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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 69)

Laura Ingraham: John Bolton was always a ‘complicated fit’ as Trump’s national security adviser

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085138874001_6085144768001-vs Laura Ingraham: John Bolton was always a 'complicated fit' as Trump's national security adviser Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 97b96bd7-0cce-5a1e-927f-0ac29d874192

From day one, John Bolton was a “complicated fit” for the job of national security adviser, so the news that he had been let go by President Trump comes as no surprise, Laura Ingraham said Tuesday.

“Here’s what I learned when I was a 22-year-old White House staffer,” Ingraham said on Fox News’  “The Ingraham Angle. ” … You work at the pleasure of the chief executive, of the president of the United States. So if you accept any position in any administration, your job is to pursue the goals of the president — not your own.”

“You work at the pleasure of the chief executive, of the president of the United States. So if you accept any position in any administration, your job is to pursue the goals of the president — not your own.”

— Laura Ingraham

TRUMP SAYS JOHN BOLTON IS DEPARTING WHITE HOUSE, SAYS THEY ‘DISAGREED STRONGLY’

Trump announced Tuesday that he had fired Bolton, saying he “disagreed strongly” with Bolton on a range of issues. Bolton said he offered to resign.

Bolton was Trump’s fourth national security adviser, following Michael Flynn, H.R. McMaster and acting adviser Keith Kellogg. On Tuesday, the White House announced that deputy national security adviser Charles Kupperman would serve as acting national security adviser until Bolton’s successor is named.

“Now, I’ve known John Bolton for decades. He’s appeared on this show many times. We obviously really like him and respect him very much. But his position at the White House, let’s all be honest, it was always going to be a complicated fit,” Ingraham said.

The host pointed out that Trump’s true allegiance is to the American people.

“Trump’s allegiance isn’t to any particular process or to any particular cabinet member but to the people who elected him and to the country at large,” Ingraham said. “He’s a true maverick because he came like a freight train at the old GOP foreign policy establishment that had gotten us bogged down in two costly wars.”

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Ingraham also credited the president for being concerned with the cost of war, adding that Trump would redirect the money to impact American lives for the better.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085138874001_6085144768001-vs Laura Ingraham: John Bolton was always a 'complicated fit' as Trump's national security adviser Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 97b96bd7-0cce-5a1e-927f-0ac29d874192   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085138874001_6085144768001-vs Laura Ingraham: John Bolton was always a 'complicated fit' as Trump's national security adviser Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 97b96bd7-0cce-5a1e-927f-0ac29d874192

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Brazen armed bank robbery on high-end Santa Monica street, suspect on loose

LOS ANGELES — A masked suspect armed with a long-barreled weapon robbed a bank in Santa Monica, Calif., on Tuesday and took off with as much as $5,000 before police could catch him.

The incident occurred inside a Wells Fargo Bank on Montana Avenue at 9: 51 a.m. The street is known for its posh stores and is frequented by celebrities.

The suspect — who was last seen jumping a wall in the rear of the bank — was dressed in layers of clothing and gloves, police said.

The robber entered the bank brandishing the firearm while wearing a “Day of the Dead” type mask. He approached a worker, demanded money and fled. There were no injuries but nearby schools were placed on a brief lockdown.

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Police said they responded within minutes and searched extensively in the area. They are appealing to stores and homeowners who may have surveillance video to help in the investigation.

Westlake Legal Group EEJKa9sUUAA0BkP Brazen armed bank robbery on high-end Santa Monica street, suspect on loose fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche c1d0783f-6dce-52e2-9c66-9d5b1d4f755d article   Westlake Legal Group EEJKa9sUUAA0BkP Brazen armed bank robbery on high-end Santa Monica street, suspect on loose fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche c1d0783f-6dce-52e2-9c66-9d5b1d4f755d article

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This Day in History: Sept. 11

On this day, Sept. 11 …

2001: America is changed forever when a coordinated terrorist attack on U.S. soil brings down four airplanes, destroys the World Trade Center and damages the Pentagon. Nearly 3,000 die in the attacks. The ramifications of the Sept. 11 terror attacks are still unfolding to this day.

Also on this day:

  • 1789: Alexander Hamilton is appointed the first Secretary of the Treasury. 
  • 1962: The Beatles record their first single, “Love Me Do.” 
Westlake Legal Group PeteRose091119 This Day in History: Sept. 11 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc f192b9ac-e81d-51c8-9cd6-135e93851ec3 article
  • 1985: Pete Rose breaks the all-time Major League Baseball record for hits with his 4,192nd hit. 
  • 1997: In Scotland, voters approve the establishment of a parliament to run their domestic affairs, after 290 years of union with England.
Westlake Legal Group Sept11WTC091119 This Day in History: Sept. 11 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc f192b9ac-e81d-51c8-9cd6-135e93851ec3 article   Westlake Legal Group Sept11WTC091119 This Day in History: Sept. 11 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc f192b9ac-e81d-51c8-9cd6-135e93851ec3 article

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California's controversial labor bill has passed. Experts forecast more worker rights, higher prices for services

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close California's controversial labor bill has passed. Experts forecast more worker rights, higher prices for services

A controversial piece of legislation passed the California Legislature late Tuesday evening, codifying and clarify a landmark state Supreme Court decision that limits whether companies can classify their workers as independent contractors.

Expected to have wide-reaching implications that resonate across the country — including posing an existential crisis for businesses built with independent, on-demand labor — the bill is now on its way to Gov. Gavin Newsom’s desk.

“This is one of the few times in recent history when so many people will be impacted by a single decision,” said Ryan Vet, an entrepreneur, and gig-economy expert who founded Boon, an on-demand health care platform. He said he sees positives and negatives in the new law, that is “good for the workers, but will also implode the gig economy as we know it today” with increased costs. 

“We have been able to get a quick and easy, safe ride from one place to the next,” he added. “We have been able to get food delivered to our door, or a package delivered on Sunday. This is not only going to affect the worker but the consumers that are benefiting from these services — it is more than a two-sided equation.”

The governor has already voiced his support and is expected to sign it. Other states could soon follow suit.

Even though the bill could soon become law, legislators speaking on the Senate floor ahead of the vote said negotiations would continue to ensure a smoother implementation. 

“We did not get to evaluate every category of worker,” Toni Atkins, the Senate president pro tempore said during discussion. Many of us have pledged to continue that conversation. I don’t know what kind of comprehensive process we would anticipate doing, because it was found to be way more complex than any of us imagined.” She added that those conversations are ongoing with stakeholders. 

At the 11th hour, 12 new amendments that sought to add more exemptions or streamline the application of the law were brought to the Senate floor by Republican senators, but all failed to make it into the final legislation. 

The bill, which passed 29-11, already included carveouts for a range of industries — but not for gig-reliant businesses, which are expected to be most impacted by the new law.

“Today we are determining the future of the California economy,” said Sen. Maria Elena Durazo, D-Los Angeles, introducing the legislation. Speaking directly about the tech industry, which pioneered the gig model and prides itself on modernizing services and work, she added, “Let’s be clear, there’s nothing innovative about underpaying someone for their labor and basing an entire business model on misclassifying workers.” 

Organizers are now hoping that the legislation will open the possibility that drivers can form a union, which they were not able to do as independent contractors. 

“AB 5 is only the beginning,” said Edan Alva, a driver with Gig Workers Rising. “I talk daily to other drivers who want a change but they are scared. They don’t want to lose their only source of income. But just because someone really needs to work does not mean that their rights as a worker should be stepped all over. That is why a union is critical. It simply won’t work without it.”

So what’s changing? 

Millions of workers are classified as independent contractors and don’t qualify for protections under the Fair Labor Standards Act, Americans with Disabilities Act, or the Civil Rights Act. They also aren’t guaranteed other rights afforded to employees, including minimum wage, overtime pay, or unemployment insurance. Now, for many—especially those working in the tech sector — that will all change.

While that could be a big win for workers, enactment of AB 5 could threaten the future of the gig economy that was built on contracted, on-demand labor. Many tech companies, including Uber and Lyft, which have been among the most vocal opponents, will have to rework their core business models. They stand to lose billions in the process and have threatened to pass those costs onto consumers.

More: What is California’s AB 5? The bill could make gig economy workers like Uber drivers employees

AB 5 applies a strict “ABC test” to determine workers’ employment status and puts the burden of proof on employers: 

  • (A) that the worker is free from the control and direction of the hirer in connection with the performance of the work, both under the contract for the performance of such work
  • (B) that the worker performs work that is outside the usual course of the hiring entity’s business
  • C) that the worker is customarily engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, or business of the same nature as the work performed for the hiring entity

With the aim to crack down on misclassification and close loopholes that enable companies to skirt labor protections and lighten their tax loads — which has resulted in an estimated $7 billion in losses of payroll tax revenue — the bill was championed by organizers hoping to secure and broaden benefits for tech workers, and pave the way for unionization.

Critics also warn that workers accustomed to having freedom and flexibility, including those who give rides, deliver food, or perform other app-based services, will now be forced to conform to typical employee expectations, like scheduled hours and stronger oversight. 

Drivers against the legislation have raised concerns about whether the workforce will be cut, as the companies face higher costs to come into compliance. 

When will the changes happen?

It’s unlikely that changes will move quickly. While the legislation provides for retroactive enforcement, used primarily for litigation, the law won’t be implemented until next year. Plus, there are still some legal obstacles in the way and a lot of paperwork will need to be filed. 

“I think this is too complicated to change things overnight,” said Domenique Camacho Moran, a labor law expert, and partner at the New York-based firm, Farrell Fritz. “It is going to require dramatic changes. All of those [independent contractors] will have to be vetted as employees and onboarded—that’s a process.”

More: Why some on-demand drivers are fighting for — or against — California’s gig economy bill

She added that the law will likely face immediate legal challenges, which could delay its implementation while the issues are worked out. “The laws as they exist did not envision these gig economy workers,” she said. “You could get a ruling relatively quickly that stays the enactment of the law while the legal battle takes place,” she said.

Gig economy players haven’t given up

Opponents to the law are already preparing for the next round of battles.

Even before the measure passed, Uber, Lyft, and food delivery company, DoorDash, invested a collective $90 million to bring the issue to voters as a proposition on the next ballot. Their plan preserves independent contractor status of their workers while offering basic protections and benefits, including a minimum earnings floor, access to health care plans not tied to their employment, and representation in the companies to better address issues. 

As Uber put up the financing to fight AB 5 and to fund the proposition, it also cut hundreds of employees in its second large-scale layoff this year. Earlier this year, 400 employees were cut from the marketing department. On the same day of the AB 5 vote, more than 400 engineers and product team employees were let go, and the company said it was reassessing its priorities.

“While certainly painful in the moment, especially for those directly affected, we believe that this will result in a much stronger technical organization, which going forward will continue to hire some of the very best talent around the world,” an Uber spokesperson told TechCrunch.

Meanwhile, the proposed proposition is already getting pushback. California Labor Federation, an organization that represents 1,200 unions, is also ready to take on the tech companies at the ballot box. After the initiative was announced, the organization posted on its website that it will “meet the gig companies’ absurd political spending with a vigorous worker-led campaign to defeat this measure to ensure working people have the basic job protections and the right to organize a union they deserve under the law.”

Lyft representatives have emphasized that even without the legislation they are intent on changing the status quo and improving their drivers’ experiences. But they are committed to fighting the bill to ensure those changes don’t include hiring their drivers as employees. 

In a statement released Tuesday night after the bill’s passage Lyft officials said: “Today, our state’s political leadership missed an important opportunity to support the overwhelming majority of rideshare drivers who want a thoughtful solution that balances flexibility with an earnings standard and benefits. The fact that there were more than 50 industries carved out of AB5 is very telling. We are fully prepared to take this issue to the voters of California to preserve the freedom and access drivers and riders want and need.” 

More: Why some on-demand drivers are fighting for — or against — California’s gig economy bill

In recent years, workers have voiced concerns about the lack of power they have and how easily the giant companies can change earnings or dismiss their complaints. Many aren’t buying the new promises of better treatment and are supporting the uncertainty, in favor of better representation.

“The ability to make some on-demand extra cash is life-changing and I can see that,” said a driver and pro-AB 5 activist, Jeff Parry, earlier this week. He added that he isn’t worried about the threats to the companies, and how that could affect drivers.  

“What’s more likely to happen is [they] find a may to make it work with the flexibility,” he said. “There’s always going to be someone who will not fit into that model. But if it works for the majority? I don’t see that as a bad thing.”

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Geraldo Rivera: NRA and San Francisco board ‘both in the distraction business’

Westlake Legal Group Geranldo-Hannity_FOX Geraldo Rivera: NRA and San Francisco board 'both in the distraction business' fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/san-francisco fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz b3c133a4-16ed-5a8a-8b9f-a143fd571fda article

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors and the National Rifle Association are both in the “distraction business,” according to Geraldo Rivera.

The board recently declared the NRA a domestic terrorist organization in a move that Rivera asserted was an effort to draw attention away from the city’s problems with homelessness and drugs. The NRA responded by suing the governing body to distract from the gun violence epidemic, Rivera claimed Tuesday on “Hannity.

“The NRA and the San Francisco Board of Supervisors are tailor-made for each other,” he said.

NRA SUES SAN FRANCISCO OVER ‘DOMESTIC TERRORIST ORGANIZATION’ DESIGNATION

“They are both in the distraction business. The Board of Supervisors … declares them domestic terrorists to distract us from this awful epidemic of homelessness and urban anarchy.

“The NRA is suing San Francisco and the Board of Supervisors to distract from the undeniable epidemic of gun violence.”

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In addition, Rivera pointed to the fact the suit will be heard by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, an often reliably liberal San Francisco-based bench, he said.

“How much of a chance do you think that lawsuit has in the liberals’ favorite federal circuit?” the Fox News correspondent-at-large asked. “It won’t even survive a motion for summary judgment.”

In response, former NYPD officer and ex-Secret Service Agent Dan Bongino rebuffed Rivera’s claim.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“San Francisco just declared a group of law-abiding gun owners and an organization that defends the Second Amendment in our Bill of Rights [a terrorist organization] and you’re saying this is a distraction for them defending themselves?” he asked.

Rivera added President Trump is right to criticize the issues that are prevalent in cities like San Francisco, and the “failure of the local Democratic regimes,” but added the federal government and local boards are working together.

Westlake Legal Group Geranldo-Hannity_FOX Geraldo Rivera: NRA and San Francisco board 'both in the distraction business' fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/san-francisco fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz b3c133a4-16ed-5a8a-8b9f-a143fd571fda article   Westlake Legal Group Geranldo-Hannity_FOX Geraldo Rivera: NRA and San Francisco board 'both in the distraction business' fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/san-francisco fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz b3c133a4-16ed-5a8a-8b9f-a143fd571fda article

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CNN’s Don Lemon says he has a ‘No Trump’ policy with his fiancé outside of work

CNN anchor Don Lemon said on Tuesday night that he has a “No Trump” policy with his fiancé whenever he’s not working because he gets overwhelmed by President Trump.

During his appearance on “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” Lemon was asked about the president’s recent Twitter attack against him where he called him the “dumbest man on television” following CNN’s Democratic debates in July, which he was one of the moderators. He responded by brushing off his shoulder.

“I don’t even follow him anymore,” Lemon told Jimmy Kimmel. “Because it’s too much. You can be informed without being inundated.”

CNN’S DON LEMON ACCUSED OF ASSAULT IN SEXUALLY-CHARGED ENCOUNTER AT NEW YORK BAR

“Do you ever just turn yourself off completely to the news?” Kimmel asked.

Westlake Legal Group don20lemon_tim20malone20AP CNN's Don Lemon says he has a 'No Trump' policy with his fiancé outside of work Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/person/jimmy-kimmel fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/politics-on-late-night fox news fnc/media fnc article 558911b6-1896-504b-bcb2-8e44de97a8ed

CNN host Don Lemon has been dating Tim Malone since 2017, according to published reports. (Sipa USA)

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Well I try to when I’m not working,” Lemon replied. “My fiancé and I- we have a No Trump policy because everywhere I go, people want to talk to me about it. It’s the first thing they do. They want to talk to me about the president and I do it for two hours on CNN five nights a week. It’s exhausting.”

Lemon later talked about his close relationship with his primetime colleague Chris Cuomo and jokingly suggested that he takes “steroids” after Kimmel asked what Cuomo likes to eat.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-0f7e272d663d43d28f5fa4167a77fa3f CNN's Don Lemon says he has a 'No Trump' policy with his fiancé outside of work Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/person/jimmy-kimmel fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/politics-on-late-night fox news fnc/media fnc article 558911b6-1896-504b-bcb2-8e44de97a8ed   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-0f7e272d663d43d28f5fa4167a77fa3f CNN's Don Lemon says he has a 'No Trump' policy with his fiancé outside of work Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/person/jimmy-kimmel fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/politics-on-late-night fox news fnc/media fnc article 558911b6-1896-504b-bcb2-8e44de97a8ed

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Jerry Falwell Jr. was among the earliest Christian conservatives to endorse Trump.

Westlake Legal Group 5d78724b2300001005512bed Jerry Falwell Jr. was among the earliest Christian conservatives to endorse Trump.

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. said Tuesday that he is asking the FBI to investigate what he called a “criminal” smear campaign orchestrated against him by several disgruntled former board members and employees.

Falwell told The Associated Press he has evidence that the group improperly shared emails belonging to the university with reporters in an attempt to discredit him. He said the “attempted coup” was partially motivated by his ardent backing of President Donald Trump.

Falwell, head of the nation’s most high-profile evangelical college, was among the earliest Christian conservatives to endorse Trump’s campaign.

His allegations come after the publication of a story in Politico Magazine on Monday that alleged Falwell “presides over a culture of self-dealing” at Liberty that has improperly benefited him and his family. The story cited unnamed sources described as current and former officials or Falwell associates.

“I’m not going to dignify the lies that were reported yesterday with a response, but I am going to the authorities and I am going to civil court,” Falwell said, referring to the reporter as a “little boy.”

He added that Liberty has hired “the meanest lawyer in New York,” whom he declined to identify, to pursue civil cases. Falwell also declined to identify the people he said were spreading the emails.

Falwell is the son of the late evangelist, Liberty founder and Moral Majority leader, the Rev. Jerry Falwell. He has come under increased scrutiny recently over his personal life and business investments, including his involvement in a Miami hostel.

The Hill first reported on Tuesday that Falwell had requested an FBI investigation.

Falwell said he contacted the FBI last week after he learned that reporters were reaching out to Liberty employees about the emails he insists were stolen.

“Liberty owns every single one of those emails. It’s our property. They were working for us when they used our server. And our policies make it clear every email sent on our server is owned by Liberty and if anybody shares it with anybody outside Liberty, it is theft. And so that’s the underlying crime,” Falwell told AP in a phone interview.

An FBI spokeswoman declined comment.

Cybercrime expert Nick Akerman said Falwell’s assertion of a criminal conspiracy is “totally insane.” Akerman said the ex-board members and employees can share emails with reporters as long as they had authorized access to them and didn’t hack into someone else’s account. He said trade secrets are also protected under the law, but Liberty wouldn’t be able to make a case there either.

“I don’t think any law enforcement agency is going to be interested in this one,” said Akerman, a partner at Dorsey & Whitney and former federal prosecutor.

Liberty, based in Lynchburg, Virginia, was founded in 1971 by Falwell’s father with just 154 students. It now boasts an enrollment of more than 100,000, including those in its massive online education program. It has become an influential hub of conservative politics, frequented by candidates courting evangelical voters.

Falwell was an early and ardent Trump supporter, which created a rift on campus during the presidential campaign and has sparked controversy since.

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California Passes Landmark Bill to Remake Gig Economy

Westlake Legal Group 10gigworklaw-facebookJumbo California Passes Landmark Bill to Remake Gig Economy Wages and Salaries Uber Technologies Inc State Legislatures Paid Time Off minimum wage Labor and Jobs Freelancing, Self-Employment and Independent Contracting Car Services and Livery Cabs

SACRAMENTO — California legislators approved a landmark bill on Tuesday that requires companies like Uber and Lyft to treat contract workers as employees, a move that could reshape the gig economy and that adds fuel to a yearslong debate over whether the nature of work has become too insecure.

The bill passed in a 29 to 11 vote in the State Senate and will apply to app-based companies, despite their efforts to negotiate an exemption. California’s governor, Gavin Newsom, endorsed the bill this month and is expected to sign it. Under the measure, which would go into effect Jan. 1, workers must be designated as employees instead of contractors if a company exerts control over how they perform their tasks or if their work is part of a company’s regular business.

The legislation will affect at least one million workers in California who have been on the receiving end of a decades-long trend of outsourcing and franchising work, making employer-worker relationships more arm’s-length. Many people have been pushed into contractor status with no access to basic protections like a minimum wage and unemployment insurance. Ride-hailing drivers, food-delivery couriers, janitors, nail salon workers, construction workers and franchise owners could now all be reclassified as employees.

But the bill’s passage threatens gig economy companies like Uber and Lyft. The ride-hailing firms — along with app-based services that offer food delivery, home repairs and dog-walking services — have built their businesses on inexpensive, independent labor. Uber and Lyft, which have hundreds of thousands of drivers in California, have said contract work provides people with flexibility. They have warned that recognizing drivers as employees could destroy their businesses.

The bill, which codifies and extends a 2018 California Supreme Court ruling, may influence other states. A coalition of labor groups is pushing similar legislation in New York, and bills in Washington State and Oregon that were similar to California’s but failed to advance could see renewed momentum. New York City passed a minimum wage for ride-hailing drivers last year but did not try to make them employees.

“It will have major reverberations around the country,” said David Weil, a top Labor Department official during the Obama administration and the author of a book on the so-called fissuring of the workplace. He argued that the bill could set a new bar for worker protections and force business owners to rethink their reliance on contractors.

“It’s particularly critical because of the impact it’s going to have on the development of other business models,” Mr. Weil said.

California legislators said the bill, known as Assembly Bill 5 and proposed by State Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez, a Democrat, would set the tone for the future of work.

“Today the so-called gig companies present themselves as the innovative future of tomorrow, a future where companies don’t pay Social Security or Medicare,” said State Senator Maria Elena Durazo, a Democrat. “Let’s be clear: there is nothing innovative about underpaying someone for their labor.”

She added, ”Today we are determining the future of the California economy.”

Gig-type work has been under the spotlight for years as companies like Uber, Lyft and DoorDash in the United States — as well as Didi Chuxing in China and Ola in India — have grown into behemoths even as the contractors they relied on did not receive the benefits or minimum pay guaranteed to employees. Many of the companies have worked assiduously to beat back efforts to classify their workers as employees, settling class-action lawsuits from drivers and securing exemptions from rules that might have threatened the drivers’ freelancer status.

While regulators in California and at least three other states — New York, Alaska and Oregon — had found that ride-hailing drivers were employees under state laws for narrow purposes, like eligibility for unemployment insurance, those findings could be overridden by state laws explicitly deeming the drivers as contractors. About half the states in the nation had passed such provisions.

But more recently, the tide began changing. Two federal proposals introduced since 2018 have sought to redefine the way workers are classified to allow more of them to unionize. Those proposals have received support from candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination, including Senators Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. The presidential hopefuls also lent their endorsement to the California bill.

In Britain, Uber has appealed a decision by a labor tribunal that drivers must be classified as workers entitled to minimum wage and vacation. The country’s Supreme Court is expected to hear arguments in the case next year.

“Some form of benefits to some population of drivers seems inevitable,” said Lloyd Walmsley, an equity research analyst at Deutsche Bank who follows the ride-hailing industry.

A critical question is how gig economy companies will react to California’s new law. Industry officials have estimated that having to rely on employees rather than contractors raises costs by 20 to 30 percent.

Uber and Lyft have repeatedly warned that they will have to start scheduling drivers in advance if they are employees, reducing drivers’ ability to work when and where they want.

Experts said that there is nothing in the bill that requires employees to work set shifts, and that Uber and Lyft are legally entitled to continue allowing drivers to make their own scheduling decisions.

In practice, Uber and Lyft might choose to limit the number of drivers who can work during slow hours or in less busy markets, where drivers may not generate enough in fares to justify their payroll costs as employees. That could lead to a reduced need for drivers over all.

But Veena Dubal, a professor at the University of California Hastings College of the Law, said it would still generally be advantageous for Uber and Lyft to rely on incentives like bonus pay to ensure they had enough drivers on the road to adjust to customer demand much more nimbly than if they scheduled drivers in advance.

“It doesn’t make sense for them” to drastically limit flexibility, she said.

Some of the companies are not done fighting the bill. Uber, Lyft and DoorDash have pledged to spend $90 million to support a ballot initiative that would essentially exempt them from the legislation. Uber has also said it will litigate misclassification claims from drivers in arbitration and press lawmakers to consider a separate bill that could exempt them from A.B. 5’s impact when the legislative session begins in January.

California cities will have ways to enforce the new law. In last-minute amendments to the measure, legislators gave large cities the right to sue companies that don’t comply.

The bill was not universally supported by drivers. Some opposed it because they worried it would make it hard to keep a flexible schedule. After Uber and Lyft sent messages to drivers and riders in California in August asking them to contact legislators on the companies’ behalf, legislative aides said they had noticed a spike in calls.

As the bill wound its way through the Legislature, the ride-hailing companies sought an agreement that would create a new category of workers between contractor and employee. They met with labor groups and Governor Newsom’s office to negotiate a deal to give drivers a minimum wage and the right to organize, while stopping short of classifying them as employees.

But in July and August, labor groups balked, and the proposed deal disintegrated. Some company officials have expressed cautious optimism in recent days about striking a deal with labor after the bill’s passage.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. Says He’s Target Of ‘Attempted Coup’

Westlake Legal Group 5d78724b2300001005512bed Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. Says He’s Target Of ‘Attempted Coup’

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. said Tuesday that he is asking the FBI to investigate what he called a “criminal” smear campaign orchestrated against him by several disgruntled former board members and employees.

Falwell told The Associated Press he has evidence that the group improperly shared emails belonging to the university with reporters in an attempt to discredit him. He said the “attempted coup” was partially motivated by his ardent backing of President Donald Trump.

Falwell, head of the nation’s most high-profile evangelical college, was among the earliest Christian conservatives to endorse Trump’s campaign.

His allegations come after the publication of a story in Politico Magazine on Monday that alleged Falwell “presides over a culture of self-dealing” at Liberty that has improperly benefited him and his family. The story cited unnamed sources described as current and former officials or Falwell associates.

“I’m not going to dignify the lies that were reported yesterday with a response, but I am going to the authorities and I am going to civil court,” Falwell said, referring to the reporter as a “little boy.”

He added that Liberty has hired “the meanest lawyer in New York,” whom he declined to identify, to pursue civil cases. Falwell also declined to identify the people he said were spreading the emails.

Falwell is the son of the late evangelist, Liberty founder and Moral Majority leader, the Rev. Jerry Falwell. He has come under increased scrutiny recently over his personal life and business investments, including his involvement in a Miami hostel.

The Hill first reported on Tuesday that Falwell had requested an FBI investigation.

Falwell said he contacted the FBI last week after he learned that reporters were reaching out to Liberty employees about the emails he insists were stolen.

“Liberty owns every single one of those emails. It’s our property. They were working for us when they used our server. And our policies make it clear every email sent on our server is owned by Liberty and if anybody shares it with anybody outside Liberty, it is theft. And so that’s the underlying crime,” Falwell told AP in a phone interview.

An FBI spokeswoman declined comment.

Cybercrime expert Nick Akerman said Falwell’s assertion of a criminal conspiracy is “totally insane.” Akerman said the ex-board members and employees can share emails with reporters as long as they had authorized access to them and didn’t hack into someone else’s account. He said trade secrets are also protected under the law, but Liberty wouldn’t be able to make a case there either.

“I don’t think any law enforcement agency is going to be interested in this one,” said Akerman, a partner at Dorsey & Whitney and former federal prosecutor.

Liberty, based in Lynchburg, Virginia, was founded in 1971 by Falwell’s father with just 154 students. It now boasts an enrollment of more than 100,000, including those in its massive online education program. It has become an influential hub of conservative politics, frequented by candidates courting evangelical voters.

Falwell was an early and ardent Trump supporter, which created a rift on campus during the presidential campaign and has sparked controversy since.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. Says He’s Target Of ‘Attempted Coup’

Westlake Legal Group 5d78724b2300001005512bed Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. Says He’s Target Of ‘Attempted Coup’

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. said Tuesday that he is asking the FBI to investigate what he called a “criminal” smear campaign orchestrated against him by several disgruntled former board members and employees.

Falwell told The Associated Press he has evidence that the group improperly shared emails belonging to the university with reporters in an attempt to discredit him. He said the “attempted coup” was partially motivated by his ardent backing of President Donald Trump.

Falwell, head of the nation’s most high-profile evangelical college, was among the earliest Christian conservatives to endorse Trump’s campaign.

His allegations come after the publication of a story in Politico Magazine on Monday that alleged Falwell “presides over a culture of self-dealing” at Liberty that has improperly benefited him and his family. The story cited unnamed sources described as current and former officials or Falwell associates.

“I’m not going to dignify the lies that were reported yesterday with a response, but I am going to the authorities and I am going to civil court,” Falwell said, referring to the reporter as a “little boy.”

He added that Liberty has hired “the meanest lawyer in New York,” whom he declined to identify, to pursue civil cases. Falwell also declined to identify the people he said were spreading the emails.

Falwell is the son of the late evangelist, Liberty founder and Moral Majority leader, the Rev. Jerry Falwell. He has come under increased scrutiny recently over his personal life and business investments, including his involvement in a Miami hostel.

The Hill first reported on Tuesday that Falwell had requested an FBI investigation.

Falwell said he contacted the FBI last week after he learned that reporters were reaching out to Liberty employees about the emails he insists were stolen.

“Liberty owns every single one of those emails. It’s our property. They were working for us when they used our server. And our policies make it clear every email sent on our server is owned by Liberty and if anybody shares it with anybody outside Liberty, it is theft. And so that’s the underlying crime,” Falwell told AP in a phone interview.

An FBI spokeswoman declined comment.

Cybercrime expert Nick Akerman said Falwell’s assertion of a criminal conspiracy is “totally insane.” Akerman said the ex-board members and employees can share emails with reporters as long as they had authorized access to them and didn’t hack into someone else’s account. He said trade secrets are also protected under the law, but Liberty wouldn’t be able to make a case there either.

“I don’t think any law enforcement agency is going to be interested in this one,” said Akerman, a partner at Dorsey & Whitney and former federal prosecutor.

Liberty, based in Lynchburg, Virginia, was founded in 1971 by Falwell’s father with just 154 students. It now boasts an enrollment of more than 100,000, including those in its massive online education program. It has become an influential hub of conservative politics, frequented by candidates courting evangelical voters.

Falwell was an early and ardent Trump supporter, which created a rift on campus during the presidential campaign and has sparked controversy since.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com