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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 67)

Morgan Stanley to Buy E-Trade, Linking Wall Street and Main Street

Westlake Legal Group 20db-etrade2-facebookJumbo Morgan Stanley to Buy E-Trade, Linking Wall Street and Main Street Morgan Stanley E TRADE Financial Corporation Banking and Financial Institutions

Morgan Stanley is betting its future on Main Street.

The Wall Street giant moved further from its investment banking origins on Thursday with an agreement to buy the discount brokerage E-Trade for about $13 billion, the biggest takeover by a major American lender since the 2008 global financial crisis.

The addition of E-Trade would allow Morgan Stanley to tap into a new source of revenue: the smaller-volume trades of the country’s so-called mass affluent, people who are wealthy enough to have some savings but not rich enough to buy into hedge funds or seek out a money manager. If it goes through, the deal will put Morgan Stanley, which does not have retail bank branches to draw in new asset-management customers, on firmer footing with competitors like Bank of America and Wells Fargo.

It would also give Morgan Stanley a big share of the market for online trading, an additional 5.2 million customer accounts and $360 billion in assets.

Morgan Stanley’s chief executive, James P. Gorman, said the merger would disrupt neither E-Trade clients nor Morgan Stanley customers, but ultimately result in more services for all.

The deal highlights the increasing convergence of Wall Street and Main Street: Elite bastions of corporate finance are seeking to cater to customers with smaller pocketbooks, and online brokerages that once hoped to overthrow traditional trading houses are instead suffering from a price war that has slashed their profits.

It also reflects a continuing shift in strategy for Morgan Stanley, which long relied on fees from high-finance services like mergers, stock offerings and massive trading desks but has lately embraced steady fees over bigger paydays and bigger risks.

Under Mr. Gorman, who has led the bank for a decade, Morgan Stanley has de-emphasized the businesses of jet-setting investment bankers and aggressive Manhattan traders, preferring the predictable and less costly realm of wealth management. It’s a strategy playing out all along Wall Street: In the dozen years since the start of the financial crisis, major financial firms from Credit Suisse to Goldman Sachs have embraced what are considered lower-risk business lines.

“This continues the decade-long transition of our firm to a more balance-sheet-light business mix, emphasizing more durable sources of revenue,” said Mr. Gorman, whose most transformative deal at Morgan Stanley before Thursday was its acquisition of Smith Barney’s retail brokerage in 2012.

E-Trade was an enticing target: It has struggled as brokerages slashed fees in a fight that peaked last fall when Charles Schwab eliminated fees for the trading of stocks and exchange-trade funds, and later agreed to buy TD Ameritrade for $26 billion.

Michael McTamney, who researches banks for the ratings agency DBRS Morningstar, said the deal accelerated Morgan Stanley’s growth plans. The bank already had a strong high-net-worth client base, he said, and now “they’ll be able to bring in this next generation of wealth via the E-Trade platform.”

If the deal goes through — it needs the approval of E-Trade shareholders and regulators — more than half of Morgan Stanley’s pretax profits will come from wealth and investment management, compared with 26 percent a decade ago.

Morgan Stanley’s $2.7 trillion in assets are largely tied to big companies and wealthy individuals. The E-Trade deal would expand its access to the comparatively well heeled, a group that encompasses more than 20 million households in the United States.

But Morgan Stanley could face a challenge luring this sort of investor toward its higher-touch investment management services.

Many E-Trade customers manage their own investments because of their intense distaste for the old-fashioned brokerage business. Others are hobbyists, trading a chunk of their retirement portfolios or some mad money. Both types have benefited greatly from decades of price wars that have made it possible for customers to pay nothing to maintain a brokerage account. Morgan Stanley will raise those fees at its peril.

But the addition of E-Trade offers another way to make money from those customers. Morgan Stanley could use the brokerage as the vehicle for delivering other products and services, such as shares of initial public offerings it has underwritten.

In Mr. Gorman’s words, the combination would unite Morgan Stanley’s “full-service, adviser-driven model” with E-Trade’s “direct-to-consumer and digital capabilities.”

Morgan Stanley is betting that regulators in Washington will approve what is perhaps the most consequential acquisition by a so-called systemically important American bank — the too-big-to-fail variety of financial institution — since 2008.

Under the Obama administration, officials at the Federal Reserve fretted about the nation’s biggest banks growing through mergers. Daniel Tarullo, a former Fed governor, said in a 2012 speech that the central bank should have a “strong, but not irrebuttable, presumption of denial” for takeovers by America’s banking titans.

But the Fed has become more industry friendly during the Trump administration, particularly with the addition of officials like Vice Chairman Randal K. Quarles, a former bank lawyer who is helping reassess the rules put in place after the financial crisis. The central bank recently approved the combination of BB&T and SunTrust, paving the way for the creation of the sixth-largest U.S. commercial bank.

The acquisition could look attractive to regulators from a financial stability perspective: The deal would infuse the Wall Street bank with stable deposits and reliable revenue streams. But it will also make Morgan Stanley more of a behemoth.

Morgan Stanley doubtless hopes an E-Trade deal goes more smoothly than a past effort to pull in retail clients. Its merger with Dean Witter Reynolds two decades ago foundered amid a clash between Morgan Stanley’s Wall Street aristocrats and Dean Witter’s more down-market brokers. Since then, however, the bank has been steadily shifting toward asset management — one of a number of approaches major banks have been trying to court Main Street.

Morgan Stanley’s traditional rival, Goldman Sachs, created a retail-focused lending arm, Marcus, in 2016 and teamed up with Apple last year to offer a credit card. Last month, Goldman said it intended to expand its retail deposit base to $125 billion, and its consumer loan and card balance to $20 billion, over the next five years.

Investors seem to be more taken with Morgan Stanley’s continuing shift than with Goldman’s, at least based on the Wall Street scoreboard of stock prices. Shares in Morgan Stanley have climbed nearly 33 percent over the past 12 months, while those in Goldman have risen about 19 percent.

Late last year, JPMorgan Chase — already known for its enormous banking operations in both the consumer and the institutional areas — established a new platform that is meant to combine financial advisory services within its bank branches with wealth-management and online brokerage offerings.

And Bank of America, whose acquisition of Merrill Lynch during the financial crisis made it a heavyweight in the wealth-management business, has moved to court less-wealthy clients as well.

Under the terms of the deal announced on Thursday, Morgan Stanley will buy E-Trade using its own stock. Its offer is worth about $58.74 a share as of Wednesday’s market close, a 30 percent premium on the value of the online brokerage’s shares.

E-Trade’s chief executive, Michael Pizzi, would continue to run the business upon the deal’s closing, which is expected by year’s end.

Jeanna Smialek and Ron Lieber contributed reporting.

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Missouri girl, 11, gives birth in bathtub, police say; 3 relatives charged

Westlake Legal Group Crime-Scene-iStock Missouri girl, 11, gives birth in bathtub, police say; 3 relatives charged Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/us/crime fox-news/entertainment/events/babies fox news fnc/us fnc article 4db2693b-28dc-564a-8890-9c65b8622408

Three family members of an 11-year-old Missouri girl who gave birth in a bathtub earlier this month after allegedly being raped by a teenage boy are facing multiple criminal charges.

A man and woman are each charged with child endangerment and a 17-year-old boy faces charges of incest, statutory rape and statutory sodomy of a child younger than 12. All live in the St. Louis suburb of St. Charles.

The woman is also accused of failing to provide medical care to the child upon giving birth.

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA SEXUAL ABUSE VICTIM SPEAKS OUT NEARLY 40 YEARS LATER: ‘HE GOT INTO THAT SLEEPING BAG’

The man brought the baby to St. Joseph’s Medical Center about an hour after its birth on Feb. 11, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported Wednesday. It was still attached to the umbilical cord and placenta with a body temperature of 90 degrees, which prompted the police to open an investigation.

Authorities said the man was in the U.S. illegally and had previously been deported.

He initially said he didn’t know the girl before admitting they were related, according to charging documents. He denied knowing she was pregnant or was being sexually abused until she gave birth.

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The teen told police he had sex with the girl around 100 times but did not know she was pregnant.

The woman and 17-year-old boy were ordered to remain in custody on $10,000 and $25,000 bonds, respectively. Bail for the man was set at $10,000, cash only.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group Crime-Scene-iStock Missouri girl, 11, gives birth in bathtub, police say; 3 relatives charged Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/us/crime fox-news/entertainment/events/babies fox news fnc/us fnc article 4db2693b-28dc-564a-8890-9c65b8622408   Westlake Legal Group Crime-Scene-iStock Missouri girl, 11, gives birth in bathtub, police say; 3 relatives charged Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/us/crime fox-news/entertainment/events/babies fox news fnc/us fnc article 4db2693b-28dc-564a-8890-9c65b8622408

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Mob scene erupts outside Roger Stone sentencing

As Trump associate Roger Stone was preparing to exit the D.C. federal courthouse after receiving a 40-month sentence for witness tampering and other charges, a fracas broke out on the other side of the building among pro-Stone forces, anti-Stone protesters and members of the media.

After it became clear that Stone was likely to leave on the east side of the William B. Bryant Courthouse, the home of the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia, an Infowars personality stepped into the middle of the media stakeout at the west side of the building and started yelling about the Stone verdict, which he said was a “threat to America.”

ROGER STONE SENTENCED TO 3 YEARS FOR LYING, WITNESS TAMPERING AS CASE ROILS DOJ

This led anti-Stone protesters to chant “lies, lies” and hurl other insults at him, with some photographers, who had been waiting for hours in the cold at the stakeout, joining in the jeers. Amid the melee, one of the Stone-aligned protesters insulted the appearance of an anti-Stone demonstrator, leading another anti-Stone protester to confront him for several tense moments. The interaction did not become physical.

The scene was just as chaotic moments later on the east side of the courthouse as Stone left the building and got into his car. Anti-Stone protesters chanted “lock him up” as Stone supporters called out various other chants. Stone didn’t say anything as he left the building, wearing a black hat, black suit, blue shirt and gray tie.

DETAILS OF ROGER STONE SENTENCE

Back on the west side of the building, Stone backers unfurled a giant banner in the middle of the media scrum with the hashtag “#PardonRogerStone” and a likeness of Stone throwing up double-peace signs and wearing dark sunglasses.

In other odd occurrences on a big day for what has been a bizarre case, two trucks toting mobile billboards circled the courthouse for hours. One read “Epstein did not kill himself” and the other featured a photo of beleaguered U.S. Attorney General Bill Barr with the caption, “Have you forgotten your oath?”

ROGER STONE CASE: TIMELINE OF TRUMP ASSOCIATE’S DRAMATIC PROSECUTION

Additionally, a small group of protesters told Fox News that they accused Stone of betraying America when he entered the courthouse at approximately 9:15 a.m. Stone, according to the protesters, had a response ready.

“We told him he was a traitor. He said ‘God bless you,’ I said ‘I don’t believe you,'” a protester said.

The protesters also predicted that Trump would pardon Stone, a possible presidential action that’s been rumored for months, and speculation has only increased after Trump’s busy day Tuesday granting clemency to 11 different individuals.

Westlake Legal Group Stone-rat-photo-5 Mob scene erupts outside Roger Stone sentencing Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox-news/politics/judiciary fox-news/person/roger-stone fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc e0ada987-ea48-5ec4-8645-b6357e7a6557 article

Anti-Stone protesters stand by a giant, blow-up rat version of President Trump. (Fox News/Tyler Olson)

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“I hope he’s locked up for at least nine years,” one protester said. “But he won’t be. Even if they lock him up, Trump’s gonna pardon him.”

In response, another protester mentioned Trump’s Tuesday commutation for former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, saying Trump issued the decision because “he looks in the mirror and sees” Blagojevich, who was convicted of attempting to sell former President Barack Obama’s vacant Senate seat after he was elected president.

Stone has requested a new trial, claiming the jury that convicted him was biased after revelations that his jury’s foreperson had a history of Democratic activism and a string of anti-Trump, left-wing social media posts. Stone remains free on bond pending the outcome of the motion for a new trial.

Fox News’ Brooke Singman, Gregg Re and Bill Mears contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group image Mob scene erupts outside Roger Stone sentencing Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox-news/politics/judiciary fox-news/person/roger-stone fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc e0ada987-ea48-5ec4-8645-b6357e7a6557 article   Westlake Legal Group image Mob scene erupts outside Roger Stone sentencing Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox-news/politics/judiciary fox-news/person/roger-stone fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc e0ada987-ea48-5ec4-8645-b6357e7a6557 article

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Texas mother who had prison sentence commuted by Trump wants to give president a ‘huge hug’

Westlake Legal Group Crystal- Texas mother who had prison sentence commuted by Trump wants to give president a 'huge hug' Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/shows/outnumbered-overtime fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc bb1f240c-74e9-58ce-a5fa-3ebcb70d5f9a article

Crystal Munoz, who was granted clemency by President Trump Tuesday, told Fox News’ “Outnumbered Overtime” Thursday that she would “really love” to give Trump “a huge hug.”

“I am in shock, to say the least,” Munoz told host Harris Faulker. “I am speechless. I’m humbled. I feel very blessed. I know that I am blessed.”

The Texas mother of two was convicted in 2007 of conspiring to distribute more than 2,200 pounds of marijuana and later sentenced to nearly 20 years in prison. Her sentence was one of four commuted by the president earlier this week.

In court filings, Munoz claimed that her only role was drawing a map others allegedly used in transporting marijuana from Mexico to Texas and said her lawyer failed to properly defend her at trial.

Munoz found an advocate in Alice Johnson, the Tennessee grandmother featured in a Super Bowl commercial spotlighting President Trump’s record on criminal justice issues.

Trump commuted Johnson’s sentence in June 2018 after her case caught the attention of high-profile figures, including Kim Kardashian West and Trump son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner.

CHELSEA HANDLER MOCKED AFTER INCORRECTLY SUGGESTING PRESIDENT TRUMP ONLY PRDONED WHITE PEOPLE

Faulkner pointed out Thursday that Munoz had a 5-month-old daughter when she started her prison sentence and gave birth to another daughter while she was behind bars. The girls are now 13 and 12 years old.

“My opinion is that it should be considered a heinous crime to shackle pregnant women and to remove a baby from their mother,” Munoz said. “If the mother is not an immediate threat to society, it’s heinous. It is a very awful experience.”

When Faulkner asked Munoz if she would advocate for criminal justice reform, she answered, “yes.”

Trump also commuted the 14-year prison sentence of former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, a Democrat who was convicted on corruption charges, including attempting to sell Barack Obama’s vacant Senate seat after he was elected president in 2008.

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Trump also pardoned financier Michael Milken, who pleaded guilty for violating U.S. securities laws; New York City Police Commissioner Bernard Kerik, who was sentenced on tax fraud charges in 2010; and former San Francisco 49ers owner Edward DeBartolo Jr., who was convicted of failing to report a bribe to the former governor of Louisiana in 1998.

Fox News’ Tyler McCarthy, Charles Creitz and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 38609ff7-Crystal- Texas mother who had prison sentence commuted by Trump wants to give president a 'huge hug' Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/shows/outnumbered-overtime fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc bb1f240c-74e9-58ce-a5fa-3ebcb70d5f9a article   Westlake Legal Group 38609ff7-Crystal- Texas mother who had prison sentence commuted by Trump wants to give president a 'huge hug' Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/shows/outnumbered-overtime fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc bb1f240c-74e9-58ce-a5fa-3ebcb70d5f9a article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Texas mother who had prison sentence commuted by Trump wants to give president a ‘huge hug’

Westlake Legal Group Crystal- Texas mother who had prison sentence commuted by Trump wants to give president a 'huge hug' Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/shows/outnumbered-overtime fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc bb1f240c-74e9-58ce-a5fa-3ebcb70d5f9a article

Crystal Munoz, who was granted clemency by President Trump Tuesday, told Fox News’ “Outnumbered Overtime” Thursday that she would “really love” to give Trump “a huge hug.”

“I am in shock, to say the least,” Munoz told host Harris Faulker. “I am speechless. I’m humbled. I feel very blessed. I know that I am blessed.”

The Texas mother of two was convicted in 2007 of conspiring to distribute more than 2,200 pounds of marijuana and later sentenced to nearly 20 years in prison. Her sentence was one of four commuted by the president earlier this week.

In court filings, Munoz claimed that her only role was drawing a map others allegedly used in transporting marijuana from Mexico to Texas and said her lawyer failed to properly defend her at trial.

Munoz found an advocate in Alice Johnson, the Tennessee grandmother featured in a Super Bowl commercial spotlighting President Trump’s record on criminal justice issues.

Trump commuted Johnson’s sentence in June 2018 after her case caught the attention of high-profile figures, including Kim Kardashian West and Trump son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner.

CHELSEA HANDLER MOCKED AFTER INCORRECTLY SUGGESTING PRESIDENT TRUMP ONLY PRDONED WHITE PEOPLE

Faulkner pointed out Thursday that Munoz had a 5-month-old daughter when she started her prison sentence and gave birth to another daughter while she was behind bars. The girls are now 13 and 12 years old.

“My opinion is that it should be considered a heinous crime to shackle pregnant women and to remove a baby from their mother,” Munoz said. “If the mother is not an immediate threat to society, it’s heinous. It is a very awful experience.”

When Faulkner asked Munoz if she would advocate for criminal justice reform, she answered, “yes.”

Trump also commuted the 14-year prison sentence of former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, a Democrat who was convicted on corruption charges, including attempting to sell Barack Obama’s vacant Senate seat after he was elected president in 2008.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Trump also pardoned financier Michael Milken, who pleaded guilty for violating U.S. securities laws; New York City Police Commissioner Bernard Kerik, who was sentenced on tax fraud charges in 2010; and former San Francisco 49ers owner Edward DeBartolo Jr., who was convicted of failing to report a bribe to the former governor of Louisiana in 1998.

Fox News’ Tyler McCarthy, Charles Creitz and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 38609ff7-Crystal- Texas mother who had prison sentence commuted by Trump wants to give president a 'huge hug' Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/shows/outnumbered-overtime fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc bb1f240c-74e9-58ce-a5fa-3ebcb70d5f9a article   Westlake Legal Group 38609ff7-Crystal- Texas mother who had prison sentence commuted by Trump wants to give president a 'huge hug' Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/shows/outnumbered-overtime fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc bb1f240c-74e9-58ce-a5fa-3ebcb70d5f9a article

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Why the Coronavirus Seems to Hit Men Harder Than Women

Westlake Legal Group 19VIRUS-MEN-facebookJumbo Why the Coronavirus Seems to Hit Men Harder Than Women your-feed-science Yale University Wuhan (China) Women and Girls Viruses Vaccination and Immunization University of Iowa testosterone Smoking and Tobacco SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) Research Reproduction (Biological) Paris (France) national institutes of health Middle East Mice MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) Men and Boys Medicine and Health Immune System Hong Kong Harvard University Estrogen Epidemics Deaths (Fatalities) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Clayton, Janine Austin Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention China Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Blood Pressure Annals of Internal Medicine

The coronavirus that originated in China has spread fear and anxiety around the world. But while the novel virus has largely spared one vulnerable group — children — it appears to pose a particular threat to middle-aged and older adults, particularly men.

This week, the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention published the largest analysis of coronavirus cases to date. Although men and women have been infected in roughly equal numbers, researchers found, the death rate among men was 2.8 percent, compared with 1.7 percent among women.

Men also were disproportionately affected during the SARS and MERS outbreaks, which were caused by coronaviruses. More women than men were infected by SARS in Hong Kong in 2003, but the death rate among men was 50 percent higher, according to a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Some 32 percent of men infected with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome died, compared with 25.8 percent of women. Young adult men also died at higher rates than female peers during the influenza epidemic of 1918.

A number of factors may be working against men in the current epidemic, scientists say, including some that are biological, and some that are rooted in lifestyle.

When it comes to mounting an immune response against infections, men are the weaker sex.

“This is a pattern we’ve seen with many viral infections of the respiratory tract — men can have worse outcomes,” said Sabra Klein, a scientist who studies sex differences in viral infections and vaccination responses at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

“We’ve seen this with other viruses. Women fight them off better,” she added.

Women also produce stronger immune responses after vaccinations, and have enhanced memory immune responses, which protect adults from pathogens they were exposed to as children.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

“There’s something about the immune system in females that is more exuberant,” said Dr. Janine Clayton, director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health at the National Institutes of Health.

But there’s a high price, she added: Women are far more susceptible to autoimmune diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, in which the immune system shifts into overdrive and attacks the body’s own organs and tissues.

Nearly 80 percent of those with autoimmune diseases are women, Dr. Clayton noted.

The reasons women have stronger immune responses aren’t entirely clear, and the research is still at an early stage, experts caution.

One hypothesis is that women’s stronger immune systems confer a survival advantage to their offspring, who imbibe antibodies from mothers’ breast milk that help ward off disease while the infants’ immune systems are still developing.

A stew of biological factors may be responsible, including the female sex hormone estrogen, which appears to play a role in immunity, and the fact that women carry two X chromosomes, which contain immune-related genes. Men, of course, carry only one.

Experiments in which mice were exposed to the SARS coronavirus found that the males were more susceptible to infection than the females, a disparity that increased with age.

The male mice developed SARS at lower viral exposures, had a lower immune response and were slower to clear the virus from their bodies. They suffered more lung damage, and died at higher rates, said Dr. Stanley Perlman, a professor of microbiology at the University of Iowa who was the senior author of the study.

When researchers blocked estrogen in the infected females or removed their ovaries, they were more likely to die, but blocking testosterone in male mice made no difference, indicating that estrogen may play a protective role.

“It’s an exaggerated model of what happens in humans,” Dr. Perlman said. “The differences between men and women are subtle — in mice, it’s not so subtle.”

Health behaviors that differ by sex in some societies may also play a role in disparate responses to infections.

China has the largest population of smokers in the world — 316 million people — accounting for nearly one-third of the world’s smokers and 40 percent of tobacco consumption worldwide. But just over 2 percent of Chinese women smoke, compared with more than half of all men.

Chinese men also have higher rates of Type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure than women, both of which increase the risk of complications following infection with the coronavirus. Rates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are almost twice as high among Chinese men as among women.

In the United States, women are more proactive about seeking health care than men, and some small studies have found the generalization applies to Chinese students at universities in the United States, as well.

In unpublished studies, Chinese researchers have emphasized that patients whose diagnoses were delayed, or who had severe pneumonia when they were first diagnosed, were at greatest risk of dying.

One study of 4,021 patients with the coronavirus emphasized the importance of early detection, particularly in older men. And men have been turning up in hospitals with more advanced disease.

But in areas of China outside Hubei Province, the disease’s epicenter and where the majority of those affected are concentrated, the patterns are different: The disease appears to have dramatically lower mortality rates, and men are being infected at much higher rates than women, according to the Chinese C.D.C. analysis.

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Men may have a “false sense of security” when it comes to the coronavirus, said Akiko Iwasaki, a professor of immunology at Yale University who studies why some viruses affect women more severely.

Gathering and analyzing data about the new virus by sex is important both for the scientists studying it and for the general public, experts said.

Since the start of the outbreak, for example, public health officials have emphasized the importance of washing hands well and often, to prevent infection. But several studies have found that men — even health care workers — are less likely to wash their hands or to use soap than women, Dr. Klein said.

“We make these broad sweeping assumptions that men and women are the same behaviorally, in terms of comorbidities, biology and our immune system, and we just are not,” Dr. Klein said.

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Paratroopers deployed to Middle East after Baghdad attack have returned home, officials say

Westlake Legal Group 82nd-Airborne-Division-3 Paratroopers deployed to Middle East after Baghdad attack have returned home, officials say Nick Givas fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/state-department fox news fnc/us fnc article 8af5edcc-1f95-54a7-8741-c64086aa4d7d

The U.S. Army’s famed 82nd Airborne Division said 800 paratroopers have returned home to Fort Bragg, N.C., on Thursday after a hasty deployment to the Middle East following the attack on the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad last year.

The announcement came on the same day the State Department slapped new sanctions on Iran ahead of parliamentary elections on Friday.

Roughly 80,000 U.S. troops remain in the Middle East, including aboard warships stationed at sea.

IRAN BELIEVED TO POSSESS MORE THAN 2,000 BALLISTIC MISSILES, PENTAGON OFFICIALS SAY

In late December 2019, dozens of Iraqi Shiite militia supporters gained entry to the embassy compound in Baghdad after reportedly smashing down a gate and storming inside. The outburst came amid protests over U.S. airstrikes in the region.

The 82nd Airborne’s Twitter account sent out a message on Thursday saluting the troops with photos of their arrival back home and wished them many happy returns.

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“Today we welcomed home the first @Strike_Hold #Paratroopers from their deployment to @CENTCOM [Central Commend],” the tweet read. “When our Nation called, the Immediate Response Force answered by conducting a no-notice deployment.

It added: “The Division is proud of you all and wishes a warm #WelcomeHome. #Airborne #ATW.”

Fox News’ Lucas Tomlinson and Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 82nd-Airborne-Division-3 Paratroopers deployed to Middle East after Baghdad attack have returned home, officials say Nick Givas fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/state-department fox news fnc/us fnc article 8af5edcc-1f95-54a7-8741-c64086aa4d7d   Westlake Legal Group 82nd-Airborne-Division-3 Paratroopers deployed to Middle East after Baghdad attack have returned home, officials say Nick Givas fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/state-department fox news fnc/us fnc article 8af5edcc-1f95-54a7-8741-c64086aa4d7d

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Bloomberg Shares Doctored Debate Video To Hide Dismal Performance

Westlake Legal Group 5e4ed63e2300003103ddcbe8 Bloomberg Shares Doctored Debate Video To Hide Dismal Performance

Mike Bloomberg flopped during Wednesday night’s Democratic debate, and now he’s accused of playing a shell game with a video clip of the event.

On Thursday morning, the billionaire businessman released a deceptively edited video that falsely suggested he rendered the other candidates speechless at one point.

The video begins at the moment when the former New York City mayor declared: “I’m the only one here I think that’s ever started a business.”

During the actual exchange, his comment was greeted with about four seconds of silence, but the video below falsely implied it was more like 20.

It seems whoever edited Bloomberg’s video tweet took moments from other parts of the debate to make it look as if his declaration was so powerful candidates like Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and former Vice President Joe Biden had no response. 

HuffPost reached out to the Bloomberg campaign for comment on the reason for releasing the doctored video, but no one has immediately responded.

However, others did, shocked that the campaign would attempt to make artificial lemonade out of a lemon of a performance.

But at least one person (sarcastically) suggested this video might pay off for Bloomberg.

The video remained on Bloomberg’s Twitter page as of Thursday afternoon. 

At least one person noted that the former New York mayor seemed to be following in the footsteps of President Donald Trump who, last May, tweeted a video edited to make it seem like Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) was drunk.

Twitter said last year that it is crafting a new policy to limit the reach of “deep fakes,” or videos altered using artificial intelligence in misleading ways, and other manipulated media.

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Marshall-ECU game date moved, will honor 1970 crash victims

Westlake Legal Group Marshall-plane-crash Marshall-ECU game date moved, will honor 1970 crash victims fox-news/sports/ncaa/marshall-thundering-herd fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article ae5273e9-2874-5339-8d39-56fce8adad8d

Marshall and East Carolina will open the 2020 football season a week earlier than scheduled to accommodate a national television broadcast marking the 50th anniversary of the worst disaster in U.S. sports history.

The schools announced Thursday that the game originally set for Sept. 5 in Greenville now will be played Aug. 29. The network was not announced.

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The schools were bonded forever when Marshall’s chartered plane crashed while returning from a game at East Carolina on Nov. 14, 1970. The jet crashed into a hillside short of an airport in rain and fog near Huntington, West Virginia. Among the 75 people killed were 36 football players.

It remains the deadliest crash involving a sports team in U.S. history.

“There is a special bond and indomitable spirit that exists between our communities, universities and football programs,” East Carolina athletic director Jon Gilbert said. “This opportunity will allow us to properly pay our respect to those we tragically lost 50 years ago and share our enduring support for Marshall University with the rest of the country.”

Rather than drop football altogether, Marshall persevered. Jack Lengyel was hired as coach for the 1971 season. The tragedy was chronicled in the 2006 movie “We Are Marshall,” starring Matthew McConaughey as Lengyel.

Marshall holds a memorial service each year at a campus fountain dedicated to the crash victims.

“We are grateful to Jon Gilbert and everyone at East Carolina University for their efforts in making this schedule change come to fruition,” Marshall athletic director Mike Hamrick said. “Our people, our universities and our football programs will forever be linked by the tragedy that occurred 50 years ago. This change will allow a national audience to join us in paying proper respect to the 75.”

East Carolina leads the series with Marshall 10-5. The schools are scheduled to meet again in 2021 and 2025 in Huntington and 2023 in Greenville.

One of Marshall’s victories was 64-61 in double overtime in the 2001 GMAC Bowl. The Thundering Herd came back from a 38-8 halftime deficit behind quarterback Byron Leftwich, who threw for a bowl-record 576 yards.

Westlake Legal Group Marshall-plane-crash Marshall-ECU game date moved, will honor 1970 crash victims fox-news/sports/ncaa/marshall-thundering-herd fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article ae5273e9-2874-5339-8d39-56fce8adad8d   Westlake Legal Group Marshall-plane-crash Marshall-ECU game date moved, will honor 1970 crash victims fox-news/sports/ncaa/marshall-thundering-herd fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article ae5273e9-2874-5339-8d39-56fce8adad8d

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Clicking Buy on Amazon? It’s Trying to Prevent a Coronavirus Caveat

Westlake Legal Group 20amazon2-facebookJumbo Clicking Buy on Amazon? It’s Trying to Prevent a Coronavirus Caveat Shopping and Retail International Trade and World Market Factories and Manufacturing Epidemics E-Commerce Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Amazon.com Inc

SEATTLE — What if the Everything Store couldn’t sell everything because of disruptions from the coronavirus?

That’s the situation that Amazon — which typically stocks more than 100 million items, from toilet paper to yoga pants — is working to avoid as the deadly outbreak continues to shut down and slow factories in China that produce the world’s goods.

Over the past few weeks, Amazon has responded to the crisis by making larger and more frequent orders of Chinese-made products that had already been shipped to the United States, according to company emails and consultants who work with major brands. Some of its suppliers have cut back on advertising and promotions on the site so they don’t run out of products too quickly.

Amazon also sent an urgent email to brands on Wednesday about Prime Day, its midsummer mega sale, indicating that it has begun worrying about inventory for the event. And the company has contacted some of its third-party merchants, whose dog leashes, crayons and other products account for about 60 percent of its sales, to figure out how their flow of goods might be impeded.

“Hello!” read one recent email from Amazon to a seller, which The New York Times reviewed. “We have identified that part of your supply chain process might be China dependent and in light of the coronavirus outbreak effecting manufacturing and logistics in China, we are reaching out to you to understand its impact on your business operations.”

With its reliance on Chinese manufacturing, Amazon is turning into a case study of how a giant retailer grapples with the fallout from the coronavirus and what may lie ahead for other stores. Already dozens of companies have indicated that the virus will take a toll on them, with Apple cutting its sales expectations this week and airlines canceling flights to China.

Retailers have so far said less about how the coronavirus will affect them. On Tuesday, Walmart said sales at its 430 stores in China had not faltered and added that the impact on its supply chain was unclear but might be more muted than at other companies.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

Last year’s trade war with China may inadvertently be helping some big retailers now. At the time, companies imported more goods than usual from China to get ahead of expected tariffs. Some moved manufacturing to Vietnam and other Asian countries. When the new tariffs never took effect, retailers were left with more supply and more sourcing from other countries already in place.

Still, if China Inc. continues to be fitful beyond the next few weeks, major stores could run out of everyday products like sponges, print cartridges and construction paper by mid-April, according to a report from Wells Fargo last week. China is the largest source of imported consumer goods.

“We believe the time to start worrying about the supply chain risk” of the virus “is here,” the report said.

Amazon is likely to feel potential shortages of goods earlier than its American peers because it usually keeps fewer items on hand than they do. In good times, that lets the internet company run more efficiently because it does not tie up money to buy and store products that are waiting to be sold.

But that approach, called “lean inventory,” exposes Amazon more to shocks.

“This is a cost to pay for the efficiency that a just-in-time supply chain gets you,” said Guru Hariharan, a former Amazon employee and the founder of CommerceIQ, a start-up whose automation tools are used by major brands including Kimberly-Clark and Logitech.

Some supply problems may be hidden. Even products made in America can rely on Chinese suppliers, which may cause problems down the line. Ketchup made in a plant in Sacramento, for example, may depend on tomato paste or bottles and caps from China.

Amazon faces an additional wrinkle in keeping its virtual shelves stocked: While traditional retailers generally control their inventory directly, most of the products on Amazon are bought and sold by third-party merchants. Amazon simply facilitates those sales, giving it less visibility into supply.

“Out of an abundance of caution, we are working with suppliers to secure additional inventory to ensure we maintain our selection for customers,” an Amazon spokeswoman said. The company later added, “We are monitoring developments related to the coronavirus and taking appropriate steps as needed.”

Amazon’s algorithms have now asked for six to eight weeks of supply on products made in China instead of just two or three weeks, said Mr. Hariharan, who discussed the changes with large brands that supply the retailer.

Amazon has also made larger and more frequent buys, deviating from its regular cadence of automated purchases, according to company emails and consultants.

“Amazon issued off-cycle orders to you last night in order to prepare for possible supply chain disruptions due to recent global events originating in China,” one recent email to a vendor read. Similar emails were earlier reported by Business Insider.

Fahim Naim, who managed inventory at Amazon and now advises brands selling there, said it had placed extra orders from his clients who have more than $10 million in annual sales on the site and had marked “China” as the source of their products. Amazon’s emails to his clients show that it is giving brands extra time to get their products to its warehouses without a penalty.

On Feb. 7, the main Amazon website that sellers use to run their business posted a message that included tips for making sure Amazon’s algorithms didn’t ding their accounts if they couldn’t fulfill orders.

Mr. Kavesh sells $85 cowboy boots on Amazon.Credit…Christian S Hansen for The New York Times His factory orders take about four months to be delivered to him.Credit…Christian S Hansen for The New York Times

Jerry Kavesh, who offers Western wear like $85 cowboy boots on Amazon, is emblematic of the supply issues that its sellers face.

Mr. Kavesh, 57, who is based in a Seattle suburb, said that the factory in China that produced his cowboy hats was closed and that he did not know when it would reopen. Even after the factory’s workers return, the facility needs wool from its Chinese suppliers to make the hats.

“The key component — they don’t know when they are going to get that,” he said.

It takes about four months for his orders to be made and to arrive in the United States, Mr. Kavesh added. That means he typically would have products already in process for Prime Day, Amazon’s two-day shopping deal extravaganza, which usually falls in early July.

Amazon appears to share the concern. On Wednesday, it sent an email to a beauty supplies brand asking whether it expected to have enough of its top five products this summer.

“Amazon is trying to establish an inventory risk for your business moving forward and specifically for Prime Day,” said the email, which The Times reviewed. “We appreciate your feedback by TODAY.”

Mr. Naim said some brands he worked with had pulled back on their ads on Amazon by 25 percent to 50 percent, and had stopped promotions they had planned, to preserve money and inventory. Other sellers said they were contemplating whether to raise prices to prevent — or at least delay — running out of stock.

Eddie Levine, who has been selling on Amazon since 2012, shipped more than 130 containers of toys, housewares and other goods from China last year, largely to offer on the site. He has cautioned the brands he works with against raising prices, saying that if a $20 product suddenly costs $40, “the last thing you want is a bad review saying it’s not worth $40.”

But if the virus disruptions persist into late spring or early summer, “people will have to raise prices without even having the option because there is just no stock,” Mr. Levine said. “That’s pure supply and demand.”

Karen Weise reported from Seattle, and Michael Corkery from New York.

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