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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 77)

California library fire that killed 1 firefighter, left 1 missing leads to arrest of 2 teens on arson, manslaughter charges

Two 13-year-olds were arrested Wednesday, accused of starting a fire in a California public library that resulted in the death of one firefighter and left another missing.

Dozens of firefighters from the Porterville Fire Department, Cal Fire and Fresno County Fire responded to the blaze that broke out in the Porterville Public Library in California’s Central Valley just after 4 p.m. Tuesday and burned for hours.

The police department began getting reports after the fire started that the two suspects were seen running away from the library. They were located and arson investigators determined they started the fire, FOX 26 of Fresno reported.

CALIFORNIA FIREFIGHTER KILLED, ANOTHER MISSING BATTLING LIBRARY FIRE

Westlake Legal Group firefighters California library fire that killed 1 firefighter, left 1 missing leads to arrest of 2 teens on arson, manslaughter charges fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 6c7e35a0-34de-5f3c-9012-5b0a35c45ffa

Porterville Fire Capt. Raymond Figueroa, left, was killed and Porterville Firefighter Patrick Jones remained missing Wednesday. (Porterville Fire Department) ( Porterville Fire Department)

Porterville Fire Capt. Raymond Figueroa, 35, was killed and Porterville Firefighter Patrick Jones, 25, hasn’t been found yet, City of Porterville Fire Chief Dave LaPere confirmed, according to FOX 26.

Both Figueroa and Jones joined the department in 2007.

The suspects were charged with arson, manslaughter, and conspiracy and booked into the Porterville Juvenile Justice Center. They have not been identified.

The library was built in 1953 and doesn’t have a sprinkler system. Its roof collapsed and the walls are unstable, FOX 26 reported.

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“It’s heart-wrenching,” Tameran Anzivino, who works at the library, told Fresno’s KSEE-TV. “It’s sad, this is the beloved Porterville city library. It’s the hub of the city and its heartbreaking to see it go down like this.”

Westlake Legal Group firefighters California library fire that killed 1 firefighter, left 1 missing leads to arrest of 2 teens on arson, manslaughter charges fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 6c7e35a0-34de-5f3c-9012-5b0a35c45ffa   Westlake Legal Group firefighters California library fire that killed 1 firefighter, left 1 missing leads to arrest of 2 teens on arson, manslaughter charges fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 6c7e35a0-34de-5f3c-9012-5b0a35c45ffa

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Wexner Is Expected to Step Down as Victoria’s Secret Goes Private

Westlake Legal Group 00wexner1-facebookJumbo Wexner Is Expected to Step Down as Victoria’s Secret Goes Private Wexner, Leslie H Victoria's Secret Lingerie and Underwear L Brands Inc. Epstein, Jeffrey E (1953- ) Appointments and Executive Changes

Leslie H. Wexner is expected to step down as the chief executive of L Brands, the retail empire he built with his purchase of Victoria’s Secret in 1982, and the lingerie brand plans to go private in a sale to Sycamore Partners that could be announced as early as Thursday, according to three people with knowledge of the deal.

Mr. Wexner turned Victoria’s Secret into the world’s most recognizable lingerie brand before facing serious questions about his leadership and the company’s internal culture and his relationship with the disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein.

The publicity-shy executive has come under intense scrutiny in the past year for his deep ties to Mr. Epstein and the flailing performance of Victoria’s Secret. L Brands, formerly known as Limited Brands, owns Victoria’s Secret and Bath & Body Works.

News of the expected sale was first reported by The Wall Street Journal.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

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Warren Interrogates Bloomberg On Sexism At His Company

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) called on former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg to release women who worked at his company from nondisclosure agreements they signed after making sexual harassment and sex discrimination allegations. The challenge, issued at Wednesday night’s Democratic presidential primary debate in Las Vegas, came as Warren hammered Bloomberg over the scores of allegations that have been made over the years. 

“The mayor has to stand on his record, and what we need to know is exactly what is lurking out there,” Warren said. “Mr. Mayor, are you willing to release all those women from these nondisclosure agreements so we can hear their side of the story?”

Warren described Bloomberg as having “muzzled” women who signed nondisclosure agreements while working at his company. Bloomberg and Bloomberg LP have faced almost 40 lawsuits from 64 women in recent decades. In several heated exchanges, Bloomberg described his hiring practices as progressive on gender equality, but Warren was not satisfied.

“I hope you heard what his defense was: ‘I’ve been nice to some women.’ That just doesn’t cut it,” Warren said.

Warren continued pressing Bloomberg as he attempted to minimize the allegations against him and his company. When Bloomberg said there were “very few” nondisclosure agreements, Warren interjected, asking, “How many is that?”

Westlake Legal Group 5e4e0374230000cf0339b6ca Warren Interrogates Bloomberg On Sexism At His Company

Mario Tama via Getty Images Democratic presidential candidates Mike Bloomberg and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) sparred over nondisclosure agreements at the Democratic presidential primary debate Wednesday in Las Vegas.

Bloomberg struggled to respond to Warren’s jabs, and his defense that “none of them accused me of doing anything other than maybe they didn’t like a joke I told” drew groans from the audience. Bloomberg also attempted to frame the NDAs as mutual agreements that neither party would want disclosed, prompting Warren to challenge Bloomberg to release any signatory who did want to speak about her case.

“If they wish to speak out and tell their side of their story, that’s OK with you? You’re releasing them on television tonight?” Warren said.

“This is not just a question of the mayor’s character. This is also a question about electability,” Warren added. “We are not going to beat Donald Trump with a man who has who-knows-how-many nondisclosure agreements and a drip, drip, drip of stories of women saying they have been harassed.” 

Bloomberg ultimately declined to say he would release women from their NDAs, falling back on his explanation that the agreements “were made consensually.” Former Vice President Joe Biden added to the criticism of Bloomberg’s NDAs, telling the former mayor to “say yes” to allowing the women to speak. 

Bloomberg’s use of NDAs and refusal to release women from these confidentiality agreements has been a campaign issue for weeks, as the former mayor has denied any wrongdoing and tried to dodge Warren’s criticism. On the debate stage Wednesday, however, Warren was placed next to Bloomberg and repeatedly went on the offensive.

Warren ripped into Bloomberg at the outset, describing him as “a billionaire who calls women fat broads and horse-faced lesbians,” while multiple candidates condemned the racially discriminatory police policy of stop-and-frisk, which he expanded as mayor. 

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Klobuchar hits back at ‘perfect’ Pete Buttigieg as feud flares at Vegas debate

Westlake Legal Group Buttigieg-Klobuchar-AP Klobuchar hits back at 'perfect' Pete Buttigieg as feud flares at Vegas debate fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 1d1306f7-2df9-563f-a458-5f417c951e0b

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., hit back at former South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg Wednesday after he challenged her record in Congress, mockingly saying she wished “everyone was as perfect” as the rising Democratic star.

“I wish everyone was as perfect as you, Pete,” Klobuchar said after the two engaged in lengthy war of words over her stance on immigration and her time in Congress.

The exchange capped off a night that saw the two moderate candidates continually snipping at one another in the lead-up to Saturday’s Nevada caucuses.

AMY KLOBUCHAR ACCUSED OF ‘PANDERING’ AFTER MENTIONING HER SPANISH NAME FROM GRADE SCHOOL

Earlier in the evening, Klobuchar decried that Buttigieg implied she is “dumb” for not knowing the president of Mexico’s name.

In an interview with Telemundo last week, three of the Democratic contenders — Klobuchar, Buttigieg and billionaire Tom Steyer — were asked to name the president of Mexico — and none but Buttigieg was able to correctly name President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, who is often referred to as AMLO.

Buttigieg brought up the incident on the debate stage in Las Vegas just days ahead of the state’s caucuses that will see droves of crucial Latino voters at the polls and drew the ire of Klobuchar.

“You’re on the committee that oversees border security. You’re on the committee that does trade. You’re literally part of the committee that’s overseeing these things,” Buttigieg said, pointing to his rival’s placement on a number of Senate committees.

“Are you trying to say that I’m dumb? Are you mocking me here, Pete?” Klobuchar said to Buttigieg, clearly irked.

“He’s basically saying that I don’t have the experience to be president of the United States,” she added.

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The tensions between Buttigieg and Klobuchar, however, appeared to be more of a sideshow to the attacks that every Democratic candidate leveled against the newest member to the debate stage, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

Bloomberg drew particular criticism from Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Bernie Sanders of Vermont for his comments about women, the stop-and-frisk policy in New York City and his personal wealth.

Fox News’ Vandana Rambaran contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Buttigieg-Klobuchar-AP Klobuchar hits back at 'perfect' Pete Buttigieg as feud flares at Vegas debate fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 1d1306f7-2df9-563f-a458-5f417c951e0b   Westlake Legal Group Buttigieg-Klobuchar-AP Klobuchar hits back at 'perfect' Pete Buttigieg as feud flares at Vegas debate fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 1d1306f7-2df9-563f-a458-5f417c951e0b

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Mike Bloomberg Gets A Rude Awakening In Las Vegas Debate

LAS VEGAS ― Former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg emerged from behind the protective shield of a $300 million-plus advertising blitz on Wednesday night, stepping into the limelight of a nationally televised debate alongside five rivals spoiling for a fight.

The result wasn’t pretty. The media and financial services mogul got pummeled in the presidential debate over his record of allegedly sexist comments and behavior, his racist policing practices, his failure to release his tax returns, his support for Republicans, and his efforts to buy his way into the Democratic primary.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) led the charge, delivering a haymaker in her opening remarks.

“I’d like to talk about who we’re running against, a billionaire who calls women fat broads and horse-faced lesbians. And no, I’m not talking about Donald Trump. I’m talking about Mayor Bloomberg,” Warren said, prompting audible gasps from the audience at the Paris Theater.

Bloomberg’s alleged treatment of women went on to become the richest source of material for his adversaries.

Moderator Hallie Jackson initiated the biggest fireworks of the night when she asked Bloomberg to explain his comments defending allegations from former female employees who say he created a hostile work environment. Bloomberg, she noted, reportedly defended some of his sexist comments by saying, “That’s the way I grew up,” and allegedly told one former female employee, “I would do you in a second.”

Bloomberg was visibly flustered, asking for his full minute and a quarter to respond. But he did not address the specific claims, instead falling back on figures demonstrating the success of women in his corporate empire. 

“I am very proud of the fact that about two weeks ago, we were voted the best place to work ― the second-best place in America,” he said. “If that doesn’t say something about our employees and how happy they are, I don’t know what does.”

Jackson turned to Warren, noting that the senator had been especially critical of Bloomberg.

“I hope you heard what his defense was: ‘I’ve been nice to some women,’” she said, prompting loud applause and cheers from the crowd.

Westlake Legal Group 5e4e06692600000405b5ee33 Mike Bloomberg Gets A Rude Awakening In Las Vegas Debate

Mario Tama/Getty Images Former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg was on the defensive for much of the Democratic presidential debate in Las Vegas on Wednesday night.

Warren went on to ask Bloomberg whether he would commit to releasing former female employees from the nondisclosure agreements he had required them to sign. 

Bloomberg did not, but struggled to give a reason. “That’s up to them,” he said. (It’s not.)

“We are not going to beat Donald Trump with a man who has who knows how many nondisclosure agreements and the drip, drip, drip of stories of women saying they have been harassed and discriminated against,” Warren said.

Former Vice President Joe Biden joined Warren in calling on Bloomberg to release the women from their NDAs.

“Let’s get something straight here,” Biden said. “It’s easy: All the mayor has to do is say, ‘You are released from the nondisclosure agreements.’”

When it came to Bloomberg’s tax returns, which the candidate has yet to release, his explanations were similarly sheepish. “It just takes us a long time,” he said, eliciting gasps from the audience. “I can’t go to TurboTax.” 

Bloomberg promised to release the tax returns as soon as were are ready, saying they would be made public in the coming weeks.

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) made sure to remind the audience that Bloomberg supported then-President George W. Bush’s reelection, as well as Republican control of the Senate, in 2004.

Later, when Sanders asked to explain why he opposes the mere existence of billionaires, the senator pointed to Bloomberg. The former mayor is reported to be worth an estimated $60 billion.

“Mike Bloomberg owns more wealth than the bottom 125 million Americans,” Sanders said. “That’s wrong. That’s immoral.”

Bloomberg, who opposes the wealth tax that Sanders and Warren hope to levy but insists he does want to see the rich contribute more, defended his earnings.

“Yes,” he replied enthusiastically when asked whether he deserved his wealth. “I worked very hard for it. And I’m giving it away.”

For former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Bloomberg occupied a place previously reserved for Biden: He was the foil for Buttigieg’s image as the happy medium between the party’s left and right ideological poles. 

Buttigieg pleaded with the public not to winnow down the field to two candidates whom he said were uniquely polarizing and not rooted in the Democratic Party. Sanders remains an independent who caucuses with Democrats, and Bloomberg was a Republican before becoming an independent and then a Democrat in 2018.

“We shouldn’t have to choose between one candidate who wants to burn this party down and another one who wants to buy this party out,” Buttigieg said.

The debate, which was by far the most contentious meeting of the primary, contained its fair share of other skirmishes. Buttigieg and Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar exchanged blows over their respective qualifications for higher office, as well as some of Klobuchar’s controversial votes. And, of course, the field of candidates slugged it out over “Medicare for All” for the umpteenth time, with the moderates pointing to Warren’s and Sanders’ support for single-payer health care as bad policy and politics.

But the overwhelming theme of the night was who would be most electable against Trump. And whatever their differences, with their relentless attacks on Bloomberg and his less-than-stellar responses, Bloomberg’s rivals united to make the case that it was not him.

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Elizabeth Warren Opens Debate by Blasting Bloomberg Over Sexist Comments

Westlake Legal Group 19breakout-warren1-facebookJumbo Elizabeth Warren Opens Debate by Blasting Bloomberg Over Sexist Comments Warren, Elizabeth Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Democratic Party Debates (Political) Bloomberg, Michael R

Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts took the stage Wednesday night with one task: reassert herself in a race where attention has slipped away from her. And she did not wait to be called on.

From the very first minutes of the debate, when she leapt into an exchange about general-election appeal and went forcefully after Michael R. Bloomberg’s record of sexist comments, Ms. Warren made one thing clear: She would not be ignored.

“I think Warren got the message that she’s got to demand her time,” tweeted Melissa R. Michelson, a political scientist at Menlo College.

After Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont answered the opening question — about what it would take to beat President Trump, and why he believed he was better equipped than Mr. Bloomberg to do it — and Mr. Bloomberg responded, Ms. Warren raised her hand and interjected.

“I’d like to talk about who we’re running against: a billionaire who calls women fat broads and horse-faced lesbians,” she said. “And no, I’m not talking about Donald Trump. I’m talking about Mayor Bloomberg.”

The tone thus firmly set, Ms. Warren continued: “Democrats are not going to win if we have a nominee who has a history of hiding his tax returns, of harassing women, and of supporting racist policies like redlining and stop-and-frisk. Look, I’ll support whoever the Democratic nominee is. But understand this: Democrats take a huge risk if we just substitute one arrogant billionaire for another.”

She went on to criticize the health care plans released by former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind. (“It’s not a plan; it’s a PowerPoint”), Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota (“It’s like a Post-it note: ‘Insert plan here’”), and Mr. Sanders (“a good start, but instead of expanding and bringing in more people to help, instead his campaign relentlessly attacks everyone who asks a question or tries to fill in details about how to actually make this work”).

And then — the debate still less than half over — Ms. Warren had an exchange with Mr. Bloomberg that seemed likely to be one of the most memorable moments of the night. The subject? The nondisclosure agreements Mr. Bloomberg had some women sign to settle accusations that he had sexually harassed them or discriminated based on gender, and Mr. Bloomberg’s defense that he had hired many women.

“I hope you heard what his defense was: ‘I’ve been nice to some women,’” Ms. Warren said, as Mr. Bloomberg rolled his eyes. “That just doesn’t cut it.”

The exchange continued:

WARREN: The mayor has to stand on his record. What we need to know is exactly what’s lurking out there. He has gotten some number of women — dozens, who knows — to sign nondisclosure agreements both for sexual harassment and for gender discrimination in the workplace. So, Mr. Mayor, are you willing to release all of those women from those nondisclosure agreements so we can hear their side of the story?

BLOOMBERG: We have very few nondisclosure agreements.

WARREN: How many is that?

BLOOMBERG: Let me finish.

WARREN: How many is that?

BLOOMBERG: None of them accuse me of doing anything other than maybe they didn’t like a joke I told. These are agreements between two parties that wanted to keep it quiet, and that’s up to them. They signed those agreements and we’ll live with it.

WARREN: So wait, when you say it is up to them, I just want to be clear, some is how many? And when you say they signed them and they wanted them, if they wish now to speak out and tell their side of the story about what it is they allege, that’s now OK with you? You’re releasing them on television tonight? Is that right?

BLOOMBERG: Senator, no. Senator, the company and somebody else in this case — the man or woman, or could be more than — they decided when they made an agreement, they wanted to keep it quiet for everybody’s interests. They signed the agreements, and that’s what we’re going to live with.

WARREN: I’m sorry. No, the question is: Are the women bound by being muzzled by you? And you could release them from that immediately. Because understand, this is not just a question of the mayor’s character. This is also a question about electability. We are not going to beat Donald Trump with a man who has who knows how many nondisclosure agreements and the drip, drip, drip of stories of women saying they have been harassed and discriminated against. That’s not what we do as Democrats.

After finishing third in Iowa and fourth in New Hampshire, Ms. Warren is fighting to regain momentum.

Despite finishing ahead of former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. in both the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary, and polling higher nationally than Mr. Buttigieg, she has received less news coverage in the past week than either of them. And an NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll released Tuesday included hypothetical general-election matchups between Mr. Trump and five Democratic candidates, but not Ms. Warren.

In the days leading up to the debate, she went on the attack against Mr. Bloomberg, saying he had essentially bought his spot onstage and suggesting bitingly that his presence would give the other candidates — herself included — an opportunity to demonstrate how they would take on Mr. Trump in a general election.

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Bloomberg tears into Sanders on stage: ‘We’re not going to throw out capitalism’

Westlake Legal Group 7e4e28c6-Debate-Stage Bloomberg tears into Sanders on stage: ‘We’re not going to throw out capitalism’ Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc article 81756d19-3407-5e06-9707-78840e469a0f

LAS VEGAS — The flare-ups between former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg and Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont extended late into Wednesday night’s Democratic presidential debate in Nevada – as the multi-billionaire and the populist senator battled over income inequality.

Sanders – calling for redistribution of wealth – emphasized that he would “deal with this grotesque level of income and wealth inequality.” And he said he wanted to allow “workers to sit on corporate boards as well so they can have some say over what happens to their lives.”

FIRING SQUAD: PLENTY OF INCOMING FIRE AS DEMOCRATS RUMBLE AT NEVADA DEBATE

Taking direct aim at Bloomberg, Sanders highlighted “you know Mr. Bloomberg it wasn’t you who made all that money. Maybe your workers played some role in that as well. It is important that those workers are able to share the benefits also.”

Asked by the debate moderators if he agreed with Sanders, Bloomberg shot back “absolutely not. I can’t think of a way that would make it easier for Donald Trump to get re-elected than listening to this conversation. It’s ridiculous. We’re not going to throw out capitalism.

“We tried that. Other countries tried that. It was called communism and it just didn’t work,” Bloomberg stressed.

Minutes later, Sanders emphasized that “I believe in Democratic socialism for working people, not billionaires.”

Bloomberg – taking aim at his Democratic nomination rival – quickly noted “what a wonderful country we have. The best known socialist in the country happens to be a millionaire with three houses. What did I miss here.”

Sanders responded, saying “What you missed is that I work in Washington, house one.”

“That’s the first problem,” Bloomberg interjected.

Sanders continued, saying “[I] live in Burlington, house two. And like thousands of other Vermonters I do have a summer cabin. Forgive me for that.”

Sanders has skyrocketed in the polls this month, after essentially tying former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg in the Iowa caucuses and winning last week’s New Hampshire primary.

Bloomberg – thanks in part to spending some $400 million to run ads on TV, Facebook and Google since launching his candidacy nearly three months ago – has seen his poll numbers surge in recent weeks as former Vice President Joe Biden’s poll numbers have slipped after disappointing fourth- and fifth-place finishes in Iowa and New Hampshire.

Westlake Legal Group 7e4e28c6-Debate-Stage Bloomberg tears into Sanders on stage: ‘We’re not going to throw out capitalism’ Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc article 81756d19-3407-5e06-9707-78840e469a0f   Westlake Legal Group 7e4e28c6-Debate-Stage Bloomberg tears into Sanders on stage: ‘We’re not going to throw out capitalism’ Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc article 81756d19-3407-5e06-9707-78840e469a0f

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Ex-boyfriend of Amie Harwick, Drew Carey’s ex-fiancee, arrested again in connection with her death

A Los Angeles man suspected of killing his ex-girlfriend, Dr. Amie Harwick — a prominent family therapist and former fiancee of comedian Drew Carey — was charged Wednesday with her murder.

Harwick died over the weekend after the suspect, Gareth Pursehouse, allegedly threw her over the third-floor balcony of her Hollywood Hills apartment, the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office said. Harwick was 38.

DREW CAREY’S EX-FIANCEE AMIE HARWICK’S CAUSE OF DEATH REVEALED

Pursehouse faces charges including murder and first-degree residential burglary with the special circumstance allegation of lying in wait, making him eligible for the death penalty, prosecutors said.

It wasn’t immediately known if Pursehouse, 41, has an attorney. He’s scheduled to be arraigned Thursday.

Westlake Legal Group Carey-Harwick Ex-boyfriend of Amie Harwick, Drew Carey's ex-fiancee, arrested again in connection with her death Nate Day fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc e1c551ba-3d6e-57a9-b46a-bdcbae464785 article

​​​​​​​Drew Carey and Amie Harwick are seen in Hollywood, Calif., Dec. 17, 2017. (Michael Bezjian/WireImage)

Police responding early Saturday to reports of a woman screaming discovered Harwick, 38, on the ground below the balcony, prosecutors said. She died at a hospital.

Police said that Harwick’s roommate said that Harwick was being “assaulted inside of her residence.”

Officers found evidence of a struggle and a forced entry to the home, police said.

WENDY WILLIAMS APPEARS TO MOCK DEATH OF DREW CAREY’S EX-FIANCEE WITH ‘PRICE IS RIGHT’ JOKE

Harwick died of blunt force injuries to her head and torso, according to the Medical Examiner’s Office.

Detectives learned Harwick had recently expressed fear about an ex-boyfriend and had previously filed a restraining order against him, according to a police statement.

The restraining order had expired, police said.

Harwick’s website described her as a marriage and sex therapist. She appeared on TV and radio and wrote a book called “The New Sex Bible for Women.”

AMIE HARWICK’S BROTHER DEMANDS PUBLIC APOLOGY FROM WENDY WILLIAMS AFTER HOST MAKES LIGHT OF HER DEATH

Harwick was engaged in 2018 to Carey, the “Price is Right” host and former sitcom star.

“I hope you’re lucky enough to have someone in your life that loves as much as she did,” Carey said on Twitter along with a short video of the two of them.

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CBS canceled tapings of the game show for the week, possibly longer, while he mourns.

Carey shared a link to an online petition created by a friend of Harwick’s calling for an update to domestic violence laws.

Pursehouse was initially arrested Saturday and posted $2 million bond. He was re-arrested Wednesday on a no bail warrant.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Carey-Harwick Ex-boyfriend of Amie Harwick, Drew Carey's ex-fiancee, arrested again in connection with her death Nate Day fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc e1c551ba-3d6e-57a9-b46a-bdcbae464785 article   Westlake Legal Group Carey-Harwick Ex-boyfriend of Amie Harwick, Drew Carey's ex-fiancee, arrested again in connection with her death Nate Day fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc e1c551ba-3d6e-57a9-b46a-bdcbae464785 article

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The 11 Criminals Granted Clemency by Trump Had One Thing in Common: Connections

Westlake Legal Group merlin_169111542_af3b58f0-a87a-4194-b641-8c3436aaf4ce-facebookJumbo The 11 Criminals Granted Clemency by Trump Had One Thing in Common: Connections United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Stanton, Angela Safavian, David H Pogue, Paul Negron, Judith Munoz, Crystal Milken, Michael R Kerik, Bernard B Johnson, Alice Marie Hall, Tynice Nichole Friedler, Ariel Blagojevich, Rod R Amnesties, Commutations and Pardons

WASHINGTON — Early Tuesday morning, Bernard B. Kerik’s telephone rang. On the line was David Safavian, a friend and fellow former government official who like Mr. Kerik was once imprisoned for misconduct. Mr. Safavian had life-changing news.

Mr. Safavian, who had ties to the White House, said that he was putting together a letter asking President Trump to pardon Mr. Kerik, the former New York City police commissioner who pleaded guilty to tax fraud and other charges. Mr. Safavian needed names of supporters to sign the letter. By noon.

Mr. Kerik hit the phones. Shortly after 10 a.m., he reached Geraldo Rivera, the Fox News correspondent and a friend of Mr. Trump’s. Mr. Rivera, who described Mr. Kerik as “an American hero,” instantly agreed to sign the one-page letter. Mr. Kerik called Representative Peter T. King, Republican of New York, and when Mr. Safavian reached Mr. King around 10:30, he too agreed to sign.

At 11:57 a.m., Mr. Kerik’s phone rang again. This time it was the president.

“He said, ‘As we speak, I am signing a full presidential pardon on your behalf,’” Mr. Kerik recalled in an interview on Wednesday. “Once he started talking and I realized what we were talking about, I got emotional.”

At 1:41 p.m., Mr. Trump approached reporters before boarding Air Force One and mentioned that he had pardoned Mr. Kerik. At 2:10, the White House announced that Mr. Safavian had been pardoned as well.

The clemency orders that the president issued that day to celebrity felons like Mr. Kerik, Rod R. Blagojevich and Michael R. Milken came about through a typically Trumpian process, an ad hoc scramble that bypassed the formal procedures used by past presidents and was driven instead by friendship, fame, personal empathy and a shared sense of persecution. While aides said the timing was random, it reinforced Mr. Trump’s antipathy toward the law enforcement establishment.

All 11 recipients had an inside connection or were promoted on Fox News. Some were vocal supporters of Mr. Trump, donated to his campaign or in one case had a son who weekended in the Hamptons with the president’s eldest son. Even three obscure women serving time on drug or fraud charges got on Mr. Trump’s radar screen through a personal connection.

While 14,000 clemency petitions sit unaddressed at the Justice Department’s Office of the Pardon Attorney, Mr. Trump eagerly granted relief to a former football team owner who hosted a pre-inauguration party, a onetime contestant on “Celebrity Apprentice” and an infamous investor championed both by Rudolph W. Giuliani, the president’s personal lawyer, and by the billionaire who hosted a $10 million fund-raiser for Mr. Trump just last weekend.

“There is now no longer any pretense of regularity,” said Margaret Love, who served as pardon attorney under President Bill Clinton and now represents clients seeking clemency. “The president seems proud to declare that he makes his own decisions without relying on any official source of advice, but acts on the recommendation of friends, colleagues and political allies.”

Mr. Trump’s advisers acknowledged that the process was unique to this president, but stressed that he had become personally committed to countering the excesses of the criminal justice system, a mission fueled by his own scalding encounters with investigations since taking office. In addition to his pardons, Mr. Trump in 2018 signed the First Step Act providing sentencing relief for many criminals.

“The president seems to be someone who’s willing to listen to people’s appeals,” said Robert Blagojevich, who lobbied for a commutation for his brother, Rod Blagojevich, the former governor of Illinois sentenced to 14 years for trying to essentially sell the Senate seat vacated by President Barack Obama. “I think he’s just got an antenna to listen to people who have been truly wronged by the system.”

Indeed, Mr. Trump takes personal pleasure in dispensing mercy. He called Patti Blagojevich, who is married to the former governor, right after signing the papers on Tuesday. He likewise called Ricky Munoz to tell him that his wife, Crystal Munoz, was coming home.

Advisers said there is little rhyme or reason to how Mr. Trump chooses clemency recipients. He meets with advisers every few weeks to discuss various cases. Once he makes a decision, he tends to announce them right away, without bothering to draft a communications strategy, reasoning that there is no point in anyone sitting in prison longer than needed.

Mr. Trump recognizes that his friends-and-family approach generates criticism, but has repeatedly cited his 2018 pardon of I. Lewis Libby Jr. as proof that he is willing to absorb attacks that others would not. President George W. Bush refused to pardon Mr. Libby, who served as chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney and was convicted of lying to the authorities.

Mr. Trump has known some of those he favored this week for years, including Mr. Kerik and Mr. Milken, the so-called junk bond king who tried at least twice to obtain a pardon from Mr. Bush without success. Mr. Trump called Mr. Milken “a brilliant guy” in his first memoir and has hosted him at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida. He called Mr. Kerik “a friend of mine” and “a great guy” in 2004 when Mr. Kerik was forced to withdraw his nomination for Mr. Bush’s secretary of homeland security because of ethics issues.

In addition to Mr. Giuliani, Mr. Milken’s pardon was supported by Mr. Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner and his developer friends Howard Lorber and Richard LeFrak. Also supportive was Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, a longtime friend who last year flew on Mr. Milken’s private jet from Washington to Los Angeles and helped secure a real estate tax break that could benefit Mr. Milken.

Paul Pogue, the former owner of a Texas construction company, was pardoned for tax charges after his family contributed more than $200,000 in the last six months to help re-elect Mr. Trump. In August, his son Benjamin and daughter-in-law Ashleigh posted a picture on Instagram of themselves with Donald Trump Jr. and his girlfriend, Kimberly Guilfoyle, in the Hamptons. “What an experience spending the weekend with these two and more!” Ms. Pogue wrote.

In announcing his pardon, the White House cited Paul Pogue’s charitable work around the world, including the creation of two nonprofit organizations that help rebuild churches and provide aid to people after natural disasters.

Ariel Friedler, the former executive of a software development company who pleaded guilty to conspiring to hack a competitor, found his way in the door through Chris Christie, the former governor of New Jersey and a close ally of Mr. Trump’s.

Mr. Christie said on Wednesday that he met with Mr. Friedler in person and agreed to represent him in a pardon application after being referred by a former prosecutor he knew. Mr. Christie said he heard nothing since 2018 about the case until Mr. Trump called him out of the blue last Thursday to ask about it.

“He said, ‘Listen, I’ve reviewed the application, but tell me what you think about this guy and what happened to him,’” Mr. Christie said. A former prosecutor himself, Mr. Christie said he told the president that the government had overreached.

“Do you really think this guy has a good heart?” he recalled Mr. Trump asking.

“I’m not soft,” Mr. Christie said he replied, “but this is over the top.”

Angela Stanton, an author and television personality with a record stemming from a stolen-vehicle ring, was championed by Alveda King, a niece of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. A Fox News contributor and outspoken Trump supporter, Ms. King appeared with Ms. Stanton at a “Women for Trump” summit meeting in 2018.

While most of this week’s recipients had political ties, Mr. Trump’s defenders pointed to three women whose sentences he commuted without any notable political background. But even those three — Ms. Munoz, 40, Tynice Nichole Hall, 36, and Judith Negron, 48 — came to his attention because of someone he already knew, Alice Marie Johnson.

Mr. Trump commuted Ms. Johnson’s life sentence for a nonviolent drug conviction in 2018 after the reality television star Kim Kardashian West made a personal plea. Since then, Ms. Johnson has become his prison reform whisperer and appeared in a multimillion-dollar Super Bowl ad for his campaign.

During an October appearance at Benedict College, a historically black school in South Carolina, Mr. Trump told Ms. Johnson to give him the names of others who had been mistreated. Ms. Johnson then traveled to Washington to meet with prisoner advocates and they identified about 10 women for the White House.

Ms. Johnson served in prison with all three of those released this week by Mr. Trump. “They don’t have Kim Kardashian, but they have me to fight for them,” she said in an interview. She was especially close to Ms. Munoz. “Crystal was like my daughter in prison,” she said. “In fact, I called her my prison daughter.”

Ms. Negron, who was sentenced to 35 years for Medicare fraud, filed a clemency petition years ago but it “disappeared into the bowels of the government,” according to her lawyer, Bill Norris. She was stunned to learn that the president had suddenly ordered her freed. “I’m indebted to him,” she said on Wednesday. “He gave us our dream come true. He gave me back my family. He gave me back our home. Just a new life. The nightmare is over.”

Ms. Munoz, serving nearly two decades on a marijuana charge, said that she was called to the office of her case manager and counselor on Tuesday. “When I went into their office, they said, ‘Who do you know? Do you know some people?’” She did not understand at first. But the person she knew had secured her a commutation.

Advocates for justice overhaul said Mr. Trump should be praised for his interventions. “Some people are trying to bash Trump for letting people circumvent the process and go directly to the White House,” said Amy Ralston Povah, the founder of the Clemency for All Nonviolent Drug Offenders Foundation. “But the system is broken.”

Among those activists these days is Mr. Safavian, the government’s top procurement official under Mr. Bush who was sentenced to a year in prison for covering up ties to the corrupt lobbyist Jack Abramoff. Now the general counsel for the American Conservative Union, Mr. Safavian lobbies for legislation and programs granting leniency and job training for lower-level drug offenders as well as white-collar former convicts like himself.

Not everyone believes in his conversion. Walter Shaub, the former director of the Office of Government Ethics, said Mr. Trump’s pardon of Mr. Safavian sent a message to dishonest officials to “wait long enough and a corrupt president may bless your corruption.”

But others, including the liberal CNN commentator Van Jones, praised Mr. Safavian’s work to redeem the system, calling him “a quiet wonder” and declining to second-guess the pardon. “I’m not going to criticize freedom,” Mr. Jones said. “I want more people to be able to come home.”

As with the others, Mr. Safavian had friends in the right places. The head of the conservative union, Matt Schlapp, is a strong supporter of Mr. Trump, and his wife, Mercedes Schlapp, worked as the White House strategic communications director before moving to the president’s campaign.

As he pushed for Mr. Kerik’s pardon, Mr. Safavian said he did not realize that he would receive one himself. “Quite frankly, it was out of the blue for me,” he said. “I was in the drive-through window at McDonald’s when I got the call that the president had just signed my pardon.

“I had zero role in the pardon process,” he added. “None. I didn’t ask for it.”

Peter Baker and Elizabeth Williamson reported from Washington, and J. David Goodman and Michael Rothfeld from New York. Reporting was contributed by Annie Karni, Zach Montague, Alan Rappeport and Michael D. Shear in Washington; Maggie Haberman and Jesse Drucker in New York; Mitch Smith in Chicago; Patricia Mazzei and Jack Begg in Miami; and Manny Fernandez in Houston.

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Twitter Users Pull Out The Popcorn As Democratic Debate Goes Into Total Smackdown

Westlake Legal Group 5e4df46f2300005b03ddcaea Twitter Users Pull Out The Popcorn As Democratic Debate Goes Into Total Smackdown

The Democratic debate quickly intensified into a heated showdown Wednesday night as candidates wasted no time in tearing into Michael Bloomberg ― and each another ― during the billionaire presidential contender’s first appearance on the debate stage.

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) set the tone, taking aim at Bloomberg from the get-go by pointing to the former New York City mayor’s controversial stop-and-frisk policing policy, which disproportionately affected Black and Latino people.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) came out (and kept on) swinging, blasting Bloomberg for his wealth and past offensive comments about women.

“I’d like to talk about who we’re running against: a billionaire who calls women fat broads and horse-faced lesbians,” Warren said. “And no, I’m not talking about Donald Trump. I’m talking about Mayor Bloomberg.”

Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Indiana, also dove in, blasting Sanders and Bloomberg as the “two most polarizing figures on this stage.”

Warren went on to go after Buttigieg and Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) for their health care proposals, labeling Buttigieg’s “thin” plan as nothing more than a “PowerPoint” and scorning Klobuchar’s as nothing more than a “Post-It Note.”

“I take personal offense because Post-It Notes were invented in my state,” Klobuchar replied. Buttigieg countered that he was “more of a Microsoft Word guy.”

Later, the two Midwestern candidates exchanged blows. Buttigieg criticized Klobuchar for forgetting the name of Mexico’s president, and Klobuchar accused him of “trying to say that I’m dumb.” They faced off again toward the end of the debate: Klobuchar derided the mayor’s lack of experience, and Buttigieg retorted that you “don’t have to be in Washington to matter.”

As things on the debate stage spiced up, so did the reactions on Twitter. Here’s a glimpse of what viewers had to say.

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