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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 72)

Olivia Culpo longs for the sun in throwback shot

Westlake Legal Group olivia Olivia Culpo longs for the sun in throwback shot Sasha Savitsky fox-news/entertainment/style fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc e5bf39f9-6a2f-5e61-a0f6-672a235e76ef article

Olivia Culpo isn’t ready to let go of the sun.

The model, who just wrapped up a vacation in Bali, is yearning for warmer weather. She posted a picture of herself lounging in a bathing suit in St. Barth.

“Gimme that back please!” Culpo captioned the series of pics.

OLIVIA CULPO SPORTS BIKINI MADE OF STRING IN RACY INSTAGRAM PHOTOS 

It was recently announced that the model will return for her third year in the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue, set to hit stands in 2020.

Back in February, Culpo opened up to Fox News about how she prepares for the big photoshoots, including her “really strict diet.”

“No sugar. No carbs. No alcohol,” she said. “Basically, all protein and fiber, and the only kinds of carbs I’ll have is sweet potato or greens or fruit.”

Despite watching what she eats ahead of photoshoots, Culpo said diets aren’t something she strictly follows in her normal day-to-day life.

“I really don’t believe in dieting,” she said. “I notice that when I have a shoot coming up or when I’m being really diligent about my diet, I can pretty much do it up until the day or two before and then I start to go crazy, and basically self-sabotage myself. As soon as I tell myself I can’t have sweets, then I really want sweets.”

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Culpo — who loves indulging in ice cream, pizza “and/or” alcohol — also credits her fitness routine to allowing her to splurge whenever she wants.

“I love working out,” she said. “I feel like if I didn’t work out as much as I did, I probably wouldn’t be able to get away with eating the way that I eat, so for me, it works out well.”

Westlake Legal Group olivia Olivia Culpo longs for the sun in throwback shot Sasha Savitsky fox-news/entertainment/style fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc e5bf39f9-6a2f-5e61-a0f6-672a235e76ef article   Westlake Legal Group olivia Olivia Culpo longs for the sun in throwback shot Sasha Savitsky fox-news/entertainment/style fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc e5bf39f9-6a2f-5e61-a0f6-672a235e76ef article

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Democrats Not Headed Too Far Left, Says Ocasio-Cortez, ‘We Are Bringing the Party Home’: “I want to be the party of the New Deal again,” says the progressive congresswoman from New York. “The party of the Civil Rights Act, the one that electrified this nation and fights for all people.”

Westlake Legal Group 396T-Mxm5spc5Zyt9hHgo0tyeJY62yWJJUJudaJ8n9Y Democrats Not Headed Too Far Left, Says Ocasio-Cortez, 'We Are Bringing the Party Home': "I want to be the party of the New Deal again," says the progressive congresswoman from New York. "The party of the Civil Rights Act, the one that electrified this nation and fights for all people." r/politics

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Kanye West addresses Joel Osteen’s church: I’m ‘in service to God’

Kanye West addressed parishioners at Joel Osteen’s Houston megachurch on Sunday where he said his recent spiritual awakening has made him realize he’s no longer in the service of fame and money but “in service to God.”

West spoke to a crowd of around 16,000 people at Lakewood Church’s 11 a.m. service.

During a 20-minute interview with Osteen before about 16,000 Lakewood Church parishioners, West told the packed crowd about his recent conversion to Christianity and how God has been inspiring him.

KANYE WEST PERFORMS AT HOUSTON JAIL

“I know that God has been calling me for a long time and the devil has been distracting me for a long time,” West said as he stood next to Osteen.

The rapper shared that at his lowest point, when he was hospitalized in 2016 after a “mental breakdown,” God “was there with me, sending me visions, inspiring me.”

Last month, West released “Jesus is King,” a Gospel-themed album that’s been described as Christian rap.

Westlake Legal Group kim-kanye-ap-2 Kanye West addresses Joel Osteen's church: I'm 'in service to God' Sasha Savitsky fox-news/person/kanye-west fox-news/faith-values/faith fox-news/faith-values fox-news/entertainment/genres/faith fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 03fe0e75-0e24-5889-840f-3c511a3397fc

Recording artist Kanye West, right, and wife Kim Kardashian West attend The Fashion Group International’s annual “Night of Stars” gala at Cipriani Wall Street on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2019, in New York. (AP)

West also was scheduled to perform Sunday evening at Lakewood with his “Sunday Service,” a church-like concert featuring a choir. Tickets for the free concert were distributed through Ticketmaster and sold out within minutes on Saturday, though some people have been reselling them for hundreds of dollars.

KANYE WEST’S SUNDAY SERVICE HAD ‘OVER 1,000’ COMMIT THEIR LIVES TO CHRIST: ‘NEW WAVE OF REVIVAL’

West has been traveling around the U.S. holding his “Sunday Service” concerts since January, including at the Coachella festival, an outdoor shopping center in Salt Lake City and at an Atlanta-area megachurch.

On Friday, he and his choir performed for inmates at the Harris County Jail in Houston.

During Sunday’s appearance, West touched on a variety of topics, including religion, the perils of fame and money and going to church as a child. He also talked about how he used to approach things, telling parishioners that “all of that arrogance” that people had seen in him, he is “now using it for God.”

Westlake Legal Group Kanye-West-1 Kanye West addresses Joel Osteen's church: I'm 'in service to God' Sasha Savitsky fox-news/person/kanye-west fox-news/faith-values/faith fox-news/faith-values fox-news/entertainment/genres/faith fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 03fe0e75-0e24-5889-840f-3c511a3397fc

West performs during 2019 Coachella Valley Music And Arts Festival on April 20, 2019 in Indio, California. (Timothy Norris/Getty Images for Coachella)

“The only superstar is Jesus,” West said as the crowd applauded loudly.

WHO IS KANYE’S PASTOR PREACHING AT SUNDAY SERVICE?

Lakewood Church, where more than 43,000 people attend services each week, has become the largest church in the U.S. It holds services at the former Compaq Center, which was once the home of the Houston Rockets.

Osteen’s weekly television program is viewed by more than 13 million households in the U.S. and millions more in more than 100 nations around the world.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6103518040001_6103509161001-vs Kanye West addresses Joel Osteen's church: I'm 'in service to God' Sasha Savitsky fox-news/person/kanye-west fox-news/faith-values/faith fox-news/faith-values fox-news/entertainment/genres/faith fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 03fe0e75-0e24-5889-840f-3c511a3397fc   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6103518040001_6103509161001-vs Kanye West addresses Joel Osteen's church: I'm 'in service to God' Sasha Savitsky fox-news/person/kanye-west fox-news/faith-values/faith fox-news/faith-values fox-news/entertainment/genres/faith fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 03fe0e75-0e24-5889-840f-3c511a3397fc

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Bristol Palin is Instagram official with new boyfriend Janson Moore

Westlake Legal Group bristol-palin-display-only Bristol Palin is Instagram official with new boyfriend Janson Moore Sasha Savitsky fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 0c4c73e1-4bbf-5f3b-9d40-d8841433d07b

Bristol Palin has a new beau.

The former “Teen Mom OG” star, 29, shared a picture of herself with boyfriend, Janson Moore, 24, on Saturday.

Her mom, former Alaska governor Sarah Palin seems to approve of the new couple as she commented on her daughter’s post, “Okeyyyyy!” along with a football emoji.

BRISTOL PALIN’S TONED INSTAGRAM PIC GOES VIRAL

According to Us Weekly, Janson is a medical sales rep. The couple seemed to be enjoying themselves at the Texas A&M football game. Bristol captioned the photo with a heart-eyed emoji.

BRISTOL PALIN SWEARS OFF MARRIAGE, DATING AFTER DAKOTA MEYER SPLIT

This is her first public relationship since divorcing Dakota Meyer. The former couple married in June 2016, and welcomed two children, before ending their marriage in February 2018. Their divorce was finalized six months later.

Bristol is also a mom to Tripp, 10, whom she shares with ex-fiance, Levi Johnston.

Westlake Legal Group bristol-palin-display-only Bristol Palin is Instagram official with new boyfriend Janson Moore Sasha Savitsky fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 0c4c73e1-4bbf-5f3b-9d40-d8841433d07b   Westlake Legal Group bristol-palin-display-only Bristol Palin is Instagram official with new boyfriend Janson Moore Sasha Savitsky fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 0c4c73e1-4bbf-5f3b-9d40-d8841433d07b

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Why ‘Stop-and-Frisk’ Inflamed Black and Hispanic Neighborhoods

Westlake Legal Group 17sqf-explainer-facebookJumbo Why ‘Stop-and-Frisk’ Inflamed Black and Hispanic Neighborhoods stop and frisk Search and Seizure racial profiling Police Department (NYC) New York City Kelly, Raymond W de Blasio, Bill Bloomberg, Michael R

During Michael R. Bloomberg’s tenure as mayor of New York City, police officers stopped and questioned people they believed to be engaged in criminal activity on the street more than five million times.

Officers often then searched the detainees — the vast majority of whom were young black and Latino men — for weapons that rarely materialized.

The encounters were part of a controversial program known as “stop-and-frisk,” which defined policing under Mr. Bloomberg.

As Mr. Bloomberg, the 108th mayor of New York, lays the groundwork for a possible presidential campaign, his legacy with stop-and-frisk has emerged as a vulnerability for him on the campaign trail.

On Sunday he apologized for his role in promoting a policy during his time in office that eroded trust of the police in black and Latino neighborhoods.

“Our focus was on saving lives,” he said during a speech at a black church in Brooklyn. “But the fact is: Far too many innocent people were being stopped.”

Here’s why the program was and remains a divisive issue in New York.

Stop-and-frisk is a crime-prevention strategy that had been a staple of policing in the United States for more than 30 years before Mr. Bloomberg took office. It allows police officers to detain someone for questioning on the street, in public housing projects or in private buildings where landlords request police patrols.

Officers are required to have reasonable belief that the person is, has been or is about to be involved in a crime. If police officers believe the detainee is armed, an officer can conduct a frisk by passing his hands over the person’s outer garments.

The strategy spread with the adoption of the data-driven Compstat management system in the 1990s, which allowed police to track and respond to crime trends in real time.

After taking office in 2002, Mr. Bloomberg oversaw a dramatic expansion in the use of stop-and-frisk. The number of stops multiplied sevenfold, peaking with 685,724 in 2011 and then tumbling to 191,851 in 2013. During Mr. Bloomberg’s three terms, the police recorded 5,081,689 stops.

“The temperature in the city at the time was that the police were at war with black and brown people on the streets,” said Jenn Rolnick-Borchetta, the director of impact litigation at the Bronx Defenders, one of the groups that has successfully sued the Police Department over the practice. “And that is how people experienced it.”

At the same time that officers were conducting more searches as part of stop-and-frisk, crime continued to decline, a correlation that Mr. Bloomberg and his police commissioner, Raymond W. Kelly, viewed as cause and effect. The two men said stop-and-frisk was helping to take guns off the street and reduce violence across the city.

Statistics appeared to back them up: In 2002, Mr. Bloomberg’s first year in office, the number of murders in the city fell below 600, and dropped to 335 by the time he left office in 2013. Even as the amount of crime rose or fluctuated in other cities, New York’s crime rate declined, continuing a streak that had begun in 1991.

Mr. Bloomberg and Commissioner Kelly fiercely defended stop-and-frisk in the face of criticism and legal challenges. They argued that it was an essential practice for police, and predicted — wrongly, it would turn out — that curtailing it would lead to a dramatic rise in crime.

“Look at what’s happened in Boston,” Mr. Bloomberg said in 2013. “Remember what happened here on 9/11. Remember all of those who’ve been killed by gun violence and the families they left behind.”

But more factors affect crime trends than just police tactics, and critics of the program said that under Mr. Bloomberg it gave officers overly broad discretion to target mostly black and Latino boys and men for stops.

In 2009, black and Latino people in New York were nine times as likely to be stopped by the police compared to white residents.

The strategy was used with such intensity that officers in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Brownsville conducted 52,000 stops over eight square blocks between January 2006 and March 2010 — the equivalent of one stop for each resident there every year. The arrest rate was less than one percent for the 14,000 residents.

The policy resulted in a series of lawsuits by black and Latino men. One man, Nicholas Peart, described being held at gunpoint on his 18th birthday as an officer passed his hand over the young man’s groin and buttocks before leaving without an explanation — one of five times he had been stopped by the police.

“Essentially, I incorporated into my daily life the sense that I might find myself up against a wall or on the ground with an officer’s gun at my head,” he wrote in The Times. “For a black man in his 20s like me, it’s just a fact of life in New York.”

Only 14 out of every 10,000 stops conducted during the Bloomberg era turned up a gun, and just 1,200 ended with a fine, an arrest or the seizure of an illegal weapon, according to police data analyzed by the New York Civil Liberties Union. A Columbia University professor said the stops were no better at producing gun seizures than chance.

Black and Latino people were more likely be to stopped and frisked, even though their white counterparts were twice as likely to be found with a gun, according to the New York Civil Liberties Union.

“This is where the racial bias is particularly clear,” Christopher Dunn, the legal director of the group, said.

The controversy culminated with a federal judge in Manhattan ruling in 2013 that the searches amounted to a “policy of indirect racial profiling” of black and Latino people. The ruling covered three concurrent cases.

According to data and testimony presented at trial, the police targeted black and Latino males as young as 13 for being in neighborhoods with high crime rates or for making “furtive” movements — a loosely defined term that encapsulated virtually any type of behavior, such as sitting on benches, looking over a shoulder or going into a building with a broken front door. Dissenting officers described being pressured to make stops to meet numerical quotas.

The city argued in court that a stop that did not result in a summons, arrest or weapons seizure still prevented crime by discouraging people from carrying guns.

“That was the theory that Bloomberg supported, that if you let them know that they might be stopped anytime, anywhere, that they will stop bringing out their guns,” the judge who made the ruling, Shira Scheindlin, now a private mediator and lawyer, said on Sunday.

Mr. Bloomberg defended the practice as recently as January, denying any racial bias in the policy by pointing to the drop in murders during his time in office.

He struck a different tone on Sunday.

“I got something important really wrong,” he said at the Christian Cultural Center, a black megachurch in Brooklyn. “I didn’t understand back then the full impact that stops were having on the black and Latino communities.”

Stop-and-frisk became a key issue in the 2013 mayoral race. Mayor Bill de Blasio won a long-shot campaign that year in part because he promised to undo the heavy-handed policing tactics of the Bloomberg administration.

During the campaign, Mr. Bloomberg criticized the attacks on stop-and-frisk as political showmanship that risked people’s lives. But his predictions about what would happen if the strategy was eliminated were wrong.

During Mr. de Blasio’s first term as mayor, stops decreased by 76 percent, to 11,627 in 2017, from 45,787 in his first year. At the same time, crime fell to levels not seen since the 1950s. Over the last two years, the city has logged fewer than 300 murders annually.

Mr. Bloomberg appealed Judge Scheindlin’s ruling, but Mr. de Blasio agreed to implement court-ordered reforms. The changes included mandating most officers to wear body cameras and the entire force to be trained in de-escalating conflict and recognizing their own bias.

But racial disparities persist in the street-stop program, and a federal monitor overseeing reforms has repeatedly raised concerns that officers and supervisors do not document and review stops in accordance with Police Department policy. The monitor, Peter L. Zimroth, said the failures impeded efforts to make sure reforms were taking hold.

“Addressing the persistent problem of underreporting of stops and the failure of supervisors to deal with that underreporting and the quality of the stop reports that are filed must be part of that effort,” Mr. Zimroth said.

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Virginia fishing pier collapses after loose barge strikes it

Westlake Legal Group fishing-pier Virginia fishing pier collapses after loose barge strikes it Michael Hollan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox news fnc/great-outdoors fnc article 9e36d1c7-4a8e-533a-87aa-a1425d0c4bf8

That’s probably going to scare away the fish.

A loose barge struck a fishing pier in Virginia, causing a portion of it to collapse.

Fortunately, no injuries were reported from the incident.

People on the fishing pier were forced to evacuate, however, as the barge got closer, WAVY reported. Officials closed the beach to both foot and vehicular traffic.

Initial reports of a loose barge started at around 5:40 a.m. this morning, but it apparently did not strike the pier until closer to 9 a.m.

NM BOY CATCHES 42-POUND CATFISH

The Hampton Virginia Police tweeted out multiple updates about the incident.

They initially posted, “Buckroe Fishing Pier is closed until further notice due to a loose barge that has struck the pier. Unknown extent of damage at this time. Hampton Fire, HPD, VMRC and US Coast Guard are on scene. Please avoid the area.”

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They quickly posted a photo of the collapsed pier, stating, “Buckroe Fishing Pier has collapsed from damage sustained from the drifting vessel. The beach and pier remain closed while VMRC, US Coast Guard, Hampton Fire and HPD work to secure the barge.”

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Within an hour, they posted another update, saying, “A portion of the Buckroe Fishing Pier has collapsed. Crews are on-scene attempting to secure the loose barge. The beach is closed from Resort to Seaboard to all traffic, both vehicular and foot.”

Westlake Legal Group fishing-pier Virginia fishing pier collapses after loose barge strikes it Michael Hollan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox news fnc/great-outdoors fnc article 9e36d1c7-4a8e-533a-87aa-a1425d0c4bf8   Westlake Legal Group fishing-pier Virginia fishing pier collapses after loose barge strikes it Michael Hollan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox news fnc/great-outdoors fnc article 9e36d1c7-4a8e-533a-87aa-a1425d0c4bf8

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Amway Coaches Poll

The Amway Coaches Poll is not the same as the playoff rankings. But this week’s voting undoubtedly presages some lively debates that figure to take place in the committee room in the days and weeks ahead.

For now, the top three positions remain fairly well established. It’s that all-important fourth slot that will cause the most discussion. LSU, Ohio State and Clemson stayed put in those first three positions, and Georgia edged ahead of Alabama at No. 4.

The Tigers received 55 of 65 first-place votes to keep the No. 1 spot following a victory at Mississippi. The Buckeyes picked up six No. 1 nods this week, while Clemson claimed the remaining four.

Westlake Legal Group  Amway Coaches Poll

The Bulldogs finished 17 poll points ahead of the Crimson Tide to claim the fourth spot. The change was likely a combination of Georgia’s road win at Auburn and Alabama’s costly victory at Mississippi State in which quarterback Tua Tagovailoa went down with a season-ending injury.

TOP 25:Complete Amway Coaches Poll rankings

Oregon held steady at No. 6, while No. 7 Oklahoma and No. 8 Utah each moved up a notch. Penn State and Florida each gained two positions to climb back into the top 10. Minnesota and Baylor, who fell from the ranks of the undefeated, slid to No. 11 and No. 13, respectively.

Joining the rankings this week were No. 23 Oklahoma State, No. 24 Texas A&M and No. 25 San Diego State.

Navy, Texas and Indiana dropped out.

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Paul Batura: Take a hike – I mean that in the nicest way

Westlake Legal Group hiking Paul Batura: Take a hike – I mean that in the nicest way Paul Batura fox-news/travel/general/national-parks fox-news/travel/general/camping-hiking fox-news/science/wild-nature fox-news/opinion fox-news/columns/natures-mysteries fox news fnc/opinion fnc b3000b5d-90a7-5075-8b62-4abdc574c87a article

Today is “National Take a Hike Day” – an annual designation intended to shake us from our sedentary habits and encourage Americans to enjoy the 60,000-plus miles of the National Trail System that are woven throughout our 50 beautiful states.

According to recent statistics, the average person sits over 11 hours a day, and that doesn’t even include sleeping. Of course, technology and the explosion of convenience have contributed to our increasingly static natures. It hasn’t always been this way.

My father had to walk to Howie’s candy store to buy the morning newspaper – I just press a button and the world’s news is instantly in the palm of my hand. Other household chores that used to take many minutes of movement now take mere moments to complete.

BRUCE ASHFORD: KANYE VISITS JOEL OSTEEN’S CHURCH – HERE’S WHAT HE SHOULD DO 

Some historians trace the hiking phenomena back a few hundred years, but people have been walking from here to there since the beginning of time. Modernity just has a habit of reinventing things and claiming credit.

With great gear from REI and other top-notch outfitters, modern hiking claims a charm and luxuries that used to be distant fantasies. I don’t think Moses and the Israelites found anything too charming about eating quail and manna on their 40-year hike in the wilderness.

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But I love hiking and resonate with all the beautiful reflections offered down through the years from people who longed to breathe deeply fresh air under wide open azure skies.

“Between every two pines is a doorway to a new world,” once wrote John Muir, the famed Scottish American naturalist credited with preserving America’s beautiful open spaces.

More from Opinion

“I took a walk in the woods and came out taller than the trees,” opined the literary giant and philosopher Henry David Thoreau.

Admittedly, although I’ve been running since high school, I didn’t fully appreciate the draw of hiking until I moved to Colorado almost 23 years ago. Back in New York, I ran the suburban streets of our neighborhood as well as the south shore beaches of Long Island.

Away from the clang and clamor of day to day living, everything seems possible on a rock-strewn trail, the sounds of leaves under foot and the whistle of the wind in the trees. 

There is beauty everywhere but there’s definitely something special about walking quietly in the mountainous forests of Colorado. John Denver wasn’t exaggerating when he sang, “I’ve seen it rainin’ fire in the sky” and “The shadow from the starlight is softer than a lullabye.”

Away from the clang and clamor of day to day living, everything seems possible on a rock-strewn trail, the sounds of leaves under foot and the whistle of the wind in the trees.

Hiking isn’t only good for the mind, of course. A brisk hike provides an excellent cardio workout, improves blood pressure, strengthens muscles and even increases bone density.

I believe human happiness would skyrocket exponentially if more people made hiking and walking a priority. Moods would improve and congeniality would increase.

Even better than quietly hiking alone is sharing the trail with a partner with whom you can share your fears along with your hopes and dreams. I love hiking with my wife and three boys. We’ve talked about things on the trail that would probably never come up anywhere else.

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But maybe the great British spy writer John le Carre offered the best reason of all to get up and go for a hike when he wryly observed, “A desk is a dangerous place from which to view the world.”

I’m going to stop typing now and head for the hills. I wish you could join me.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM PAUL BATURA

Westlake Legal Group hiking Paul Batura: Take a hike – I mean that in the nicest way Paul Batura fox-news/travel/general/national-parks fox-news/travel/general/camping-hiking fox-news/science/wild-nature fox-news/opinion fox-news/columns/natures-mysteries fox news fnc/opinion fnc b3000b5d-90a7-5075-8b62-4abdc574c87a article   Westlake Legal Group hiking Paul Batura: Take a hike – I mean that in the nicest way Paul Batura fox-news/travel/general/national-parks fox-news/travel/general/camping-hiking fox-news/science/wild-nature fox-news/opinion fox-news/columns/natures-mysteries fox news fnc/opinion fnc b3000b5d-90a7-5075-8b62-4abdc574c87a article

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For Start-Ups, Cash Is King (Again)

Westlake Legal Group 17cash-facebookJumbo For Start-Ups, Cash Is King (Again) Venture Capital Start-ups Sondermind Innovation Initial Public Offerings Entrepreneurship Computers and the Internet

SAN FRANCISCO — Mark Frank, who runs a health technology start-up called SonderMind, had planned to wait until the end of 2020 to raise more money for his company.

But after Uber and Lyft stumbled when going public and WeWork ousted its chief executive and pulled its initial stock offering, Mr. Frank changed his mind. With so much disappointment clouding start-up land and an economic slowdown looming, he decided that having more cash on hand was the better course.

SonderMind, which raised $3 million in April, has 80 percent of that money left, Mr. Frank said. To increase the start-up’s “runway,” or the amount of time before it runs out of cash, he decided to spend less than planned, and to be extra safe, he began informal conversations with investors for a new round of fund-raising early next year.

“The question is now, ‘Do we push that timeline up even further?’” said Mr. Frank, 41, who is based in Denver.

Tech start-ups, which have enjoyed years of easy money and fast growth, are preparing for a potential downturn by doing something that was unpopular in boom times: hoarding cash. Many young companies are spending less and raising more than they planned, said Scott Orn, chief operating officer at Kruze Consulting, a San Francisco firm that provides accounting and human resources services to more than 200 start-ups.

In the first three months of the year, Kruze’s clients had an average cash balance of $3.5 million. By September, that had increased to $4.5 million, he said. And start-ups that began the year burning $260,000 a month had, on average, reduced that to $230,000, he said.

“People are locking down that last dollar,” Mr. Orn said.

Stockpiling cash is at odds with the model of most venture capital-backed start-ups, which typically raise piles of money to spend on growing faster. Many investors are now pushing their companies to turn a profit.

Joe Horowitz, an investor at Icon Ventures, a venture capital firm in San Francisco and Palo Alto, Calif., said he had recently met with two companies in one day that were raising unplanned “interim” rounds of funding to safeguard against a difficult environment next year. He said those were prudent moves.

“We do advise companies to be more cautious on spending, move up fund-raising plans and raise a bit of extra capital if they can, particularly as we look at these headwinds,” he said.

Ben Parr, president and co-founder of Octane, a customer service software start-up in San Francisco, said investors had been asking him how much money his company was spending and how long it would take to break even.

“A year ago, they’d ask, ‘What’s your month-over-month growth rate?’” Mr. Parr, 34, said. His 16-person start-up, which has raised $4 million, is on track to turn a profit early next year, he said.

Whether a start-up bust is actually coming is unclear. Many investors and entrepreneurs recalled similar fears in 2015, when mutual funds reduced the values of the largest “unicorns,” the start-ups valued at $1 billion or higher. Some venture capitalists even warned of “dead unicorns.” While some companies spoke of austerity, the venture money continued to flow.

Now the fear factor should be higher, said Micah Rosenbloom, an investor at the venture capital firm Founder Collective.

“Most folks under 30 haven’t known anything but a growing market, so most people in the ecosystem aren’t as worried as they should be,” he said.

Some start-ups are listening and taking no chances with their cash.

In September, Fairygodboss, a women’s career website in New York, cut the amount of money it was losing by several hundred thousand dollars a month. The start-up, which has 55 employees, is at a higher-than-average risk in the event of a downturn because corporations are more likely to buy its services in a strong labor market, said Georgene Huang, the chief executive and a co-founder.

She wanted Fairygodboss’s $14 million in venture capital funding to last as long as possible. So she reduced spending.

“We’ve definitely gotten more conservative,” Ms. Huang, 39, said. “We see storm clouds on the horizon.”

The question of profitability “comes in up pretty much every conversation” with investors, said Pranav Sachdev, the chief executive and a co-founder of Glyph, a New York shoe start-up that has raised $400,000.

The company, which has two full-time employees, is profitable, Mr. Sachdev said. Still, he plans to increase the size of his next funding to give Glyph more support and durability, he added.

“Instead of raising $750,000 or $1 million, maybe we’ll raise $1.5 million,” Mr. Sachdev, 30, said.

Even some venture capital firms have expressed concern about whether they can raise new money next year, said Chris Douvos, a founder of Ahoy Capital, which invests in venture funds.

“There’s this sense that all of these eye-popping valuations that we experienced and were so proud of over the last several years are now in danger of being debunked,” he said.

Venture fund-raising is often affected by stock market sentiment, said Mr. Horowitz, of Icon Ventures who has worked in venture capital for four decades.

“When the public markets are doing well, we’re this sexy asset class,” he said. “When the public markets turn, we become toxic waste.”

Mr. Frank, the chief executive of SonderMind, is a founder of the company, which was established in 2014 and runs a network of therapists. As the start-up environment shifted, he said, he moved his fund-raising plans up and lowered his company’s burn rate.

But Mr. Frank said he still intended to spend on building new products, as well as advertising and hiring. If the economy takes a drastic turn, then the company will quickly alter its strategy.

“We can flip the switch and be profitable if we need to,” he said.

Whatever happens, Mr. Frank doesn’t expect SonderMind to follow the same path as the unicorns that went public this year. “The times of raising $10 billion before an I.P.O. are probably gone,” he said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

GOP Congressman: Trump’s Yovanovitch Tweet ‘Unfortunate’ But ‘Not Impeachable’

Westlake Legal Group 5dd192ff2100006a6434d32c GOP Congressman: Trump’s Yovanovitch Tweet ‘Unfortunate’ But ‘Not Impeachable’

Rep. Mike Turner (R-Ohio) said President Donald Trump’s tweet attacking former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch as she testified before Congress on Friday was “generally unfortunate” but did not amount to witness intimidation. 

In his tweet, Trump claimed everywhere Yovanovitch went “turned bad.” House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) read Yovanovitch the tweet during the hearing Friday ― minutes after it was sent ― and asked for her reaction. She responded that Trump’s comments were “very intimidating.”

But Turner, a member of House Intelligence Committee, appeared to shrug off the president’s timely tweet during an appearance Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

“Does it concern you at all that a witness found what President Trump tweeted to be intimidating?” host Jake Tapper asked Turner.

“I think along with most people I find Trump’s tweet generally unfortunate,” the Republican congressman responded before attacking Schiff and accusing him of being “obsessed with impeachment.”

“It’s kind of laughable that in the middle of the hearing [Schiff] reads a witness a tweet that she’s, up to that point, unaware of and then says, ‘Shazam! Eureka! I have another reason to impeach the president,’” Turner continued.

Tapper pressed him again: “I get you don’t like Congressman Schiff, but you do find it concerning that a witness in real time found the president’s tweet to be …  intimidating?”

“It’s certainly not impeachable,” Turner said. “And it’s certainly not criminal. And it’s certainly not witness intimidation. It certainly wasn’t trying to prevent her ― or wouldn’t have prevented her ― from testifying. She was actually in the process of testifying.”

But Tapper continued to grill him, asking how the tweet doesn’t amount to witness intimidation if Yovanovitch herself said she felt intimidated by it.

“Clearly, she testified completely and fully. … She was in no means intimidated and prevented from testifying,” Turner claimed, prompting Tapper to note that he’s “not a mind reader” and has no idea whether Trump’s tweet caused her to hold back during her testimony.

Though Republicans have largely defended Trump’s comments, his tweet drew significant backlash from Democrats and some members of the GOP.

Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) said Sunday, during an appearance on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” that the House may want to consider the tweet as an article of impeachment. Though Trump abruptly recalled Yovanovitch from her position as ambassador in May, Murphy said, she continues to work in the State Department.

“The president is basically telling her during her testimony is that there may be consequences to you and your family and your paycheck if you don’t shut up,” Murphy said. “And the message that’s being sent to everybody else who’s thinking about testifying is chilling as well.”  

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