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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 69)

Oscar Wilde’s stolen ring recovered by ‘art detective’

A stolen ring once belonging to the famed Irish writer Oscar Wilde has been recovered nearly 20 years after it was stolen from Britain’s Oxford University, according to reports.

Arthur Brand, a Dutchman nicknamed the “Indiana Jones of the Art World” for successfully recovering high-profile stolen artworks, used his connections in the underworld to track down Wilde’s ring, AFP reported.

The ring, which Wilde gave to a fellow student in 1876, was stolen during a burglary in 2002 at Oxford’s Magdalen College. At the time, the ring was worth about $45,000.

Westlake Legal Group Oscar-Wilde Oscar Wilde's stolen ring recovered by 'art detective' fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/crime fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article 89d5814d-b174-5d0f-a55a-fcd62818ea44

The stolen ring that had belonged to Oscar Wilde was recovered some 20 years later. (Getty, File)

The burglary remained unsolved for years, with fears that the ring – made from 18-carat gold – may have been melted down.

650-YEAR OLD BURIED TREASURE FOUND IN AUSTRIAN BACKYARD

“We had given up hope of seeing it again,” Mark Blandford-Baker, Magdalen College’s home bursar, told AFP.

He said the university was “very pleased to have back a stolen item that forms part of a collection relating to one of our more famous alumni.”

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“[W]e are extremely grateful to Arthur Brand for finding it and returning it to us,” Blandford-Baker said.

The ring is set to make its return to Magdalen College in a formal ceremony on Dec. 4.

Westlake Legal Group Oscar-Wilde Oscar Wilde's stolen ring recovered by 'art detective' fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/crime fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article 89d5814d-b174-5d0f-a55a-fcd62818ea44   Westlake Legal Group Oscar-Wilde Oscar Wilde's stolen ring recovered by 'art detective' fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/crime fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article 89d5814d-b174-5d0f-a55a-fcd62818ea44

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Arizona mother arrested after accidentally shooting 13-year-old son, police say

A 13-year-old boy was seriously injured on Saturday after his mother accidentally shot him during a fight outside an Arizona home, police said.

Phoenix police said the shooting unfolded in the backyard of a home on East Taylor Street around 5:20 p.m. on Saturday.

They said the 13-year-old was in the backyard when a man named Michael Wilson, 59, confronted an unwanted guest outside, which led to a fight.

Westlake Legal Group Tonya-Monroe Arizona mother arrested after accidentally shooting 13-year-old son, police say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 728e4716-1566-5c02-9cbe-0c0bce90db87

Police said the teen’s mother, Tonya Monroe, 41, went to get a gun from their home to break up a fight and accidentally fired it, striking her son. (Phoenix PD)

CREATOR OF YOUTUBE CHANNEL ABUSED 7 ADOPTED CHILDREN WHO STARRED IN VIDEOS WATCHED BY MILLIONS, POLICE SAY

Police said the teen’s mother, Tonya Monroe, 41, went to get a gun from their home to break up the fight and accidentally fired it, striking her son.

The 13-year-old was taken to a nearby hospital with serious injuries. Doctors later listed him in stable condition, according to police.

NEW MEXICO HUNTER SHOT BY DOG SAYS DOG WAS FATALLY SHOT WEEKS LATER: REPORT

Police arrested both Wilson and Monroe. The teen’s mother faced several charges including aggravated assault and disorderly conduct involving a weapon.

Wilson was accused of drug and weapons possession. The unwanted guest, who did not report any injuries, did not cooperate with investigators, police said.

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Investigators said they developed probable cause to arrest Monroe and Wilson based on interviews and evidence found inside the home.

The investigation was ongoing.

Westlake Legal Group Tonya-Monroe Arizona mother arrested after accidentally shooting 13-year-old son, police say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 728e4716-1566-5c02-9cbe-0c0bce90db87   Westlake Legal Group Tonya-Monroe Arizona mother arrested after accidentally shooting 13-year-old son, police say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 728e4716-1566-5c02-9cbe-0c0bce90db87

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WeWork May Lay Off Thousands

Westlake Legal Group 00weworklayoffs1-facebookJumbo WeWork May Lay Off Thousands WeWork Companies Inc SOFTBANK Corporation Real Estate (Commercial) Neumann, Adam Layoffs and Job Reductions Co-Working

WeWork is preparing to cut at least 4,000 people from its work force as it tries to stabilize itself after the company’s breakneck growth racked up heavy losses and led it to the brink of collapse, two people with knowledge of the matter said.

The cuts are expected to be announced as early as this week and will take place across WeWork’s sprawling global operation. Under the plan, the company’s core business of subletting office space would lay off 2,000 to 2,500 employees, one of the people said. An additional 1,000 employees will leave as WeWork sells or closes down noncore businesses, like a private school in Manhattan that WeWork set up. Additionally, roughly 1,000 building maintenance employees will be transferred to an outside contractor. Together, these employees would represent around a third of the 12,500 people WeWork employed at the end of June.

But one of the people said the company could shed as many as 5,000 to 6,000 employees.

The staff reductions will be included in a five-year plan to overhaul WeWork that could be presented to employees as early as Tuesday, said the people, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the layoff plans.

The layoffs represent the human cost of a remarkable reversal in WeWork’s fortunes. Under its co-founder and former chief executive, Adam Neumann, the company piled billions of dollars into an erratic expansion that included adding huge office spaces in the world’s most expensive cities, offering discounts to lure tenants and buying other businesses. WeWork, which leases office space from landlords, refurbishes it and rents it out to its customers, shelved plans for an initial public offering in late September after investors were put off by the company’s losses and had questions about its corporate governance.

SoftBank, the Japanese conglomerate that is WeWork’s largest outside shareholder, last month announced a plan to bail out the company and is now trying to stabilize the business. But it is not clear how far the plan, which rests on selling billions of dollars of new WeWork bonds to investors, has progressed. The prices of the company’s existing bonds have tumbled in recent days, a sign that investors are worried about its prospects.

WeWork last week reported that it lost $1.25 billion in the three months that ended in September, more than twice as much as the company had lost in the same period a year earlier. A corporate presentation provided to investors revealed that WeWork opened nearly half of its locations in the 12 months that ended in September. Many of these locations are losing money and are likely to be depleting WeWork’s cash, which stood at $2 billion at the end of September.

Mr. Neumann, who agreed to cede control over WeWork after stepping down from the chief executive post in September, stands to receive an exit package worth around $1 billion. As part of that, he will receive a $185 million consulting fee for four years and can sell nearly $1 billion of his shares in the company to SoftBank. The soft landing for Mr. Neumann deepened anger among employees as the layoffs loomed.

During the recent tumult at the company, employees formed a group, the WeWorkers Coalition, that, among other things, is pressing for severance packages for departing employees that it considers equitable.

Starting on Dec. 9, cleaning and facilities jobs at WeWork will be outsourced to JLL, a real estate services company, or one of its partners, according to an email sent to affected staff members last week that was reviewed by The New York Times. WeWork has assured employees that every member of its cleaning and facilities teams will keep their jobs and receive the same level of pay and comparable benefits. But employees who choose not to transfer will lose their jobs and receive no severance, according to a document provided to employees that was reviewed by The Times.

The changes have unnerved many employees, according to interviews with workers and Slack messages reviewed by The Times, stirring fears that some staff members will eventually lose benefits or be forced to work different schedules.

In the Slack messages, one WeWork facilities staff member said that hearing about the outsourcing was like being informed of a death in the family. Another employee said the decision showed that management was unconcerned about the workers’ welfare and was making decisions based on what would save the company the most money.

David Yaffe-Bellany contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Ohio man charged in high school students’ overdose of heroin-laced vape pens, police say

Westlake Legal Group 1c8fe596-AP19318628714359 Ohio man charged in high school students' overdose of heroin-laced vape pens, police say fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/west-virginia fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz b23f48c6-ab81-592d-a99d-c1e4d56e5d36 article

An Ohio man was arrested in West Virginia Thursday after heroin-laced vape pens sent two high school students to the hospital in a 24-hour period, police said.

Tristan Anderson, 23, of Bolivar, Ohio, has been charged with possession with intent to deliver a controlled substance, the Morgantown Police Department said in a news release cited by WBOY.

Anderson was pulled over in Morgantown, about 150 miles southest of Bolivar, around 6 p.m. Wednesday, police said.

VAPING DEATH TOLL HITS 42, OVER 2,100 LUNG ILLNESSES REPORTED NATIONWIDE

MPD officers conducted a search of Anderson’s pickup truck, finding more than 2.5 pounds of marijuana, scales and packaging materials, according to police.

Investigators obtained a search warrant for Anderson’s Morgantown address where they found more than 25 pounds of marijuana, more than 70 bottles of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) oils, 300 “TKO” labeled vaping cartridges, and more than 100 THC edible candies, police said.

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Police determined the “TKO” products were the heroin-laced vaping cartridges that had caused the overdose of the two high school students.

Anderson was booked into the North Central Regional Jail where he has remained pending arraignment, police said.

Westlake Legal Group 1c8fe596-AP19318628714359 Ohio man charged in high school students' overdose of heroin-laced vape pens, police say fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/west-virginia fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz b23f48c6-ab81-592d-a99d-c1e4d56e5d36 article   Westlake Legal Group 1c8fe596-AP19318628714359 Ohio man charged in high school students' overdose of heroin-laced vape pens, police say fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/west-virginia fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz b23f48c6-ab81-592d-a99d-c1e4d56e5d36 article

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WeWork May Lay Off Thousands

Westlake Legal Group 00weworklayoffs1-facebookJumbo WeWork May Lay Off Thousands WeWork Companies Inc SOFTBANK Corporation Real Estate (Commercial) Neumann, Adam Layoffs and Job Reductions Co-Working

WeWork is preparing to cut at least 4,000 people from its work force as it tries to stabilize itself after the company’s breakneck growth racked up heavy losses and led it to the brink of collapse, two people with knowledge of the matter said.

The cuts are expected to be announced as early as this week and will take place across WeWork’s sprawling global operation. Under the plan, the company’s core business of subletting office space would lay off 2,000 to 2,500 employees, one of the people said. An additional 1,000 employees will leave as WeWork sells or closes down noncore businesses, like a private school in Manhattan that WeWork set up. Additionally, roughly 1,000 building maintenance employees will be transferred to an outside contractor. Together, these employees would represent around a third of the 12,500 people WeWork employed at the end of June.

But one of the people said the company could shed as many as 5,000 to 6,000 employees.

The staff reductions will be included in a five-year plan to overhaul WeWork that could be presented to employees as early as Tuesday, said the people, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the layoff plans.

The layoffs represent the human cost of a remarkable reversal in WeWork’s fortunes. Under its co-founder and former chief executive, Adam Neumann, the company piled billions of dollars into an erratic expansion that included adding huge office spaces in the world’s most expensive cities, offering discounts to lure tenants and buying other businesses. WeWork, which leases office space from landlords, refurbishes it and rents it out to its customers, shelved plans for an initial public offering in late September after investors were put off by the company’s losses and had questions about its corporate governance.

SoftBank, the Japanese conglomerate that is WeWork’s largest outside shareholder, last month announced a plan to bail out the company and is now trying to stabilize the business. But it is not clear how far the plan, which rests on selling billions of dollars of new WeWork bonds to investors, has progressed. The prices of the company’s existing bonds have tumbled in recent days, a sign that investors are worried about its prospects.

WeWork last week reported that it lost $1.25 billion in the three months that ended in September, more than twice as much as the company had lost in the same period a year earlier. A corporate presentation provided to investors revealed that WeWork opened nearly half of its locations in the 12 months that ended in September. Many of these locations are losing money and are likely to be depleting WeWork’s cash, which stood at $2 billion at the end of September.

Mr. Neumann, who agreed to cede control over WeWork after stepping down from the chief executive post in September, stands to receive an exit package worth around $1 billion. As part of that, he will receive a $185 million consulting fee for four years and can sell nearly $1 billion of his shares in the company to SoftBank. The soft landing for Mr. Neumann deepened anger among employees as the layoffs loomed.

During the recent tumult at the company, employees formed a group, the WeWorkers Coalition, that, among other things, is pressing for severance packages for departing employees that it considers equitable.

Starting on Dec. 9, cleaning and facilities jobs at WeWork will be outsourced to JLL, a real estate services company, or one of its partners, according to an email sent to affected staff members last week that was reviewed by The New York Times. WeWork has assured employees that every member of its cleaning and facilities teams will keep their jobs and receive the same level of pay and comparable benefits. But employees who choose not to transfer will lose their jobs and receive no severance, according to a document provided to employees that was reviewed by The Times.

The changes have unnerved many employees, according to interviews with workers and Slack messages reviewed by The Times, stirring fears that some staff members will eventually lose benefits or be forced to work different schedules.

In the Slack messages, one WeWork facilities staff member said that hearing about the outsourcing was like being informed of a death in the family. Another employee said the decision showed that management was unconcerned about the workers’ welfare and was making decisions based on what would save the company the most money.

David Yaffe-Bellany contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Colin Kaepernick’s workout sparks war of words between Stephen A. Smith, Eric Reid

Sports personality Stephen A. Smith, one of the biggest stars at ESPN, and Eric Reid, the Carolina Panthers safety, had a war of words on the Internet over the weekend after the San Francisco 49ers ex-quarterback Colin Kaepernick held a workout for NFL teams Saturday.

Smith posted a three-minute video criticizing Kaepernick for calling an audible less than an hour before he was scheduled to work out for 25 NFL teams.

The ESPN star said Kaepernick had no interest in playing in the NFL, which got a digital clapback from Reid, who played with Kaepernick when they were with the San Francisco 49ers and knelt with him during the “Star-Spangled Banner.”

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Reid, who called the showcase a “PR stunt,” tweeted back, tagging Smith’s original post: “Tap dancing for the NFL like ⬇️. Da– straight Colin wants to control the narrative! He supposed to trust the organization that blackballed him and has done absolutely nothing in good faith??? Born on Tuesday, just not last Tuesday.”

Smith then took the fight to Instagram, saying: “The more you talk, the more ridiculous you sound, @e_reid35. Actually, it’s worse than I thought since you’re the one tweeting at me hours before a da– game. And speaking of the game, weren’t you in Atlanta in attendance for Kaepernick’s workout yesterday — before having to leave EARLY to play for a team in a league you’re feeling so oppressed by? Wasn’t that you? Just asking!”

He added: “We just have a difference of opinion. I still respect the hell out of your immature, belligerent self. But I’m going to call it like I see it. Kaepernick made a mistake the way he handled all this…….IF he really wants a job in the NFL. Period. And your contribution to all of this doesn’t help. It hurts. It ain’t about you being wrong. It’s about you needing to grow the hell up. Your decision. Your life! Do you!”

Kaepernick had moved the session to a high school football field in Riverdale, Ga., from the Atlanta Falcons training facility in Flowery Branch, 60 miles away.

Westlake Legal Group Smith-Kaepernick-Reid_AP-getty-AP Colin Kaepernick's workout sparks war of words between Stephen A. Smith, Eric Reid Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/colin-kaepernick fox-news/news-events/national-anthem-protests fox-news/media fox news fnc/sports fnc article 41b4eb09-f0a5-5bd1-9e58-fa466366e4d7

Stephen A. Smith, left, and Eric Reid, right, had a war of words on the Internet over the weekend after the NFL teams’ workout for former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick on Saturday. (AP/Getty, File)

Kaepernick threw passes for about 40 minutes to free-agent receivers Bruce Ellington, Brice Butler, Jordan Veasy and Ari Werts before signing autographs for hundreds of fans gathered in the end zone.

“I’ve been ready for three years. I’ve been denied for three years,” Kaepernick told reporters at the conclusion of the day. “… We are waiting for the 32 owners, 32 teams and [NFL Commissioner] Roger Goodell to stop running. Stop running from the truth, stop running from the people.”

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Kaepernick, 32, has not played since 2016 when he suited up for the 49ers. He helped start a wave of protests regarding social and racial injustice that season by kneeling during the National Anthem at games.

The NFL this past February settled a collusion grievance Kaepernick and Reid filed against the league.

Westlake Legal Group Smith-Kaepernick-Reid_AP-getty-AP Colin Kaepernick's workout sparks war of words between Stephen A. Smith, Eric Reid Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/colin-kaepernick fox-news/news-events/national-anthem-protests fox-news/media fox news fnc/sports fnc article 41b4eb09-f0a5-5bd1-9e58-fa466366e4d7   Westlake Legal Group Smith-Kaepernick-Reid_AP-getty-AP Colin Kaepernick's workout sparks war of words between Stephen A. Smith, Eric Reid Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/colin-kaepernick fox-news/news-events/national-anthem-protests fox-news/media fox news fnc/sports fnc article 41b4eb09-f0a5-5bd1-9e58-fa466366e4d7

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Kyle Busch leads Gibbs trio to win 2nd NASCAR championship

Westlake Legal Group kylebusch Kyle Busch leads Gibbs trio to win 2nd NASCAR championship fox-news/auto/nascar fnc/auto fnc c37ed527-366a-5cd6-8704-db47e202a4ea Associated Press article

Kyle Busch emerged from the Joe Gibbs Racing juggernaut as NASCAR’s latest champion, winning his second title Sunday after two teammates were slowed by pit-road gaffes.

Busch won the season finale at Homestead-Miami Speedway to snap a 21-race losing streak and beat Gibbs teammates Denny Hamlin and Martin Truex Jr., as well as rival Kevin Harvick, for the Cup. Busch won the 2015 title and joins seven-time champion Jimmie Johnson as the only active drivers with multiple titles.

“Ol’ two-timer out there,” crew chief Adam Stevens radioed. “I’m proud of you buddy.”

The 34-year-old Busch, somewhat subdued, simply thanked his crew.

KEVIN HARVICK WINS NASCAR TEXAS FALL RACE FOR THIRD STRAIGHT YEAR

“Awesome job, guys,” he said. His crew climbed the pit wall and handed Busch the championship flag for his post-race celebration.

When he was met on the frontstretch by 4-year-old son Brexton, who immediately asked: “Dad are you going to throw me in the air again?” about their celebratory tradition.

Busch had raced for the championship in each of the last three seasons but fell short a year ago in part because of his crew’s own pit error.

This time, it was Truex and Hamlin bitten by silly mistakes. Truex dominated early but fell a lap back after his crew put tires on the wrong side of his Toyota. Hamlin fell out of contention when a crew member placed a large piece of tape across the front of his car that caused his engine to overheat and Hamlin had to make an unscheduled pit stop.

Truex recovered to finish second, but Hamlin didn’t have enough time to overcome the miscue and was a disappointing 10th.

Harvick, the only Ford driver in the championship field, never seemed to be a solid contender and finished fourth.

The finale pitted a trio of Toyota drivers from Hall of Fame owner Gibbs against Harvick, the hand-picked driver of former Gibbs protege Tony Stewart at Stewart-Haas Racing. The Gibbs group had the edge based on its tremendous season — Busch’s win was the 19th out of 36 races for the organization — and the trio insisted it would continue its note-sharing all weekend.

Las Vegas couldn’t chose a title favorite and the four had essentially even odds at the start of the race, even though Busch was probably the least likely contender of the group. Although he won the regular season crown, his last Cup win was at Pocono in June, his playoffs leading into Homestead had been mediocre at best and his mood soured with every missed victory lane.

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Hamlin, Harvick and Truex had all won playoff races, and Hamlin’s win at Phoenix last week gave him all the momentum. But with friend and fan Michael Jordan in attendance, Hamlin failed to win his first championship in his third try. Hamlin is the only driver in the final four without a Cup title.

Busch, ironically, had one of his worst races in the pits in last year’s finale as his front-tire changer had hiccups on two stops.

But he was flawless Sunday night and gave Gibbs his fifth Cup title and bookended a season in which the Gibbs cars opened the year 1-2-3 at the Daytona 500. Gibbs this entire year has been mourning the death of his son, JGR co-chairman J.D. Gibbs, and the organization promoted a “Do it for J.D.” theme the entire weekend.

The season ended with a 1-2-3 finish in the finale as it was Busch, Truex and Erik Jones across the finish line.

Busch gave Toyota its third drivers’ championship in five seasons.

Westlake Legal Group kylebusch Kyle Busch leads Gibbs trio to win 2nd NASCAR championship fox-news/auto/nascar fnc/auto fnc c37ed527-366a-5cd6-8704-db47e202a4ea Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group kylebusch Kyle Busch leads Gibbs trio to win 2nd NASCAR championship fox-news/auto/nascar fnc/auto fnc c37ed527-366a-5cd6-8704-db47e202a4ea Associated Press article

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President Trump Bet Big This Election Year. Here’s Why He Lost.

Westlake Legal Group 17louisiana-trump-01-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 President Trump Bet Big This Election Year. Here’s Why He Lost. Voting and Voters United States Politics and Government Republican Party Republican National Committee Presidential Election of 2020 Politics and Government Louisiana Elections, Governors Democratic Party

WASHINGTON — When President Trump showed up in Louisiana for the third time in just over a month to try to help Republicans win the governor’s race, he veered off script and got to the heart of why he was staging such an unusual political intervention. His attempt to lift Gov. Matt Bevin of Kentucky to victory this month had failed, Mr. Trump explained, and it would look bad for him to lose another race in a heavily Republican state.

“You got to give me a big win, please, O.K.,” the president pleaded with a red-hatted crowd last Thursday in Bossier City, La.

But on Saturday night, Mr. Trump’s wager backfired in spectacular fashion.

Not only did Gov. John Bel Edwards, a Democrat, win re-election by more than 40,000 votes, he did so with the same coalition that propelled Governor-elect Andy Beshear to victory in Kentucky and that could put the president’s re-election chances in grave jeopardy next year. Like Mr. Beshear, Mr. Edwards energized a combination of African-Americans and moderate whites in and around the urban centers of his state, building decisive margins in New Orleans, Baton Rouge and Shreveport.

It was a striking setback for a president who proclaimed himself his party’s kingmaker in last year’s midterms, but has a decidedly mixed record when it comes to pushing his chosen candidates to victory in general elections. And it continued a November losing streak that included not only Mr. Bevin’s loss in Kentucky, but a wave of state and local Democratic victories in Virginia, Pennsylvania and Missouri that also were driven by suburban voters.

The results in Kentucky and Louisiana are particularly ominous for the president, in part because they indicate that his suburban problem extends to traditionally conservative Southern states and may prove even more perilous in the moderate Midwest next year.

They also reveal political weakness for the president at a moment he is embroiled in a deepening impeachment inquiry and desperately needs to project strength with his own party. And as he enters what will likely be a difficult re-election campaign, the two states emphatically demonstrated that he has become just as much of a turnout lever for the opposition as with his own supporters.

“If you had any doubt that Trump was a human repellent spray for suburban voters who have a conservative disposition, Republicans getting wiped out in the suburbs of New Orleans, Louisville and Lexington should remove it,” said Tim Miller, a Republican strategist and outspoken critic of the president.

The Louisiana results are a stinging rebuke for the president, because he spent so much time there and because Trump allies couldn’t chalk it up entirely to local factors as they did for Kentucky, where Mr. Bevin was deeply unpopular. And even before the Louisiana race was called on Saturday night, finger-pointing from the Capitol to the White House to Mr. Trump’s campaign broke out about why he spent so much political capital on the race in the first place.

Mr. Trump carried Louisiana by 20 points in 2016, so the outcome of the governor’s race carries no implications for his own re-election, the balance of power in Congress or the president’s policy agenda. And the moderate Mr. Edwards has relentlessly cultivated Mr. Trump, showing up at the White House every chance he gets — so it was not even an opportunity to defeat a critic.

Some of the president’s advisers were mystified, therefore, that the White House would repeatedly send him to a state irrelevant to his re-election for a candidate he scarcely knows, Eddie Rispone, after they had just been scalded in their attempt to rescue Mr. Bevin in another safely red state.

In Congress, Louisiana lawmakers and their aides grumbled that Mr. Trump was not being shown quality polling indicating how formidable Mr. Edwards was with Republican-leaning voters. And some in the delegation pointed a finger at Louisiana’s voluble junior senator, John Kennedy, who has become a close White House ally, for pushing the president to campaign in the state.

But the president was receptive to Republicans who told him he could be the difference-maker in these elections, according to G.O.P. officials briefed on the discussions.

One of those people said that Ronna McDaniel, the Republican National Committee chairwoman, had been preparing the president for the past two weeks for the possibility of a Louisiana loss. That’s because early voting patterns showed Democrats mobilizing their core voters, especially African-Americans.

Mr. Trump’s supporters defended him, noting that Republicans won down-ballot in Kentucky and captured the Mississippi governor’s race, while arguing that he would benefit from a polarizing opponent next year.

“The gubernatorial results in 2019 in Kentucky and Louisiana are in no way a referendum on President Trump or a foreshadowing of the 2020 presidential election,” said the R.N.C. spokesman Mike Reed. “The Democrats who ran for governor in those red states aren’t anything like the far-left candidates running against President Trump.’’

Still, the main instigator for the president’s involvement in the races, many Republicans said, was Mr. Trump himself, who simply craves the adulation of his supporters and is singularly focused on notching victories, no matter the details. He is even more eager to flex his political muscle in the face of impeachment, and has surrounded himself with several aides who either defer to his whims regardless of the neon-flashing signs of risk before them, or know little about politics.

People close to Mr. Trump — who spoke anonymously to discuss sensitive matters — said he viewed the campaigns he had weighed in on mostly as opportunities for gratification. And with few seasoned political advisers in his inner circle — his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, who has control over the president’s campaign, has never worked on another race — there was nobody to tell him that attacking an anti-abortion rights, pro-gun Democrat like Mr. Edwards as a radical would be folly.

“There were people who are normally part of the Republican base who voted for the governor,” said Senator Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, noting that the portrayal of Mr. Edwards as a liberal extremist was ineffective given his views on cultural issues and credentials as a West Pointer turned Army Ranger. “He’s a very likable man and a man of character.”

Of course, plenty of well-credentialed and well-liked candidates have fallen prey to the forbidding political demographics of their states or districts.

What was different in Louisiana was that Mr. Edwards enjoyed a huge spike between the all-party primary last month and the Saturday runoff among the voters who Mr. Trump most alienates: While turnout grew modestly in many of the rural areas, it jumped by 29 percent in New Orleans and 25 percent in the parish that includes Shreveport, and it was nearly as high in Baton Rouge and in the largest New Orleans suburbs.

In that context, Mr. Trump’s two appearances in the state between the primary and runoff had the effect of motivating the Democratic base as much as it did the conservative one.

“Forcing Trump down people’s throats in television, mail and radio produced a backlash among Democratic voters, especially African-Americans,” said Zac McCrary, a pollster on Mr. Edwards’s campaign, alluding to Mr. Rispone’s Trump-centric message. “The intense negatives outweigh the intense positives for Trump, which speaks to the turnout.”

State and local Democrats were more careful targeting their message, linking Mr. Rispone to Mr. Trump on radio stations with black audiences and in tailored mailers. But Mr. Trump’s engagement also prompted organic efforts, including some from liberals who aren’t exactly enamored with Mr. Edwards but wanted to send a message of their own from Louisiana.

One New Orleans Democrat took matters into her own hands and created an Instagram account, @youcanringmybel, that sought to rally reluctant progressives for Mr. Edwards.

“We don’t love him but we need him,” said the site’s creator, Marcelle Beaulieu. “Rispone has made the entire campaign about national politics and Trump,” she added, and that annoyed many voters.

The former Democratic National Committee chairwoman Donna Brazile, a native of the New Orleans area, said the only other time she had been able to nudge her entire extended family to go to the polls was to support former President Barack Obama in 2008.

”Donald Trump just has the same effect of pushing people out the door when they would prefer to stay home,” said Ms. Brazile. “I’ve never seen folks more unified.”

Mr. Trump, of course, is not the first president to be faulted for his party’s losses. But few have so openly invited the risk of being blamed for them.

“Donald Trump just happens to relish this centrality more than most,” said Liam Donovan, a Republican strategist, “and has a tendency to say the quiet part loud, sometimes to his detriment.”

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Iran’s Ayatollah warns ‘thugs’ as protests escalate over increase gas prices

Iran’s supreme leader on Sunday, commenting on widespread protests over the government’s decision to increase gasoline prices by 50 percent, denounced protesters who have attacked public property as “thugs.”

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei’s comments were carried live on state television. He said, “some lost their lives and some places were destroyed.”

He specifically targeted those aligned with the family of Iran’s late shah, who was ousted 40 years ago, and an exile group called the Mujahedeen-e-Khalq which has called for the overthrow of Iran’s government.

Westlake Legal Group AP19321309567014 Iran’s Ayatollah warns 'thugs' as protests escalate over increase gas prices fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox news fnc/world fnc caa2bb2f-5381-54ed-95d0-7f5b425e92fb Bradford Betz article

The Iranian supreme leader, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei talks to clerics in his Islamic thoughts class in Tehran, Iran. (Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader via AP)

“Setting a bank on fire is not an act done by the people. This is what thugs do,” Khamenei said.

Khamenei ordered security forces “to implement their tasks” and for Iran’s citizens to keep clear of violent demonstrators.

The government has shut down internet access across the nation, making it difficult to gauge whether unrest that took place in a reported 100 cities and towns was continuing. Images published by state and semiofficial media showed images of burned gas stations and banks, torched vehicles and roadways littered with debris.

It remained to be seen how many people were arrested, injured or killed. Videos from the protests have shown some people gravely wounded.

Westlake Legal Group AP19321592350022 Iran’s Ayatollah warns 'thugs' as protests escalate over increase gas prices fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox news fnc/world fnc caa2bb2f-5381-54ed-95d0-7f5b425e92fb Bradford Betz article

A gas station that was burned during protests that followed officials’ decision to raise gasoline prices, in Tehran, Iran. (Iranian Students’ News Agency via AP)

Attackers targeting a police station in the city of Kermanshah on Saturday killed an officer, according to the IRNA news agency. A lawmaker said another person was killed in a suburb of Tehran. Earlier, one man was reported killed Friday in Sirjan – about 500 miles southeast of Tehran.

Iran’s Intelligence Ministry said the “key perpetrators of the past two days’ riot have been identified and proper action is ongoing,” signaling a possible impending crackdown.

The Fars news agency put the total number of protesters at more than 87,000, saying demonstrators ransacked around 100 banks and stores. Law enforcement arrested some 1,000 people, Fars reported, citing security officials.

The protests have put renewed pressure on Iran’s government as it has struggled to overcome the U.S. sanctions that have strangled the economy since President Trump withdrew the U.S. from the controversial nuclear deal in May 2018.

White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham released a statement Sunday condemning the “lethal force and severe communications restrictions used against demonstrators.”

“Tehran has fanatically pursued nuclear weapons and missile programs, and supported terrorism, turning a proud nation into another cautionary tale of what happens when a ruling class abandons its people and embarks on a crusade for personal power and riches,” the statement read.

IRANIAN CITIZEN WHO VIOLATED US SANCTIONS BY EXPORTING CARBON FIBER GETS PRISON TIME

While representing a political risk for Rouhani ahead of February parliamentary elections, the demonstrations also showed widespread anger among the Iranian people, who have seen their savings evaporate amid scarce jobs and the collapse of the national currency, the rial.

Iran is home to the world’s fourth-largest crude oil deposits.

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Gasoline in the country has remained among the cheapest in the world, with the new prices jumping 50 percent to a minimum of 15,000 rials per liter. That’s 13 cents a liter, or about 50 cents a gallon.

A gallon of regular gasoline in the U.S. has been $2.60 on average, by comparison.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19321309567014 Iran’s Ayatollah warns 'thugs' as protests escalate over increase gas prices fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox news fnc/world fnc caa2bb2f-5381-54ed-95d0-7f5b425e92fb Bradford Betz article   Westlake Legal Group AP19321309567014 Iran’s Ayatollah warns 'thugs' as protests escalate over increase gas prices fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox news fnc/world fnc caa2bb2f-5381-54ed-95d0-7f5b425e92fb Bradford Betz article

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Hong Kong Protests: Police Rush Barricades at University Campus, but Retreat in Face of Fire

HONG KONG — The Hong Kong police early Monday morning tried to enter in force a university campus that antigovernment activists had occupied for days, a tense moment that could significantly escalate the monthslong political crisis gripping the semiautonomous Chinese city.

Student leaders said police had carried out “a massive arrest of persons within the campus” and that there had been multiple injuries, with three people suffering injuries to their eyes and 40 suffering from hypothermia after being hit with water from police water cannons.

At one of the entrances to the campus, the police were able to arrest a few protesters at the outer edges of a barricade protecting the university, but they fell back after other students set the barricades on fire and threw dozens of petrol bombs at the police.

The police have been surrounding Hong Kong Polytechnic University and have threatened to use “lethal force” to arrest those who did not surrender. The incursion on Monday was the police force’s most direct intervention yet onto one of the city’s university campuses, which until recently were safe spaces for young demonstrators.

The police assault began at about 5:30 a.m. in Hong Kong, and at 6:15 a.m., the fire at the barricade set ablaze by protesters was still big enough, and burning bright enough, to be visible at a distance.

The standoff at the PolyU campus, in which a police officer was hit in his leg with an arrow, shattered a fragile calm that had returned to Hong Kong after a workweek marred by severe transit disruptions and street violence. Protesters on the fringes of the campus continued their multiday blockage of a nearby and vital cross-harbor tunnel, and stepped up their tactics by setting fire to two nearby bridges and an armored police vehicle.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_164572914_5405566b-67d7-40bb-8ec0-81fce29066c4-articleLarge Hong Kong Protests: Police Rush Barricades at University Campus, but Retreat in Face of Fire Propaganda People's Liberation Army (China) Hong Kong Protests (2019) Hong Kong Baptist University Hong Kong Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Defense and Military Forces Communist Party of China Colleges and Universities

Protesters continued a multiday occupation of the Polytechnic University campus into early Monday morning.Credit…Lam Yik Fei for The New York Times

Here’s more on the latest developments in Hong Kong.

PolyU’s president, Jin-Guang Teng, said in a prerecorded video released after the police tried to storm the campus that he had negotiated a temporary suspension of violence with the police, but suggested that protesters occupying the campus would still have to turn themselves into the police.

“If the protesters do not initiate the use of force, the police will not initiate the use the use of force,” he said in the video statement. “In addition, we have also received permission from the police for you to leave the campus peacefully, and I will personally accompany you to the police station to ensure that your case will be fairly processed.”

The president’s statement came after a night of confrontation.

After nightfall, the protesters set fire to a flyover near the tunnel and a pedestrian bridge leading to the campus, forcing an armored police vehicle to retreat and setting another police vehicle on fire. Plumes of black smoke billowed across the campus.

Superintendent Louis Lau of the Hong Kong police said in a video statement that an officer had fired a live round at a vehicle that charged toward officers Sunday night. “Coldblooded rioters can only imitate terror acts,” he said, warning that live rounds could be used as a “necessary minimum force.”

The police later said in a statement that “rioters” had jeopardized public safety by hurling bricks and gasoline bombs, and that “such behaviors cannot be condoned.”

Before the attempt to storm the campus, a riot police officer on the site warned that protesters were surrounded and that the force would use lethal force against them if they did not surrender.

“Time is running out,” the officer said through a loudspeaker. The police also warned anyone inside the campus to leave immediately through a designated exit, which was later set on fire.

After many protesters and journalists left the campus ahead of a 10 p.m. deadline the police had set, several protesters returned to an entrance, chanting “Hong Kongers, take revenge.” The police fired volleys of tear gas and streams of a stinging blue dye at the protesters, who shielded themselves with umbrellas and threw petrol bombs.

In a statement issued just before midnight, Civil Human Rights Front, an umbrella group that organized large, peaceful marches in the early weeks of the protest movement, urged the government and police to de-escalate what it called “state violence.”

“With the tense atmosphere and escalation of the use of force by police, we worry that the protesters, most of whom are our young and future generation, will face arrest with bloodshed,” the statement said.

Dozens of civilians and volunteer drivers have poured into nearby neighborhoods, trying to help protesters trapped inside the campus escape arrest or injury.

An American pastor and a half-dozen Hong Kong lawmakers said late on Sunday that they were calling on the Hong Kong government to prevent any bloodshed. They said they had asked the United States Consulate to get the police to allow them inside the campus to ensure protesters’ safety.

The pastor, William Devlin, said in a telephone interview that he had been on campus for at least four hours as the clashes unfolded, and had left at 8 p.m. But he was trying to re-enter with the lawmakers at a northwest entrance.

Mr. Devlin estimated there were many hundreds of determined activists still inside when he left, perhaps up to 1,000. He said they were spread out across all parts of the campus, with at least 200 in the cafeteria.

“They were all in good spirits,” he said. “They were not being deterred. They were ready to be arrested. They said, ‘We stand for freedom, dignity, democracy, human rights.’ They said they were staying.”

Mr. Devlin said he had been on the front line with the activists in the late afternoon when the police used tear gas, rubber bullets and water cannons against protesters. Much of that took place outside a main southwest entrance to the university that is a 15-minute walk from the bustling commercial strip of Nathan Road.

He said he had seen protesters throw 10 to 20 petrol bombs to deter the police from advancing. Officers deployed at least one water cannon truck and two armored vehicles. At least two protesters were armed with bows and arrows, he said.

Mr. Devlin said he would call an American diplomat before midnight to ask for help getting the police to grant him permission to re-enter the campus with six Hong Kong legislators. They want to “make sure the students are being treated fairly,” he said.

William Lau, 22, a protester on campus, said around midnight that about 500 activists were still on campus. “I know that there is a possibility that the police will fire live bullets on us tonight, but right now we have no choice,” he said.

About 50 activists were arrested after trying to leave via a northwest entrance, he said, so others were wary of trying to exit.

“The police would never just let us walk out like that,” he said. “I know that some want to leave now but don’t know how, while a fair number wants to stay and fight.”

Scores of protesters in nearby areas of Mong Kok confronted the police in an attempt to draw forces away from the campus. On Hong Kong Island, protesters with the same aim put up barricades in Central, the main business and luxury shopping district.

Louis Lau, the police superintendent, said before midnight that an officer had fired a live round at a vehicle that charged toward officers.

“Coldblooded rioters can only imitate terror acts,” he said, warning that live rounds could be used as a “necessary minimum force.” The police also said they might use lethal force if the protesters do not leave the campus.

Civil Human Rights Front, an umbrella group that organized large, peaceful marches in the early weeks of the six-month-old movement, urged the government and the police to de-escalate what it called “state violence.”

“With the tense atmosphere and escalation of the use of force by police,” the group said in a statement, “we worry that the protesters, most of whom are our young and future generation, will face arrest with bloodshed.”

For hours on Sunday, the police fired gas and sprayed water cannons at young demonstrators who were continuing a multiday occupation of the campus and blockading an adjacent tunnel that connects Hong Kong Island with the Kowloon Peninsula.

Ensconced above the Kowloon streets in fort-like enclosures, some of the protesters spent hours throwing gasoline bombs, some from improvised catapults. Others were armed with bows and arrows, and the police said an officer had been hit in the calf with an arrow.

Dozens of hard-line protesters also clashed with riot police in several working-class neighborhoods nearby, apparently in an attempt to divert the force’s energies away from the campus.

The PolyU campus, which sits beside the harbor tunnel and a Chinese military barracks, is one of several that young protesters had occupied days earlier, turning them into quasi-militarized citadels. Most of the other sieges gradually tapered off.

The Sunday clash came on the heels of a particularly intense week of transit delays, street scuffles and flash-mob-style demonstrations across the city. The unrest was prompted in part by the police shooting of a young demonstrator at point-blank range. He survived.

On Saturday, Chinese soldiers jogged out of their barracks near Hong Kong Baptist University and cleared bricks from streets that had been swarmed days earlier by young demonstrators.

The soldiers wore T-shirts and basketball jerseys, rather than military uniforms, and carried brooms instead of weapons. Their appearance threatened to inflame tensions in the semiautonomous Chinese territory, where many are deeply sensitive about what they see as Beijing’s growing influence over their lives.

The Hong Kong garrison of the People’s Liberation Army is based in 19 sites once occupied by the British military before the former colony returned to Chinese control in 1997. But even though Chinese troops have been stationed in Hong Kong for years, it is highly unusual for them to venture into the city.

Hong Kong’s mini-Constitution says that P.L.A. forces “shall not interfere” in local affairs and that the local government may ask for the army’s assistance for disaster relief and maintaining public order. The Hong Kong government said in a statement on Saturday that the soldiers’ cleanup had been a self-initiated “community activity.”

The cleanup, which was lauded in China’s state-run news media, prompted a torrent of criticism from local residents. On Saturday, 24 lawmakers from Hong Kong’s pro-democracy legislative minority issued a joint statement saying that the local government and the P.L.A. had ignored restrictions imposed on the troops by local laws.

Ezra Cheung, Paul Mozur and Keith Bradsher contributed reporting.

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