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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 68)

Eno The Emu Dies During Capture After Eluding Authorities For Months

Westlake Legal Group 5d7ac3203b00002b88d1cc02 Eno The Emu Dies During Capture After Eluding Authorities For Months

A free-spirited emu who became a North Carolina celebrity after running rogue in two counties for months has died after being captured.

“We are incredibly sad about what happened today,” Orange County Animal Services spokesperson Tenille Fox told HuffPost in an email.

OCAS director Bob Marotto said in a county statement about the bird’s death that “everyone is devastated.”

Locals in the state’s Orange and Chatham counties had started spotting the bird, later nicknamed Eno, popping up in various locations in late June. Emus are native to Australia and officials suspected that Eno had escaped from a local farm, though throughout the ordeal, no one ever stepped forward as the owner.

Animal control workers had hoped to be able to lure Eno to a location where they could corral the bird without causing too much stress, Fox told HuffPost in July. That plan seemed to be progressing in August, when the county posted on Facebook that Eno was “settling down in a specific area” where food and water had been left out.

But the plan, which the county noted was developed in collaboration with an avian veterinarian and specialists from the North Carolina Zoo, went awry on Thursday and ended with Eno’s death.

Fox told HuffPost that a team of people arrived at Eno’s location in Chapel Hill at around 10:15 a.m. on Thursday, and once they spotted Eno, fed the bird sedatives via grapes and bananas.

“Once they tried restraint, it was clear that the sedatives had not worked as expected,” she said. 

Eno “eventually collapsed during restraint” and attempts at CPR were unsuccessful. 

“We do not know if the bird had a heart attack or something similar,” said Fox.

If the capture had been successful, the plan had been for Eno to be relocated to The Blind Spot Animal Sanctuary in Rougemont. 

Marotto noted in the county statement that officials had not considered leaving Eno in the wild to be a “viable option” due to hazards like traffic and the impending hunting season in the region.

“Of course we were hoping for a much better ending to this story but we were always concerned that something like this could happen,” Fox said. “So, we expended a massive amount of time and resources trying to avoid any harm that might come to this animal. Unfortunately, we were not successful.”

This story has been updated with comments from Tenille Fox.

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Beto O’Rourke Talks Tough On Guns. But He Didn’t Step Up To Oppose An NRA Champion.

Beto O’Rourke, the former Democratic congressman from El Paso, Texas, is hoping a push for tougher gun laws can lift the fortunes of his struggling presidential campaign.

In the wake of the mass shooting in an El Paso Walmart that killed 22 people, he has backed more ambitious gun safety policies than any of his rivals, particularly his call for a mandatory buyback program for military-style assault rifles already in circulation.

But this new ardor on gun regulation hits a still-raw nerve for some of O’Rourke’s critics, who recall his neutrality in a key House race in 2018 that returned a National Rifle Association-approved lawmaker to Congress. 

At the time, O’Rourke was engaged in his own high-profile, grassroots-approved run for the Senate against incumbent Ted Cruz (R-Texas). 

The race to represent Texas’ 23rd Congressional District pitted Gina Ortiz Jones, a Democrat backed by the Giffords gun safety group, against Rep. Will Hurd, a Republican who had an “A” rating from the NRA. O’Rourke declined to endorse Ortiz Jones, a lesbian Iraq War veteran who would have been the first Filipina-American in Congress. She went on to lose the race to Hurd, who is friends with O’Rourke, by a mere 926 votes

Although it is impossible to know for sure what O’Rourke’s endorsement would have done for Ortiz Jones, he racked up bigger vote totals than she did in a number of the 23rd District’s rural counties that November, which suggests his blessing could have made a difference. The district covers 26 counties and parts of three more. A HuffPost analysis of election results found that if Ortiz Jones had attained O’Rourke’s totals in these seven counties ― Culberson, Brewster, Val Verde, Maverick, Zavala, Dimmit and Presidio ― she would have netted an additional 970 votes, more than Hurd’s margin of victory.

“I am glad that Beto is coming to this [guns] fight when so many have been organizing and making policy on it for so long,” said Annie Weinberg, a former elections director for the liberal group Democracy for America, which endorsed both O’Rourke’s Senate bid and Ortiz Jones’ House run. “It remains to be seen the depth of his commitment and how he is going to follow through, because he was willing to give a pass to a congressman who had an A rating from the NRA. That is a trust deficit.” 

“When Beto had a chance to help elect a pro-gun control Democrat over the NRA favorite, he stayed on the sidelines,” said Monica Klein, who advises progressive women running for office. “His newfound gun control activism is the kind of inauthentic posturing that turns voters off of the Democratic Party.”

Westlake Legal Group 5d7a9bff2400002e2a78b887 Beto O’Rourke Talks Tough On Guns. But He Didn’t Step Up To Oppose An NRA Champion.

Scott Eisen/Getty Images Beto O’Rourke has endorsed a mandatory assault weapons buyback, among other tough gun safety provisions.

Some Democrats have also faulted O’Rourke for lending Hurd bipartisan credibility during the 2018 election cycle. In March 2017, after a Washington snowstorm scuttled air travel plans, the neighboring House members embarked on a buddy road trip from San Antonio, Texas, back to the nation’s capital in time for important votes. The pair, who earned some viral attention with a live stream of their trip, appeared together at an official event more than a year later, at a time when O’Rourke’s Senate run and Hurd’s reelection bid were in full swing.

“When it came to his congressional career, Beto was never about the issues. Beto has always been about protecting his buddies in Congress,” said progressive strategist Murshed Zaheed, noting that O’Rourke endorsed Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney for New York attorney general in 2018 over both progressive law professor Zephyr Teachout and Tish James, who became the state’s first Black attorney general.

But other Democratic strategists have disputed the idea that full-throated support from O’Rourke would have made the difference for Ortiz Jones. And as a Senate candidate, O’Rourke has noted that he shared voter data and other resources with Texas’ entire slate of down-ballot Democratic candidates, including Ortiz Jones. And even as he declined to officially endorse her, O’Rourke spoke highly of her at campaign events where she was present.

Hurd, currently the only African-American Republican in the House, has taken more moderate stances on some issues than his GOP colleagues. For example, he voted against the bill that tried to repeal the Affordable Care Act in May 2017.

But until recently, Hurd has stuck to party orthodoxy on guns. In a message to members encouraging them to vote for Hurd in 2018, the NRA noted, among other things, his opposition to expanded background checks and his support for a bill requiring all states to honor concealed carry permits issued in gun owners’ home states. In January 2016, following the mass shooting in San Bernardino, California, Hurd blasted then-President Barack Obama for a series of executive actions tightening gun safety, including measures designed to increase background checks and keep closer track of firearms lost in transit from manufacturers to gun sellers.

Hurd is not seeking reelection next year. If he were, it is not clear that he would still receive an “A” rating from the NRA. This year, Hurd voted for a bill to close some major background check loopholes, such as those exempting gun shows and other private sales. He still voted against a bill to close the “Charleston loophole” by extending the background check period from three to 10 days. And he is still co-sponsoring the bill that would effectively prevent more liberal states from upholding their own concealed carry laws.

Of course, Hurd’s reelection did not prevent Democrats from taking control of the House in the 2018 midterm elections, nor did his “no” vote on the Charleston loophole bill stop it from passing the House. O’Rourke said in June that he would support Ortiz Jones if she were the Democratic nominee in the race for the now-open Texas House seat. Ortiz Jones announced in May that she would run for the seat again; Hurd announced his plans to retire at the end of his term in August.

O’Rourke has been candid about how the two recent mass shootings in Texas ― in El Paso in early August and in the Midland-Odessa area at the end of the month ― have sharpened his views on gun safety.

In a mid-August interview on CNN, O’Rourke argued that the time had passed for merely deliberating bold measures like a mandatory buyback of assault weapons. “I’ve talked to people. I’ve listened to that survivor,” he said. “And now, beyond a shadow of a doubt, regardless of what it does to our prospects going forward, you’ve got to speak the truth and be clear about where the solutions are.”

O’Rourke, who has hovered in the low single digits in most presidential primary polls, has the opportunity to test the appeal of his gun safety pitch at the Democratic primary debate in Houston on Thursday evening.

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Andrew McCarthy: McCabe indictment expected – what’s next?

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085783544001_6085784543001-vs Andrew McCarthy: McCabe indictment expected – what’s next? National Review fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/person/james-comey fox-news/opinion fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fnc/opinion fnc article Andrew McCarthy 88c24bda-2652-5129-8f52-ff1066bbda43

Federal prosecutors in Washington have recommended that criminal charges be filed against Andrew McCabe, the FBI’s former deputy director, and the Justice Department has rejected a last-ditch appeal by McCabe’s lawyers, according to a report on Thursday by Fox News. This clears the way for what appears to be McCabe’s imminent indictment.

Jesse Liu, the U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia (appointed by Trump), has reportedly decided that McCabe should be charged. The decision was based on a referral by the Justice Department’s inspector general (appointed by Obama), Michael Horowitz. In a comprehensive report last year, issued after a probe of a leak of investigative information to the media orchestrated by McCabe, Horowitz found that McCabe had misled investigators, including making false statements under oath. As we observed here when the IG’s report was released, the case laid out by Horowitz appears compelling.

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The Fox report indicates that Liu signaled to McCabe’s lawyers that she was persuaded to file charges. McCabe’s lawyers then appealed that decision to Jeffrey Rosen, the deputy attorney general (DAG). At least one source told Fox that McCabe’s team received an email from the Justice Department, which states: “The Department rejected your appeal of the United States Attorney’s Office’s decision in this matter. Any further inquiries should be directed to the United States Attorney’s Office.”

US ATTORNEY RECOMMENDS PROCEEDING WITH CHARGES AGAINST MCCABE, AS DOJ REJECTS LAST-DITCH APPEAL

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In the Justice Department chain of command, U.S. attorneys (who are presidential appointees confirmed by the Senate) report to the DAG. For most crimes, including false-statements offenses, the district U.S. attorney does not need authorization from the Justice Department to file charges. Nevertheless, in light of the facts that McCabe was a high-ranking Justice Department official (the FBI is part of DOJ) and that the potential charges stem from a Justice Department IG investigation, it makes sense that the district’s chief prosecutor would stay her hand to allow McCabe the opportunity to appeal to the Justice Department.

McCabe has indicated that, if charged, he would claim that the Justice Department was indicting him because of pressure from the White House. President Trump has been an unrestrained critic of McCabe, accusing him of rampant corruption.

CLICK HERE TO KEEP READING ANDREW MCCARTHY’S COLUMN IN THE NATIONAL REVIEW

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085783544001_6085784543001-vs Andrew McCarthy: McCabe indictment expected – what’s next? National Review fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/person/james-comey fox-news/opinion fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fnc/opinion fnc article Andrew McCarthy 88c24bda-2652-5129-8f52-ff1066bbda43   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085783544001_6085784543001-vs Andrew McCarthy: McCabe indictment expected – what’s next? National Review fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/person/james-comey fox-news/opinion fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fnc/opinion fnc article Andrew McCarthy 88c24bda-2652-5129-8f52-ff1066bbda43

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Tonight’s Democratic Debate: Live Updates From Houston

How to watch: 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Eastern on ABC, Univision and on streaming services.

Moderators: The debate will be hosted by George Stephanopoulos, David Muir, Linsey Davis and Jorge Ramos.

Candidates: Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., Senator Elizabeth Warren, Senator Bernie Sanders, Senator Kamala Harris, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, the entrepreneur Andrew Yang, Senator Cory Booker, former Representative Beto O’Rourke, Senator Amy Klobuchar and former housing secretary Julián Castro.

Here’s what you need to know:

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The third Democratic debate is being hosted by ABC News and Univision at Texas Southern University in Houston on Thursday.CreditTamir Kalifa for The New York Times

It is the presidential campaign that brought hundreds of reporters and photographers to this sprawling, and still-steamy-in-September, city. But while Texas Democrats are happy to host the third presidential primary debate, it is not the White House race that many of them are most excited about.

One year after they beat a pair of veteran House Republicans, Democrats here are downright giddy about the possibility of picking up even more seats in 2020. That’s because of what has been called the “Texodous” — the decisions of five, so far, House Republicans from Texas to retire rather than seek re-election.

“They see the handwriting on the wall,” said Gilberto Hinojosa, the Texas Democratic Chair.

Three of the G.O.P. lawmakers who are retiring had won re-election by only five points or less and hail from districts filled with the sort of suburban and nonwhite voters who are uneasy with President Trump and are nudging this state toward the political center.

Even though he won Texas by nine points, Mr. Trump’s standing has plummeted in Texas: a new Quinnipiac poll found that 50 percent of the state’s voters disapprove of his job performance and 48 percent said they would definitely not vote for him next year.

While few officials in either party believe Democrats could capture the state from Mr. Trump next year, their prospects up and down the ticket here could depend in part on who they nominate.

And Mr. Hinojosa said most Texas Democrats were less focused on policy issues than who can make the best case against Trump. “They want a candidate that can beat him,” he said. “That’s the number one priority.”

But as for his own priorities, Mr. Hinojosa said he was more focused further down the ticket.

“Our main goal in Texas right now is to flip the state House,” he said, noting that many of the nine seats they are hoping to pick up in the legislature are in those same suburban districts where they may be able to win more congressional races.

And why is he so focused on state house races going into a year when Democrats have a chance at the White House? Because if Democrats control one chamber of the legislature they could at least slow Republican attempts to redraw legislative boundaries for another decade after next year’s census.

Below the marquee matchup between Mr. Biden and Ms. Warren, perhaps the most intriguing subplot onstage will be among the candidates stuck in the single-digits in polling trying to position themselves as the leading, less ideological alternative to Mr. Biden.

For now, Ms. Warren and Mr. Sanders seem to dominate the left. Who can emerge as Mr. Biden’s leading rival for the center-left?

The various candidates each have different theories of the case. Mr. Buttigieg has been making a generational argument, though he has increasingly waded into more centrist and unifying grounds. “We need real solutions, not more polarization,” he said in his first TV ad that aired in Iowa.

Ms. Harris, who confronted Mr. Biden directly in the first debate, has tried to position herself as a tough former prosecutor who could take on President Trump one-on-one. Ms. Klobuchar is probably closest to Mr. Biden ideologically and has sold herself as a Midwestern moderate (who would also be a history-making first female president). Mr. Booker has, like Mr. Biden, promised to unify the nation and positioned himself as a healer. But while Mr. Biden has focused chiefly on beating Mr. Trump, Mr. Booker has said from the start that is “a floor not a ceiling” for 2020.

Senator Bernie Sanders has shown no inclination to squabble with Senator Elizabeth Warren.CreditNick Cote for The New York Times

If other candidates are itching to go after Ms. Warren, Mr. Sanders has shown no inclination to squabble with the other leading liberal in the race.

At his debate preparations in Colorado this week, Ms. Sanders has focused on what he has been talking about his entire political career: limiting the power of corporations, installing a single-payer health care system and requiring billionaires to pay more to subsidize a broader social safety net.

That’s not likely to draw him into much of a contrast with Ms. Warren, but it may lead him into a fight with Mr. Biden, either as a tag-team partner with Ms. Warren or on his own.

Mr. Biden, aside from ideological differences, is Mr. Sanders’s chief competitor for Democratic primary voters. Their supporters tend to be lower-income, less educated and far less tuned in to the day-to-day machinations of the presidential campaign than those who back candidates like Ms. Warren or Mr. Buttigieg.

So for Mr. Sanders, a clash with Ms. Warren does less good than showcasing his ideological contrast with Mr. Biden and peeling support away from the former vice president.

Unlike many onstage in Houston, the question for Ms. Harris is not whether she can have a breakout moment. She can. She already has. The question — a harder one to answer — is whether she can turn a strong debate performance into sustained political momentum.

Ms. Harris’s first debate takeover of Mr. Biden of his past work with segregationists and busing led to a quick rise in the polls that quickly faded.

In the second debate, Ms. Harris arrived as the subject of attacks herself — most sharply by Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii, who will not be onstage this week — and delivered a more uneven performance.

Ms. Harris has herself among the top-tier candidates but that is the kind of phrase often best left for others to utter. Her mandate on Thursday is to show that to be the case, and then have public polling demonstrate the same.

Beto O’Rourke has dropped the F-word in several recent interviews while describing his anger about the spread of gun violence.CreditTamir Kalifa for The New York Times

Our colleague Michael Grynbaum wrote today about ABC’s decision not to delay Thursday’s broadcast, leaving censors helpless to bleep any blurted profanities:

Faced with profligate profanities on the campaign trail — and at least one candidate who publicly threatened to work blue on its airwaves (ahem, Beto O’Rourke) — ABC News issued a warning this week to the 10 Democrats appearing on the debate stage in Houston on Thursday: Keep it clean, folks.

“We wanted to take this opportunity to remind you that, as the debate will air on the ABC broadcast network, we are governed by Federal Communications Commission indecency rules,” Rick Klein, the network’s political director, wrote in a memo forwarded to campaigns by the Democratic Party.

“Candidates should therefore avoid cursing or expletives in accordance with federal law,” Mr. Klein added, presumably sighing deeply.

The fact that the debate will be carried on regular broadcast airwaves — instead of cable — means the network could face penalties from federal regulators if obscenities are uttered.

Jonathan Martin and Astead W. Herndon contributed reporting from Houston.

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25 Mistakes Tourists Make While Visiting Hawaii

It’s obvious why Hawaii is a popular tourist destination. The islands boast a variety of spectacular natural landscapes, a rich cultural history, delicious food and countless opportunities for adventure.

While locals welcome tourists from around the world with open arms, they’ve also observed visitors making a few mistakes during their stays. We asked people who live on the islands to share some of these faux pas.

From touching wildlife to ignoring road etiquette, here are 25 mistakes tourists often make while visiting Hawaii ― and some advice for avoiding these errors during your travels.

1. Touching Wildlife

“Do not touch sea turtles, monk seals and other wild animals living in Hawaii. Unfortunately, I can’t repeat this one enough because people keep doing it. Both of these beautiful creatures are on the endangered and threatened species lists, making it a federal offense to touch or harass them. Getting that close-up selfie is also a big no-no. People have been heavily fined, featured on the local news and even hunted and harassed on social media. Many local families consider the honu (Hawaiian green sea turtle) to be their ʻaumākua ― a family god or ancestor — and disturbing them is disrespectful and taboo.” ― Amy Fujimoto, blogger at Aloha With Love

2. Wearing Reef-Unfriendly Sunscreen

“Staying protected against the sun’s harmful UV rays is a challenge for anyone. One thing you won’t see locals doing is applying spray sunscreen that drifts off into the wind, barely covering the skin appropriately. If you want to be protected, long sleeves, hats and sunglasses all do fine in the waterproof category. Be aware that some sunscreens have coral reef-destroying chemicals (oxybenzone & octinoxate). Avoid aerosols, and consider products that include mineral sunblocks with zinc oxide and titanium dioxide.” ― Maryrose and Reid Hicks, bloggers at Wanderlustyle

3. Saying ‘Hawaiian Shirts’

“Don’t call tropical print shirts in Hawaii ‘Hawaiian Shirts.’ They’re called ‘Aloha Shirts’ and are very common to see people wearing, even professionally.” ― Julie Estrella, blogger at Aloha Lovely

4. Taking Lava Rocks And Sand Home

“If you visit Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on the Big Island, know that taking the lava rocks, black sand or any natural resource out of the park is a federal offense. Many people also believe that taking the rocks and sand is stealing from Pele, the Hawaiian goddess of volcanoes, and any misfortune you experience is your punishment from her. This may or may not be true depending on who you ask, but every year more than a thousand rocks, bags of sand and even seashells are mailed back to the national park, post offices, universities and even Hawaiian Airlines with letters of apologies.” ― Fujimoto

5. Hiking Unprepared

“One common mistake I’ve noticed is when tourists hear about hikes that are off the beaten path and decide to try to find it and hike it without local knowledge or a local friend. They don’t know where to park, where to start the hike, what the inherent dangers are on the hike, etc. This can prove dangerous, as many of the hikes in Hawaii are not easy and tourists who are not experienced can quickly find themselves in trouble if they do a hike beyond their skill level. My suggestion is to always do your homework before any hike, especially if you aren’t going with someone who knows the area or has done that exact hike before.” ― Jimmy Wilkinson, photographer at OpticalHi

Westlake Legal Group 5d7aa1a2240000d32678bcd6 25 Mistakes Tourists Make While Visiting Hawaii

Rosanna U via Getty Images

Tourists shouldn’t hike off the beaten path without taking the proper precautions. 

6. Not Monitoring The Water

“There are several inherent dangers related to the ocean that tourists often are completely unaware of. One of those is that though the water looks calm and inviting, large swells can sometimes be several minutes or even longer between breaking, which means someone who jumps into a seemingly calm ocean can find themselves in serious trouble if they entered in between the swells. My suggestion: Always spend at least 15-20 minutes simply watching the ocean to see if and where any waves may be breaking before swimming or exploring the exposed rocks close to the water. ― Wilkinson

“Probably the best advice I could give to tourists is that seasons matter here in Hawaii. Everyone thinks we get summer weather all year round. That may be the case as far as temperatures go but what most don’t know is that the ocean changes drastically during winter and summer seasons. Don’t be afraid to talk to lifeguards. They know the ocean better than anyone and usually give good advice on where not to swim. I encourage all visitors to visit this website for more information about ocean safety in Hawaii.” ― Chad Koga, photographer at Chad Koga Photography

7. Doing It ‘For The Gram’

“No geo-tagging ― especially if you have the benefit of being taken to special places with a local. It is disrespectful, and doing it for the ‘gram’ is frowned upon.” ― Juice Aguirre, founder of Juice Productions Hawaii

“Too many times we see visitors trekking along dangerous (or illegal) trails just to get the Instagram post they’ve seen on social media. Or they snap the pic and leave — without even enjoying just being there. While social media is great at sharing travel experiences, posting to it shouldn’t be your travel goal.” ― Catherine Toth Fox, blogger at The Cat Dish

8. Being Rude On The Road

“Whether you’ve just landed or are still enjoying your vacation, driving in Hawaii comes with a little extra responsibility. Too often we forget that aloha extends to the mahalos we give one another, especially in tight situations such as when cars wait until the last minute to merge and a fellow driver lets them in. So many times, I’ve experienced the lack of thankfulness from drivers I’ve rescued in a bind. Give a wave, or better yet, throw a shaka out the window. There’s a lot of traffic these days and a shaka can go a long way!” ― Nainoa Ciotti, photographer at ThreeIfBySea

9. Turning Your Back On The Ocean

“I’m not quite sure who coined the phrase, ‘Never turn your back on the ocean,’ but it is one of the biggest mistakes that I see tourists make. At a young age, this phrase was ingrained in my brothers and I for two important reasons. The ocean is a great place to swim, surf, dive and play, but it can also be very dangerous, especially for the inexperienced. Most people are cautious in the water, but forget that mindset when they are dry and on the sand. I remember when I was a city and county lifeguard, we would have to rescue countless people who got swept out by waves crashing on the shore. ‘Never turn your back on the ocean’ also serves as a gentle reminder for us to always show our respect for the ocean and everything that calls it home.” ― Ciotti

10. Not Trying Local Foods

“Do not leave Hawaii without trying Kona coffee, shave ice, poke, spam, or malasadas. I know all those sound cliche for Hawaii, but you cannot get a better product or experience outside of Hawaii. For shave ice I love Waiola or Uncle Clay’s on Oahu. Kona coffee can be found everywhere but I highly recommend a peaberry. Malasadas have to be from Leonard’s, and I usually get my spam meals from McDonald’s, where it’s on their local menu, or 711. For poke you can’t go wrong with Ono Seafood or Maguro Brothers!” ― Vince Lim, photographer at Vince Lim Photo

Westlake Legal Group 5d7aa2f1240000c92b78bdb2 25 Mistakes Tourists Make While Visiting Hawaii

Rick Poon via Getty Images

This lunch plate includes Kalua pork and pork lau lau with lomi lomi salmon, loco moco with brown rice and spam musubi.

11. Making Yourself Vulnerable To Theft

“When you do go on a hike, do not leave valuables in your vehicle!” ― Wilkinson

12. Off-Roading At Sandy Beaches

“Don’t take your rental convertible Mustang off-roading ON A sandy beach. I see so many of them stuck in the sand.” ― Nova Rizzo, blogger at The 96815

13. Entering Someone’s Home With Shoes On

“’Ohana is a big part of what makes Hawaii so special. In some way or another, on top of our immediate ’ohana, we’ve created an extended family within our communities, within our workplaces and with our friends. We are quick to extend our aloha and invite a fellow neighbor or friend in, to talk story over some drinks and pupus, even if we’ve just met. With that being said, a big no-no we see non-locals make is walking into someone else’s house with their slippers on. As a word of advice, when someone invites you over for a pā’ina, ‘Leave your slippers at the door,’ and don’t take better ones when you leave. We don’t want you to spend time at your first party wiping up the sand and dirt you tracked into the house.” ― Ciotti

14. Trashing The Islands

“Respect the Aina: Above all, take care of the islands as you would your own home. Just like the Earth, Hawaii is a fragile ecosystem. Its pristine beauty can only be enjoyed by future generations if we consistently strive to care and respect it. Pick up after yourselves, leave no ‘footprint.’ No littering. Using refillable canisters are a MORE reliable alternative than a one-time-use plastic water bottle.” ― Hicks

15. Not Learning The History

“The biggest mistake tourists make when visiting Hawaii is not reading up on the history of Hawaii before they arrive. How Hawaii became a state is both a fascinating and tragic story.” ― Takara Swoopes Bullock, blogger at Fun Little Ohana

16. Walking Everywhere In the Ocean, Including On Coral Reef

“Besides the damage to any coral under your feet, creatures that feel threatened by an unknowing tourist foot can attack. In my experience, moray eels sometimes like to hang out in holes in tide pools that are at least waist deep in water. Watch your step because you do not want to get bitten by one. Pokey sea urchins will also ruin your vacation by giving you a limp for the rest of your stay.” ― Fujimoto

17. Ignoring Signs

“This means signs that say, ‘No Parking,’ ‘Do Not Trespass,’ ‘Dangerous Current,’ ‘Warning: Jellyfish.’ These signs are meant to keep you safe and respectful. Locals heed them — and visitors should, too.” ― Fox

18. Failing To Learn Surf Etiquette

“Some people learn quickly, but for the majority I would recommend investing in a lesson not just to learn the basics, but also the proper etiquette. There are rules when catching waves and it’s very possible you’ll get told off if you take a wave that you shouldn’t have. For safety reasons, be a good swimmer and know that there’s a chance your board can get carried away and you’ll have to swim for it.” ― Fujimoto

Westlake Legal Group 5d7a9f21240000d32678baf6 25 Mistakes Tourists Make While Visiting Hawaii

Bike_Maverick via Getty Images

There are many rules when it comes to surf etiquette. 

19. Standing Where The Rocks Are Wet

“Here’s some good advice from my dad: Wet rocks mean the big waves are reaching those spots. Don’t stand on the wet rocks and don’t turn your back on the ocean. I constantly hear on the news about tourists getting swept out to sea. There have been plenty of near-drownings, drownings and deaths of all ages from children to healthy adults.” ― Fujimoto

20. Not Scheduling Downtime

“I get it ― visiting Hawaii is exciting and tourists want to see ‘everything’ they can, so they jam-pack their schedules of things to do. I think it is a mistake to overbook (or fill your schedule with so many activities) because they go back home feeling tired and needing another vacation. Part of the Hawaiian culture is being laid-back and enjoying the Aina (the land). Tourists should ‘experience’ that being laid-back when they visit Hawaii. Spending time at the beach can be a ‘downtime,’ as long as you are not hopping from one beach to another.” ― Liza Pierce, blogger at A Maui Blog

21. Planning To Eat Or Shop Late At Night

“On the smaller neighbor islands, keep in mind that local restaurants and shops may close down early. It’s safer to plan afternoon shopping excursions and early dinners. Check their opening hours in advance especially on Sundays. Also, don’t be surprised if you can’t find anything open on a late Sunday afternoon in the airports. We like to dig out a little early to enjoy the rest of our weekend.” ― Fujimoto

22. Visiting During Jellyfish Season

“The Portuguese man o’ war and box jellyfish swarm into certain Hawaii shores every month depending on the wind, tide and moon. Although it only happens if conditions are right, it’s something to consider when planning your trip to paradise. I hardly pay attention to it now as I’ll either chance it or just hang out on the sand if it’s really bad, but if you know you’ll have a bad reaction, plan your beach days to avoid the jellies. Jellyfish show up roughly eight days after the full moon and hang around for three to five days.” ― Fujimoto

23. Thinking Everyone Who Lives In Hawaii Is Hawaiian

“Hawaii is not like Texas or California, where you can add an ‘an’ at the end of the state name to describe people who live in the Islands. Hawaiian relates to the indigenous people of Hawaii. You can be native Hawaiian by ethnicity and never live in Hawaii. That said, people who have lived in the Islands for generations but do not possess any actual Hawaiian blood are not Hawaiian. They’re kamaʻāina, or local.” ― Fox

Westlake Legal Group 5d7aa35f240000d32678bdf7 25 Mistakes Tourists Make While Visiting Hawaii

Art Wager via Getty Images

24. Choosing The Wrong Location

“When planning on where to stay on Oahu, definitely decide if you want convenience or if you want to be off the grid. Most people stay in Waikiki which is central to just about everything, and is why all the hotels are located here. There are also beautiful places to stay on the north and west sides of the island but the commute to Honolulu, where most restaurants, bars and malls are can be challenging. Traffic on Oahu can be just as bad as the 405 in LA during rush hour. Even though the island is small, there are only a few major highways so plan your commute accordingly. If you are driving out of Honolulu to either the north shore or west side, leave before 3 p.m. to avoid traffic. If you are commuting to Honolulu in the morning, leave before 6 a.m.” ― Lim

25. Cramming In Too Many Islands At Once

“Some people will create a busy itinerary and cram too many islands into one trip, limiting their time on each island. Getting to know an island intimately takes time. Each island has a different history, a variety of habitats and even a unique local culture that you’ll want to get to know. I recommend spending at the very least four days on Oahu, the Big Island, Maui and Kauai.” ― Fujimoto

Quotes have been edited and condensed for clarity.

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Beto O’Rourke Talks Tough On Guns Now. But Critics Say He Helped Elect An NRA Champion.

Beto O’Rourke, the former Democratic congressman from El Paso, Texas, is hoping a push for tougher gun laws can lift the fortunes of his struggling presidential campaign.

In the wake of the mass shooting in an El Paso Walmart that killed 22 people, he has backed more ambitious gun safety policies than any of his rivals, particularly his call for a mandatory buyback program for military-style assault rifles already in circulation.

But this new ardor on gun regulation hits a still-raw nerve for some of O’Rourke’s critics, who recall his neutrality in a key House race in 2018 that returned a National Rifle Association-approved lawmaker to Congress. 

At the time, O’Rourke was engaged in his own high-profile, grassroots-approved run for the Senate against incumbent Ted Cruz (R-Texas). 

The race to represent Texas’ 23rd Congressional District pitted Gina Ortiz Jones, a Democrat backed by the Giffords gun safety group, against Rep. Will Hurd, a Republican who had an “A” rating from the NRA. O’Rourke declined to endorse Ortiz Jones, a lesbian Iraq War veteran who would have been the first Filipina-American in Congress. She went on to lose the race to Hurd, who is friends with O’Rourke, by a mere 926 votes

Although it is impossible to know for sure what O’Rourke’s endorsement would have done for Ortiz Jones, he racked up bigger vote totals than she did in a number of the 23rd District’s rural counties that November, which suggests his blessing could have made a difference. The district covers 26 counties and parts of three more. A HuffPost analysis of election results found that if Ortiz Jones had attained O’Rourke’s totals in these seven counties ― Culberson, Brewster, Val Verde, Maverick, Zavala, Dimmit and Presidio ― she would have netted an additional 970 votes, more than Hurd’s margin of victory.

“I am glad that Beto is coming to this [guns] fight when so many have been organizing and making policy on it for so long,” said Annie Weinberg, a former elections director for the liberal group Democracy for America, which endorsed both O’Rourke’s Senate bid and Ortiz Jones’ House run. “It remains to be seen the depth of his commitment and how he is going to follow through, because he was willing to give a pass to a congressman who had an A rating from the NRA. That is a trust deficit.” 

“When Beto had a chance to help elect a pro-gun control Democrat over the NRA favorite, he stayed on the sidelines,” said Monica Klein, who advises progressive women running for office. “His newfound gun control activism is the kind of inauthentic posturing that turns voters off of the Democratic Party.”

Westlake Legal Group 5d7a9bff2400002e2a78b887 Beto O’Rourke Talks Tough On Guns Now. But Critics Say He Helped Elect An NRA Champion.

Scott Eisen/Getty Images Beto O’Rourke has endorsed a mandatory assault weapons buyback, among other tough gun safety provisions.

Some Democrats have also faulted O’Rourke for lending Hurd bipartisan credibility during the 2018 election cycle. In March 2017, after a Washington snowstorm scuttled air travel plans, the neighboring House members embarked on a buddy road trip from San Antonio, Texas, back to the nation’s capital in time for important votes. The pair, who earned some viral attention with a live stream of their trip, appeared together at an official event more than a year later, at a time when O’Rourke’s Senate run and Hurd’s reelection bid were in full swing.

“When it came to his congressional career, Beto was never about the issues. Beto has always been about protecting his buddies in Congress,” said progressive strategist Murshed Zaheed, noting that O’Rourke endorsed Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney for New York attorney general in 2018 over both progressive law professor Zephyr Teachout and Tish James, who became the state’s first Black attorney general.

But other Democratic strategists have disputed the idea that full-throated support from O’Rourke would have made the difference for Ortiz Jones. And as a Senate candidate, O’Rourke has noted that he shared voter data and other resources with Texas’ entire slate of down-ballot Democratic candidates, including Ortiz Jones. And even as he declined to officially endorse her, O’Rourke spoke highly of her at campaign events where she was present.

Hurd, currently the only African-American Republican in the House, has taken more moderate stances on some issues than his GOP colleagues. For example, he voted against the bill that tried to repeal the Affordable Care Act in May 2017.

But until recently, Hurd has stuck to party orthodoxy on guns. In a message to members encouraging them to vote for Hurd in 2018, the NRA noted, among other things, his opposition to expanded background checks and his support for a bill requiring all states to honor concealed carry permits issued in gun owners’ home states. In January 2016, following the mass shooting in San Bernardino, California, Hurd blasted then-President Barack Obama for a series of executive actions tightening gun safety, including measures designed to increase background checks and keep closer track of firearms lost in transit from manufacturers to gun sellers.

Hurd is not seeking reelection next year. If he were, it is not clear that he would still receive an “A” rating from the NRA. This year, Hurd voted for a bill to close some major background check loopholes, such as those exempting gun shows and other private sales. He still voted against a bill to close the “Charleston loophole” by extending the background check period from three to 10 days. And he is still co-sponsoring the bill that would effectively prevent more liberal states from upholding their own concealed carry laws.

Of course, Hurd’s reelection did not prevent Democrats from taking control of the House in the 2018 midterm elections, nor did his “no” vote on the Charleston loophole bill stop it from passing the House. O’Rourke said in June that he would support Ortiz Jones if she were the Democratic nominee in the race for the now-open Texas House seat. Ortiz Jones announced in May that she would run for the seat again; Hurd announced his plans to retire at the end of his term in August.

O’Rourke has been candid about how the two recent mass shootings in Texas ― in El Paso in early August and in the Midland-Odessa area at the end of the month ― have sharpened his views on gun safety.

In a mid-August interview on CNN, O’Rourke argued that the time had passed for merely deliberating bold measures like a mandatory buyback of assault weapons. “I’ve talked to people. I’ve listened to that survivor,” he said. “And now, beyond a shadow of a doubt, regardless of what it does to our prospects going forward, you’ve got to speak the truth and be clear about where the solutions are.”

O’Rourke, who has hovered in the low single digits in most presidential primary polls, has the opportunity to test the appeal of his gun safety pitch at the Democratic primary debate in Houston on Thursday evening.

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MIT To Settle Suit Alleging It Hurt Workers In 401(k) Plan

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1096028034-08a36ca049d7974ed5663790e5e55828f4346756-s1100-c15 MIT To Settle Suit Alleging It Hurt Workers In 401(k) Plan

MIT is agreeing to settle a lawsuit that claimed it allowed its workers to be hit with big fees in their retirement accounts. DEA / M. Borchi/De Agostini via Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  MIT To Settle Suit Alleging It Hurt Workers In 401(k) Plan

MIT is agreeing to settle a lawsuit that claimed it allowed its workers to be hit with big fees in their retirement accounts.

DEA / M. Borchi/De Agostini via Getty Images

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has reached an agreement in principle to settle a lawsuit that alleged that MIT, one of the nation’s most prestigious universities, hurt workers in its retirement plan by engaging in an improper relationship with the financial firm Fidelity Investments.

Just days ahead of the start of the trial, MIT and the plaintiffs said in a court filing that they had reached the deal and are asking the court for 45 days in order for the details to be finalized and prepared for consideration by the court.

The lawsuit alleged that MIT went against the advice of its own consultants and allowed Fidelity to pack the university’s retirement plan with high-fee investment funds that ended up costing employees tens of millions of dollars. In return, the lawsuit said, MIT leveraged millions of dollars in donations from Fidelity.

MIT and Fidelity have said the allegations have no merit.

The lawsuit said Fidelity executives took MIT officials on lavish outings, including an NBA Finals game. Court documents show that in 2015, when the university considered other options to Fidelity, an MIT dean emailed the head of an MIT committee overseeing the plan: “If we’re not switching to Vanguard or TIAA Cref, I am going to expect something big and good coming to MIT,” according to the court records.

Jerry Schlichter, the attorney for the plaintiffs, said that soon afterwards, “Fidelity donated $5 million to MIT.”

In a court filing, MIT said the dean who wrote that email “never had any fiduciary responsibility for the plan.”

In a letter to faculty and staff Thursday, MIT Provost Martin Schmidt wrote: “Although MIT believes firmly that it has managed the 401(k) Plan in careful compliance with the law and in the best interests of its participants, the continued cost and distraction of litigation are likely to be significant. In order to avoid that continued drain of MIT resources, we have reached an agreement to settle the dispute.”

Schlichter has made a career of suing big company and university retirement plans, claiming they charge excessive fees and hurt workers. He sues to try to force the companies and universities to offer better plans. That has earned him the nickname “the 401(k) Lone Ranger.”

Given that history, assuming the settlement deal holds together and is approved by the court, it could include agreements from the university to change the way it manages its retirement plan.

In his letter, MIT’s Schmidt says, “We are proud of the retirement benefits offered to our employees and the processes in place to oversee those benefits. MIT is unique among our peers in offering employees both a supplemental 401(k) plan, with an MIT contribution match up to the first 5% of an employee’s pay, and a traditional defined-benefit pension plan, paid in full by the Institute.”

Fidelity, which is a financial supporter of NPR, is not named in the case. The company has said that the assertions in the lawsuit “are completely fictional and wholly irresponsible.”

Experts say lawsuits like this one have made big companies and universities much more aware of the legal duty they have to protect their workers’ interests in retirement accounts. They say that has helped reduce fees that workers pay in retirement plans at the largest companies. But they say many smaller organizations still have very high fees and bad investment options.

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Tonight’s Democratic Debate: What Time Is It and How to Watch

Westlake Legal Group 12WHATTOWATCH-facebookJumbo Tonight’s Democratic Debate: What Time Is It and How to Watch Yang, Andrew (1975- ) Warren, Elizabeth Sanders, Bernard Presidential Election of 2020 Klobuchar, Amy Houston (Tex) Harris, Kamala D Democratic Party Debates (Political) Castro, Julian Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Booker, Cory A Biden, Joseph R Jr ABC Inc
  • The debate is 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Eastern, and you can watch it on ABC and Univision. It is being held in Houston and will also be available on streaming services.

  • Ten Democratic candidates will debate: Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., Senator Elizabeth Warren, Senator Bernie Sanders, Senator Kamala Harris, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, the entrepreneur Andrew Yang, Senator Cory Booker, former Representative Beto O’Rourke, Senator Amy Klobuchar and former housing secretary Julián Castro.

  • The candidates will have 60-second opening statements, followed by 60 seconds to answer questions from the four moderators: George Stephanopoulos, David Muir, Linsey Davis and Jorge Ramos. There will be no closing statements.

  • The New York Times will have extensive debate coverage, including a live analysis throughout the event by Peter Baker, Maggie Haberman, Astead W. Herndon, Annie Karni, Sydney Ember, all hosted by Lisa Lerer.

Join us for live analysis on debate night. Subscribe to “On Politics,” and we’ll send you a link.

Quick, name the most substantive discussion of foreign policy you have heard during the nearly 10 hours of debates so far. Struggling? Yes, foreign affairs has played a minimal role so far in the Democratic primary debates but that could change on Thursday night.

In particular, Mr. Sanders has suggested that he wants to differentiate himself on international matters from Mr. Biden, a former chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, especially focusing on Mr. Biden’s initial support for the Iraq War in 2003.

But there are plenty of international developments for the candidates to weigh in on:

  • President Trump’s plan to invite Taliban leaders to Camp David, before their secret Afghanistan peace talks collapsed.

  • The ouster of John Bolton, the former national security adviser.

  • The turmoil in the British Parliament over Brexit.

  • The pledge by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel to annex nearly a third of the occupied West Bank.

  • Turkey returning refugees to Syria, and refugees from the Bahamas arriving in Florida.

Like on so many matters, Mr. Biden’s long record leaves openings for his rivals to pick over. But it could also give him gravitas in the eyes of many voters, and an ability to position himself as a steady hand at a moment of turbulence.

Disagreements within the field over what to do on health care — the issue that most Democratic strategists believe propelled the party’s gains in the 2018 midterms — offer some of the clearest fissures in the race.

They are likely to be a major issue of debate on Thursday. One reason for that? Multiple campaigns see political advantage in highlighting their differences.

For Mr. Sanders, whose campaign has adopted the “no middle ground” mantra, his uncompromising push for “Medicare for all” is almost definitional. Of the 10 candidates onstage, only two have unequivocally stated that they support phasing out private insurers from the American marketplace as part of their plan to implement a “Medicare for all” system: Mr. Sanders and Ms. Warren.

Advisers to other campaigns have seen that as politically treacherous — possibly ceding the party’s advantage on the issue back to the Republican Party.

Mr. Biden has portrayed his health care plan as building upon the Affordable Care Act, while positioning his pro-“Medicare for all” rivals as undermining that achievement.

As Mr. Biden said in a recent television ad, “Obamacare is personal to me. When I see the president try to tear it down, and others propose to replace it and start over, that’s personal to me, too. You’ve got to build on what we did.”

Our colleague Zolan Kanno-Youngs had a story on Wednesday looking at the immigration plans — or lack thereof — of the Democratic hopefuls. The story began:

One Democratic candidate would post asylum officers at the border to decide immigration cases on the spot. Others would create an entirely new court system outside the Justice Department. Some have suggested reinstating a program that would allow Central American minors to apply for refugee status in their home countries.

The Democrats running for the White House do not lack ideas on the hot-button issues of immigration and border control. But as they prepare to take the stage on Thursday for their debate in Houston, most would rather talk about the hard-line policies of the man they seek to replace, President Trump.

The candidates have disagreements: whether to repeal a statute that makes crossing the border without permission a criminal offense, for instance, and whether to provide undocumented immigrants with taxpayer-subsidized health care. And there are also a lot of unknowns about what the candidates favor in terms of who to deport and other areas of immigration that may be unpopular with some Democrats. The debate could bring additional clarity to one of the most hotly discussed and intensely felt issues facing Americans.

Ever since they sparred from across a Senate hearing room in 2005, Mr. Biden and Ms. Warren have represented the Democratic Party’s poles on economic policy. Now they will meet on a debate stage for the first time Thursday, an encounter that many Democrats have been eagerly awaiting.

There has been relatively little sword-crossing between the two on the campaign trail. Ms. Warren had a lone quip about Mr. Biden previously being “on the side of the credit card companies.” Mr. Biden pooh-poohs Ms. Warren’s plans without mentioning her name.

But pressed by Thursday night’s moderators and, perhaps, their fellow candidates, there will be little room for Mr. Biden and Ms. Warren to hide from the fight — one that Ms. Warren appears far more eager to re-enact than does Mr. Biden, who Ms. Warren told The Boston Globe in 2012, once referred to her as “that woman who cleaned my clock.”

With so much anticipation toward and attention to the Biden-Warren showdown, the big question is how long the moderators wait to tee up the confrontation. In the first two sets of debates, NBC and CNN spent the first 30 minutes focusing the candidates on health care policy. Mr. Biden and Ms. Warren differ there, too, but for two candidates hoping to focus on the future, real fireworks may come when they discuss the past.

Once upon a time — in 2015 — Ms. Warren and Ms. Harris were very close. Ms. Warren was among the first to endorse Ms. Harris’s Senate run, sending a fund-raising solicitation the day her senate campaign began.

The two were ideological partners, having worked together when Ms. Harris, as California’s attorney general, sued the big banks over her state’s mortgage crisis.

But in the 2020 campaign they have taken different paths while competing for the same set of Democratic voters — those with college degrees, especially women. Ms. Warren’s rise over the last four months has come as Ms. Harris has fallen.

Now they will appear on a debate stage for the first time Thursday night in Houston. Ms. Harris has edged away from the firebrand liberalism Ms. Warren espouses. She’s hedged on her support for a single-payer, “Medicare for all” health care system and stumbled when talking about policy specifics, both areas in the Warren wheelhouse.

Ms. Warren, far ahead of Ms. Harris in public polling, is unlikely to go on the attack first, but she is certain to be ready if Ms. Harris seeks to draw a contrast between them or declares that Ms. Warren’s politics are too risky for a general electorate.

For Ms. Harris, who has shown great skill at made-for-social media moments, the stakes are much higher. Having seen her debate moment with Mr. Biden dissipate over the summer, she must find a way to strike a permanent vision in voters’ minds in Houston. That may mean taking a bite out of Ms. Warren’s popularity.

It spotlights the key candidate pairings and political dynamics onstage, assessing how the top-tier Democrats are likely to engage and how the rest of the contenders will try to find breakout moments. Read the guide here.

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Biden campaign rejects moderate label, swipes at plan-obsessed rivals ahead of debate

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085464898001_6085458059001-vs Biden campaign rejects moderate label, swipes at plan-obsessed rivals ahead of debate fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc f5807759-48a7-5c59-bc58-ebc079cbc4be Brooke Singman article

The Biden campaign previewed its debate strategy for Thursday night by making clear at least two things clear: The onetime vice president will reject efforts to cast him as an incremental moderate. And he’ll call on his rivals to do more than just wave around an arsenal of policy proposals.

“The vice president will argue we need more than just plans — we need action. We need progress,” a senior Biden campaign official said Thursday. “This race is not just about plans, it’s about getting things done for people.”

TRUMP CAMPAIGN FLIES ANTI-SOCIALISM BANNER OVER DEBATE SITE

The comments came during a briefing with reporters on the sidelines of the debate in Houston, and they amounted to an implicit swipe at surging Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who is best known for her reams of plans. The Massachusetts senator published yet another of those plans on Thursday morning, focused on Social Security.

The dynamic between the two rivals could be the main attraction, as this is the first time Warren has been on the same stage with Biden in this Democratic primary cycle. With the criteria tightened for this, the third debate matchup among the Dem candidates, only the 10 top-polling contenders will appear, as opposed to the field being split in half for two consecutive nights of debates.

The debate is a clear opportunity for Warren to build on the momentum her campaign has experienced in recent weeks. But Biden, grappling with sustained critical media coverage over a string of verbal flubs and a narrative from his left flank that he’s not progressive enough, is determined to convince voters there’s more to his candidacy than just the “electability” factor.

According to the campaign, he’ll talk about the “meaningful change” he helped pursue while vice president under Barack Obama, and his plans to build on that success.

“He’ll talk about his substantive record,” the official said, touting his victories against the National Rifle Association (NRA) and support for the Violence Against Women Act.

“Joe Biden has been at the forefront of progressive change,” the official said.

WARREN UNVEILS SOCIAL SECURITY PLAN

The campaign also said Biden will “reject the premise that the ideas he is putting forward are incremental.”

“We believe there is a false dichotomy in this race between candidates who are supposedly the liberal revolutionaries and those who are for incremental change,” another official said.

As for his strategy for the debate stage, the campaign made clear that Biden “is not in this race to attack other Democrats.”

“He’s been very clear about that,” one official said. “Our hope and aim is that this will be a substantive policy discussion.”

The official added, though, that Biden “has not shied away from drawing a contrast between his health care plan and Medicare-for-all — specifically the cost, in another apparent swipe at Warren and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.

“He’s not in the race to attack other Democrats but he is not going to shy away from having a meaningful conversation,” the official said.

Despite being the consistent frontrunner in the crowded Democratic primary field, Biden has grappled with critical media coverage and general frustration with his candidacy from the left. His campaign appearances have also been marred by some verbal slips in recent weeks, while some top Democrats have questioned his handling of his own record.

Former Obama adviser David Axelrod recently accused him of distorting his record on the Iraq War.

Biden famously weathered a rhetorical broadside from Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., during the first primary debate, in connection with his past stance on desegregation busing.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085464898001_6085458059001-vs Biden campaign rejects moderate label, swipes at plan-obsessed rivals ahead of debate fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc f5807759-48a7-5c59-bc58-ebc079cbc4be Brooke Singman article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085464898001_6085458059001-vs Biden campaign rejects moderate label, swipes at plan-obsessed rivals ahead of debate fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc f5807759-48a7-5c59-bc58-ebc079cbc4be Brooke Singman article

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ABC Tells Democrats to Keep Debate Clean. Looking at You, Beto.

Westlake Legal Group 15orourke-1-sub-facebookJumbo ABC Tells Democrats to Keep Debate Clean. Looking at You, Beto. United States Politics and Government Television Presidential Elections (US) Presidential Election of 2020 O'Rourke, Beto News and News Media Indecency, Obscenity and Profanity Democratic Party Debates (Political) ABC News

There was a time in American history when candidates for president did not need to be reminded to avoid using obscene and inappropriate language in front of millions of people.

That time is not now.

Faced with profligate profanities on the campaign trail — and at least one candidate who publicly threatened to work blue on its airwaves (ahem, Beto O’Rourke) — ABC News issued a warning this week to the 10 Democrats appearing on the debate stage in Houston on Thursday: Keep it clean, folks.

“We wanted to take this opportunity to remind you that, as the debate will air on the ABC broadcast network, we are governed by Federal Communications Commission indecency rules,” Rick Klein, the network’s political director, wrote in a memo forwarded to campaigns by the Democratic Party.

“Candidates should therefore avoid cursing or expletives in accordance with federal law,” Mr. Klein added, presumably sighing deeply.

There will be no delay on Thursday’s broadcast, leaving ABC censors helpless to bleep any blurted profanities. And the fact that the debate will be carried on regular broadcast airwaves — rather than the more libertine environment of cable — means the network could face penalties from federal regulators if obscenities are transmitted into Americans’ living rooms.

Concerns about uncouth language may seem quaint in an era when President Trump regularly indulges in all kinds of locker-room talk, peppering his social media and rally speeches with oaths once considered unspeakable (publicly, anyway) for a commander in chief.

But Democratic candidates, several of whom have denounced Mr. Trump’s degradation of political discourse, are increasingly dipping into dirty words themselves.

Mr. O’Rourke, the former Texas congressman, has dropped the F-word in numerous recent interviews while describing his anger about the spread of gun violence. A T-shirt available for sale on Mr. O’Rourke’s campaign website features the word in question spelled out six times. (In a nod to modesty, one letter is replaced by an asterisk.)

Obscenities, Mr. O’Rourke argues, are an appropriate response to the nation’s recent spate of gun massacres, including a mass shooting at an El Paso Walmart in the district he represented. Asked in New Hampshire over the weekend if he planned to swear on the debate stage, the candidate replied: “Maybe.”

Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey has casually used an obscene word for feces on his Twitter account, and Julián Castro, the former housing secretary, has indulged in a similar obscenity in live interviews. Coarse words like “pissed” or “hell” have also shown up in candidates’ statements.

Still, the ABC memo, first reported by CNN, was widely seen as an implicit warning toward Mr. O’Rourke. (The sponsors of this year’s two previous Democratic debates, NBC News and CNN, did not feel the need to circulate a similar warning against expletives.) ABC declined to comment, and the O’Rourke campaign did not respond to questions.

For television news executives, censoring curse words is typically a no-brainer. But sometimes the swear itself is newsworthy, a predicament that cropped up last year after Mr. Trump used a vulgar term to describe African nations and Haiti during a White House meeting with lawmakers.

The word appeared on cable news chyrons and in some news outlets’ smartphone alerts. Broadcast networks, governed by stricter rules, were more circumspect: Of the major network newscasts, only Lester Holt of NBC News uttered the offending word. On “ABC World News Tonight,” the anchor David Muir, who is serving as one of Thursday’s debate moderators, said Mr. Trump used “a profanity we won’t repeat.”

Technically, the F.C.C. prohibition on “grossly offensive” language on television expires at 10 p.m., so Democrats could hold off on their curses until then. There will still be an entire hour of debating left to go.

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