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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 74)

NFL plans to increase playoff field next season under new CBA: report

Westlake Legal Group 040716-NFL-Logo-PI.vresize.940.529.-e249915582fa6510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ NFL plans to increase playoff field next season under new CBA: report fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/sports fox news fnc/sports fnc David Aaro article 7b4b2f1f-1601-5f0d-bd56-58e5e8c2bba8

NFL owners are looking to make big changes to the playoff structure next season as part of their new collective bargaining agreement (CBA) proposal, according to multiple reports.

Under the new CBA, the number of teams who make the playoffs would increase from 12 to 14, which could happen as soon as the 2020 season. It would include seven teams from the AFC and NFC.

The sweeping changes would make it so only one team per conference would earn a first-round bye, compared with two in the NFL’s current format, which has been in place since 2002 when the league expanded to 32 clubs.

COWBOYS’ AMARI COOPER DISMISSES VIRAL TWEET HE HAD BEEN SHOT IN DALLAS: ‘FAKE NEWS Y’ALL’

The increase in teams making the playoffs would mean a revised postseason schedule that would include six games on wild-card weekend.

If the format existed in 2019, the Pittsburgh Steelers (8-8) and Los Angeles Rams (9-7) would have made the playoffs based on their records at the end of last season.

NFL owners will meet Thursday in New York City to discuss negotiations with the players’ association about a new CBA before the current 10-year deal expires. The owners’ proposal will be discussed by players via a conference call Friday.

Some final issues both sides are working out include a proposed 17-game regular season, which wouldn’t take effect until 2021 at the earliest. The new playoff format could be implemented before the 17-game decision.

FORMER NO. 2 DRAFT PICK FACING FEDERAL DRUG CHARGE AFTER ARREST AT BORDER: REPORT

The proposed addition to the regular season would increase revenue for the league and owners but players argue it would likely increase wear and tear of on their bodies. To compensate, owners are proposing that preseason games be reduced to three per team, according to ESPN.

The current CBA deal was reached in the summer of 2011 after a lockout that began in March that year. No games were lost except the Hall of Fame’s preseason opener.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

The NFL’s business season starts when free agency begins on March 18. Getting a CBA before that date would allow the league to focus attention to further broadcast and digital contracts as well as international initiatives.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 040716-NFL-Logo-PI.vresize.940.529.-e249915582fa6510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ NFL plans to increase playoff field next season under new CBA: report fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/sports fox news fnc/sports fnc David Aaro article 7b4b2f1f-1601-5f0d-bd56-58e5e8c2bba8   Westlake Legal Group 040716-NFL-Logo-PI.vresize.940.529.-e249915582fa6510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ NFL plans to increase playoff field next season under new CBA: report fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/sports fox news fnc/sports fnc David Aaro article 7b4b2f1f-1601-5f0d-bd56-58e5e8c2bba8

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When You Click Buy on Amazon, It May Be Sweating the Supply

Westlake Legal Group 20amazon2-facebookJumbo When You Click Buy on Amazon, It May Be Sweating the Supply Shopping and Retail International Trade and World Market Factories and Manufacturing Epidemics E-Commerce Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Amazon.com Inc

SEATTLE — What if the Everything Store couldn’t sell everything because of disruptions from the coronavirus?

That’s the situation that Amazon — which typically stocks more than 100 million items, from toilet paper to yoga pants — is working to avoid as the deadly outbreak continues to shut down and slow factories in China that produce the world’s goods.

Over the past few weeks, Amazon has responded to the crisis by making larger and more frequent orders of Chinese-made products that had already been shipped to the United States, according to company emails and consultants who work with major brands. Some of its suppliers have cut back on advertising and promotions on the site so they don’t run out of products too quickly.

Amazon also sent an urgent email to brands on Wednesday about Prime Day, its midsummer mega sale, indicating that it has begun worrying about inventory for the event. And the company has contacted some of its third-party merchants, whose dog leashes, crayons and other products account for about 60 percent of its sales, to figure out how their flow of goods might be impeded.

“Hello!” read one recent email from Amazon to a seller, which The New York Times reviewed. “We have identified that part of your supply chain process might be China dependent and in light of the coronavirus outbreak effecting manufacturing and logistics in China, we are reaching out to you to understand its impact on your business operations.”

With its reliance on Chinese manufacturing, Amazon is turning into a case study of how a giant retailer grapples with the fallout from the coronavirus and what may lie ahead for other stores. Already dozens of companies have indicated that the virus will take a toll on them, with Apple cutting its sales expectations this week and airlines canceling flights to China.

Retailers have so far said less about how the coronavirus will affect them. On Tuesday, Walmart said sales at its 430 stores in China had not faltered and added that the impact on its supply chain was unclear but might be more muted than at other companies.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

Last year’s trade war with China may inadvertently be helping some big retailers now. At the time, companies imported more goods than usual from China to get ahead of expected tariffs. Some moved manufacturing to Vietnam and other Asian countries. When the new tariffs never took effect, retailers were left with more supply and more sourcing from other countries already in place.

Still, if China Inc. continues to be fitful beyond the next few weeks, major stores could run out of everyday products like sponges, print cartridges and construction paper by mid-April, according to a report from Wells Fargo last week. China is the largest source of imported consumer goods.

“We believe the time to start worrying about the supply chain risk” of the virus “is here,” the report said.

Amazon is likely to feel potential shortages of goods earlier than its American peers because it usually keeps fewer items on hand than they do. In good times, that lets the internet company run more efficiently because it does not tie up money to buy and store products that are waiting to be sold.

But that approach, called “lean inventory,” exposes Amazon more to shocks.

“This is a cost to pay for the efficiency that a just-in-time supply chain gets you,” said Guru Hariharan, a former Amazon employee and the founder of CommerceIQ, a start-up whose automation tools are used by major brands including Kimberly-Clark and Logitech.

Some supply problems may be hidden. Even products made in America can rely on Chinese suppliers, which may cause problems down the line. Ketchup made in a plant in Sacramento, for example, may depend on tomato paste or bottles and caps from China.

Amazon faces an additional wrinkle in keeping its virtual shelves stocked: While traditional retailers generally control their inventory directly, most of the products on Amazon are bought and sold by third-party merchants. Amazon simply facilitates those sales, giving it less visibility into supply.

“Out of an abundance of caution, we are working with suppliers to secure additional inventory to ensure we maintain our selection for customers,” an Amazon spokeswoman said. The company later added, “We are monitoring developments related to the coronavirus and taking appropriate steps as needed.”

Amazon’s algorithms have now asked for six to eight weeks of supply on products made in China instead of just two or three weeks, said Mr. Hariharan, who discussed the changes with large brands that supply the retailer.

Amazon has also made larger and more frequent buys, deviating from its regular cadence of automated purchases, according to company emails and consultants.

“Amazon issued off-cycle orders to you last night in order to prepare for possible supply chain disruptions due to recent global events originating in China,” one recent email to a vendor read. Similar emails were earlier reported by Business Insider.

Fahim Naim, who managed inventory at Amazon and now advises brands selling there, said it had placed extra orders from his clients who have more than $10 million in annual sales on the site and had marked “China” as the source of their products. Amazon’s emails to his clients show that it is giving brands extra time to get their products to its warehouses without a penalty.

On Feb. 7, the main Amazon website that sellers use to run their business posted a message that included tips for making sure Amazon’s algorithms didn’t ding their accounts if they couldn’t fulfill orders.

Mr. Kavesh sells $85 cowboy boots on Amazon.Credit…Christian S Hansen for The New York Times His factory orders take about four months to be delivered to him.Credit…Christian S Hansen for The New York Times

Jerry Kavesh, who offers Western wear like $85 cowboy boots on Amazon, is emblematic of the supply issues that its sellers face.

Mr. Kavesh, 57, who is based in a Seattle suburb, said that the factory in China that produced his cowboy hats was closed and that he did not know when it would reopen. Even after the factory’s workers return, the facility needs wool from its Chinese suppliers to make the hats.

“The key component — they don’t know when they are going to get that,” he said.

It takes about four months for his orders to be made and to arrive in the United States, Mr. Kavesh added. That means he typically would have products already in process for Prime Day, Amazon’s two-day shopping deal extravaganza, which usually falls in early July.

Amazon appears to share the concern. On Wednesday, it sent an email to a beauty supplies brand asking whether it expected to have enough of its top five products this summer.

“Amazon is trying to establish an inventory risk for your business moving forward and specifically for Prime Day,” said the email, which The Times reviewed. “We appreciate your feedback by TODAY.”

Mr. Naim said some brands he worked with had pulled back on their ads on Amazon by 25 percent to 50 percent, and had stopped promotions they had planned, to preserve money and inventory. Other sellers said they were contemplating whether to raise prices to prevent — or at least delay — running out of stock.

Eddie Levine, who has been selling on Amazon since 2012, shipped more than 130 containers of toys, housewares and other goods from China last year, largely to offer on the site. He has cautioned the brands he works with against raising prices, saying that if a $20 product suddenly costs $40, “the last thing you want is a bad review saying it’s not worth $40.”

But if the virus disruptions persist into late spring or early summer, “people will have to raise prices without even having the option because there is just no stock,” Mr. Levine said. “That’s pure supply and demand.”

Karen Weise reported from Seattle, and Michael Corkery from New York.

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Victor Davis Hanson: China’s government is showing us what ‘1984’ looks like

Westlake Legal Group 854081161001_6133197334001_6133196438001-vs Victor Davis Hanson: China’s government is showing us what '1984' looks like Victor Davis Hanson Tribune Media Services fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fnc/opinion fnc article 8678bc91-9532-5371-a9f2-fd421a259399

The Chinese communist government increasingly poses an existential threat not just to its own 1.4 billion citizens, but to the world at large.

China is currently in a dangerously chaotic state. And why not, when a premodern authoritarian society leaps wildly into the brave new world of high-tech science in a single generation?

The Chinese technological revolution is overseen by an Orwellian dictatorship. Predictably, the Chinese Communist Party has not developed the social, political or cultural infrastructure to ensure that its sophisticated industrial and biological research does not go rogue and become destructive to itself and to the billions of people who are on the importing end of Chinese products and protocols.

BLOOMBERG NEWS EX-REPORTER’S WIFE SAYS HIS LAWYERS THREATENED TO ‘RUIN’ FAMILY OVER CHINA REPORTING

Central party officials run the government, military, media and universities collectively in a manner reminiscent of the science-fiction Borg organism of “Star Trek,” which was a horde of robot-like entities all under the control of a central mind.

Thirty years ago, American pundits began gushing over China’s sudden leap from horse-drawn power to solar, wind and nuclear energy. The Chinese communist government wowed Westerners. It created from nothing high-speed rail, solar farms, shiny new airports and gleaming new high-density apartment buildings.

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Western-trained Chinese scientists soon were conducting sophisticated medical and scientific research. And they often did so rapidly, without the prying regulators, nosy elected officials and bothersome citizen lawsuits that often burden American and European scientists.

To make China instantly rich and modern, the communist hierarchy — the same government that once caused the deaths of some 60 million innocents under Mao Zedong — ignored property rights. It crushed individual freedom. It embraced secrecy and bulldozed over any who stood in its way.

More from Opinion

In much the same manner that silly American pundits once praised Benito Mussolini’s fascist efforts to modernize Depression-era Italy, many naifs in the West praised China only because they wished that their own countries could recalibrate so quickly and efficiently — especially in service to green agendas.

But the world is learning that China does not just move mountains for new dams or bulldoze ancient neighborhoods that stand in the path of high-speed rail. It also hid the outbreak and the mysterious origins of the deadly coronavirus from its own people and the rest of the planet as well — a more dangerous replay of its earlier effort to mask the spread of the SARS virus. The result was that thousands of unknowing carriers spread the viral plague while the government covered up its epidemic proportions.

China, of course, does not wish to have either its products or citizens quarantined from other countries. But the Chinese government will not allow foreign scientists to enter its country to collaborate on containing the coronavirus and developing a vaccine.

No wonder internet conspiracies speculate that the virus was either a rogue product of the Chinese military’s bioengineering weapons lab or originated from bats, snakes or pangolins and the open-air markets where they are sold as food.

It is hard to believe that in 2020, the world’s largest and second-wealthiest county, which boasts of high-tech consumer products and gleaming cities, has imprisoned in “re-education camps” more than 1 million Uighur Muslims in the manner that Hitler, Stalin and Mao once relocated “undesirable” populations.

China seems confident that it will soon rule the world, given its huge population, massive trade surpluses, vast cash reserves and industries that produce so many of the world’s electronic devices, pharmaceuticals and consumer goods.

For a year, the Chinese government has battled massive street demonstrations for democracy in Hong Kong. Beijing cynically assumes that Western nations don’t care. They are expected to drop their characteristic human rights advocacy because of how profitable their investments inside China have proven.

Beijing was right. Few Western companies complain that Chinese society is surveilled, regulated and controlled in a nightmarish fashion that George Orwell once predicted in his dystopian novel “1984.”

All of these recent scandals should remind the world that China got rich by warping trade and stealing technology in much the same way that it deals with epidemics and dissidents. That is, by simply ignoring legitimate criticism and crushing anyone in its way.

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If the Chinese communist Borg is willing to put millions of its own citizens at risk of infection and death, why would it care about foreigners’ complaints that China is getting rich and powerful by breaking international trade rules?

The truth about President Trump’s decision to call China to account over its systematic abuse of international trade norms is not that Trump’s policy is reckless or ill-considered. It’s that at this late date, the reckoning might prove too little, too late.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY VICTOR DAVIS HANSON

Westlake Legal Group 854081161001_6133197334001_6133196438001-vs Victor Davis Hanson: China’s government is showing us what '1984' looks like Victor Davis Hanson Tribune Media Services fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fnc/opinion fnc article 8678bc91-9532-5371-a9f2-fd421a259399   Westlake Legal Group 854081161001_6133197334001_6133196438001-vs Victor Davis Hanson: China’s government is showing us what '1984' looks like Victor Davis Hanson Tribune Media Services fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fnc/opinion fnc article 8678bc91-9532-5371-a9f2-fd421a259399

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Disparities In Government Contracting Hurt Minority-Owned Businesses

Westlake Legal Group minoritycontractor-calvin-photo2-4515fc837382f113684b61aaedf6a8b52c91cd53-s1100-c15 Disparities In Government Contracting Hurt Minority-Owned Businesses

Calvin Brandford (center) is a certified minority contractor who has run an excavation business north of Boston for almost 30 years. Brandford said getting state-funded work as a subcontractor is very hard and often comes with a serious drawback: not getting paid for 60 to 90 days. Chris Burrell/WGBH hide caption

toggle caption

Chris Burrell/WGBH

Westlake Legal Group  Disparities In Government Contracting Hurt Minority-Owned Businesses

Calvin Brandford (center) is a certified minority contractor who has run an excavation business north of Boston for almost 30 years. Brandford said getting state-funded work as a subcontractor is very hard and often comes with a serious drawback: not getting paid for 60 to 90 days.

Chris Burrell/WGBH

State and local governments spend billions of dollars hiring contractors for goods and services, but most of those contracts go to white-owned businesses, not minority contractors — despite decades of affirmative action and other policies meant to make up for disparities.

A federal study released by the Minority Business Development Agency in early 2017 found the needle has barely moved on boosting minority business participation in public contracts.

Albert Shen, the former deputy chief of minority business development under President Obama, believes one reason is that government procurement officials just hire who they know.

“The people that manage these large projects are — to be blunt — very homogeneous. They don’t have diverse networks, so they don’t know who to reach out to,” Shen said. “[But] because they don’t know doesn’t mean they don’t exist.”

There are more than 11 million minority owned businesses in the U.S. In places such as Massachusetts, minority entrepreneurs are now getting a smaller slice of the pie when it comes to doing business with local government. Over the last two decades, adjusted for inflation, the value of Massachusetts contracts going to minority-owned businesses has fallen 24%. That’s $135 million less per year paid to minority entrepreneurs.

“The smart thing to do”

In Massachusetts and many other states, public projects are required to hire a certain percentage of minority and women-owned businesses.

But Larry Cole, who runs a trucking company in Springfield, Mass., said there’s very little oversight to make sure that happens. In 2007, a construction company promised him hundreds of hours of work as a minority subcontractor but Cole got only a fraction of the work – despite sometimes showing up onsite with trucks and drivers.

“You’ve got to feed a family. At that time, I had three kids in college, plus the trucks, the insurance, payroll taxes,” said Cole, remembering how he challenged the construction company when they turned him and his dump trucks away. “I said, ‘Wait, I’m supposed to be doing all the trucking here.’ Well, next thing you know, you’re not doing it.”

Westlake Legal Group image003-30e38b567f6d04c75e71aa9498ce6b56343c5dff-s1100-c15 Disparities In Government Contracting Hurt Minority-Owned Businesses

Lionel Henry (right), who works for a minority-owned contracting firm, repairs the roof of an outdoor hockey rink at Philadelphia’s Fishtown Recreation Center in December 2019. The project was part of a Philadelphia effort to expand participation of minority contractors in city-funded construction jobs. Christopher Burrell/WGBH hide caption

toggle caption

Christopher Burrell/WGBH

Westlake Legal Group  Disparities In Government Contracting Hurt Minority-Owned Businesses

Lionel Henry (right), who works for a minority-owned contracting firm, repairs the roof of an outdoor hockey rink at Philadelphia’s Fishtown Recreation Center in December 2019. The project was part of a Philadelphia effort to expand participation of minority contractors in city-funded construction jobs.

Christopher Burrell/WGBH

Cole’s trucking company shrank, he said, partly because of his frustration of getting work in the public sector.

Massachusetts’ leaders began decades ago trying to fix economic disparities facing minority businesspeople such as Cole, passing laws and creating agencies to even the playing field. Last fall, Massachusetts Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito praised efforts to boost minority participation in building two casinos approved by the state.

“The one thing the Mass Gaming Commission did was to be intentional to diversify their workforce — setting these goals, holding everyone accountable, measuring progress,” she said.

James Jennings, an expert on race and politics and an emeritus professor at Tufts University, said the state’s efforts to increase fairness and equity for minority business owners aren’t cutting it.

“The pushing has been going on for 25 to 30 years now,” Jennings said. “I think leadership has to be more aggressive in saying we’re going to do something about this because it’s the right thing to do (and) it’s also economically the smart thing to do.”

Inclusive and equitable

Critics in Massachusetts have pointed to Philadelphia as a model for local government getting more aggressive about hiring minority contractors.

On a raw December afternoon in North Philadelphia, a dozen kids are chasing a soccer ball on a blacktop basketball court on a city-owned playground slated for renovation. It’s part of a $400 million initiative aimed at fixing up recreation centers, parks and libraries in low-income neighborhoods like this one.

The city of Philadelphia also intends to spend a third of that money hiring businesses owned by minorities to do the work.

“These poor communities that are mostly minority in the city of Philadelphia: It makes a lot of sense that if you have people coming in and working and fixing things and designing things, let them look like [local people],” said Cappy Sabir, an engineer and minority business owner whose company is working a new vision for this playground. “You’re giving a level of motivation and pride to the community. ‘See? I can be an architect. I can be an engineer, I can be a contractor.'”

Sabir is a co-owner of SRW Engineering & Architecture, which won five contracts with the city worth almost half a million dollars. City-wide, minority-owned businesses landed 23% of Philadelphia city contracts last year, totaling $166 million.

Iola Harper, who heads up Philadelphia’s office of economic opportunity, said Philadelphia’s mayor — now in his second term — has prioritized contracting with minority businesses.

“You really have to have buy-in from the top,” Harper said. “The boss of the city, not their boss, but their boss’s boss, expects that there’s going to be some inclusion. They know that part of my evaluation or part of what my boss is looking at is my ability to be inclusive and be equitable.”

Underlying this mandate is simple economics, said Harper, especially in a city with a poverty rate at 26% — one of the country’s highest for a big city.

“Businesses that are owned by people of color hire people who look like them,” she said. “That’s people that are going to be employed and that’s going to impact the poverty rate.”

Harper’s office also sets minority hiring goals and enforces compliance. Since 2017, Philadelphia has disbarred three vendors from working with the city that violated minority contracting regulations.

The city has also lowered barriers that have historically favored big contractors by offering assistance to smaller, minority-owned and women-owned firms before they even bid on projects.

Sabir’s company — with just 20 employees — took advantage of the city’s new rules and is now treated as a prime contractor, not just a subcontractor that has to lobby other private businesses for a share of the work.

“Opportunities come out from the city (were) worded in a way, structured in a way that is impossible for either for any minority, or woman-owned business to even have a chance,” Sabir said. “Offering the opportunity for minority firms to be primes? To us, that’s like Obama becoming president. It’s huge.”

The huge change that Sabir has welcomed in Philadelphia, though, is not happening across the country. The federal report at the end of the Obama administration analyzed 100 disparity surveys done by cities and states across the country. The majority of those places found minority-owned businesses face significant disparities.

President Trump’s budget for next year calls for cutting the Minority Business Development Agency budget by 76%.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Amid coronavirus, flu outbreaks, here’s how to disinfect plane seats

Achooew!

Frequent flyers may be especially nervous about getting sick during their travels amid flu seasons and the ongoing coronavirus outbreak.

What’s worse, a recent study from MIT estimates that only about 20 percent of people in airports have clean hands (meaning they were washed with soap and water for a minimum of 15 seconds within the hour). However, researchers also found that if about 60 percent of airport-goers had truly clean hands, it could help slow the spread of global disease by as much as 69 percent.

Though you can’t control your fellow passengers, you can take matters into your own hands by thoroughly disinfecting your airplane seat before your next flight. Here’s how:

CHINESE BARS DELIVERING HAPPY HOUR DRINKS AMID CORONAVIRUS LOCKDOWN

Use antibacterial wipes

Use a pack of antibacterial wipes with alcohol to wipe down everything in your personal area, including the tray table, arm rest, seatbelt handle, air vents and call buttons, Ohio State University infectious disease specialist Debra A. Goff, Pharm.D. told Reader’s Digest. Hitting these “high touch” areas is a surefire way to fight germs, she said.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-866714174 Amid coronavirus, flu outbreaks, here's how to disinfect plane seats Janine Puhak fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/travel fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/respiratory-health/cold-and-flu fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/travel fnc article 85a41428-e2a6-5c43-9a5a-b372855d127d

Though you can’t control your fellow passengers, you can take action into your own hands by thoroughly disinfecting your airplane seat before your next flight. (iStock)

If you’re feeling generous, consider passing out the wipes to your fellow seatmates, Goff suggests — after all, the cleaner the area, the better for all passengers.

“Unlike sharing bacteria and viruses, this is something you want to share,” she said.

Consider a seat cover

Wary of the upholstered seats? Whether you’re flying high in first-class or hunkering down in economy, antibacterial wipes won’t help you here. Instead, avid travelers may want to invest in a reusable seat and tray table cover, SmarterTravel recommends.

Furthermore, a 2018 study of aircraft cleanliness suggested that seats’ headrests may be the germiest surfaces on the plane, with some testing positive for E. coli bacteria. All the more reason to get sit back and relax with your own cover, on your own terms.

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Be careful what you touch

Don’t get too comfortable too quickly: If you’re a fan of spreading out and using the seatback pocket for your belongings or snacks, SmarterTravel suggests keeping your personal items a bit closer. Because seatback pockets are often touched by dozens of passengers, they can harbor “one of the airplane’s highest concentrations of germs,” the site claims.

Westlake Legal Group PlaneSeatsIstock Amid coronavirus, flu outbreaks, here's how to disinfect plane seats Janine Puhak fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/travel fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/respiratory-health/cold-and-flu fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/travel fnc article 85a41428-e2a6-5c43-9a5a-b372855d127d

Frequent flyers may be especially nervous about getting sick during their travels amid the ongoing coronavirus outbreak and flu season.  (iStock)

According to new research from Emory University, the safest place to sit on an airplane, interns of avoiding germs, might just be the window seat.

Respiratory illnesses, like coronavirus, generally spread via a person coming into contact with an infected persons’ saliva or mucus. Droplets from a sneeze or cough can land on surfaces, such as tray tables or arm rests, and potentially infect a nearby passenger sharing the enclosed space.

However, study participants who sat in window seats had less interaction with other passengers — beyond those sitting within two rows of them — thus limiting their chances of interacting with an infected person, the study leads said.

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As the disease is transmissible between humans, check out these other safety tips for keeping yourself and your loved ones as healthy as possible amid the ongoing outbreak.

As of Tuesday, the outbreak of the COVID-19 virus (formerly known as the novel coronavirus) has reportedly infected more than 73,250 people across the globe, while the death toll has risen to at least 1,868.

A February report from the CDC states that the flu has caused at least 26 illnesses and 14,000 deaths between Oct. 1 of last year and Feb. 8.

Fox News’ Michael Bartiromo, Alexandra Deabler and Madeline Farber contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-866714174 Amid coronavirus, flu outbreaks, here's how to disinfect plane seats Janine Puhak fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/travel fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/respiratory-health/cold-and-flu fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/travel fnc article 85a41428-e2a6-5c43-9a5a-b372855d127d   Westlake Legal Group iStock-866714174 Amid coronavirus, flu outbreaks, here's how to disinfect plane seats Janine Puhak fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/travel fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/respiratory-health/cold-and-flu fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/travel fnc article 85a41428-e2a6-5c43-9a5a-b372855d127d

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Amid coronavirus, flu outbreaks, here’s how to disinfect plane seats

Achooew!

Frequent flyers may be especially nervous about getting sick during their travels amid flu seasons and the ongoing coronavirus outbreak.

What’s worse, a recent study from MIT estimates that only about 20 percent of people in airports have clean hands (meaning they were washed with soap and water for a minimum of 15 seconds within the hour). However, researchers also found that if about 60 percent of airport-goers had truly clean hands, it could help slow the spread of global disease by as much as 69 percent.

Though you can’t control your fellow passengers, you can take matters into your own hands by thoroughly disinfecting your airplane seat before your next flight. Here’s how:

CHINESE BARS DELIVERING HAPPY HOUR DRINKS AMID CORONAVIRUS LOCKDOWN

Use antibacterial wipes

Use a pack of antibacterial wipes with alcohol to wipe down everything in your personal area, including the tray table, arm rest, seatbelt handle, air vents and call buttons, Ohio State University infectious disease specialist Debra A. Goff, Pharm.D. told Reader’s Digest. Hitting these “high touch” areas is a surefire way to fight germs, she said.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-866714174 Amid coronavirus, flu outbreaks, here's how to disinfect plane seats Janine Puhak fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/travel fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/respiratory-health/cold-and-flu fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/travel fnc article 85a41428-e2a6-5c43-9a5a-b372855d127d

Though you can’t control your fellow passengers, you can take action into your own hands by thoroughly disinfecting your airplane seat before your next flight. (iStock)

If you’re feeling generous, consider passing out the wipes to your fellow seatmates, Goff suggests — after all, the cleaner the area, the better for all passengers.

“Unlike sharing bacteria and viruses, this is something you want to share,” she said.

Consider a seat cover

Wary of the upholstered seats? Whether you’re flying high in first-class or hunkering down in economy, antibacterial wipes won’t help you here. Instead, avid travelers may want to invest in a reusable seat and tray table cover, SmarterTravel recommends.

Furthermore, a 2018 study of aircraft cleanliness suggested that seats’ headrests may be the germiest surfaces on the plane, with some testing positive for E. coli bacteria. All the more reason to get sit back and relax with your own cover, on your own terms.

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Be careful what you touch

Don’t get too comfortable too quickly: If you’re a fan of spreading out and using the seatback pocket for your belongings or snacks, SmarterTravel suggests keeping your personal items a bit closer. Because seatback pockets are often touched by dozens of passengers, they can harbor “one of the airplane’s highest concentrations of germs,” the site claims.

Westlake Legal Group PlaneSeatsIstock Amid coronavirus, flu outbreaks, here's how to disinfect plane seats Janine Puhak fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/travel fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/respiratory-health/cold-and-flu fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/travel fnc article 85a41428-e2a6-5c43-9a5a-b372855d127d

Frequent flyers may be especially nervous about getting sick during their travels amid the ongoing coronavirus outbreak and flu season.  (iStock)

According to new research from Emory University, the safest place to sit on an airplane, interns of avoiding germs, might just be the window seat.

Respiratory illnesses, like coronavirus, generally spread via a person coming into contact with an infected persons’ saliva or mucus. Droplets from a sneeze or cough can land on surfaces, such as tray tables or arm rests, and potentially infect a nearby passenger sharing the enclosed space.

However, study participants who sat in window seats had less interaction with other passengers — beyond those sitting within two rows of them — thus limiting their chances of interacting with an infected person, the study leads said.

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As the disease is transmissible between humans, check out these other safety tips for keeping yourself and your loved ones as healthy as possible amid the ongoing outbreak.

As of Tuesday, the outbreak of the COVID-19 virus (formerly known as the novel coronavirus) has reportedly infected more than 73,250 people across the globe, while the death toll has risen to at least 1,868.

A February report from the CDC states that the flu has caused at least 26 illnesses and 14,000 deaths between Oct. 1 of last year and Feb. 8.

Fox News’ Michael Bartiromo, Alexandra Deabler and Madeline Farber contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-866714174 Amid coronavirus, flu outbreaks, here's how to disinfect plane seats Janine Puhak fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/travel fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/respiratory-health/cold-and-flu fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/travel fnc article 85a41428-e2a6-5c43-9a5a-b372855d127d   Westlake Legal Group iStock-866714174 Amid coronavirus, flu outbreaks, here's how to disinfect plane seats Janine Puhak fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/travel fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/respiratory-health/cold-and-flu fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/travel fnc article 85a41428-e2a6-5c43-9a5a-b372855d127d

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Bloomberg pounded at debate debut; Bolton speaks out on Trump impeachment trial

Good morning and welcome to Fox News First. Here’s what you need to know as you start your day …

Bloomberg pummeled in debate debut – with Warren leading the onslaught
The Democrats’ showdown Wednesday night in Las Vegas repeatedly put former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg in his primary rivals’ crosshairs as the surging billionaire made his debate-stage debut. But the event quickly expanded into an all-out melee and was easily the most aggressive debate of the nomination season to date, as each of the 2020 presidential candidates took sharp and often personal shots at one another.

The fight started out white-hot when, in her first turn at the microphone, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., asserted she would support whoever wins the nomination, but warned that Democrats “take a huge risk if we just substitute one arrogant billionaire for another.”

She said the field is running against somebody “who calls women fat broads and horse-faced lesbians — and no, I’m not talking about Donald Trump, I’m talking about Mayor Bloomberg.”

In another explosive moment, attendees erupted in the hall when Warren called on Bloomberg to release women from nondisclosure agreements they have signed concerning their civil complaints that he harassed them in the workplace. After a disappointing fourth-place finish in New Hampshire, Warren was particularly combative as she tangled with multiple rivals in a bid to distinguish herself once more ahead of Saturday’s Nevada caucuses. Click here for more on our top story.

Democracy 2020: Other developments Wednesday’s debate:
– Mary Anne Marsh: In fierce Democratic presidential debate, one winner and five losers
Bloomberg tears into Bernie Sanders: ‘We’re not going to throw out capitalism’
Sanders challenges NBC moderator over question about unfavorable poll on socialism
Klobuchar hits back at ‘perfect’ Pete Buttigieg as feud flares
Trump slams Bloomberg at Phoenix rally, pushing MAGA message during Dem debate

Westlake Legal Group AP20051068087958 Bloomberg pounded at debate debut; Bolton speaks out on Trump impeachment trial fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 67784e09-85b8-5676-a43f-462cf7252ed6

Former national security advisers Susan Rice, left, and John Bolton take part in a discussion on global leadership at Vanderbilt University, Wednesday in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Bolton: ‘I sleep at night’ following Trump impeachment drama
Former national security advisers John Bolton and Susan Rice engaged in a sometimes-tense debate over Russia and President Trump’s impeachment trial in front of a crowd of 1,500 people Wednesday in Nashville, Tenn.

The pair came together for a lecture series titled “Defining U.S. Global Leadership” at Vanderbilt University two weeks after the Senate acquitted Trump without subpoenaing Bolton to testify. He said he didn’t expect the Senate to vote against having him testify.

Rice, citing security clearance procedures for her own book, said she couldn’t imagine “withholding my testimony, with or without a subpoena” or going public with information if she thought it was of national importance. But Bolton insisted his testimony would not have mattered.

“People can argue about what I should have said and what I should have done,” he said. “I would bet you a dollar right here and now, my testimony would have made no difference to the ultimate outcome.”

He added, “I sleep at night because I have followed my conscience.” Click here for more.

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A passenger talks on a mobile phone on the quarantined Diamond Princess cruise ship anchored at a port in Yokohama, near Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 20, 2020. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

Coronavirus claims lives of two Diamond Princess passengers from Japan, health officials say
Two passengers from the quarantined Diamond Princess cruise ship docked off Yokohama, Japan, have died of coronavirus, Japan’s health ministry said Thursday.

The Japanese man and woman, both in their 80s, reportedly had existing chronic diseases. They were the first among the ship’s passengers to die from the disease, officials said. Both passengers were removed from the ship last week and hospitalized.

Japan now has three coronavirus-related deaths. The 621 confirmed coronavirus cases among the cruise ship’s 3,711 passengers represent the largest outbreak outside China. The Diamond Princess has been under a two-week quarantine since Feb. 5. Click here for more.

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TODAY’S MUST-READS
Mainstream media erupts after Trump picks ‘Twitter troll’ Richard Grenell to be acting DNI.
Holder pushes for Supreme Court term limits, says ’18 years is enough.’
San Francisco sheriff, mayor say they won’t help federal agents deport illegal immigrants.
Skull Breaker Challenge‘ going viral on TikTok is dangerous, doctors warn.

THE LATEST FROM FOX BUSINESS
New IRS policy could see government agents knocking on your door.
Some Americans have more credit card debt than emergency savings.
What is financial infidelity in a marriage?

#TheFlashback: CLICK HERE to find out what happened on “This Day in History.”
 
SOME PARTING WORDS

Sean Hannity rips Michael Bloomberg’s “aloof, smug” comments about farmers made in a newly surfaced video.

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Fox News First is compiled by Fox News’ Bryan Robinson. Thank you for making us your first choice in the morning! Enjoy your day! We’ll see you in your inbox first thing Friday morning.

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Rock Icon Neil Young Hits Trump Where It Hurts In Searing Attack Message

Westlake Legal Group 5ab60c8e1f0000280616b56b Rock Icon Neil Young Hits Trump Where It Hurts In Searing Attack Message

Rock icon Neil Young slammed President Donald Trump, threw his support behind Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and warned Republicans they were being lied to. 

Young, a newly minted U.S. citizen, described Trump as “a disgrace to my country” in an open letter posted on his website. He called out Trump for his “unforgivable” attacks on the environment and U.S. allies, then unfavorably compared him to former President Barack Obama ― not just as a leader, but as a person. 

“Our first black president was a better man than you are,” Young wrote.

That’s a famous sore spot for Trump, who is obsessive about his predecessor. Prior to the 2016 election, Trump was a leader of the racist “birther” movement that falsely claimed Obama was not a natural-born citizen. Since becoming president, Trump has continued to attack Obama and attempted to compare his presidency to the Obama administration. But Young said any success Trump could claim about the economy was “what you inherited almost 4 years ago.”

The rocker also reached out to Trump voters. 

“I support their right to express themselves, although they have been lied to, and in many cases believed the lies,” Young wrote. “They are true Americans. I have their back.”

Young didn’t mention Sanders explicitly, but detailed the presidential candidate’s positions and said, “His initials are BS. Not his policies.” 

And in a final dig at the president, Young added: “We are going to vote you out and Make America Great Again.”

The two-time Rock & Roll Hall of Famer ― as both a solo artist and a member of Buffalo Springfield ― ended his essay with a link to his 2017 song, “Children Of Destiny,” which includes the chorus: 

Stand up for what you believe
Resist the ‘powers that be’
Preserve the ways of democracy
So the children can be free
The children of destiny

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Jägermeister logo does not offend Christians, court rules

The logo for the popular alcoholic drink Jägermeister was found to not be religiously offensive, a Swiss court said Monday.

Judges in Switzerland rejected a case by the country’s Federal Institute of Intellectual Property that demanded the logo be restricted because they said the image was offensive to the religious beliefs of some citizens.

The institute said the logo — a stag with a cross between its antlers — could offend the country’s Christians due to the religious symbol on each bottle. They had blocked attempts by the German brand to expand its trademark beyond alcohol and clothing.

KIM KARDASHIAN AND KAYE WEST’S KFC RUN IN PARIS DRAWS HUMOR: ‘WAS POPEYES CLOSED OR TOO FAR?’

Westlake Legal Group jagermeister Jägermeister logo does not offend Christians, court rules fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/religion/christianity fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc David Aaro article 6dd8291b-9485-518e-84c5-c23dc75c5c19

An institute in Switzerland said the logo — a stag with a cross over its head — could offend the country’s Christians due to the religious symbol on each bottle. They had blocked attempts by the German brand to expand its trademark. (Jagermeister)

Judges said while the story behind the logo comes from an old Christian tale, the modern consumer associates it with the alcohol.

They ruled the “intensive” use of the image by Jägermeister had “weakened its religious character” over time and no one was likely to be offended, according to Swissinfo.

The logo’s origin stems from the eighth-century legend of St. Hubertus.

STARBUCKS WORKER EXPOSES DRIVE-THRU SECRET BY SURPRISING CUSTOMERS BY SINGING

Before becoming the “Apostle of the Ardennes,” St. Hubertus was a devoted hunter who was chasing a stag on Good Friday morning when he received a vision of a glowing crucifix between the animal’s antlers.

Legend says a heavenly voice spoke to him about living a more holy life and he converted to Christianity after that revelation.

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Considering it’s now the 21st century, Jägermeister is free to use the logo for all promotional activities and products in Switzerland — including cosmetics, mobile phones, or telecommunications services.

Westlake Legal Group jagermeister Jägermeister logo does not offend Christians, court rules fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/religion/christianity fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc David Aaro article 6dd8291b-9485-518e-84c5-c23dc75c5c19   Westlake Legal Group jagermeister Jägermeister logo does not offend Christians, court rules fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/religion/christianity fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc David Aaro article 6dd8291b-9485-518e-84c5-c23dc75c5c19

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Andy Puzder: Debating Dems ignore strong Trump economy – have no plans to boost wages, job growth

Westlake Legal Group MAGA-club Andy Puzder: Debating Dems ignore strong Trump economy – have no plans to boost wages, job growth fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article Andy Puzder 64042cf5-f69c-5567-948f-38e7e53c027d

The presidential candidate debate Wednesday night showed that Democrats simply have no idea how to defeat President Trump in the November election – and their frustration was on full display.

Not one of the six Democrats on stage in Las Vegas even claimed to have a plan to increase economic growth, create jobs and grow wages – areas in which President Trump has had great success and benefitted the American people.

Democratic socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont; former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg; former Vice President Joe Biden; Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts; former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg; and Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota all focused on taxing Americans who have been successful and redistributing that wealth through massive government-controlled welfare programs.

MARY ANNE MARSH: IN FIERCE DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE, 1 WINNER AND 5 LOSERS

What separates the candidates is the degree to which they want taxes and government to grow, and how many job-killing restrictions they want to put on the private sector.

But even the so-called “moderate” candidates are advocating programs so massive that their most aggressive tax plans would be wholly insufficient to fund them.

The candidates might as well have told potential voters that they intend to tax employers to the point where they are unable to invest in their businesses, create jobs or raise workers’ wages. That’s hardly an effective campaign slogan.

If you listened closely, you also heard what I believe will cost the Democrats the election: their refusal to acknowledge the obvious fact that the U.S. economy – and working-class Americans in particular – are doing quite well. Rather, the candidates fell all over themselves trying to outdo each other on claims that Americans are suffering.

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Yet, more people are working than at any time in our nation’s history, the unemployment rate is near a 50-year low, and wages are rising for all workers at rates not seen in a decade – higher for low earners than for high earners. Income inequality is declining and we still have 1 million more job openings than people unemployed. If you have a job or want one, life is good.

Contrary to what the Democrats on the debate stage at least claim to believe, the economic future of our country looks very bright and Americans know it – even if the Democrats running for president don’t.

According to Fidelity Investments’ 2020 New Year Financial Resolutions Study, 78 percent of Americans believe they will be better off in 2020 than they were in 2019.

A December CNN poll conducted by SSRS found that 68 percent of Americans expect our economy to be in good shape a year from now – the best showing in CNN’s polling since December 2003.

In a December poll from Quinnipiac University, 79 percent of Americans said “they are optimistic about their own financial future.”

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Finally, a Gallup poll released earlier this month found that “74% of Americans say they will be better off financially in a year.”

Those are really tremendous numbers. And how Americans feel about the economy is a huge indicator of how they will vote in the presidential election.

A December Gallup found that 84 percent of Americans believe the economy is an “extremely” or “very” important issue in the upcoming election. That’s a huge number and was higher than for any other issue. You would think a presidential debate would spend some significant time discussing it.

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The poll found the least important issues were wealth distribution, climate change and LGBT rights. You sure wouldn’t know that if you listened to the Democratic debate.

It’s hard to win an election when you’re unable to figure out how to address the issue that’s most important to voters. That’s where the Democrats find themselves and that’s why they will lose in November.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY ANDY PUZDER

Westlake Legal Group MAGA-club Andy Puzder: Debating Dems ignore strong Trump economy – have no plans to boost wages, job growth fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article Andy Puzder 64042cf5-f69c-5567-948f-38e7e53c027d   Westlake Legal Group MAGA-club Andy Puzder: Debating Dems ignore strong Trump economy – have no plans to boost wages, job growth fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article Andy Puzder 64042cf5-f69c-5567-948f-38e7e53c027d

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