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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 81)

Kyrgyzstan ex-president charged with murder following arrest: reports

Former Kyrgyzstan President Almazbek Atambayev was charged with murder Tuesday, following two violent police raids at his residence last week that left one officer dead, reports said.

Atambayev supporters held six officers hostage during the raids that left more than 100 people injured before the former president finally surrendered Thursday. He now faces corruption charges.

KYRGYZSTAN EX-PRESIDENT DETAINED AFTER GOVERNMENT RAID ON HOME; ONE POLICE OFFICER KILLED

Prosecutors additionally charged Atambayev with hostage-taking and causing mass unrest, Reuters reported, citing state news agency Kabar.

Westlake Legal Group Kyrgyzstan-Raid-AP Kyrgyzstan ex-president charged with murder following arrest: reports Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/conflicts fox news fnc/world fnc ecb7532d-d89c-53cd-8d2a-ddcc61b2a837 article

Atambayev supporters repelled the first raid, in which an officer was killed, on Wednesday. Atambayev surrendered after the second raid a day later. (AP Photo/Vladimir Voronin)

National security chief Orozbek Opumbayev further accused Atambayev of planning to stage a coup, the news outlet report.

Atambayev, who was in office from 2011 to 2017, was stripped of the prosecution immunity he enjoyed as a former president in June. Authorities wanted to subpoena him as a witness in the unlawful release of a Chechen crime boss in 2013, the BBC reported.

KYRGYZSTAN’S CABINET RESIGNS AMID POLITICAL TURMOIL

The conflict highlights tensions between Atambayev and his handpicked successor, Acting President Sooronbai Jeenbekov. After Jeenbekov took office in 2017, he purged Atambayev loyalists holding powerful government positions, souring their relationship, according to the BBC.

Jeenbekov has also accused Atambayev of multiple counts of corruption, which Atambayev denies.

Westlake Legal Group Almazbek-Atambayev-AP Kyrgyzstan ex-president charged with murder following arrest: reports Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/conflicts fox news fnc/world fnc ecb7532d-d89c-53cd-8d2a-ddcc61b2a837 article

Atambayev was charged with murder Tuesday following raids on his compound that left one police officer dead, according to reported. (AP)

Kyrgyzstan is a republic in Central Asia that gained autonomy with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. The nation’s first two presidents after independence were both driven from office by riots, and the latest violence has fueled concerns of more instability.

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Russia, Kyrgyzstan’s main sponsor and ally, has called for restraint.

While Russian President Vladimir Putin met with Atambayev last month, he has since publically endorsed Jeenbekov, Reuters reported.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Almazbek-Atambayev-AP Kyrgyzstan ex-president charged with murder following arrest: reports Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/conflicts fox news fnc/world fnc ecb7532d-d89c-53cd-8d2a-ddcc61b2a837 article   Westlake Legal Group Almazbek-Atambayev-AP Kyrgyzstan ex-president charged with murder following arrest: reports Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/conflicts fox news fnc/world fnc ecb7532d-d89c-53cd-8d2a-ddcc61b2a837 article

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Eddie Murphy Powers Comeback Bid In ‘Dolemite Is My Name’ Trailer

Westlake Legal Group 5d52dbc12400006100b772d2 Eddie Murphy Powers Comeback Bid In ‘Dolemite Is My Name’ Trailer

But the actor and comedian, whose last major film success was 2010′s “Shrek Forever After,” appears to be mounting a comeback ― and it looks like his new Netflix movie due out this fall will be a critical component of that. A trailer for “Dolemite Is My Name” dropped Monday, featuring the former “Beverly Hills Cop” star and “Saturday Night Live” trouper as real-life blaxploitation star Rudy Ray Moore. (See the preview below.)

Moore, a comic, turned the stage persona of a kung fu-fighting pimp into his memorable 1975 screen turn as “Dolemite.”

“Dolemite is my name and fucking up motherfuckers is my game,” Murphy’s Moore declares.

There are lots of fine ’70s touches in the clip, not to mention fun appearances by Wesley Snipes, Keegan-Michael Key and others.

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Sanders overtakes Biden in New Hampshire poll

Westlake Legal Group qzkv9wER0NIvwxMpWfmTRLNtuNln7Drtl1tnTTRMR8A Sanders overtakes Biden in New Hampshire poll r/politics

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Hooked On The Internet, South Korean Teens Go Into Digital Detox

Westlake Legal Group 20190722_183041_slide-7920056eb4e837b4368e5f59b047d35e90ccf7f6-s1100-c15 Hooked On The Internet, South Korean Teens Go Into Digital Detox

Computer cafes in South Korea, such as the Oz PC Bang in the Gangnam district of Seoul, are often shiny places with big, comfy chairs, huge screens and fast Internet. Michael Sullivan/NPR hide caption

toggle caption

Michael Sullivan/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  Hooked On The Internet, South Korean Teens Go Into Digital Detox

Computer cafes in South Korea, such as the Oz PC Bang in the Gangnam district of Seoul, are often shiny places with big, comfy chairs, huge screens and fast Internet.

Michael Sullivan/NPR

South Korea is one of the most wired countries in the world. But that level of connectivity is a double-edged sword in a society that some experts say is becoming increasingly addicted to the Internet and where 95% of adults own a smartphone.

“Korea has an environment that allows easy access to computer games and other activities online,” says Sungwon Roh, a psychiatrist at Seoul’s Hanyang University who studies Internet addiction. “You can connect to your smartphone anywhere. Every neighborhood has what we call a ‘PC bang’ or, in English, PC café. Here, Koreans of all ages can access the Internet very easily.”

And those PC bangs are often shiny places with big, comfy chairs, huge screens and fast Internet, all for about a dollar an hour. Most are open 24 hours a day. So it’s no wonder some customers overstay their welcome.

“I’ve seen a lot of customers come here late in the afternoon and leave the next morning. That’s pretty common,” says Lee Kae Seong, the owner of the OZ PC Bang in Seoul’s upmarket Gangnam neighborhood. Some, he says, stay a day or two. And others become… well, ripe.

“Some customers who play for too long, I’m sorry to say, they get smelly,” he says. “And other customers start to complain. So we have to ask them to leave.”

Stories like these help explain why Roh says South Korea is facing a public health crisis — one he sees firsthand while treating patients at his hospital.

“Here I see dramatic cases of both adolescents and adults come to seek professional help,” he says, “because they started to have serious problems in their health, relationships with their family or studies at school from game addiction. Some students will refuse to go to school or even inflict physical force on their parents.”

To some parents in the United States, this might sound distressingly familiar even though mental health experts are still debating the extent of the problem. The American Psychiatric Association does not recognize Internet or online game addiction as a unique mental disorder.

But the South Korean authorities know the country has a problem: Almost 20% of the population — nearly 10 million people — are at serious risk of Internet addiction, according to a 2018 government survey. Roh says the country is trying to do something about it.

“There are regional education offices that provide services such as in-school counseling, screening surveys, preventive disciplines and, for severe cases, addiction camps,” he says. Almost all of the services are financed by the government, at the national or municipal levels, and have been for more than a decade.

Westlake Legal Group 20190719_145343_custom-98c0a8ab88a5f84a75f1339f095a41185a586e07-s1100-c15 Hooked On The Internet, South Korean Teens Go Into Digital Detox

Two young women browse the library at the National Center for Youth Internet Addiction Treatment in Muju, South Korea. Michael Sullivan/NPR hide caption

toggle caption

Michael Sullivan/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  Hooked On The Internet, South Korean Teens Go Into Digital Detox

Two young women browse the library at the National Center for Youth Internet Addiction Treatment in Muju, South Korea.

Michael Sullivan/NPR

One of the camps started by the national government, the National Center for Youth Internet Addiction Treatment, is three hours south of Seoul in the mountainous Muju region.

“We’re targeting teenagers who are heavily dependent on the Internet and smartphones,” says Shim Yong-chool, the director. They’re referred either by their parents or concerned teachers. And all their tech devices are seized when they arrive for the two- to four-week program.

While they’re here, he says, “We help students find a new hobby. Students who are overly dependent on Internet and smartphones will be doing only that [using their phones] when they have extra time. So, we are showing them many other options so they can spend their free time in a healthier way.”

Art classes, volunteering at a local senior center and board games are all on the agenda for the group of 32 girls, ages 13 to 19, on the fifth day of their two-week stay this summer. They’re gathered in a classroom playing a word association game that prompts frequent howls of laughter and huge smiles. And no selfies!

The center’s director says there have been more boys than girls treated there. More of the boys come for game addiction, while girls have tended to be hooked on social media, he says. But that’s not always the case.

Speaking almost in a whisper, a 16-year-old girl says her time at the center has been a painful experience. The center requests NPR not use the names or show the faces of the young people receiving treatment there for privacy reasons.

She recalls feeling “nervous” when she first handed over her phone. “I’ve had my phone since my first year in elementary school. I’ve never been without it since. So I was worried,” she says.

She is less worried five days into the program. She has made some new friends and says she now realizes she can live without her phone. It used to consume her for eight hours a day or more, especially if she was gaming.

Another girl, who is 14, is still struggling. “My hands get shaky, I can’t concentrate,” she says. “When I go back to the dormitory to get some rest, I keep thinking of Facebook. There are hearts there I can collect from a game, but they’ll go away if I don’t take them in three days. That worries me.”

She constantly checks for her phone, too, she says. And she thinks about the games she’s not playing, like Overwatch, which she says she’s good at. Back at home, she would play during the day, after school. Her mother knew she had a problem, the girl says, so her mother would turn the Internet off by bedtime at 10 p.m. The 14-year-old would wait for her mother to fall asleep around 11 p.m., then plug it back in and play until dawn. Then she would go to school.

Westlake Legal Group 20190722_175023_slide-c69adc273bd882070e56f68bb3afb37d617079fd-s1100-c15 Hooked On The Internet, South Korean Teens Go Into Digital Detox

The center emphasizes group activities involving all 32 participants at the facility. Michael Sullivan/NPR hide caption

toggle caption

Michael Sullivan/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  Hooked On The Internet, South Korean Teens Go Into Digital Detox

The center emphasizes group activities involving all 32 participants at the facility.

Michael Sullivan/NPR

She didn’t eat much. Every minute spent eating, she says, was a minute lost gaming.

Is being at the center helping? “No, I don’t think so,” she says. Is she just counting the days until she gets your phone back? “Yes,” she says. And looks down at the floor.

Shim is more hopeful about her chances.

The 14-year-old girl just started, he says. She’ll be better by the end of the two-week camp, he adds. And then there’s the aftercare.

“Each local government has an institution that works with the Ministry of Gender Equality and Family,” he says. “We connect the students to these institutions after the camp so they can receive counseling continuously. It does not end at the camp, we follow up with students through other relevant institutions so that students can constantly get counseling.”

But Shim is worried about the size of the problem.

“The percentage of teenagers dependent on Internet and smartphones is actually increasing,” he says. “So, our organization is expanding and trying to get ready to accept more students.”

The group is building more facilities to accommodate those students to deal with a problem it knows isn’t going away.

In May, the World Health Organization added “gaming disorder” to its list of recognized addictions. That decision hasn’t gone over well with South Korea’s lucrative esports industry, which fears the economic fallout and stigmatization such a designation may bring. But it may bring more resources to a system already struggling to deal with the problem at hand.

The WHO move may also help the U.S. government and mental health professionals to focus on these problems.

“It is important for the U.S. government and relevant experts to pay attention to this issue,” says psychiatrist Roh, “to screen out addicted students and provide adequate therapy to those diagnosed with game addiction.”

South Korea already has its public health crisis, he says. If the U.S. doesn’t act, it won’t be far behind.

Kang Jae-un contributed reporting to this story in Seoul.

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United Airlines changes alcohol policy for pilots after Glasgow incident

United Airlines has updated its alcohol policy for pilots, requiring that they refrain from drinking alcohol for a period of 12 hours before reporting for duty, the carrier has confirmed to Fox News.

The previous guidelines stipulated that pilots have their last alcoholic drink no later than 8 hours before work. The new policy went into effect August 10, United said.

LOOK: PIECES FROM NORWEGIAN AIR FLIGHT RAIN DOWN ‘LIKE BULLETS’ ON NEIGHBORHOOD

It is unclear when exactly the airline made the decision to update the rule, but news of the change was confirmed just over a week after two United pilots were arrested for allegedly failing a breath test prior to takeoff.

Their flight, scheduled to depart from Glasgow Airport for Newark Liberty International Airport on Aug. 3, was canceled following the arrests.

Westlake Legal Group united-airlines United Airlines changes alcohol policy for pilots after Glasgow incident Michael Bartiromo fox-news/travel/general/travel-safety fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/travel fnc article 0260ae0b-6ba2-5b29-ac12-8cee9674ac12

Two United pilots were arrested after reportedly failing a breath test at Glasgow Airport on Aug. 3. (iStock)

The following week, United pilot Glendon Gulliver, 61, was formally charged in a Scotland court with being over the legal alcohol limit prior to the flight. His 45-year-old co-pilot was not charged as of Tuesday.

A representative for United was not able to comment on the pilots’ current employment status with the carrier.

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The Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) guidelines, which cite the Code of Federal Regulations, say that any pilot attempting to operate an aircraft must wait a minimum of 8 hours, though “a more conservative approach is to wait 24 hours from the last use of alcohol before flying.” However, the FAA also warns pilots to consider the effects of a hangover and “use good judgment.”

Federal regulations also prohibit any crew member from working on a civil aircraft within 8 hours of consuming alcohol.

In similar headlines, also on Aug. 3, an Air Wisconsin flight attendant was released from an Indiana jail for allegedly being drunk while working a United Express flight, a branch of United Airlines.

Charging documents detail that the woman’s erratic behavior during the trip made some passengers feel “scared for their lives” during the flight from Chicago to South Bend, Ind.

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Fox News’ David Aaro and Louis Casiano contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group UnitedPlaneIstock2 United Airlines changes alcohol policy for pilots after Glasgow incident Michael Bartiromo fox-news/travel/general/travel-safety fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/travel fnc article 0260ae0b-6ba2-5b29-ac12-8cee9674ac12   Westlake Legal Group UnitedPlaneIstock2 United Airlines changes alcohol policy for pilots after Glasgow incident Michael Bartiromo fox-news/travel/general/travel-safety fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/travel fnc article 0260ae0b-6ba2-5b29-ac12-8cee9674ac12

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22 States Sue EPA To Block Trump’s Coal-Friendly Power Plant Rule

Westlake Legal Group 5d52dec83b0000a912db2a80 22 States Sue EPA To Block Trump’s Coal-Friendly Power Plant Rule

Twenty-two states sued the Trump administration Tuesday to block the Environmental Protection Agency’s new power plant rule, arguing it fails to adequately protect Americans from pollution and the ravages of climate change

The District of Columbia and seven municipalities, including Los Angeles and New York City, joined the states in a bid to halt the EPA from implementing the Affordable Clean Energy rule. 

The White House finalized the rule in June, all but completing its rollback of the Obama-era Clean Power Plan. But the new rule offers regulators fewer tools to cut planet-heating emissions and eases the Clean Power Plan’s restrictions on coal-fired power stations, kneecapping the federal government’s effort to address the climate crisis at a moment when scientific projections demand a much stronger response. 

“Without significant course correction, we are careening towards a climate disaster,” New York Attorney General Letitia James said in a statement. “Rather than staying the course with policies aimed at fixing the problem and protecting people’s health, safety, and the environment, the Trump Administration repealed the Clean Power Plan and replaced it with this ‘Dirty Power’ rule.”

The lawsuit mirrors the Republican effort to stop the Clean Power Plan just four years ago. In 2015, 24 states, led by Oklahoma, sued the Obama administration over the regulation, winning a stay in the Supreme Court. The ruling was only supposed to put the emissions-cutting rule on pause. But after President Donald Trump won in November 2016, he named then-Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt as his EPA administrator.

Pruitt moved quickly to repeal the Clean Power Plan. But the Clean Air Act mandates the EPA regulate planet-heating carbon dioxide as a pollutant, meaning eliminating the Clean Power Plan required a replacement. 

By the time he resigned in disgrace amid mounting scandals last summer, the process of writing a rule was already underway. Last August, the EPA ― by then under the command of then-Deputy Administrator Andrew Wheeler, himself a former coal lobbyist who opposed the Clean Power Plan ― unveiled the Affordable Clean Energy rule. 

The new rule abandoned the Clean Power Plan’s incentives for utilities to shift from coal to cleaner-burning natural gas or renewables, or join a regional carbon trading scheme that caps emissions and lets generators buy and sell pollution permits. Instead, the ACE rule dictates that power plants can only reduce emissions with technologies that work “inside the fence-line,” meaning retrofits that capture or reduce gases spewed from individual plants.  

To keep global warming within 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, the U.S. power sector must cut emissions 74% below 2005 levels by 2030, according to the International Energy Agency. The ACE rule, by the EPA’s own estimates, only projects reducing emissions by 35% below 2005 levels ― and only 1% of that is attributable to the regulation, the lawsuit alleged. 

“President Trump’s Dirty Power Plan is more than just disgraceful and immoral, it is unlawful,” California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said in a statement. “There is no justification for gutting a law that would have significantly reduced emissions and prevented thousands of premature deaths per year. While the Trump Administration might lack the necessary courage, we’re prepared to confront the climate crisis head-on.”

The EPA did not immediately respond to a request for comment. 

This story was updated with more details on the Affordable Clean Energy rule and its background. 

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This University Has Banned Beef Products To Help ‘Save The Planet’

Beef burgers have been banned by a university as part of efforts to tackle the climate emergency.

Goldsmiths, University of London, said it is to remove all beef products from sale from next month as the institution attempts to become carbon neutral by 2025.

Students will also face a 10 pence (12 cent) levy on bottles of water and single-use plastic cups when the academic year starts to discourage use of the products.

The college’s new Warden, Professor Frances Corner, said staff and students “care passionately about the future of our environment” and that “declaring a climate emergency cannot be empty words.”

The move has been backed by Goldsmiths Students’ Union, with president Joe Leam saying that the university has a “huge carbon footprint” and that the promise to eradicate this in the next few years is needed. 

As well as the beef ban and levy on single-use water bottles and plastic cups, there are plans to install more solar panels across the college’s New Cross campus in southeast London and switch to a 100% clean energy supplier as soon as possible.

Westlake Legal Group 5d5175393b00004b00daee3e This University Has Banned Beef Products To Help ‘Save The Planet’

Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm via Getty Images

Officials said Goldsmiths will also continue to invest in its allotment area and identify other places where planting could help to absorb carbon dioxide, and will review how all students can access modules which cover climate change and the role of both individuals and organizations in reducing carbon emissions.

Corner said: “The growing global call for organizations to take seriously their responsibilities for halting climate change is impossible to ignore.

“Though I have only just arrived at Goldsmiths, it is immediately obvious that our staff and students care passionately about the future of our environment and that they are determined to help deliver the step change we need to cut our carbon footprint drastically and as quickly as possible.”

<img class="image__src" src="https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/5d5175663b00003900daee3f.jpeg?ops=scalefit_720_noupscale" alt="Professor Frances Corner“>

PA Media: UK News Professor Frances Corner

Figures show that Goldsmiths emits around 3.7 million kg of carbon emissions each year, the college said.

Referring to the statistic in a blog, Leam said: “It is clear our university has a huge carbon footprint. The promise to have ended this by 2030 at the latest, with the hope of doing so by 2025, is one which is needed.

“Whilst this plan/action is only the beginning, and much work is yet to be done, it is fantastic to see Goldsmiths taking responsibility and responding to its impact on the climate.”

Rosie Rogers, climate emergency campaigner for Greenpeace UK, said: “It’s encouraging to see an institution like Goldsmiths not simply declaring a climate emergency, but acting on it.

“From energy use, to food sales and plastic pollution – all universities and organizations with campus sites can make changes across their facilities that are better for our planet.

“We call on others to urgently follow suit, and to include cutting all ties from fossil fuel funding in their climate emergency response.” 

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Chaos Grips Hong Kong’s Airport as Police Clash with Protesters

HONG KONG — Bearing batons and pepper spray, Hong Kong riot police officers clashed with anti-government protesters who crippled the airport on Tuesday for the second straight day, chaos that underscored the deepening unrest gripping the city.

The mayhem at the airport — unprecedented in the Asian financial hub known for efficiency and order — came hours after mass protests forced the airport to suspend check-ins for the second consecutive day. The city’s embattled leader, Carrie Lam, had pleaded earlier for order after days of escalating street violence.

Thousands of demonstrators had occupied parts of Hong Kong International Airport’s departures and arrivals halls on Tuesday afternoon, with some using luggage trolleys to block travelers from reaching their departure gates. The Hong Kong Airport Authority later closed check-in services and advised all passengers to leave as soon as possible.

Monday was the first day that demonstrators had seriously disrupted operations at the airport, one of the world’s busiest, and another sign that the two-month-old protest movement is turning to increasingly desperate measures, amid threats from Beijing and the refusal of Ms. Lam, Hong Kong’s chief executive, to meet their demands.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_159228123_028e0361-b55e-45bb-a665-29c028a36b21-articleLarge Chaos Grips Hong Kong’s Airport as Police Clash with Protesters Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Lam, Carrie (1957- ) Hong Kong International Airport Hong Kong Demonstrations, Protests and Riots China Cathay Pacific Airways Limited Attacks on Police airports

The mayhem came hours after a mass protest forced the airport to suspend check-ins for the second day in a row.CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

The clashes began late in the evening when police vans arrived outside the departures hall, which was full of black-clad protesters. Some of the protesters went outside, blocked the vans with makeshift blockades and threw plastic bottles at them.

Minutes later, some of the officers began running after the protesters outside the terminal, wrestling some to the ground with batons. As midnight neared, thousands of protesters were still in the airport, while bewildered travelers, fresh off arriving flights, walked past them and into the sweltering night.

The protesters at the airport on Tuesday were particularly angered by the tactics used by the police against demonstrators on Sunday, including firing tear gas into a train station and sending officers into crowds dressed as demonstrators to make arrests. With tensions running high at the airport late Tuesday, a group of demonstrators surrounded and attacked a man they accused of being a mainland Chinese police officer impersonating a protester, causing him to faint.

Hong Kong is facing its worst political crisis since the former British colony returned to Chinese rule in 1997 as a semiautonomous territory. The intensifying unrest this month has stoked widespread anxiety in the financial hub, in part because Beijing has started to warn protesters in increasingly strident terms to stand down or face consequences.

As of Tuesday night, arriving flights were still scheduled, along with some departures, apparently for passengers who had managed to clear immigration before check-in closed. But Cathay Pacific Airways, Hong Kong’s flag carrier, told its customers to postpone “nonessential travel” out of the city for the rest of the day and on Wednesday.

Video

Westlake Legal Group merlin_159218919_514e203a-7fc8-4739-9a78-218d5c4b3a98-videoSixteenByNine3000 Chaos Grips Hong Kong’s Airport as Police Clash with Protesters Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Lam, Carrie (1957- ) Hong Kong International Airport Hong Kong Demonstrations, Protests and Riots China Cathay Pacific Airways Limited Attacks on Police airports

More than 150 flights were canceled at Hong Kong’s airport on Monday and check-ins were suspended for a second day on Tuesday after thousands of demonstrators filled the arrivals and departures hall.CreditCreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

Demonstrators had staged a days-long sit-in in the arrivals hall over the weekend that did not noticeably disrupt services.

On Tuesday, the United Nations’ human rights chief, Michelle Bachelet, said there was evidence that the Hong Kong police had violated international standards for the use of less-lethal weapons like tear gas.

In a news conference with combative reporters on Tuesday morning, Hong Kong’s leader, Carrie Lam, urged protesters to obey the law.

“The stability and well-being of seven million people are in jeopardy,” Mrs. Lam said, her voice breaking slightly. “Take a minute to think about that. Look at our city, our home. Do we really want to push our home to the abyss where it will be smashed into pieces?”

During street clashes this summer, the Hong Kong police have regularly fired tear gas, rubber bullets and bean bag rounds to disperse protesters, even in residential areas and crowded shopping districts. On Sunday night, in addition to using tear gas in a train station, the police beat protesters and chased some down an escalator at another station.

Chief Executive Carrie Lam emerging from behind police barriers that surround her office, in Hong Kong on Tuesday.CreditThomas Peter/Reuters

The authorities, for their part, accused protesters of attacking officers with bricks and gasoline bombs.

[Here’s a guide to what prompted the Hong Kong protests and how they evolved.]

On Tuesday, Mrs. Lam was frequently interrupted by journalists who demanded an explanation for what protesters have called blatant police misconduct. She looked more visibly emotional than she has at other recent public appearances.

“Will you apologize to the girl?” one reporter asked, referring to a woman who was hit in her right eye on Sunday, apparently by a projectile fired by police officers, during the city’s 10th straight weekend of mass demonstrations.

“Why have you never condemned the police?” another asked.

Toward the end of the briefing, Mrs. Lam said that police operations were not determined by “someone like myself, who is outside the police.”

Also on Tuesday, medical professionals held rallies at several local hospitals against the police’s tactics and in solidarity with the woman who was hit in the eye on Sunday. The Hong Kong newspaper Apple Daily reported that the injured woman is a veterinary nurse.

Some demonstrators used luggage trolleys to stop passengers from reaching their departure gates.CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

The rallies are a “direct response to what happened on Sunday,” Dr. Alfred Wong, a cardiologist who works at Tuen Mun hospital in northwest Hong Kong, said at a gathering there that drew several hundred of his colleagues.

The wave of protests began in early June, in opposition to legislation that would have allowed extraditions to mainland China, where the courts are controlled by the Communist Party.

[Read how the protests have put Hong Kong on a collision course with the Communist Party.]

They have since morphed into calls for more direct elections, a call for Mrs. Lam to resign and an investigation of the police, among other demands.

Beijing, which views the unrest as a direct challenge to its authority, has warned the protesters to stop and has leaned on Hong Kong’s political and business elite to close ranks behind Mrs. Lam, a career civil servant.

Much of the pressure on the business community has focused in recent days on Cathay Pacific, one of the territory’s best-known international brands. The Chinese government has forced it to bar staffers who support or participate in the protests from doing any work involving flights to mainland China.

Protesters held signs and handed leaflets to arriving travelers.CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

On Tuesday afternoon, Rupert Hogg, the airline’s chief executive, warned employees against participating in Tuesday’s airport demonstration because it was not sanctioned by the government.

“It is important that you do not support or participate in this protest,” Mr. Hogg said in an internal email. “Again, we would be concerned about your safety if this protest becomes disorderly or violent.” Cathay also said on Tuesday that it had suspended an officer for misusing company information the day before.

As if to eliminate any possible ambiguity about the airline’s stance on the unrest, Cathay’s largest shareholder, the Hong Kong-based conglomerate Swire Pacific, issued a statement on Tuesday condemning “all illegal activities and violent behavior.”

So far, the disruptions have not affected cargo flights in or out of Hong Kong’s airport, which handles more cargo traffic than any other airport in the world. But more and more airfreight is carried nowadays in the bellies of wide-body passenger planes, and these shipments have invariably been disrupted.

On Tuesday, the Hong Kong Public Opinion Research Institute released the results of a public survey showing that Mrs. Lam’s popularity rating in early August had reached a record low for any chief executive.

The Hong Kong Airport Authority said operations had been “seriously disrupted.”CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

But Dixon Ming, a researcher at the institute, told reporters that the protesters could also lose public trust if they continued to target the city’s public transit system.

The continued disruptions at the airport on Tuesday left some travelers frustrated and angry. Some described themselves as supporters of the protest movement who had grown disillusioned with it.

“Why are you not letting me in?” one traveler told a group of protesters outside an entrance to the airport’s departure gates, video footage showed. “I support you, but I think your strategy is wrong.”

Maisa Sodebayashi, a Brazilian who works in a car factory in Japan, said on Monday afternoon that she had been stranded in the airport for about 24 hours and counting, after landing there on a connecting flight to Rio de Janeiro.

Ms. Sodebayashi, 32, said that while she understood the protesters were fighting for democracy, she also wanted to go home.

“Honestly, I don’t know what to do,” she said, standing beside a customer service desk.

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Larry Elder defends Trump’s new green card rule: ‘Incompatible to have porous borders and a welfare state’

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2019-08-13-at-11.10.50-AM Larry Elder defends Trump's new green card rule: 'Incompatible to have porous borders and a welfare state' Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 503d633b-82bf-5137-a180-267f9552598b

Talk radio host Larry Elder said on Tuesday that immigrants coming into the U.S. should benefit Americans, defending the Trump administration’s new rule that strengthens federal officials’ ability to deny green cards to immigrants after determining their likelihood of getting government aid.

“I kind of thought that people coming to this country are supposed to benefit us and not benefit them. Our welfare state is bigger than ever and it is incompatible to have porous borders and a welfare state,” Elder told “Fox & Friends.”

Elder went on to say, “I think it’s just common sense to say if you come here, you ought not to be a charge on taxpayers. Why is that so controversial?”

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION BOOSTS ABILITY TO DENY GREEN CARDS TO IMMIGRANTS USING WELFARE PROGRAMS

Officials described the so-called “public charge” rule as a way to ensure those granted permanent residency are self-sufficient — and protect taxpayers in the process.

The updated rule will better define, and expand, the factors that can be considered to deny an applicant on these grounds.

While the “public charge” inadmissibility standard has long been part of U.S. immigration law, the term has not been formally defined in statute. The new rule, which will go into effect on October 15, will define “public charge” as an immigrant who receives one or more designated public benefits for more than 12 months within a 36-month period.

Elder addressed concerns about the Trump administration measure being “anti-immigrant.”

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION SEEKS TO BREAK UP IMMIGRATION JUDGES’ UNION

“Democrats used to say the same kinds of things that Trump is saying right now, but now that Trump is saying them, he’s harsh, he’s unfair, he’s xenophobic, if not racist,” he argued.

The “public charge” inadmissibility standard was part of U.S. immigration law before Trump was in office. The new rule goes into effect on October 15.

“Donald Trump ran to do something about immigration, about illegal immigration. He ran on that platform. We take in about a million people legally every year and several hundred thousands of people who are here illegally,” Elder said.

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“We have no idea how many people who are here illegally,” he added.

“There was a study recently done by some Yale professors who estimate the number at 20 million. This is costing us a great deal of money. Especially, the unskilled,” Elder said.

Fox News’ Adam Shaw contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2019-08-13-at-11.10.50-AM Larry Elder defends Trump's new green card rule: 'Incompatible to have porous borders and a welfare state' Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 503d633b-82bf-5137-a180-267f9552598b   Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2019-08-13-at-11.10.50-AM Larry Elder defends Trump's new green card rule: 'Incompatible to have porous borders and a welfare state' Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 503d633b-82bf-5137-a180-267f9552598b

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U.S. to Delay Some China Tariffs Until Stores Stock Up for Holiday Shoppers

Westlake Legal Group 13dc-chinatrade2-facebookJumbo U.S. to Delay Some China Tariffs Until Stores Stock Up for Holiday Shoppers United States Politics and Government United States Customs (Tariff) China

The Trump administration on Tuesday narrowed the list of Chinese products it plans to impose new tariffs on as of Sept. 1, delaying levies on cellphones, laptop computers, toys and other consumer goods until after stores stock up for the back-to-school and holiday shopping seasons.

The move, which pushed off a new 10 percent tariff on some goods and spared others entirely, came as President Trump faces mounting pressure from businesses and consumer groups over the harm they say the continuing trade war between the United States and China is doing.

Mr. Trump’s earlier tariffs on Chinese imports were carefully crafted to hit businesses in ways that everyday Americans would mostly not notice. But his announcement this month of the 10 percent tariff on $300 billion of Chinese goods meant consumers would soon feel the trade war’s sting more directly.

“Until such time as there is a deal, we’ll be taxing them,” Mr. Trump said at the time.

On Tuesday, the United States trade representative’s office shifted gears, saying that while the new tariffs would take effect as threatened, some notable items would not immediately be subject to them.

Consumer electronics, video game consoles, some toys, computer monitors and some footwear and clothing items were among the items the trade representative’s office said would not be hit with tariffs until Dec. 15 — giving retailers time to stockpile what they need for their busiest time of year.

The administration also said some products were being removed from the tariff list altogether “based on health, safety, national security and other factors.”

Stocks rallied on the news, with the S&P 500 climbing nearly 2 percent in morning trading. The benchmark index was lifted, in part, by stocks of retailers and computer chip producers, two industries that have been sensitive to indications that trade tensions were getting either better or worse.

Best Buy, which gets a many of the products it sells from China, was among the best-performing stocks in the S&P 500, up more than 8 percent in morning trading. The Nasdaq composite index rose more than 2 percent.

Mr. Trump has been pressing Beijing since last year to make a trade deal that would, among other things, strengthen protections for American intellectual property, open Chinese markets to American business and result in China buying large quantities of American energy and agricultural goods.

But negotiators for the United States and China have made little progress since May, when progress stalled out over several issues. The stumbling blocks include whether Mr. Trump would roll back the 25 percent tariffs the administration has already imposed on roughly $250 billion of Chinese goods and whether Beijing would enshrine in law the reforms it has pledged to make.

Liu He, China’s vice premier and the country lead trade negotiator, spoke with Robert Lighthizer, the United States trade representative, and Steven Mnuchin, the Treasury secretary, on Tuesday, and the three agreed to speak again in two weeks, the state-run Xinhua News Agency reported.

On Tuesday, Mr. Trump criticized China for not making large purchases of American farm goods, suggesting that the tariffs might force them into action.

“As usual, China said they were going to be buying ‘big’ from our great American Farmers,” he wrote. “So far they have not done what they said. Maybe this will be different!”

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