chicago to 10-7, the Rams (6-4) put it out of reach with 3:35 remaining in the fourth quarter on Brown’s 5-yard run.

COLIN KAEPERNICK’S WORKOUT SPARKS WAR OF WORDS BETWEEN STEPHEN A. SMITH, ERIC REID

Jared Goff was 11 of 18 for 173 yards and an interception. That is the least attempts the fourth-year quarterback has had when he has started. Cooper Kupp was the Rams’ only active starting receiver, which might explain why the Rams relied more on their ground game.

Westlake Legal Group 53af78b6-GURLEY-1024x576-cropped-106am Rams top Bears 17-7 behind RBs Gurley, Brown JOE REEDY fox-news/sports/nfl/los-angeles-rams fox-news/sports/nfl/chicago-bears fox-news/sports/nfl fnc/sports fnc f8eed7f2-f8e6-583a-a93e-b347f2322f9f Associated Press article

Los Angeles Rams running back Todd Gurley runs against the Chicago Bears during the first half of an NFL football game Sunday, Nov. 17, 2019, in Los Angeles. (Associated Press)

The Bears (4-6) ran 22 more plays than the Rams but averaged only 3.6 yards. Mitchell Trubisky was 24 of 43 for 190 yards with a touchdown and interception. Chase Daniel replaced Trubisky for the final series.

Gurley — who went over 5,000 yards of career rushing — came in averaging 53.5 rushing yards per game, but had 63 in the first half, including three carries of 10 yards or more. His TD was set up when Goff connected with Kupp for a 50-yard gain. Kupp beat Buster Skrine up the left sideline and hauled in the pass at the 15 before he fumbled going out of bounds at the 1. It appeared as if Kupp might have fumbled it at the pylon, which would have been a Chicago touchback.

Chicago got to 10-7 on its first drive of the second half when Trubisky connected with Cohen for a 12-yard score. Cohen beat linebacker Cory Littleton in single coverage to score his third touchdown of the season.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The Bears drove inside the Rams 35 on their first three series but had nothing to show for it. Eddy Piñeiro missed 48- and 47-yard field goal attempts and Chicago turned it over on downs on the second series.

Goff’s pass was intercepted by Roquan Smith at the Bears 17 to end the Rams’ second drive before they scored on their next possession. Greg Zuerlein nailed a 38-yard field goal with 11:31 remaining in the second quarter to give the Rams a 3-0 lead.

Westlake Legal Group GURLEY-1024x576-cropped-106am Rams top Bears 17-7 behind RBs Gurley, Brown JOE REEDY fox-news/sports/nfl/los-angeles-rams fox-news/sports/nfl/chicago-bears fox-news/sports/nfl fnc/sports fnc f8eed7f2-f8e6-583a-a93e-b347f2322f9f Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group GURLEY-1024x576-cropped-106am Rams top Bears 17-7 behind RBs Gurley, Brown JOE REEDY fox-news/sports/nfl/los-angeles-rams fox-news/sports/nfl/chicago-bears fox-news/sports/nfl fnc/sports fnc f8eed7f2-f8e6-583a-a93e-b347f2322f9f Associated Press article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

California shooting at NFL-watch party leaves 4 dead, 6 wounded: report

Westlake Legal Group Crime-scene-iStock California shooting at NFL-watch party leaves 4 dead, 6 wounded: report fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime fox-news/great-outdoors/shooting fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 30536f04-b7af-52c8-ad07-38a8658fb69c

A backyard gathering of football fans turned into a bloodbath after gunfire broke out in Fresno, Calif., on Sunday night.

“Several” people were reported dead and multiple others were wounded, authorities told Fresno’s FOX 26.

A Twitter message from reporter Marie Edinger later said four people were dead and six were wounded.

4 PHILADELPHIA SHOOTINGS IN 4 HOURS LEAVE AT LEAST 2 DEAD, REPORTS SAY

“Officers arrived on scene. … What we found were several individuals deceased in the backyard,” Lt. Bill Dooley of the Fresno Police department told the Fresno Bee. “We do have multiple shooting victims. We’re not releasing the total number yet.”

“What we do know is that this was a gathering, a family and friend gathering in the backyard,” Dooley said. “Everyone was watching football this evening when unknown suspects approached the residence, snuck into the backyard and opened fire.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Westlake Legal Group Crime-scene-iStock California shooting at NFL-watch party leaves 4 dead, 6 wounded: report fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime fox-news/great-outdoors/shooting fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 30536f04-b7af-52c8-ad07-38a8658fb69c   Westlake Legal Group Crime-scene-iStock California shooting at NFL-watch party leaves 4 dead, 6 wounded: report fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime fox-news/great-outdoors/shooting fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 30536f04-b7af-52c8-ad07-38a8658fb69c

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Hong Kong Protests: Campus Siege Enters a Second Day as Court Overturns Mask Ban

Westlake Legal Group 18hongkong-briefing-1sub-facebookJumbo Hong Kong Protests: Campus Siege Enters a Second Day as Court Overturns Mask Ban Hong Kong Protests (2019) Hong Kong Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Colleges and Universities

A standoff at a Hong Kong university between protesters and the police entered a second day on Monday with riot officers lobbing tear gas and firing rubber bullets at some students trying to flee the besieged campus, while others stayed bunkered inside with homemade weapons.

At least 38 people were injured in a protracted battle at the university, Hong Kong Polytechnic, on Sunday, the city’s Hospital Authority said, after a bloody battle in which a police officer was struck by an arrow and demonstrators set a police van on fire.

A core group of students remained inside the walls awaiting an expected operation to remove them from the campus.

As protests raged across the city, Hong Kong’s High Court struck down a contentious ban on the wearing of face masks in public. The court found that the ban, enacted in October, violated the territory’s mini-constitution, know as the Basic Law.

By The New York Times

The Hong Kong protests began in June over legislation, since scrapped, that would have allowed extraditions to mainland China, and have expanded to include a broad range of demands for police accountability and greater democracy.

Here’s the latest:

The city’s High Court on Monday struck down a ban on wearing face masks in public, issuing a blow to the local government’s ability to characterize the ongoing protests as a situation that requires the invocation of emergency powers.

The ban, which was enacted in October, quickly inflamed tensions in the city and set off a series of violent clashes. The city’s chief executive, Carrie Lam, imposed the ban without seeking legislative approval by invoking powers granted under the rarely used Emergency Regulations Ordinance, or E.R.O.

In its ruling, the court said the ban violated the city’s mini-constitution, known as the Basic Law, because it was too vague and endangered the ability of the Legislative Council, or LegCo, to make the territory’s laws.

“The E.R.O. is so wide in its scope, the conferment of powers so complete, its conditions for invocation so uncertain and subjective, the regulations made thereunder invested with such primacy, and the control by the LegCo so precarious, that we believe it is not compatible with the constitutional order laid down by the Basic Law,” the court said in its ruling.

Masks have been worn by protesters since the early days of the movement, as a way for protesters to conceal their identities and protect themselves from the pepper spray and tear gas routinely deployed by the police. Many protesters saw the law a pretext that would allow officers to arrest nonviolent demonstrators in order to discourage people from joining the street actions.

Scores of people were arrested by the police on Monday morning near the university. A large group of arrested people were seen seated outside a hotel in the Tsim Sha Tsui district of Kowloon, their hands zip-tied behind their backs.

It was unclear if the bulk of the arrestees were protesters trying to flee the campus or allies who had arrived at the university after responding to calls for help evacuating protesters trapped on campus.

At least 500 protesters remained on campus, after the police thwarted their attempts to escape by firing rubber bullets and volleys of tear gas, in an apparent break of a temporary truce that the university president, Jin-Guang Teng, said he had negotiated with the police.

The police said in a statement on Facebook that “a large group of masked rioters who have been holed up” at the university “suddenly charged at police cordons,” including many who held firebombs.

The police said they urged those inside the campus to “drop their weapons” and leave. Protesters were wary of following the police’s order to evacuate, as some were arrested after trying to leave, according to witnesses.

The police fired tear gas in the nearby neighborhood of Jordan, where roadblocks made with brick clusters and bamboo poles disrupted traffic.

Protesters have called for another strike on Monday in support of the campus occupiers, with demonstrations expected in the city’s Central business district.

Trains at several sections of the city’s rail network have been suspended or delayed.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com