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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 80)

Rudy Giuliani Desperately Wants To Join Trump’s Impeachment Defense Team

WASHINGTON — Rudy Giuliani, whose advocacy of a debunked conspiracy theory ultimately led to President Donald Trump’s impeachment, is lobbying to join the president’s defense team in the Senate trial but has so far been rebuffed.

Giuliani, who has acted as Trump’s attorney for free since early 2018, has been “working Trump hard” to be included among the lawyers who will defend him on the floor of the Senate, according to an informal adviser close to the White House who spoke on condition of anonymity.

The White House declined to comment on Giuliani. A second informal adviser said Giuliani has not really been aggressively lobbying, but has made it known that he is “available” to offer his services. “They said, ‘Thanks, but no thanks,’” the adviser said, also on condition of anonymity.

Giuliani did not respond to HuffPost’s queries on the matter.

The former New York City mayor has, however, made it clear in recent public statements that he would enjoy arguing Trump’s case before the Senate. “I’d try the case. I’d love to try the case,” Giuliani told reporters at Trump’s New Year’s Eve party for paying guests at his Palm Beach resort. “I don’t know if anybody would have the courage to give me the case. But if you give me the case, I will prosecute it as a racketeering case.”

And Saturday night, Giuliani told Fox News host Jeanine Pirro he would ask for the U.S. Supreme Court to dismiss the case against Trump, which, in his view, would have the effect of expunging the impeachment from Trump’s record. “I would say if it’s nonconstitutional, it’s null and void,” he said.

Trump responded by posting a tweet of the interview with the statement: “Thank you Rudy!”

Top White House aide Kellyanne Conway told reporters Friday that Trump’s case would be handled by White House counsel Pat Cipollone, his two deputies and Jay Sekulow, another of Trump’s personal lawyers. She was noncommittal on the possibility of any others joining the team.

Westlake Legal Group 5e1ccf162100003000af8c51 Rudy Giuliani Desperately Wants To Join Trump’s Impeachment Defense Team

JIM WATSON via Getty Images “I’d try the case. I’d love to try the case,” Rudy Giuliani told reporters of President Trump’s Senate impeachment trial.

Giuliani, a onetime federal prosecutor, bought into the false story that Russia had not helped Trump win the 2016 election, but rather it was Ukraine framing Russia with fake evidence. Giuliani was making that story a centerpiece of his planned rebuttal to special counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

Mueller found last spring that Trump’s campaign had expected and welcomed election help from Russia but did not engage in a criminal conspiracy to obtain it. The special counsel did not recommend any specific actions by Congress against Trump, and the White House never released Giuliani’s response.

Giuliani nonetheless continued pushing the theory to Trump — particularly the element that former Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter Biden had somehow been involved and that an investigation into the younger Biden’s job with a Ukrainian energy company could hurt his father’s campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination. Last spring, Trump and his top advisers believed Biden presented the most potent threat against Trump’s reelection.

According to testimony by State Department and National Security Council officials during impeachment proceedings in the House, Trump responded by referring them to Giuliani when questions arose about his Ukraine policy.

“Go talk to Rudy,” recalled Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union who had become Trump’s point person in charge of Ukraine after the president, at Giuliani’s urging, recalled the ambassador to Ukraine back to Washington.

Trump even personally referred the new Ukrainian president to Giuliani in their July 25 phone call. “I will have Mr. Giuliani give you a call,” Trump said, according to a rough transcript released by the White House. “Rudy very much knows what’s happening, and he is a very capable guy. If you could speak to him that would be great.”

Trump was impeached last month for trying to coerce Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky into opening investigations into the Bidens and the election conspiracy theory, using $391 million in congressionally approved military aid to Ukraine as leverage. Trump had ordered the aid withheld but released it after learning that a whistleblower had filed a formal complaint about his conduct and that it was likely to reach Congress.

Trump’s upcoming trial for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress notwithstanding, he has continued to push the conspiracy theory — a theory so convoluted that conservative radio host Glenn Beck needed two chalkboards to explain it all.

Former NSC staffer Fiona Hill testified during the impeachment proceedings that the conspiracy theory was actually Russian disinformation designed to obscure the country’s responsibility for helping Trump win. “This is a fictional narrative that has been perpetrated and propagated by the Russian security services themselves,” she said.

Trump’s own former homeland security adviser, Tom Bossert, called the theory baseless in an interview with ABC News. “It’s not only a conspiracy theory, it is completely debunked,” he said in September. “I don’t want to be glib about this matter, but last year, retired former Senator Judd Gregg wrote in The Hill magazine Five Ways or Three Ways to Impeach Oneself and the third way was to hire Rudy Giuliani.”

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The Decimation of Local News Has Lawmakers Crossing the Aisle

Westlake Legal Group merlin_165018315_770f549d-2c9c-489e-843b-3139f75c32ef-facebookJumbo The Decimation of Local News Has Lawmakers Crossing the Aisle United States Politics and Government Online Advertising Northeast Georgian, The (Newspaper) Newspapers News and News Media Law and Legislation Google Inc Georgia Facebook Inc Computers and the Internet Community Newspapers Inc Collins, Douglas A (1966- ) Cicilline, David N Antitrust Laws and Competition Issues

CORNELIA, Ga. — When a sport utility vehicle swerved out of its lane several weeks ago, slamming into a pickup truck and killing a teenager, a reporter from The Northeast Georgian raced to the scene. Within hours, the paper had posted the news on Facebook and updated it twice. It was shared by hundreds of people on the social network.

The fatal wreck consumed the town of Cornelia, Ga., nestled near the Chattahoochee National Forest about 90 miles northeast of Atlanta. The Northeast Georgian was the first to report the news, but unless the people who shared its story on Facebook follow a link to its website, either to see an ad or to subscribe to its twice-weekly print edition, the paper won’t get paid.

As with many small papers across the country, that business strategy is not working for The Northeast Georgian. The paper’s five employees do not just report and write. They also edit the articles, take photographs and lay out the newspaper.

“My grandmother used to say, ‘Honey, if you let them get milk through the fence, they’ll never buy the cow,’” said Dink NeSmith, chief executive of Community Newspapers Inc., which owns The Northeast Georgian and 23 other local papers.

But the tough economics facing small newspapers like Mr. NeSmith’s has generated rare bipartisan agreement in Washington.

Anger toward big technology companies has led to multiple antitrust investigations, calls for a new federal data privacy law and criticism of the companies’ political ad policies. Perhaps no issue about the tech companies, though, has united lawmakers in the Capitol like the decimation of local news.

Lawmakers from both parties blame companies like Facebook and Google, which dominate the online ad industry.

Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, gave a big boost last week to a bill that may provide some papers a lifeboat. The proposal would give news organizations an exemption from antitrust laws, allowing them to band together to negotiate with Google and Facebook over how their articles and photos are used online, and what payments the newspapers get from the tech companies. (The bill is backed by the News Media Alliance, a trade group that represents news organizations including The New York Times Company.)

The proposal was sponsored by Representative Doug Collins, a conservative Georgia Republican whose district includes Cornelia. It was written by Representative David Cicilline, a liberal Democrat from Rhode Island. Senator John Kennedy, Republican of Louisiana, sponsored an identical version in the Senate. Prominent co-sponsors joined, including Democrats like Cory Booker of New Jersey and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, and Rand Paul, Republican of Kentucky.

For the politicians, the issue is personal. They see news deserts in places where one or two local newspapers used to track their campaigns and official actions, keep local police departments and school boards accountable, and stitch together communities with big layouts on Main Street holiday parades and high school sports stars.

“I am a free-markets guy and have fought against the idea that just because something is big it is necessarily bad,” Mr. Collins said. “But look, I’m a politician and live with the media and see its importance. These big, disruptive platforms are making money off creators of content disproportionately.”

Facebook and Google declined to comment about the legislation. Representatives of the companies say their businesses have spent hundreds of millions of dollars on programs to bolster local journalism. The companies also work with news organizations to promote their articles and videos, driving traffic to their websites.

Facebook recently announced partnerships with major news organizations, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and CNN, that would see some of the publishers paid for the content they share.

“We know this is a challenging time for journalism,” Campbell Brown, Facebook’s vice president of global news partnerships, said in a statement. “And we are working closely with publishers to find new ways to address those challenges.”

A Google spokeswoman said, “Every month, Google News and Google Search drive over 24 billion visits to publishers’ websites, which drive subscriptions and significant ad revenue.”

Newspapers have faced devastating financial losses for years. One in five newspapers has closed since 2004 in the United States, and about half of the nation’s more than 3,000 counties have only one newspaper, many of them printing weekly, according to a report by the University of North Carolina published in late 2018. In the last year alone, Facebook and Google added tens of thousands of employees and reported billions of dollars in profits.

Take Mr. Collins’s district in northern Georgia. The Atlanta Journal Constitution, the state’s biggest newspaper, has cut its staff by half in the past eight years. In Mr. Collins’s hometown, The Gainesville Times, one of the biggest papers in its region, cut its weekly print publication schedule to five days from seven a year ago.

The demand for local news remains. One day shortly after the fatal car crash, all of the discussion at Fender’s Diner, a 1950s-inspired eatery in Cornelia, was about the victim and allegations that the woman behind the wheel of the S.U.V. had been drinking.

“I care more about the people who walk through my front door of my place and the issues that matter to them than anything going on in Washington,” said Bradley Cook, the owner of the restaurant.

Many local leaders say the power of local newspapers was on display recently in Jesup, in southeastern Georgia. One of Mr. NeSmith’s papers in the area, The Press Sentinel in Wayne County, discovered that an Arizona-based company backed by wealthy investors, including Bill Gates, had quietly applied to dump 10,000 tons of coal ash per day in Jesup.

The paper published more than 70 articles about the application, and Mr. NeSmith wrote several editorials. The attention led to public hearings, and the company, Republic Services, to delay its plans.

Many officials also say that without robust local coverage, they are constantly fighting against misinformation that spreads on social media. After the Board of Commissioners in Habersham County, Ga., proposed a bond issue to expand the county jail, speculation spread online about the motivations for the project and the burden for taxpayers, said Stacy Hall, the board’s chairman. Voters defeated the proposal in November.

“Disinformation on social media is our No. 1 problem,” Mr. Hall said. “There is a crisis in getting the facts — the basic facts that only community newspapers can provide.”

The proposed antitrust exemption for news organizations still faces hurdles. Congress passed few bills of note in 2019 — and it may pass even fewer this year, in the face of impeachment and the November election. Conservative think tanks and some consumer groups are pushing back on the bill, wary of giving any antitrust exemptions to businesses.

“Instead of trying to innovate and find solutions that way,” said Neil Chilson, a senior research fellow for technology and innovation at the Charles Koch Institute, “they are trying to make better deals with people with more money, and that doesn’t solve their basic business-model problems.”

Supporters of the legislation said it was not a magic pill for profitability. It could, they say, benefit newspapers with a national reach — like The Times and The Washington Post — more than small papers. Facebook, for instance, has never featured articles from Mr. NeSmith’s newspaper chain in its “Today In” feature, an aggregation of local news from the nation’s smallest papers that can drive a lot of traffic to a news site.

“It will start with larger national publications, and then the question is how does this trickle down,” said Otis A. Brumby III, the publisher of The Marietta Daily Journal in Georgia.

But the supporters say it could stop or at least slow the financial losses at some papers, giving them time to create a new business model for the internet.

“The tech industry platforms benefit from our news,” said Robin Rhodes, the executive director of the Georgia Press Association, which supports the proposal. “And we need to be on a level playing ground.”

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Couple’s wedding pics include dramatic shot of Taal Volcano erupting

One island’s natural disaster is another couple’s perfect wedding backdrop.

Chino and Kat Vaflor married Sunday at a venue roughly 10 miles from Taal Volcano, right as the volcano was erupting. The pictures taken show the pair at the altar with an intensely dramatic background of ash and smoke billowing behind them.

Westlake Legal Group Chino-Kat-Randolf-Evan-Photography-1- Couple’s wedding pics include dramatic shot of Taal Volcano erupting fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e1d76e66-9fb1-597e-b8ef-d0d451c57785 article Alexandra Deabler

Chino and Kat Vaflor married at a venue roughly 10 miles from Taal Volcano Sunday, right as the volcano was erupting. (Randolf Evan Photography)

The once-in-a-lifetime photos were taken by Randolf Evan, New York Post reports.

The wedding party knew of the the volcano, which is located about 37 miles south of Manila, and its potential eruption.

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Despite the warnings, the wedding continued as planned.

In an image shared on Facebook by the venue, Savanna Farm Tagaytay, swirls of smoke are seen in the background while guests look on.

“The wedding continues!” the photo was captioned.

Westlake Legal Group Chino-Kat-Randolf-Evan-Photography-3 Couple’s wedding pics include dramatic shot of Taal Volcano erupting fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e1d76e66-9fb1-597e-b8ef-d0d451c57785 article Alexandra Deabler

The wedding party knew of the potential for the volcano, which is located about 37 miles south of Manila, and its potential eruption. (Randolf Evan Photography)

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On Facebook, the picture received over 20,000 reactions and nearly 6,000 shares as of Monday afternoon.

“What a beautiful picture!” one wrote.

“What a magnificent backdrop,” another commented.

“Beautiful shot,” another wrote.

Westlake Legal Group Chino-Kat-Randolf-Evan-Photography-2 Couple’s wedding pics include dramatic shot of Taal Volcano erupting fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e1d76e66-9fb1-597e-b8ef-d0d451c57785 article Alexandra Deabler

Despite the warnings, the wedding continued as planned. (Randolf Evan Photography)

People in high-risk areas on the island were evacuated. There have been no reports of injuries or deaths.

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Taal is one of the world’s smallest volcanoes and one of the two dozen active ones in the Philippines.

Westlake Legal Group Chino-Kat-Randolf-Evan-Photography-1- Couple’s wedding pics include dramatic shot of Taal Volcano erupting fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e1d76e66-9fb1-597e-b8ef-d0d451c57785 article Alexandra Deabler   Westlake Legal Group Chino-Kat-Randolf-Evan-Photography-1- Couple’s wedding pics include dramatic shot of Taal Volcano erupting fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e1d76e66-9fb1-597e-b8ef-d0d451c57785 article Alexandra Deabler

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Bloomberg takes heat from Iowa, New Hampshire Dems for call to ‘re-order the primary calendar’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122237602001_6122240806001-vs Bloomberg takes heat from Iowa, New Hampshire Dems for call to 're-order the primary calendar' Paul Steinhauser fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox news fnc/politics fnc article 7be4a36e-c8a6-5b99-9837-20ae79c516c5

DES MOINES, Iowa — The Democratic Party chairmen of New Hampshire and Iowa – which together kick off the presidential nominating calendar – are firing back at Mike Bloomberg over the presidential candidate’s new push “to re-order the primary calendar in ways that better reflect our diverse electorate.”

The former New York City mayor and multibillionaire business and media mogul made that call in an op-ed Monday for CNN. He argued that “the two early voting states are unlikely to be consequential in the general election. So as a party, we are spending all of our time and resources outside of the battleground states we need to win.”

And he pledged, if elected, to work with the Democratic National Committee to revamp the primary calendar.

BLOOMBERG’S SPENDING HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS TO RUN CAMPAIGN COMMERCIALS FROM COAST TO COAST

Iowa and New Hampshire – two overwhelmingly white states – have for decades held the first two contests along the road to the White House, attracting plenty of presidential campaign visits in the year leading up to the start of the primaries and caucuses. The small populations in each state have long provided candidates, regardless of their campaign war chests, a level playing field to reach out to voters person-to-person with retail-style politics.

But Iowa and New Hampshire have long faced criticism over their cherished role of leading off the nominating calendar, with the argument that due to their lack of diversity and urban areas, they aren’t reflective of the nation as a whole.

Bloomberg, who jumped into the presidential race late, is skipping campaigning in all four early voting states that hold contests in February — Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina. Instead, he’s concentrating immense firepower on the larger delegate-rich states that vote Super Tuesday, which is March 3, and beyond.

BLOOMBERG, TRUMP, TRADE FIRE ON TWITTER OVER BLOOMBERG’S MASSIVE TV AD BLITZ

Shooting back at Bloomberg, Iowa Democratic Party Chairman Troy Price said in a statement:

“Misplacing frustration with your campaign with falsehoods about the early nominating states is a mistake and we are puzzled by Mr. Bloomberg’s comments. Anyone who writes off Iowa as inconsequential in the general election hasn’t paid attention to history. Iowa’s grassroots organizing structure connects candidates directly with swing voters to build our bench.”

Longtime New Hampshire Democratic Party Chairman Ray Buckley said earlier Monday that “it seems like Michael Bloomberg is having some second thoughts about his choice not to campaign in South Carolina, Nevada, New Hampshire and Iowa — and is doing what many candidates in that position have done who are desperate for some press attention.”

“Also, anyone who thinks New Hampshire isn’t consequential in the general election must also believe that Al Gore served a term as president of the United States,” Buckley added.

Although they pale compared to larger general election battlegrounds such as Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, both Iowa and New Hampshire have often been important general election states.

Besides holding the first primary in the nominating calendar, New Hampshire’s also one of around a dozen battleground states up for grabs in the general election every four years. President Trump lost New Hampshire’s four electoral votes to Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton by less than 3,000 votes in the 2016 election, the smallest margin by popular vote of any of the 50 states.

If then-Vice President Gore had won New Hampshire – he narrowly lost the state to George W. Bush by just over 1 percent – he would have won the White House.

Iowa also saw close contests for president in the 2000, 2004 and 2012 presidential elections, but Trump topped Clinton by nearly 10 percent in 2016 in the state.

Fox News reached out to the Iowa Democratic Party for a response to Bloomberg’s op-ed, but had yet to receive comment at the time this article was published.

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Bloomberg highlighted in his opinion piece that Iowa and New Hampshire “are among the most homogeneous in the nation. While it’s great that candidates reach out to voters in these states at every pancake breakfast and town hall around, what about African-American, Latino, Asian American, Pacific Islanders, and other voters in places like Detroit, Montgomery, Phoenix, and Houston?”

Bloomberg argued that technological advances like social media are giving all presidential candidates accessibility in larger states that were once out of reach to many contenders.

“The traditional justification for giving two small states so much influence is that larger states require more money. But with social media platforms and cable news, there are few barriers to getting a message out — that’s why more than two dozen Democrats entered the race,” Bloomberg said.

And he pledged that “as president, I will ensure the DNC works with state party leaders at every level to re-order the primary calendar in ways that better reflect our diverse electorate and channel more resources into the states we actually need to win in November.”

Bloomberg isn’t the only candidate this cycle to call for Iowa and New Hampshire to lose their primary status. Former San Antonio Mayor and former Housing Secretary Julian Castro, who was the only Latino in the Democratic field, also repeatedly called for the states to lose the position at the front end of the nominating calendar. Castro ended his White House bid earlier this month.

Bloomberg did say at the end of his op-ed: “Don’t get me wrong: I have enormous respect for the voters of Iowa and New Hampshire. Both states are full of devoted citizens. But so are the other 48.”

Bloomberg’s new stance seems to be a shift from last week.

Campaigning in Ohio on Jan. 8, Bloomberg said “I think we’ve got a tradition here of four states … they work very hard. They love the attention. The system has gotten used to it. And I guess the Democratic Party probably shouldn’t take it away.”

But this past weekend, Bloomberg seemed to discount the results in the early voting states in an exclusive interview with Fox News.

“I don’t know that it really means anything other than if they win. They get the votes from that state with the delegates to the DNC convention. Does that have an impact on other states? It used to, but I don’t think it does anymore,” he said.

Fox News’ Kelly Phares contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122237602001_6122240806001-vs Bloomberg takes heat from Iowa, New Hampshire Dems for call to 're-order the primary calendar' Paul Steinhauser fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox news fnc/politics fnc article 7be4a36e-c8a6-5b99-9837-20ae79c516c5   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122237602001_6122240806001-vs Bloomberg takes heat from Iowa, New Hampshire Dems for call to 're-order the primary calendar' Paul Steinhauser fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox news fnc/politics fnc article 7be4a36e-c8a6-5b99-9837-20ae79c516c5

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Trump Campaign Adviser Pleads Guilty to Child Porn, Sex Trafficking

Westlake Legal Group 2qjPFzSP141JzuxtK7YwpGsi-JY4fnC2umi60oQO1t4 Trump Campaign Adviser Pleads Guilty to Child Porn, Sex Trafficking r/politics

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Iowa Forum Will Spotlight Presidential Candidates’ Plans To Fix Democracy

Westlake Legal Group 5e1c9b322100003100af8bf7 Iowa Forum Will Spotlight Presidential Candidates’ Plans To Fix Democracy

Things in Washington aren’t working right now. 

Ten years ago, the Supreme Court opened the floodgates on political spending, giving outsize influence to corporations and wealthy donors who often face no accountability because their contributions are allowed to remain secret. 

Today, not surprisingly, Americans have less and less trust in government. A majority see corruption as a significant problem and want major changes to the political system. 

But what would those changes look like? And is it even possible to make them happen?

On Sunday, Jan. 19, at 3:00 p.m. Central time in Des Moines, Iowa, HuffPost’s Kevin Robillard and I will be talking with four of the Democratic presidential candidates ― Former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (Minn.), former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.) ― about their plans to address the dominance of big money in politics, protect the right to vote, ensure fair courts and create a democracy that the American people believe works for them.

The We The People 2020: Protecting our Democracy a Decade After Citizens United forum will be sponsored by the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, Common Cause, End Citizens United Action Fund, MoveOn Political Action, NAACP, People For the American Way, Progress Iowa and Public Citizen.

The candidates will present their plans for structural change and will take questions both from the moderators and the audience. 

A livestream of the event will be available on HuffPost that day. Please mark your calendars and tune in. 

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Canadian C.E.O. Tweets His Anger at U.S. Over Jet Downed in Iran

Westlake Legal Group 13mapleleaf-facebookJumbo Canadian C.E.O. Tweets His Anger at U.S. Over Jet Downed in Iran United States Politics and Government United States Ukraine International Airlines Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Michael McCain Maple Leaf Foods Incorporated Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Canada

Michael McCain, the chief executive of a Canadian meat processor, Maple Leaf Foods, strongly criticized President Trump and his foreign policy on Twitter on Sunday night.

In tweets published on the company’s official account but signed by him, Mr. McCain blamed “U.S. government leaders” and “a narcissist in Washington” for policies that led to last week’s downing of a jetliner near Tehran, killing all 176 people on board, including 57 Canadians.

Among the dead, Mr. McCain said, was the family of a Maple Leaf Foods colleague.

The plane was shot down as tensions escalated after the United States killed an Iranian military commander, Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani. Iranian leaders eventually conceded that they had shot the aircraft down and said it was a human error.

The statements, from the head of a large Canadian company, were a rare show of political anger from the corporate world, where executives tend to stay out of the fray. The tweets stated that they were personal reflections.

Maple Leaf Foods confirmed that Mr. McCain had written the statements, and said he would not comment further. “Michael would prefer to let the messages in his tweets speak for themselves,” the company said in an email. “He felt the tragedy warranted his response.”

“I am very angry, and time isn’t making me less angry,” Mr. McCain wrote. “A MLF colleague of mine lost his wife and family this week to a needless, irresponsible series of events in Iran.”

“U.S. government leaders unconstrained by checks/balances, concocted an ill-conceived plan to divert focus from political woes,” he continued.

The statement did not use Mr. Trump’s name. Mr. McCain said a “narcissist in Washington tears world accomplishment apart; destabilizes region.” This had made the United States “unwelcomed everywhere in the area including Iraq” and the “collateral damage of this irresponsible, dangerous, ill-conceived behavior” meant that “63 Canadians needlessly lost their lives in the crossfire, including the family of one of my MLF colleagues (his wife + 11 year old son)!” he said.

Mr. McCain, who has worked for Maple Leaf Foods since 1995 and became the chief executive in February, signed off saying: “We are mourning and I am livid. Michael McCain.”

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Rep. Chip Roy: California’s homeless crisis could be migrating to Austin – Here’s how to tackle it

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113344758001_6113346388001-vs Rep. Chip Roy: California's homeless crisis could be migrating to Austin – Here's how to tackle it fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Chip Roy article 98100745-29c2-5d82-a7cc-36501825910f

In my hometown, the phrase “Keep Austin Weird,” popularized on T-shirts and bumper stickers, symbolizes the funky, and historically offbeat, culture of the people and businesses of Texas’ capital city. But over the past several months, an ordinance approved by the Austin City Council and defended by Mayor Steve Adler has produced “tent cities” for the homeless and a surge in violent crime.

As droves of Californians move to Texas for jobs, it appears they and their values are turning parts of Austin from merely “weird” to potentially dangerous mirror images of failed California cities.

Beginning last July, the city implemented a new policy allowing homeless people to sleep and camp in public spaces. To be clear, we should do all we can in our community to make sure everyone has a home. But this policy does nothing to address the growing problem of housing affordability in Austin, has endangered the community, and is a bandaid approach that actually perpetuates homelessness.

AUSTIN ‘STABBING INCIDENT’ SEES ONE KILLED, THREE HURT; SUSPECT IN CUSTODY

News from California about that state’s housing problems provides clear evidence that allowing the homeless to camp in the open creates public health and safety crises. Poor sanitation for homeless individuals living on the streets led to an outbreak of Hepatitis A in 2017 that grew to include communities up and down the state.

It is one of the reasons that so many Californians are seeking refuge in the state of Texas.

The residents of Austin deserve to walk the streets in safety and peace — and the homeless themselves deserve better than the “promise” of a tent in a public park.

As the congressman representing much of downtown Austin, I have seen and heard the impact of the homeless problem. Local business owners have told me about their increased security needs and of finding needles in their parking lots. These developments not only endanger the local community but also will have an impact on visitors’ perceptions of the city, threatening the vitally important tourism dollars that come to Austin every year.

The changes in Austin came at the same time that the downtown area experienced an 18 percent increase in violent crime during the first 10 months of 2019.

The tragic incidents of last week—when a homeless man fatally stabbed two individuals at a restaurant and subsequently died of his own injuries—speak to the trauma the homeless problem causes for all Austin residents, including the homeless themselves.

In response to the murders last week and the surge in violent crime in downtown Austin, Gov. Abbott wisely directed the Texas Department of Public Safety Thursday to patrol sections of downtown, as well as areas near the University of Texas campus.

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The city can and must do better to solve the problems of homelessness and make sure all Austin residents feel safe. City officials and community organizations can work together to provide individuals with access to temporary shelters, mental health care, and social services that will provide not just short-term assistance to displaced individuals, but long-term plans to get them in stable, permanent housing.

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More broadly, Austin must do a better job on the issue of housing affordability. As one of the nation’s fastest-growing cities, our housing stock must grow to accommodate our burgeoning population. Otherwise, a shortage of houses will push prices and rents ever-upward, making any “solutions” to the homeless problems temporary and short-lived.

Anti-growth zoning restrictions and crushingly burdensome tax rates do not help “solve” the problem rather— as we have seen in recent weeks, have only created more problems by increasing the homeless population.

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As a proud Texan who once enjoyed living downtown – I know our city can come together to solve this problem. The residents of Austin deserve to walk the streets in safety and peace—and the homeless themselves deserve better than the “promise” of a tent in a public park.

Working together, we can prevent California’s homeless and housing crises from migrating to Texas’ capital.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113344758001_6113346388001-vs Rep. Chip Roy: California's homeless crisis could be migrating to Austin – Here's how to tackle it fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Chip Roy article 98100745-29c2-5d82-a7cc-36501825910f   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113344758001_6113346388001-vs Rep. Chip Roy: California's homeless crisis could be migrating to Austin – Here's how to tackle it fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Chip Roy article 98100745-29c2-5d82-a7cc-36501825910f

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2021 GMC Canyon pickup debuts with new face

GMC’s small pickup will soon look more like its big ones.

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The midsize Canyon is being updated for 2021 by swapping its rectangular grille for a larger, six-sided version that resembles the one on the Sierra 1500, along with some other minor styling tweaks.

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The 2020 Canyon features the same rectangular grille the model has featured since its debut in 2015. (GMC)

Along with the fresh exterior styling, the Canyon All Terrain model is being rebooted as the AT4, which is an off-road trim level that’s already been introduced on the Sierra and Acadia SUV.

The AT4 package includes unique 17-inch wheels with 31-inch all-terrain tires, off-road shocks, an electronic locking rear differential, hill descent control, a skid plate for the transfer case and a set of red tow hooks.

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GMC said the top of the line Canyon Denali will be the most luxurious version yet, with features like chrome steps and open-pore ash wood trim, but has not yet released any photos.

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A carryover 308 hp 3.6-liter V6 will be standard on both models, which can also be equipped with the Canyon’s 2.8-liter turbodiesel four-cylinder engine.

FOX NEWS AUTOS TEST: THE 2020 GMC ACADIA AT4 IS AN OFF-ROADISH SUV

Pricing and information about other Canyon models will be available closer to its launch later this year.

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Barr Asks Apple to Unlock iPhones of Pensacola Gunman

Westlake Legal Group 13dc-justice-sub-facebookJumbo Barr Asks Apple to Unlock iPhones of Pensacola Gunman United States Politics and Government United States Defense and Military Forces San Bernardino, Calif, Shooting (2015) Privacy Naval Air Station Pensacola Shooting (2019) mass shootings Justice Department Federal Bureau of Investigation Computer Security Apple Inc

WASHINGTON — Attorney General William P. Barr declared on Monday that a deadly shooting last month at a naval air station in Pensacola, Fla., was an act of terrorism, and he asked Apple in an unusually high-profile request to provide access to two phones used by the gunman.

Mr. Barr’s appeal was an escalation of an ongoing fight between the Justice Department and Apple pitting personal privacy against public safety.

“This situation perfectly illustrates why it is critical that the public be able to get access to digital evidence,” Mr. Barr said, calling on Apple and other technology companies to find a solution and complaining that Apple has provided no “substantive assistance.”

Apple has given investigators materials from the iCloud account of the gunman, Second Lt. Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, a member of the Saudi air force training with the American military, who killed three sailors and wounded eight others on Dec. 6. But the company has refused to help the F.B.I. open the phones themselves, which would undermine its claims that its phones are secure.

Justice Department officials said that they need access to Mr. Alshamrani’s phones to see messages from encrypted apps like Signal or WhatsApp to determine whether he had discussed his plans with others at the base and whether he was acting alone or with help.

“The evidence shows that the shooter was motivated by jihadist ideology,” Mr. Barr said, citing a message that Mr. Alshamrani posted on last year’s anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks warning that “the countdown has begun.” He also visited the 9/11 memorial in New York over the Thanksgiving holiday.

Mr. Alshamrani also posted anti-American, anti-Israeli and jihadist messages on social media, including just two hours before he attacked the base, Mr. Barr said.

Mr. Barr turned up the pressure on Apple a week after the F.B.I.’s top lawyer, Dana Boente, asked the company for help searching Mr. Alshamrani’s iPhones. Apple said that it would turn over only the data it had, implying that it would not work to unlock the phones and hand over the private data on them.

Apple’s stance set the company on a collision course with a Justice Department that has grown increasingly critical of encryption that makes it impossible for law enforcement to search devices or wiretap phone calls.

The confrontation echoed the legal standoff over an iPhone used by a gunman who killed 14 people in a terrorism attack in San Bernardino, Calif., in late 2015. Apple defied a court order to assist the F.B.I. in its efforts to search his device, setting off a fight over whether privacy that was enabled by impossible-to-crack encryption harmed public safety.

As in the investigation into the Pensacola shooting, the San Bernardino gunman, Syed Rizwan Farook, was also dead and no longer had a right to privacy. In both cases, law enforcement officials worked to piece together a clear motive and any ties to extremist groups.

The San Bernardino dispute was resolved when the F.B.I. found a private company to bypass the iPhone’s encryption. Tensions between the two sides, however, remained; and Apple worked to ensure that neither the government nor private contractors could open its phones.

Mr. Alshamrani’s phones are also of interest because he tried to destroy them at some point before he began firing, according to a Justice Department official who spoke on condition of anonymity because the investigation is ongoing.

Justice Department officials have long pushed for a legislative solution to the problem of “going dark,” law enforcement’s term for how increasingly secure phones have made it harder to solve crimes, and the Pensacola investigation gives them a prominent chance to make their case.

But the F.B.I. has been bruised by Mr. Trump’s unsubstantiated complaints that former officials plotted to undercut his presidency and by a major inspector general’s report last month that revealed serious errors with aspects of the Russia investigation. A broad bipartisan consensus among lawmakers allowing the bureau to broaden its surveillance authorities is most likely elusive.

But much has also changed for Apple in the years since Tim Cook, the chief executive of Apple, excoriated the Obama administration publicly and privately in 2014 for attacking strong encryption. Obama officials who were upset by Apple’s stance on privacy, along with its decision to shelter billions of dollars in offshore accounts and make its products almost exclusively in China, aired those grievances quietly.

Now Apple is fighting the Trump administration, and President Trump has shown far more willingness to publicly criticize companies and public figures. When he recently claimed falsely that Apple had opened a manufacturing plant in Texas at his behest, the company stayed remained silent rather than correct him.

At the same time, Apple has financially benefited more under Mr. Trump than under President Barack Obama. It reaped a windfall from the Trump administration’s tax cuts, and Mr. Trump said he might shield Apple from the country’s tariff war with China.

Even so, people close to the company say that Apple will not back down from its unequivocal support of encryption that is impossible to crack.

Mr. Barr indicated on Monday that he is ready for a sharp fight.

He had said last month that finding a way for law enforcement to gain access to encrypted technology was one of the Justice Department’s “highest priorities.”

Mr. Alshamrani, who was killed at the scene of the attack, came to the United States in 2017 and soon started strike-fighter training in Florida. Investigators believe he may have been influenced by extremists as early as 2015.

The investigation into the shooting also found that some Saudi students training with the American military in Pensacola had ties to extremist movements while others possessed pornography, which is forbidden in Saudi Arabia. About a dozen trainees will be sent back to Saudi Arabia as a result.

Investigators have not found evidence to suggest that any of those students knew about Mr. Alshamrani’s contact with extremist groups or his mass shooting plan.

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