web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 78)

Rep. Doug Collins: Democrats trying ‘to find anything shiny’ to distract Americans from ‘how poorly they did their job’

Westlake Legal Group CollinsOutnumbered Rep. Doug Collins: Democrats trying 'to find anything shiny' to distract Americans from 'how poorly they did their job' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/outnumbered-overtime fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/jerrold-nadler fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc cb1b098c-8a7b-5a25-b3b1-3a3fa24c55ad article

House Judiciary Committee ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., appeared on “Outnumbered Overtime” Monday and criticized Democrats for continuing to make demands about the conduct of President Trump’s Senate impeachment trial, which begins this week.

“Their case is falling apart and the American people are seeing that their rush to judgment is actually going to cause the people to see that they really did not do their job,” Collins told guest host Dagen McDowell. “And it’s not fair to say the Senate should do their job for them.”

DEMOCRATS CLASH WITH GOP OVER PROSPECT OF CALLING HUNTER BIDEN IN IMPEACHMENT TRIAL

Trump’s legal team called the House’s impeachment case “flimsy” and a “dangerous perversion of the Constitution” in a trial memo filed Monday morning.

The 110-page filing claimed that the two articles of impeachment – abuse of power and obstruction of Congress – do not amount to impeachable offenses and that the Democrat-led House inquiry was not a quest for the truth.

Collins spoke out against House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., who told CBS’ “Face the Nation” this past weekend that “any Republican senator who says there should be no witnesses, or even that witnesses should be negotiated, is part of the cover-up” to help the president.

“It’s not the way Chairman Schiff worked. It’s not what they did in the House. And so they understand this, that they’re trying to now to find anything shiny for the people [not] to see how poorly they did their job, how much they ransacked the House rules to get to an outcome that they wanted,” Collins said. “This is just a travesty perpetrated upon the American people.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The congressman also commented on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s impeachment signing ceremony and her demeanor during the process, including her appearance this weekend on HBO’s “Real Time with Bill Maher.”

“Don’t me hand me that anymore, Speaker Pelosi,” Collins said. “You’ve shown that you’re willing to lead a House off of a cliff of due process wrongs, of trashing the rules of the House to get to a president that you can’t stand.”

Fox News’ Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group CollinsOutnumbered Rep. Doug Collins: Democrats trying 'to find anything shiny' to distract Americans from 'how poorly they did their job' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/outnumbered-overtime fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/jerrold-nadler fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc cb1b098c-8a7b-5a25-b3b1-3a3fa24c55ad article   Westlake Legal Group CollinsOutnumbered Rep. Doug Collins: Democrats trying 'to find anything shiny' to distract Americans from 'how poorly they did their job' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/outnumbered-overtime fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/jerrold-nadler fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc cb1b098c-8a7b-5a25-b3b1-3a3fa24c55ad article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

The Davos Plutocrats Warm Up to Trump

Westlake Legal Group 20db-sorkin1-facebookJumbo The Davos Plutocrats Warm Up to Trump World Economic Forum United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Economic Conditions and Trends Davos (Switzerland)

DAVOS, Switzerland — The last time President Trump arrived at the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting, his trip was treated with deep skepticism, if not disdain, by the business and political leaders who gather once a year in this ski town in the Swiss Alps. It was 2018 and even with his newly enacted tax cuts, his populist, antiglobalist rhetoric and Twitter outbursts were more than enough to make the event’s collection of plutocrats uneasy.

This time is likely to be different.

With the stock market at record highs, two trade deals announced and the possibility that Mr. Trump may be in office for another four years, there is an increasing sense that he will be accepted, if not embraced (although some attendees may roll their eyes behind his back) when he arrives on Tuesday, even as he faces an impeachment trial.

As anathema as it may be to some participants, Mr. Trump may be the new Davos Man.

The Davos forum, marking its 50th year, has always sought to foster a sense of multilateral unity. But Mr. Trump, along with his counterpart in Britain, Prime Minister Boris Johnson, is seemingly moving the world into a tariff based, decoupled universe, based on bilateral negotiations and diplomacy by tweet.

To the surprise of many Davos regulars, the economic results have yet to prove as disastrous as they expected — and, at least in the short term, have seemingly proven to be quite positive. (The long-term effects, of course, are still unknown.)

Even Mr. Trump’s most ardent detractors acknowledge that an acceptance of the president is settling in among the Davos crowd.

“We are all adjusting to his abnormal behavior,” said the investor Anthony Scaramucci, Mr. Trump’s onetime spokesman turned enemy who has been a Davos regular for over a decade and hosts a wine tasting party that has become a hot ticket for the boldfaced names. “The economic strength helps their cognitive dissonance,” he said.

Just last week, a lineup of some executives who will attend the Davos forum were in the audience at the White House when Mr. Trump signed the initial China trade deal. They more than politely applauded.

“Will you say, ‘Thank you, Mr. President’ at least? Huh?” Mr. Trump asked Mary Erdoes, the chief executive of JPMorgan’s asset and wealth management division and a Davos regular, along with Jamie Dimon, the bank’s C.E.O. “They just announced earnings, and they were incredible,” Mr. Trump said about JPMorgan. “They were very substantial. I made a lot of bankers look very good. But you’re doing a great job. Say hello to Jamie.”

Stephen Schwarzman, the co-founder of Blackstone, who often gets calls from global C.E.O.s seeking advice on how to manage relations with Mr. Trump because of his close relationship with him, said there has been a shift among the C-suite crowd.

“The attitude of the business community toward the Trump Administration appears quite positive,” said Mr. Schwarzman, who runs one of the world’s biggest investment funds. Among the reasons for the warm feelings, he said, are the strength of the economy, trade deals with China, Mexico and Canada, the tax bill and the elimination of regulations.

Still, if there is one topic expected to dominate the week here besides Mr. Trump himself, it will be an issue that he and the Davos community vehemently disagree about: climate change

Just last week, Satya Nadella, the chief executive of Microsoft — and a Davos participant — announced the company would be carbon negative by 2030, and by 2050 it would seek to remove all of the carbon it has ever emitted since its founding in 1975. The World Economic Forum itself announced the meeting would be carbon neutral after it bought carbon credits to offset carbon emission from the event.

Of course, Mr. Trump doesn’t believe in climate change and pulled out of the Paris Climate Agreement to the horror of most of the executives and attendees of Davos.

He is likely to hear criticism from activists like Greta Thunberg, the high school phenom who has become a global icon for the climate. And he may get some nudging from C.E.O.s, but, unlike the activists, they will be unlikely to confront him publicly out of fear that he might turn on them or their companies.

“The Davos crowd are well respected followers of fashion and love whomever is in power,” said Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, the senior associate dean at the Yale School of Management and an expert on corporate leadership. “They celebrate when the people are rich and powerful.”

Mr. Sonnenfeld pointed out that, despite the stock market run-up, only “12 percent anticipate economic conditions will improve over the next six months, up from just 4 percent in the third quarter,” according to the Conference Board’s most recent survey of chief executives.

While the business community has come to accept Mr. Trump — one executive described the view by saying “life is relative” — Mr. Sonnenfeld noted that a poll he conducted three weeks ago found that 56 percent of C.E.O.s favored the president’s impeachment and removal from office.

Mr. Trump may find himself flattered by the Davos audience. Whether it is genuine flattery or something else remains an open question. Whatever the answer, Mr. Scaramucci is convinced it is all self-interested: “The unspeakable truth is that C.E.O.s and their staff are horrified.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Second-Largest Doctor Group Endorses National Health Insurance

Westlake Legal Group 5e25ba422400003100dd12cc Second-Largest Doctor Group Endorses National Health Insurance

The campaign to create a government-managed, truly universal health care system may have just picked up an important new ally: the nation’s second-largest physician organization.

The American College of Physicians, which represents 159,000 doctors with training in internal medicine, on Monday said the federal government should assert more control over national health spending and guarantee insurance for all Americans, either by covering everybody directly (through what advocates call “Medicare for All”) or by creating a new public program that can compete with private plans (through what’s come to be known as a “public option”).

ACP’s announcement could prove to be a milestone in the century-long quest to make health care a universal right, considering how frequently and effectively physicians have resisted ambitious reforms. And it comes at a time when such reforms are once again a focus of national debate, because so many Americans are still struggling with the cost of medical care and because the two political parties are calling for such radically different responses.

Republicans, led by President Donald Trump, are still trying to repeal or roll back the Affordable Care Act, which dramatically reduced the number of uninsured people and established key principles of universal coverage such as guaranteed insurance for people with preexisting conditions. Insofar as Republicans support new initiatives, they have in mind reforms that would relax or eliminate these regulations on insurance companies and shrink government insurance programs on which tens of millions rely.

Democrats want government to do more than it does today ― by reaching the remaining uninsured, providing everybody with more protection from medical bills, and addressing health care spending more aggressively. Inside the party, the debate is all about whether Medicare for All or the public option is the best way to achieve those goals.

What They Are Saying About Government And Health Care

After more than a year of study and internal deliberations, ACP’s governing boards and policy committees have concluded that either Medicare for All or a strong public option could work, though it doesn’t use those terms. The overriding goal, the organization says, should be to give the government much more sway over health care, like other developed countries have long done, rather than to rely on some combination of patchwork reforms and the free market.

And in a series of articles that appear in the new Annals of Internal Medicine, ACP officials and affiliates make a detailed case for why. The package includes a thorough review of national health systems abroad, along with summaries of what American politicians are now proposing.

“The U.S. health care system is like a chronically ill patient, and ACP is proposing a new prescription,” three of the group’s officials say in the lead essay. “Simple market solutions have been unsuccessful elsewhere, and we do not believe that health care is a commodity.”

ACP, which supported the Affordable Care Act and has fought efforts to repeal it, has always been among the most liberal physician organizations. But this is the first time the organization has formally called for the government to create a new insurance program, be it mandatory or optional, and to exert so much more power over health care spending, according to Robert McLean, an internist and the group’s president.

“We have said in the past, ‘Hey, maybe we need to consider or look at single-payer financing as an option,’ but we didn’t fully come out and boldly endorse it,” McLean told HuffPost. “We are doing that now. This is a really assertive endorsement with much more detail on how this approach has been shown to be effective for these various reasons. … That is new for us.”

What It Means For The 2020 Election

The ACP articles assiduously avoid endorsing any politician or party. But ACP’s positions line up with some well-known advocates.

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) is Medicare for All’s most visible champion, having written the damn bill, as he likes to say, and endorsed it for nearly his entire life in politics. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) has also endorsed Medicare for All, though she has said she would seek to get there through a two-step process, starting with a law to create a public option.

Other 2020 Democratic presidential candidates ― including former Vice President Joe Biden; former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg; and Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) ― have warned that Medicare for All represents too dramatic a change. They have said they would prefer simply to pass public option reforms, at least for now, although the specific initiatives those candidates have put forward would appear to be less ambitious than what ACP has in mind. 

In its review of public option proposals, ACP cited plans from the Center for American Progress and Yale political scientist Jacob Hacker. The closest analogue to those plans is proposed ”Medicare for Americalegislation from Reps. Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.) and Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.) that would envision, among other things, more federal intervention to control prices.

And that element of the ACP endorsement, the interest in letting government get more involved with the price of health care through either Medicare for All or a public option, may ultimately be the most important part of its endorsement. 

How And Why Physician Opinion May Be Shifting

Physicians, like most providers of health care, have a long history of fighting ambitious reforms, going back to the Progressive Era when state medical societies fought the first, embryonic efforts at “compulsory health insurance.” Thirty years later, the American Medical Association, which was and remains the largest U.S. organization representing doctors, led the fight to defeat Harry Truman’s universal coverage plan.

Since that time, however, physician opposition to sweeping health reforms has softened. 

The AMA, like the ACP, supported the Affordable Care Act and has opposed efforts to repeal it. Last year, the AMA’s House of Delegates came within a few percentage points of voting to rescind its historic opposition to single-payer schemes like Medicare for All. It also withdrew from the Partnership for America’s Health Care Future, a health industry group that has fought both Medicare for All and the public option.

The evolution of physician sentiment likely reflects a variety of factors, including a generational shift. Older physicians came into the profession with expectations of operating in solo practices or as small groups, with minimal outside interference. 

Younger doctors are more accustomed to working in large organizations and in many cases see government as a necessary, even welcome force to counter the influence of insurance companies and guarantee access in a way that private plans do not.

“First, there is widespread recognition of the harm that our health care financing system inflicts on our patients’ health,” said Adam Gaffney, a pulmonology specialist who is president of Physicians for a National Health Program. “But second, there’s also growing recognition of the ways that the system fails physicians too — endless hours glued to the electronic medical record, enormous amounts of time, energy, and resources expended on billing, documentation, and other onerous clerical tasks. We’re recognizing more and more that patients and doctors are in this together.”   

What The Endorsement Doesn’t Say

PNHP is a longtime champion of Medicare for All and recruited more than 2,000 doctors to sign an open letter, set to run as an advertisement in The New York Times on Tuesday, endorsing the idea. Together with ACP’s announcement, the letter suggests that Medicare for All is gaining mainstream credibility.

The fact that the largest medical specialty society in the country explicitly and officially endorsed Medicare for All is a huge deal — even if they also endorsed another option,” Gaffney said. 

ACP’s support of both Medicare for All and strong public option reforms comes with warnings that limiting provider payments too aggressively could hurt doctors and hospitals that operate with low margins, ultimately hurting patients. This is no small thing.

Actual legislation to create either a Medicare for All or ambitious public option system could entail limits on provider income that many physicians would find objectionable. Yet without enough control over health spending, the math of reform gets tricky and it’s difficult to deliver the benefits advocates promise.

But though it’s a tough problem to solve, as policy and politics, McLean says more and more physicians understand it’s worth the effort. “We can do better, our patients deserve better,” he said. “No system is perfect but we can get a lot closer than we are.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Bloomberg willing to spend ‘whatever it takes’ in 2020 White House bid: campaign manager

Westlake Legal Group AP20019758958515 Bloomberg willing to spend 'whatever it takes' in 2020 White House bid: campaign manager Louis Casiano fox-news/shows/fox-news-reporting fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 19d83aea-2688-5cf2-8f17-a7e34c165a03

Democratic presidential hopeful Mike Bloomberg is willing to “spend whatever it takes” to get his message out and broaden his support to secure the party’s nomination, campaign manager Kevin Sheekey told Fox News’ “Bill Hemmer Reports” on Monday.

During Monday’s interview, Hemmer questioned Sheekey over how much of Bloomberg’s own money the former New York City mayor is willing to spend to unseat President Trump.

“Fox Business headline here it is and it’s big one: ‘Two billion reasons Bloomberg could unseat Trump,'” Hemmer said. “Is he willing to go deep, two billion, or is that just a headline?”

BLOOMBERG, IN OKLAHOMA, PUSHES PLAN TO FIGHT RACIAL INCOME INEQUALITY

“Mike’s view is, ‘Hey I want to spend whatever it takes to put myself in a position to make a difference,'” Sheekey responded,” before touting Bloomberg’s record as the three-term mayor of America’s largest city.

“He was able to make an enormous difference in New York through three terms as mayor,” Sheekey added. “There’s no one who doesn’t say that he didn’t bring this city back from 9/11, that he didn’t improve education, that he didn’t make the streets safer, that he didn’t rebuild the economy of New York after the worst tragedy ever to occur on American soil.”

In an earlier segment on the show, Hemmer interviewed Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale, who said he wasn’t worried about Bloomberg’s candidacy until he outpolls the likes of Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg

“Brad is not running a national campaign,” Sheekey responded. “Brad is running a campaign in six states… and right now if the election was held, I think President Trump is re-elected and that’s one of the reasons Mike Bloomberg got into this campaign.”

BLOOMBERG PANS DEMOCRATIC FIELD FOR FAILING TO ADDRESS ISSUES, SAYS HE ‘DIDN’T LEARN ANYTHING’

Bloomberg, a former Republican, will skip key nominating contests in Iowa and New Hampshire to focus on California and other states in an effort to broaden Democratic support.

“We’ve allowed two states, Iowa and New Hampshire, to pick our nominee… to the exclusion of people around the country,” Sheekey said. “So Mike Bloomberg has said ‘What if we actually got everyone involved… what if we actually empowered people to play a role in this campaign and what if we got the ideas?'”

Hemmer pointed put that when Bloomberg’s predecessor as mayor, Rudy Giuliani, tried the same strategy during his failed White House bid in 2008, it backfired.

“When he skipped Iowa and he showed up in New Hampshire, reporters were not asking him, ‘What is your campaign about?’ They were asking him, ‘Where have you been?'” Hemmer said.

Sheekey dismissed the comparison, noting that Giuliani focused mostly on Florida, while Bloomberg has volunteers campaigning across 36 states on his behalf.

Hemmer then asked whether Bloomberg will divest himself from his media empire, Bloomberg Media Group, and other assets should he be elected in 2020.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“So if he’s the nominee it’s billionaire versus billionaire. And we’ve seen President Trump break the rules of precedent of the past. Does Michael Bloomberg plan to do the same?” asked Hemmer.

“No, I think Mike Bloomberg is the candidate that can take Donald Trump on and take this country in the right direction. I don’t think there’s another candidate in the Democratic primary that can do that,” Sheekey said. “Mike has said that if he was elected, he would take that company and all of his assets and put it in a blind trust.”

Westlake Legal Group AP20019758958515 Bloomberg willing to spend 'whatever it takes' in 2020 White House bid: campaign manager Louis Casiano fox-news/shows/fox-news-reporting fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 19d83aea-2688-5cf2-8f17-a7e34c165a03   Westlake Legal Group AP20019758958515 Bloomberg willing to spend 'whatever it takes' in 2020 White House bid: campaign manager Louis Casiano fox-news/shows/fox-news-reporting fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 19d83aea-2688-5cf2-8f17-a7e34c165a03

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Virginia Gun Rally Live Updates: 22,000 Protesters Oppose New Gun Laws

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_167455953_f4394824-606a-42ea-bd2a-15b938795530-articleLarge Virginia Gun Rally Live Updates: 22,000 Protesters Oppose New Gun Laws Virginia Van Cleave, Philip Second Amendment (US Constitution) RICHMOND, Va. Richmond, Va, Gun Rally (January, 2020) Politics and Government gun control Fringe Groups and Movements Demonstrations, Protests and Riots

Elizabeth Szmurlo and Hunter Mitchell of Richmond, Va., gathered with gun-rights advocates at the State Capitol on Monday to oppose proposals for gun control.Credit…Alyssa Schukar for The New York Times

Thousands of pro-gun advocates, many of them armed, converged on the Virginia State Capitol on Monday, flooding a secure area around the building and packing the surrounding streets with firearms, flags and political posters in a pointed message to state lawmakers who are weighing new gun control proposals.

The rally in Richmond, organized to oppose a series of measures being considered in the State Legislature, became a rallying cry for Second Amendment rights nationwide, inspiring cross-country flights from Colorado and road trips from Texas and attracting a crowd of about 22,000 people.

A threat of potential violence had been looming over Virginia’s capital city for days, fueled by reports that white supremacists, armed militia groups and other extremists planned to attend. But there were no official reports of skirmishes or major incidents as of Monday afternoon.

Hoping to head off trouble, the state set up a security perimeter around the Capitol grounds and banned weapons — including firearms — from the area inside. Police officers guarded the area with the help of bomb-sniffing dogs, and people entering the perimeter through the single entrance were screened with metal detectors.

The organizers of the rally, the Virginia Citizens Defense League, and other participants said they tried to keep the event peaceful.

Vincent Carter, 36, who was picking up trash at the end of the event, said that participants were well aware that “the world was watching” and that any violence would have been blamed on gun rights groups.

“A lot of time was spent in planning for safety — to not let a certain type of person sort of mingle in with us,” he said. “If we didn’t know them, we didn’t let them come with us. We have a lot of guys who are ex-military, so that helped keep things in order.”

Even so, plenty of demonstrators came armed to Richmond, and officials worried that confrontations could develop just outside the perimeter entrance or in the surrounding streets where weapons were allowed.

During the rally, David Triebs and his two sons held a giant banner across the street from the perimeter entrance, reading “Come and Take It,” a reference to a defiant slogan used by Texan revolutionaries in 1835 when the Mexican authorities demanded the handover of a cannon.

Mr. Triebs and his sons drove for 24 hours straight through to Richmond from Fredericksburg, Texas, he said, drinking Red Bulls along the way to stay awake. He said relatives were worried about him coming to Virginia.

“The internet stuff I read made it sound like tanks were rolling in the streets and neo-Nazis were marching and antifa has descended,” he said. “But none of that stuff happened. It was like a family gathering.”

As they packed up their banner to leave after the rally, one of his sons struggled with two tall flagpoles, nearly knocking into a passing pedestrian.

“Careful — don’t hit anybody in the last five minutes,” Mr. Triebs said. “If you assault someone with a flagpole, that would be the only thing that made the news.”

The landmark 2008 Supreme Court decision holding that the Second Amendment protected an individual’s right to keep and bear arms is known as the Heller decision, after Dick Heller, the lead plaintiff in the lawsuit that overturned a gun-control law in the District of Columbia.

When Mr. Heller addressed the rally in Richmond on Monday, the crowd listened with rapt attention.

He got a big reaction when he quoted part of the amendment’s text: “Let’s yell it to them, so the media and left legislature can hear it: The right of the people to keep and bear arms will not be infringed!” The crowd roared the end of the sentence along with him.

And when he asked the crowd, “Do we need gun control in Virginia?,” the crowd roared back, “No!”

Another speaker, Sheriff Scott Jenkins of Culpeper County, Va., who has long been outspoken in advocating gun rights, told the crowd, “I ask that you all return to your homes and ask your elected officials, where is the line they will not cross?”

After the official speeches, as people began to leave the secure perimeter, participants made impromptu speeches in the street, denouncing abortion and the governor in addition to gun control. Some participants picked up litter and scraped discarded orange “Guns save lives” stickers off the pavement. “No confiscation! No registration!” the crowd chanted.

While armed men and women thronged the capital’s streets, gun-control advocates mostly stayed away. Organizers of an annual vigil in support of gun restrictions, which was scheduled for Monday, called it off this year.

Lori Hass, the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence’s state director for Virginia, said in a news release that gun-rights activists “have amplified and fanned the flames of insurrectionism and civil war in a way that is irresponsible and dangerous.”

“Now, citizens who represent the overwhelming majority of Virginians are prevented from lobbying their officials because of credible threats to their safety,” Ms. Hass said.

But hours after the pro-gun rally ended, a crowd of about 30 gun control activists, many of them college students, went inside the Capitol grounds. Several of the students, including some who had survived school shootings, drove in from various locations in Virginia and slept at the office of a state legislator, Dan Helmer, on Sunday night.

The group had initially planned to hold a vigil earlier on Monday, but it moved the event to later in the afternoon after reports that white nationalists and militia members would attend the pro-gun rally. The advocates stayed in Mr. Helmer’s office throughout the morning.

“We heard them screaming from the office,” said Mollie Davis, 19, who survived a shooting at Great Mills High School in 2018. “That really scared me.”

Andrew Goddard, a gun control activist, asked the group to have a moment of silence for the thousands of people who have been killed by gun violence. “What would it be like if 10,000 of those people were standing with us and beside and behind us today?” Mr. Goddard said.

Though no incidents were reported at the gun rights rally on Monday, Mr. Goddard said it did not feel peaceful to see so many armed people marching in the streets. “Intimidation is not peaceful.”

He added, “They were looking for someone to scream at and shout at, and we weren’t going to provide that.”

Nupol Kiazolu, 19, the president of Black Lives Matter Greater New York, said she was compelled to attend the vigil for shooting victims “because oftentimes black and brown voices are left out of these issues.”

One gun-control advocate who did go to the rally on Monday morning to confront pro-gun demonstrators was Paul Karns, 49, a writer from Richmond. Mr. Karns said he had been dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder after he was shot 13 years ago while defending his neighbor during a robbery.

He got into a heated debate with a pro-gun demonstrator who said schools were vulnerable to violence because of the lack of guns on campus. Mr. Karns yelled and stormed off. “One thing I don’t see from that side of the spectrum is empathy for the rest of us,” he said.

On a day when guns and Second Amendment grandeur took center stage, the atmosphere also took on an overtly political tone at times, as pro-gun groups criticized the state’s Democratic governor, Ralph Northam.

Demonstrators circulated a racist photograph from Mr. Northam’s medical school yearbook, which showed a man in blackface and another in a Ku Klux Klan robe, an image that nearly destroyed Mr. Northam’s political career. An investigation last year could not conclusively determine whether Mr. Northam appeared in the photo, and he now leads a state government that is fully controlled by Democrats and focused on enacting gun control.

“The man behind the sheet wants your guns,” read one poster, which had reprinted the photograph. In another case, a pamphlet using the photograph called on liberals and conservatives to “fight back” against “slave masters” in the state legislature.

Support for President Trump was apparent among many of the gun rights activists in attendance.

A large “Make America Great Again” flag whipped above the crowds that gathered outside the State Capitol perimeter. A bus adorned in pro-Trump posters, including a “Women for Trump” flag and a flag with the president’s head photoshopped on Rambo, occasionally drove passed the entrance of the capitol grounds and was greeted with cheers from the crowd.

“Trump 2020, baby!” one man shouted. “Amen,” a man wearing a camouflage hat replied.

Despite concerns about potential violence, which led the governor to declare a state of emergency ahead of the rally, the authorities said they were not aware of any major incidents or arrests by late afternoon. The Richmond police estimated the crowd at about 22,000, with 6,000 inside the perimeter and 16,000 outside.

Organizers had said they expected 120,000 people to attend. The Virginia Citizens Defense League noted online that it had failed to meet its fund-raising goal. Its website indicated that some 1,200 people had given a total of $71,533 by late afternoon Monday, short of the target of $100,000.

“The real fight is yet to come,” the group said in a Facebook post. “Can you throw a few bucks our way? We are behind in our goal.”

Inside the Capitol grounds on Monday morning, a peaceful crowd held banners and flags, and shouts of “U.S.A.” swelled in the background.

At the same time, a swelling crowd jammed the surrounding streets.

Weapons were allowed outside the security perimeter, and demonstrators walked through the area carrying firearms and flags, as if on parade. There were military-style rifles, shotguns, 9-millimeter handguns, .45- and .22-caliber pistols, and even a man carrying .50-caliber sniper rifle.

Chris Dement, 22, said he brought a 9-millimeter carbine to stand in solidarity, but was prepared to use it for self-defense in case of violence.

“It’s never out of the realm of possibility,” he said.

Richmond was alive with activity as early as 6 a.m. as clusters of people made their way toward the Capitol. The traffic downtown included a Jeep flying an American flag, and numerous pickup trucks.

Logan Smith, 25, a transmission plant worker from Indianapolis, said he set out Saturday night and drove in his black Dodge Charger for 9 hours and 46 minutes to reach Richmond on Sunday. Standing in a teal sweatshirt in the early morning cold on Monday, his hands in his pockets, he watched the line for entrance to the Capitol grounds start to snake around the block.

“I see how it matters — it matters to me back home,” Mr. Smith said of gun rights. Referring to the gun regulations bills before the Virginia legislature, he said, “Seeing stuff like this being pushed, it doesn’t sit well.”

Around the corner, a whoop went up from a small crowd when several men unfurled a large cloth banner with a long gun emblazoned on the front.

Teri Horne, 51, stood on the sidewalk directly across from the entrance to the Capitol grounds, with a Smith & Wesson M&P15T rifle straddled around her shoulder and a Texas flag at her side. Ms. Horne, of Quitman, Texas, said she and about three dozen others from the women’s chapter of Open Carry Texas attended “to support the people in Virginia.”

“This is where freedom began, right here, and this is what they’re doing to the people of Virginia,” Ms. Horne said. “Thomas Jefferson, he was a very livid character, he would have some strong words to say.”

The rally has been a frequent topic of discussion on internet platforms that are popular among anti-government militia groups and white supremacists. Many users expressed interest in attending the rally. But over the weekend, white-supremacist chat rooms began to overflow with warnings against attending.

Many suggested that participants were being set up for a government trap where they would either be blamed for any violence that broke out, or would even be the targets of violence themselves.

Those warnings continued on Monday from members of anti-government militias, white supremacists and others who were in Richmond. The message “Don’t go in the cage” was posted repeatedly on Twitter, along with comments like “Flood the rest of Richmond instead.”

For years, Martin Luther King’s Birthday, which falls early in the legislative session, has been a day for ordinary Virginians and advocacy groups to talk with state legislators about issues that concern them, in a tradition known as “Lobby Day.”

This year, gun rights groups made especially big plans, after control of the legislature flipped in the November election.

After a generation of dominance by Republicans sympathetic to gun rights, the State Senate and House of Delegates are now run by Democrats who want to impose tighter regulations — measures that have become increasingly popular in the state, especially after a gunman fatally shot 12 people last May in Virginia Beach.

The State Senate approved three gun control bills last week that the House of Delegates could approve as early as this week.

The prospect of new laws restricting firearms has met with stiff opposition in the state’s rural areas. Since November, more than 100 municipalities have declared themselves “Second Amendment sanctuaries” — a purely symbolic step, but one that highlights the widening rift in Virginia between its cities and its rural areas, which have been losing population and political power for years.

Timothy Williams, Sabrina Tavernise and Zolan Kanno-Youngs reported from Richmond, Va., and Sarah Mervosh from New York. Neil MacFarquhar contributed reporting from New York.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

New Disneyland Star Wars reportedly suffering breakdowns, long wait times

Westlake Legal Group Rise-of-the-Resistance-opening New Disneyland Star Wars reportedly suffering breakdowns, long wait times Michael Hollan fox-news/travel/general/theme-parks fox-news/travel/general/disney fox news fnc/travel fnc article 507fc705-3e10-5c22-b821-627675b5bbc6

Being part of a resistance is never easy.

Disneyland in California recently opened Rise of the Resistance, its latest addition to its Star Wars land. While fans have given the ride positive reviews, there are reports of issues with the virtual queue and breakdowns.

On opening day, the boarding group passes for the ride sold out within six minutes, The Orange County Register reports. Fans reportedly starting lining up starting at midnight for a chance to experience the new ride. The virtual queue opened at 8 a.m.

DISNEY TRYING TO STOP BABY YODA KNOCKOFF SOLD ON ETSY: REPORT

Fans could sign up for the virtual queue on the Disneyland app, where they would be assigned a boarding group number, which ranged from one to 160. Guests assigned a group number higher than 81 were reportedly placed on a “standby” status.

The ride reportedly broke down just before 10 a.m. and did not come back online for 50 minutes. Another breakdown occurred around 2:30 p.m. By this point, 61 boarding groups had moved through the ride, according to The Orange County Register.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

The news outlet reported that at around 5 p.m., guests registered for boarding groups 115 and above were told it was unlikely they would experience the ride that day.

The new ride experienced similar delays on Sunday, WDW News Today reports. According to the outlet, the park notified guests from certain “standby” groups around 1:30 p.m. that they would not be experiencing the ride that day.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Fox News reached out to Disneyland for comment but did not immediately get a response.

Westlake Legal Group Rise-of-the-Resistance-opening New Disneyland Star Wars reportedly suffering breakdowns, long wait times Michael Hollan fox-news/travel/general/theme-parks fox-news/travel/general/disney fox news fnc/travel fnc article 507fc705-3e10-5c22-b821-627675b5bbc6   Westlake Legal Group Rise-of-the-Resistance-opening New Disneyland Star Wars reportedly suffering breakdowns, long wait times Michael Hollan fox-news/travel/general/theme-parks fox-news/travel/general/disney fox news fnc/travel fnc article 507fc705-3e10-5c22-b821-627675b5bbc6

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Avenatti allegedly took settlement money from football fans

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6092449950001_6092450544001-vs Avenatti allegedly took settlement money from football fans Lee Ross fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/trials fox-news/person/michael-avenatti fox news fnc/us fnc article 81f27020-fbca-58e6-b85c-6c2943526179

Disgraced attorney Michael Avenatti is accused of stealing money from dozens more clients than previously known, according to newly unsealed documents and recent interviews with Fox News.

It’s alleged that Avenatti, currently behind bars awaiting trial in New York on unrelated charges, directed up to $1.3 million in settlement funds – intended for approximately 170 clients – to cover his own expenses. It’s the latest example of alleged malfeasance by the lawyer who was once a fixture on cable news and flirted with a presidential run.

“We didn’t receive any of that,” Donald Albaugh, one of Avenatti’s clients, said by phone Monday.  Albaugh said he and his wife, Tracy, went to the 2011 Super Bowl in Dallas but, like hundreds of other ticket holders, had problems with their seats and sued the NFL.

“The whole thing is so ludicrous,” Arianne Dar told Fox News about taking her son to the game as a graduation present. Dar said she made sure to buy tickets that were not “obstructed view” but they ended up behind a metal pole. “I never heard about a settlement.”

H. Dean Steward, who Avenatti hired to represent him last year, did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

The Albaughs and Dar said they each submitted itemized costs to Avenatti and his legal team seeking reimbursement for about $10,000, but they haven’t seen a penny.

In May 2017, Avenatti, representing the ticket holders, entered into an agreement with the NFL for a settlement of about $1,550,000 and a dismissal of all legal claims. But, in a request for a search warrant of Avenatti’s computers and phones seized following his March 2019 arrest, IRS Special Agent Remoun Karlous told a federal judge that Avenatti paid out only a small fraction of that settlement.

“Avenatti used the remainder of the approximately $1.31 million dollars [he] and his law firm received from the settlement of the Super Bowl Litigation for [his] own personal and business purposes,” Karlous wrote.

AVENATTI TRIES TO SUE STORMY DANIELS FOR OVER $2 MILLION

Avenatti has not been charged with defrauding his clients in the Super Bowl case, but Karlous wrote, “The government will be seeking to admit this evidence at trial on the basis that this criminal conduct falls squarely within and is inextricably intertwined with” an already existing 36-count federal fraud indictment in Orange County, Calif. In one of those charges, Avenatti stood accused of hiding the existence of the NFL settlement from a bankruptcy court dealing with his now-former law firm.

Avenatti’s office manager had witnessed the behavior, Karlous alleged, writing, “In response to a question as to whether she was aware of Avenatti taking money from client funds, [the manager] said that the plaintiffs in the Super Bowl litigation had not all been paid out … even though there had been money available to pay them.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Paul Colavecchi said he did get money back from Avenatti, but only after his sister, who went with him to the Super Bowl, threatened to report Avenatti to the State Bar of California. None of the Avenatti clients reached by Fox News said they saw any paperwork from Avenatti or his firm after the settlement.

The California fraud case is just one of three criminal cases Avenatti has been facing. He’s scheduled to go to trial in New York next week on charges that he tried to extort $25 million from Nike. But, the timing of that case was thrown into question when Avenatti was arrested in Los Angeles last week on allegations of violating his bond. Avenatti also stood accused of stealing money from adult-film star Stormy Daniels, who he represented in her litigation against President Trump.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6092449950001_6092450544001-vs Avenatti allegedly took settlement money from football fans Lee Ross fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/trials fox-news/person/michael-avenatti fox news fnc/us fnc article 81f27020-fbca-58e6-b85c-6c2943526179   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6092449950001_6092450544001-vs Avenatti allegedly took settlement money from football fans Lee Ross fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/trials fox-news/person/michael-avenatti fox news fnc/us fnc article 81f27020-fbca-58e6-b85c-6c2943526179

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Kelly Ripa reveals she’s stopped drinking since co-hosting ‘Live’ with Ryan Seacrest

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1038171826 Kelly Ripa reveals she's stopped drinking since co-hosting 'Live' with Ryan Seacrest Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/kelly-ripa fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/diet-fitness fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9072cce8-d909-5c15-a66c-738bd90387d0

Kelly Ripa revealed she has quit drinking alcohol.

On Monday’s episode of “Live with Kelly and Ryan,” the 49-year-old Emmy winner joked there was a downtick in total wine purchased in 2019.

“They are saying Americans bought less wine in the last year,” she told co-host Ryan Seacrest. “It’s the first drop in a quarter of a century. Now, I believe this is because I quit drinking, that I caused this slip. I have influenced the market.”

KELLY RIPA REVEALS HER INTENSE WORKOUT ROUTINE, SAYS HER BODY ‘LOOKS LIKE PETER PAN NO MATTER WHAT’ SHE DOES

“I’m not saying I’ve driven people out,” she added. “I’m saying I stopped buying wine and there’s a 25 percent dip.”

Seacrest, who became her co-host in 2017, quipped, “I started the show and she quit drinking. What does that tell you?”

Ripa didn’t further explain why she chose to stop drinking a few years ago. Meanwhile, according to a New York Times interview last year, Seacrest loves his wine. He told the outlet he breaks his strict diet and enjoys himself on the weekends.

KELLY RIPA, 48, UNVEILS BIKINI BODY IN SKIMPY WHITE SWIMSUIT

“During the week, it’s impossible, but Fridays and Saturdays, it’s fantastic to have a two-hour meal, family-style, with a fantastic bottle of wine,” Seacrest said.

Ripa has previously spoken about her strict diet.

“It has changed my life, it’s changed the whole way I think about food,” Ripa said in 2015 of the high-alkaline diet she follows, which focuses on vegetables like beets, broccoli, cucumbers, kale, kiwis and bell peppers while avoiding acidic foods like yogurt, fish and sugar.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“I like to drink coffee. I occasionally will have fish. The alkaline diet is primarily a vegan diet, but I like cream in my coffee. I like to have a glass of wine,” she added at the time. “So I don’t adhere to it strictly, but when I do a cleanse, it will be seven days, and then I go back to my normal life. But my normal life, like I said, is not that different than the alkaline cleanse.”

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1038171826 Kelly Ripa reveals she's stopped drinking since co-hosting 'Live' with Ryan Seacrest Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/kelly-ripa fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/diet-fitness fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9072cce8-d909-5c15-a66c-738bd90387d0   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1038171826 Kelly Ripa reveals she's stopped drinking since co-hosting 'Live' with Ryan Seacrest Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/kelly-ripa fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/diet-fitness fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9072cce8-d909-5c15-a66c-738bd90387d0

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

CNN poll: 51% say Senate should remove Trump from office

Westlake Legal Group Ft79_n_k4ONJHVYTyGzB4gfUOgQs0Z-n5aXqwJqjfZc CNN poll: 51% say Senate should remove Trump from office r/politics

As a reminder, this subreddit is for civil discussion.

In general, be courteous to others. Debate/discuss/argue the merits of ideas, don’t attack people. Personal insults, shill or troll accusations, hate speech, any advocating or wishing death/physical harm, and other rule violations can result in a permanent ban.

If you see comments in violation of our rules, please report them.

For those who have questions regarding any media outlets being posted on this subreddit, please click here to review our details as to whitelist and outlet criteria.


I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

CNN poll: 51% say Senate should remove Trump from office

Westlake Legal Group Ft79_n_k4ONJHVYTyGzB4gfUOgQs0Z-n5aXqwJqjfZc CNN poll: 51% say Senate should remove Trump from office r/politics

As a reminder, this subreddit is for civil discussion.

In general, be courteous to others. Debate/discuss/argue the merits of ideas, don’t attack people. Personal insults, shill or troll accusations, hate speech, any advocating or wishing death/physical harm, and other rule violations can result in a permanent ban.

If you see comments in violation of our rules, please report them.

For those who have questions regarding any media outlets being posted on this subreddit, please click here to review our details as to whitelist and outlet criteria.


I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com