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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 82)

Poll: Sanders Rises, But Socialism Isn’t Popular With Most Americans

Westlake Legal Group ap_19163690814236_custom-96ddc18d21b5ccaf2fb7c0f4cac18645f001a331-s1100-c15 Poll: Sanders Rises, But Socialism Isn't Popular With Most Americans

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders speaks at George Washington University in June 2019 about his economic philosophy of democratic socialism. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Poll: Sanders Rises, But Socialism Isn't Popular With Most Americans

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders speaks at George Washington University in June 2019 about his economic philosophy of democratic socialism.

Andrew Harnik/AP

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is rising in the polls among Democrats, but questions about his electability against President Trump persist because he self-identifies as a democratic socialist.

A new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll backs up the idea that the label could hurt him.

Asked about their impression of socialism, only about a quarter of Americans (28%) said they have a favorable view, while almost 6-in-10 (58%) said they had an unfavorable impression.

If socialism is so unpopular with Americans, how can Sanders be on the rise in the Democratic primary? Because Democrats and, more specifically, progressives view socialism favorably. Half of Democrats said so, while more than two-thirds of progressives did.

Just 23% of independents, though, and 7% of Republicans viewed socialism favorably.

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Views of socialism grow more unfavorably the older the generation, but even 50% of Gen Z and Millennials had an unfavorable view of it, as opposed to just 38%, who had a favorable one.

Suburban voters, who have been trending with Democrats since Trump’s election, are overwhelmingly against it by a 27%-to-61% margin.

Capitalism, on the other hand, was viewed overwhelmingly favorably by a 57%-to-29% margin. But a majority of progressives (52%) had an unfavorable view of capitalism, as did a 45%-to-37% plurality of African Americans.

The views of capitalism versus socialism is one reason why Republicans prefer to face Sanders in the general election. They and veteran Democrats point out that Sanders hasn’t yet faced the likely barrage of attacks around his economic belief system — Democratic socialism.

But Sanders, in this poll and others, does beat President Trump in a head-to-head match up, 48% to 45%. That’s something his campaign and surrogates are eager to point out.

In June 2019, Sanders reiterated his case for Democratic socialism, as he defines it — a push for a “New Deal” of the 21st century, in line with Western European countries that have policies like universal health care and paid leave.

In a 2015 Democratic presidential debate, Sanders said, “I believe in a society where all people do well, not just a handful of billionaires.”

Warren is top second choice, but mostly of Sanders supporters

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has tried to distinguish herself from Sanders by calling herself a capitalist. But she has slid in the polls, as progressives appear to have begun to coalesce around Sanders.

In the latest NPR poll, Warren is fourth with 12%, down 5 points from December, the last time Democratic preferences were tested.

It turns out Warren leads as Democratic voters’ top second-choice candidate — 23% say she’s their second choice, followed by Sanders’ 14%; Biden, Buttigieg and Bloomberg each get 13%; Klobuchar is the second choice of 10% of Democratic voters.

Unfortunately for Warren, many of those who list her as their second choice are Sanders supporters. And that’s the difficult position Warren is in. She most needs the support of progressives, who are largely supporting Sanders, and she has not been able to wrest them away.

She is the second choice of 45% of Sanders supporters. Fourteen percent of Sanders backers would go with former Vice President Joe Biden as a second choice; 13% would go with former New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg, and 11% would pick former Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

Bloomberg and Biden, on the other hand, take equally from each other — 28% of each of their supporters said the other is their second-choice pick. Buttigieg, Sanders, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar and Warren follow.

Optimism about the country hits eight-year high

The percentage of Americans saying the country is headed in the right direction was just 41%, but that represents the highest level since March of 2012 in Marist’s polling.

That’s up 6 points from October. Half the country still says the country is headed in the wrong direction, but the 50% who said so is the lowest the poll has recorded since January 2011.

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Part of that is likely because of the economy. Unemployment was at just 3.6% for the month of January, the 12th straight month of sub-4% unemployment.

What’s more, two-thirds of people say the economy is working well for them.

President Trump is benefiting from that — 51% of all adults and 54% of registered voters approve of the job Trump is doing handling the economy.

That’s higher than his overall approval rating of just 42% of all adults and 44% of registered voters. A majority of Americans (51%) still disapprove of the job the president is doing overall.

Beating Trump is most important to Democratic voters

The strength of the economy is likely aiding Trump’s reelection chances. Democrats seem to understand that he could be tough to beat, which might be why, by a 55%-42% margin, Democrats say picking a nominee who has the best chance of beating Trump is more important than someone who shares their position on most issues.

Not surprisingly, overwhelming majorities of Bloomberg and Biden supporters said it was more important to pick someone who could beat Trump, while the opposite was true for Sanders backers.

Of Bloomberg voters, 70% said it was more important to beat Trump, and 63% of Biden backers said the same.

When it comes to Sanders, though, 60% said it was more important for the nominee to share their values.

People 45 and older (66%), whites (65%) and suburban women (64%) were the most likely to say picking someone who could win was most important.

Voters under 45 (59%) and independents (53%) and non-whites (50%) were the most likely to say it was most important to pick someone who shares their positions.

A quarter of Democrats could stay home or back someone else in November

One danger sign for Democrats is that nearly 1 in 5 Democratic voters or independents who lean Democratic say that if their preferred candidate doesn’t get the nomination, they’ll either stay home, vote for someone else or vote for Trump.

Of that group, 12% of Sanders backers said they would not vote for president if he is not the nominee.

More than a quarter of voters under 45 (26%) said they would not vote for the Democratic nominee if it’s not the candidate they support, including 10% who said they would not vote for president at all, 11% who would vote for someone else and 5% who said they’d vote for Trump.

But the potential decline with young voters has to be a red flag for the Democratic Party.

Independents were the least likely to vote for whoever the nominee is — just 65% said so — 15% said they’d vote for someone else, 12% said they would not vote for president and another 3% would vote for Trump.

Much of that is likely because it’s the heat of the primary battle; these numbers might decline when there is an actual nominee and calls for unity.

Three-quarters (76%) of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents said they would vote for the Democratic nominee, whoever that ends up being.

Democrats lead by a solid margin on the congressional ballot

For all the disarray in the Democratic primary, voters say they’d back a Democrat in their congressional district by an 8-point margin, if elections were held today.

That 48%-to-40% margin is the highest in the poll for Democrats since late October 2018, right before the midterm elections that saw Democrats swept into control of the House.

That Democratic support is buoyed, once again, by suburban women. There is a massive gender gap in the suburbs, with women there saying they’d back a Democrat by a 63%-to-26% margin and men saying they’d back a Republican, 49%-to-40%.

“There might be a lot of fights in those households right now,” said Lee Miringoff, director of the Marist Institute for Public Opinion, which conducted the poll. “It’s probably best to avoid talking about politics [in those homes] right now.”

The live-caller survey of 1,416 adults was conducted from Feb. 13 to Feb. 16 by the Marist Poll at the Marist Institute for Public Opinion. It has a margin of error of +/- 3.3 percentage points. The poll includes 1,164 registered voters with a margin of error of +/- 3.7 percentage points and 527 Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents with a margin of error of +/- 5.4 percentage points.

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Pete Buttigieg Hoped to Win Over Voters of Color. It Still Hasn’t Happened.

Westlake Legal Group merlin_169115586_e229afa0-c598-43f3-83ba-123459a45ea9-facebookJumbo Pete Buttigieg Hoped to Win Over Voters of Color. It Still Hasn’t Happened. Voting and Voters Sanders, Bernard Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Nevada Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Bloomberg, Michael R

LAS VEGAS — Pete Buttigieg liked the line so much, he used it twice.

Asked at back-to-back rallies on Monday what would happen if President Trump claimed election fraud and refused to vacate the White House for him, Mr. Buttigieg said, “If he really doesn’t want to leave, we could work something out, but he’d have to do his chores.”

After a burst of laughter, he said that Democrats couldn’t merely “eke out a win” in November; they must earn a large majority that includes taking the Senate. “So I’m determined to build the broadest, biggest coalition possible,” Mr. Buttigieg said in Carson City, Nev., repeating a message he has leaned on heavily before the Nevada caucuses on Saturday.

Yet Mr. Buttigieg’s efforts at coalition-building — a strategy that helped deliver him top-two finishes in Iowa and New Hampshire — are at risk of falling short now that the primary has come to racially diverse states. The difficulty that Mr. Buttigieg has long had winning over people of color and younger voters has become a more obvious liability. As Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont builds momentum and the former New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg emerges as a contender for the anti-Sanders vote, Mr. Buttigieg’s path to the Democratic nomination may soon be narrowing.

For months, as Mr. Buttigieg poured time and money into Iowa, he told skeptics that winning would beget winning. Even though the first two states are nearly all white, he said that top finishes there would bring more black and Latino supporters.

There is not much sign of that so far in Nevada or South Carolina, which votes Feb. 29.

Mr. Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., said in an interview that he expected his effort in Nevada — more than 100 organizers, a packed events schedule, an ad that he narrates in Spanish — would pay off. “We’re putting in the work,” he said. “You’ve got to earn it.”

“One thing we’re also seeing is a lot of voters will be making a final decision very late in the game,” he added. “Every day of distance run here is going to pay off.”

Undecided voters who have come to hear Mr. Buttigieg in the days before Saturday’s caucuses — as well as in Sacramento, Calif., on Friday — often left as converts.

But Mr. Buttigieg may simply be running out of runway for his candidacy as Nevadans completed four days of early voting on Tuesday, and delegate selection is set to move into high gear in the 14 Super Tuesday states.

Mr. Bloomberg’s addition to a nationally televised debate on Wednesday in Las Vegas may also draw an unflattering contrast between the two former mayors: one who oversaw a city of 100,000, and one who led a metropolis of eight million. Mr. Buttigieg argued that Mr. Bloomberg has gained a spot on the debate stage thanks to lavish spending, but that Democrats should beware.

“There’s more to winning an election than how much money you put in,” he said. “After all, President Trump, I believe, was outspent in the last general election. That should be a warning to anybody who thinks that money alone is going to make somebody the right candidate to defeat Donald Trump.”

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On Tuesday, a Monmouth University poll of Virginia, a diverse state that votes on Super Tuesday, showed Mr. Buttigieg barely in double digits, trailing three others.

Nevada polls, while scarce, suggest it was Mr. Sanders who gained the most ground after winning New Hampshire by an unexpectedly close margin over Mr. Buttigieg.

A Telemundo poll of likely Latino caucusgoers in Nevada that was released Tuesday showed former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. with 34 percent support, Mr. Sanders with 31 percent and Mr. Buttigieg a distant third with 7 percent.

When asked about immigration, as he often is here in a state with a population that is 30 percent Latino, Mr. Buttigieg calls for a path to citizenship for undocumented people and speaks about how Hispanic newcomers to South Bend reversed a decades-long population decline and brought economic vigor. At a rally in Las Vegas on Sunday morning, he answered in Spanish at length to a Spanish-speaker’s question, which led to a chant of “Si se puede.”

That evening in Sparks, Nev., after hearing him at a high school gym, Senen Bonilla, a Mexican immigrant who became a citizen four years ago and plans to caucus for the first time, said she had leaned toward Mr. Sanders but decided that day on Mr. Buttigieg. “He’s young and has a lot more energy,” she said.

Paul Traudt, a Buttigieg supporter and donor in Las Vegas, said: “I’m realistic. I’m not optimistic.” He predicted a third- or fourth-place finish in Nevada for Mr. Buttigieg.

Mr. Traudt, a retired media studies professor, said that as a donor to the campaign, he was getting more incessant appeals to contribute, which might reflect that Mr. Buttigieg spent not just lots of his time but also much of his treasure in Iowa and New Hampshire.

“I’m getting texts from two or three different parties, and it’s just this urgency and ‘we need more money, we need more money, we need more money,’” Mr. Traudt said.

In addition to being nearly 30 percent Latino, Nevada is about 10 percent black and 10 percent Asian-American. Dina Neal, a member of the State Assembly whose district in North Las Vegas is 25 percent black, said that despite Mr. Buttigieg’s robust organizing, he had not made inroads with black caucusgoers.

“There are some people who feel strongly” that Mr. Buttigieg has “not properly courted the African-American community,” said Ms. Neal, who endorsed Mr. Biden.

She attended a brunch on Sunday hosted by the Black Legislative Caucus, where Mr. Buttigieg told the room about his Douglass Plan to end institutional racism. He seemed to draw little attention from the 200 guests, who chatted and served themselves at a buffet.

Attendees mentioned Mr. Buttigieg’s lack of experience as the 38-year-old former mayor of a small city, as well as news accounts of opposition he faced by some black residents of South Bend.

In Nevada, Mr. Buttigieg’s message and strategy are similar to what worked for him in Iowa: Organize and travel widely, especially in areas where Democrats don’t often compete. On Monday, he campaigned in Elko, a deeply Republican region. He drew 300 people, but the effort may pay small dividends: Only 88 Democrats caucused in 2016 in all of Elko County, one of Nevada’s largest by area.

Democratic voters are overwhelmingly concentrated in just two places: Clark County (Las Vegas) and Washoe County (Reno).

While Mr. Biden has attacked Mr. Sanders in recent days, and Mr. Sanders has rounded on Mr. Bloomberg, Mr. Buttigieg has stood largely apart from the fighting. On Tuesday night, his campaign announced that on Wednesday he would join members of Nevada’s powerful Culinary Workers Union, which declined to endorse a candidate, in a picket outside the Palms Casino.

Except for the faintest of swipes at Mr. Sanders in a TV ad here — saying Democrats can’t defeat Mr. Trump by “overreaching” — Mr. Buttigieg has portrayed himself as welcoming independents and “future former Republicans.”

“One of the things that’s really important to me in building this campaign is reaching out to everybody,” he said in Reno. “I’m never going to push somebody away who maybe doesn’t agree 100 percent of the time.”

And at his rallies, there are always Republicans who have soured on Mr. Trump and say they like Mr. Buttigieg’s promise to end the country’s bitter polarization.

“His tone, his believability factor, are just a lot stronger than most of the candidates,” said James Sohl, a Republican whose wife lured him away from work to Mr. Buttigieg’s rally in Carson City.

The night before, Bob Swiatek, a Republican who is a retired law enforcement officer, said he could vote for Mr. Buttigieg as the Democratic nominee.

“There’s a lot of Republicans out there that aren’t talking that are going to go the other way” in November, he said.

But running as a candidate who would appeal to independents and Republicans in the general election isn’t helping Mr. Buttigieg as he seeks a primary victory. Neither Mr. Sohl nor Mr. Swiatek planned to change their party registrations to caucus for Mr. Buttigieg.

With Mr. Buttigieg pinning his hopes on late-deciding voters, some who have come to hear him in the last days left persuaded by his message.

“I came not sure if I’d put him No. 1 or Amy No. 1,” Ron Procter said after a Buttigieg event for veterans in Reno, referring to Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota. “He’s definitely No. 1.”

A Vietnam combat veteran, Mr. Procter said he was impressed by Mr. Buttigieg’s quick responses to audience questions, in which he talked about veteran suicides and immigration, as well as his motivation for joining the Navy Reserve.

“I was worried about him being on the stage with Trump, but I think this guy can handle him,” he said. “He seems to have a presence that I’ve seen on some really good leaders in my life. I don’t think he intimidates very easy.”

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McDonald’s debuts pickle- and beef-scented candles as part of ‘Quarter Pounder Fan Club’ merch

Ah, the sweet, sweet smell of fast-food hamburgers.

Now you can finally have that lingering odor of onions and fast-food beef in your house anytime you want — without even having to get take-out.

KFC, CROCS TEAM UP TO CREATE BUCKET CLOG: ‘WHAT FRIED CHICKEN FOOTWEAR DREAMS ARE MADE OF’

That’s right: McDonald’s has debuted a collection of Quarter Pounder with Cheese-scented candles, allegedly because “there’s no better smell than 100 percent fresh beef and a perfect combination of toppings,” the press release shared.

The collection of six scented candles, which is part of a larger assortment of Quarter Pounder-themed merchandise, comes in glass jars representing the six components of a Quarter Pounder: sesame seed bun, ketchup, pickle, cheese, onion, and 100-percent fresh beef.

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While the customizable candles can be burned in any variation, the brand recommends burning them all simultaneously “for maximum deliciousness.”

Westlake Legal Group McDonalds-Quarter-Pounder-Fan-Club-Merch-002 McDonald’s debuts pickle- and beef-scented candles as part of 'Quarter Pounder Fan Club' merch fox-news/food-drink/food/fast-food fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article Alexandra Deabler 13df3e17-af9a-569b-a1be-4964d10b702d

McDonald’s launched a variety of items for its Quarter Pounder Fan Club line, including a calendar, locket and t-shirt. (iStock)

Meanwhile, devotees of the Quarter Pounder — who don’t necessarily want to smell like it — can still flaunt their fandom with one of the other six items McDonald’s has dropped as part of the fan club collection.

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Among them: the “Quarter Pounder with Love” locket, for those who want to keep the hamburger “close to their heart”; the Couples Quarter Pounder mittens, which come with two of the four mittens attached so wearers can “hold hands and hold a hot and deliciously juicy Quarter Pounder”; and the self-explanatory (yet oddly comely) 2020 Quarter Pounder calendar.

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The new line also features pins, stickers and a fan club T-shirt.

The limited-time swag will be sold online, with items becoming available throughout the week, according to McDonald’s. The chain also said fans can find out more about the release date of each by following McDonald’s on Twitter.

Westlake Legal Group mcdonalds-candles McDonald’s debuts pickle- and beef-scented candles as part of 'Quarter Pounder Fan Club' merch fox-news/food-drink/food/fast-food fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article Alexandra Deabler 13df3e17-af9a-569b-a1be-4964d10b702d   Westlake Legal Group mcdonalds-candles McDonald’s debuts pickle- and beef-scented candles as part of 'Quarter Pounder Fan Club' merch fox-news/food-drink/food/fast-food fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article Alexandra Deabler 13df3e17-af9a-569b-a1be-4964d10b702d

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‘Lego Masters’ host Will Arnett reveals what he learned on set: ‘I thought I was a decent Lego builder’

Westlake Legal Group Will-Arnett-lego ‘Lego Masters’ host Will Arnett reveals what he learned on set: ‘I thought I was a decent Lego builder’ Nate Day fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox-news/columns/on-set-with fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 7b23bfd1-d9f6-5de0-8b96-a2e16a4aa273

After starring as the Lego version of Batman in several movies, it stands to reason that Will Arnett would know everything about the famous plastic building blocks.

Arnett, 49, currently serves as the host of “Lego Masters,” a reality competition series on FOX where contestants are tasked with building Lego creations to serve different purposes. And despite being well versed in the Lego world, Arnett has learned a thing or two about Legos during his time on the show.

WHAT ACTOR HAS THE MOST ON-SCREEN DEATHS?

“I thought I was a decent Lego builder and I built a lot with my kids and I’ve been around Legos a lot,” Arnett told Fox News during a set visit to the show. “I can’t hold [the contestants’] bricks.”

The Lego-filled set features a wall that showcases bins full of the colorful building blocks not to mention there’s an entire display that features Lego-figurines. Plus, there are cubbies filled with Legos.

As for Arnett, he also revealed that he’s picked up on the lingo that builders use.

“A MOC, an M-O-C,” said Arnett, “make your own creation.”

He also shared that he’s familiar with the term “SNOT,” meaning “studs not on top.”

Arnett explained that the contestants use the “three million-plus pieces on set” to complete “all these insane challenges” on the show.

‘PRICE IS RIGHT’ POSTPONES PRODUCTION FOLLOWING DEATH OF DREW CAREY’S EX-FIANCEE AMIE HARWICK

“They have to build bridges that withstand crazy amounts of weight,” said Arnett of some of the show’s challenges, “or we ask them to build things and then we’re going to destroy them a certain way.”

The “Arrested Development” star noted that one of his favorite moments comes when he destroys a Lego creation with a baseball bat.

Arnett also teased the appearance of a special guest star featured on the show: Terry Crews. “[Crews] makes one of the best entrances in television history,” said Arnett.

It’s safe to say that Arnett is enjoying his time on set.

“Everything is awesome,” explained the actor, referencing the Oscar-nominated theme song to 2014’s “The Lego Movie.”

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“Lego Masters” airs Wednesdays at 9 p.m. EST on FOX.

Fox News’ Ashley Dvorkin contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Will-Arnett-lego ‘Lego Masters’ host Will Arnett reveals what he learned on set: ‘I thought I was a decent Lego builder’ Nate Day fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox-news/columns/on-set-with fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 7b23bfd1-d9f6-5de0-8b96-a2e16a4aa273   Westlake Legal Group Will-Arnett-lego ‘Lego Masters’ host Will Arnett reveals what he learned on set: ‘I thought I was a decent Lego builder’ Nate Day fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox-news/columns/on-set-with fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 7b23bfd1-d9f6-5de0-8b96-a2e16a4aa273

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Oklahoma catch-and-release law forces angler to let go of monstrous 157-lb. paddlefish

For angler Justin Hamlin, it’s the tale of the big fish that got away.

Fishing in Oklahoma’s Keystone Lake in the northeastern part of the state Friday, Hamlin caught a huge, 157-lb. paddlefish that might have shattered a world record if not for a state regulation, officials told the Tulsa World.

KAYAK FISHERMAN HOOKS 500-POUND MARLIN, RESULTS IN 6-HOUR BATTLE

His Valentine’s Day monster catch was likely the biggest paddlefish ever caught, but will likely never appear in the record books because it was caught on a Friday, one of two days that the state’s catch-and-release law applies, the newspaper reported.

The state regulation requires that fish caught Mondays and Fridays be released immediately.

Westlake Legal Group paddlefish-cropped-248am Oklahoma catch-and-release law forces angler to let go of monstrous 157-lb. paddlefish Jack Durschlag fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/oklahoma fox-news/politics/regulation fox-news/great-outdoors/fishing fox-news/great-outdoors fox news fnc/sports fnc article 878b01c1-f827-54dc-9e1c-2dfdba0ba262

Justin Hamlin of Kerryville, Okla., caught a whopping 157-lb. paddlefish on Valentine’s Day while fishing at Keystone Lake. State law forced him to return the fish to the water because Mondays and Fridays are catch-and-release days. (Oklahoma Department of Wildlife)

Those same regulations say paddlefishers on other days may keep only one of the species in a day’s fishing, forcing them to stop as soon as one is kept.

The fish measured 60.5 inches from tail-to eye with a girth of 45.25 inches, the World reported.

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Hamlin said in his Valentine’s outing with his wife — in which they caught five other fish — he was excited by the catch as the paddlefish fought him three times before he brought it in.

“It would come up to where you could see it and it would take off again,” he said.

Westlake Legal Group paddlefish-cropped-248am Oklahoma catch-and-release law forces angler to let go of monstrous 157-lb. paddlefish Jack Durschlag fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/oklahoma fox-news/politics/regulation fox-news/great-outdoors/fishing fox-news/great-outdoors fox news fnc/sports fnc article 878b01c1-f827-54dc-9e1c-2dfdba0ba262   Westlake Legal Group paddlefish-cropped-248am Oklahoma catch-and-release law forces angler to let go of monstrous 157-lb. paddlefish Jack Durschlag fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/oklahoma fox-news/politics/regulation fox-news/great-outdoors/fishing fox-news/great-outdoors fox news fnc/sports fnc article 878b01c1-f827-54dc-9e1c-2dfdba0ba262

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Rep. Warren Davidson: Our Founding Fathers would let bulk surveillance expire

Westlake Legal Group Congress-sunrise-pic Rep. Warren Davidson: Our Founding Fathers would let bulk surveillance expire Warren Davidson fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/privacy fox-news/us/constitution fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc b2110506-055f-51e8-bbfd-b95fcb33bbe7 article

When our Founding Fathers established this American Republic, a wise group insisted that our Constitution include the Bill of Rights to ensure that the federal government they created could not infringe on the natural rights of Americans. The First and Second Amendments protect speech and the right to bear arms, respectively. After these essential freedoms, however, comes an amendment that most consider obsolete: the Third, which prohibits the federal government from quartering soldiers in Americans’ homes during peacetime.

On its face, Americans shouldn’t have to worry about the Third Amendment. The Founding Fathers’ ban on quartering addresses a problem we no longer encounter. But, considered in tandem with the Fourth Amendment— the right to keep private property and documents secure against illegal searches — a different picture emerges.

Taken together, the Third and Fourth Amendments dovetail to form a right to privacy as it applies to the home, your property, and your person. The government cannot take up residence in your home, and it cannot look through your private effects without a warrant.

HOUSE REPUBLICANS BOYCOTT INTEL HEARING, ACCUSE SCHIFF

Yet that’s exactly what the government has done. Technology developed for national security purposes has worked its way into phones, computers, and tablets, compromising not only the American right to privacy but also the sanctity of our homes.

In less than a month, Congress can make our Founding Fathers proud and reverse this invasive legal trend. Section 215 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) is set to expire on March 15. FISA was originally created in 1978 and massively expanded after 9/11 under the USA Patriot Act. The emphasis is on “foreign” — there are supposed to be safeguards to protect American citizens from being targeted with these statutes. However, the U.S. government secretly has secretly taken up residence in Americans’ smartphones and laptops.

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The scope of abuse from this troublesome law gained notoriety in 2013 when whistleblower Edward Snowden went public about the National Security Agency’s warrantless warehousing of millions of Americans’ phone records and geolocation data. Congress attempted to “fix” the obvious legal problems by passing the USA Freedom Act in 2015, but we know the story of abuse doesn’t end there.

In 2016, the FBI spied on a member of President Trump’s campaign staff, abusing the lax standards and selective enforcement mechanisms of FISA, using stories of “Russian meddling” in the general election to prop up Clinton-sourced opposition research linked to Russia.

Separately, an October 2018 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) found more widescale abuse. The FISC opinion was declassified on Oct. 8, 2019. Among other findings, it shows that the FBI made 3.1-million warrantless searches of Americans’ data in 2017 alone. Some 57,000 individuals were subject to illegal searches by the FBI in April 2018. The year before, the FBI searched over 70,000 email addresses and phone numbers. At no point did a court issue a warrant and these individuals were never notified that they were subject to such a search.

Worse, no one batted an eye after the FISA court made these abuses public — despite the fact that such abuses strike at the very heart of our civil liberties and the spirit of our constitutional republic.

Fortunately, an unlikely group of legislators from both chambers in Congress has banded together to introduce legislation that will finally protect the 3rd and 4th Amendments and overhaul FISA.

In the House, I joined my colleagues Reps. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., Pramila Jayapal D-Wash., Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore. and Ted Yoho, R-Fla., to work with Sens. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Steve Daines, R-Mont., to introduce the Safeguarding Americans’ Private Records Act (SAPRA).

This bipartisan legislation ends the National Security Agency’s mass phone record program and prohibits warrantless searches of GPS, web browsing, and search engine history. It also makes the FISA court more accountable by requiring the court to notify American citizens if they’ve been investigated under FISA and forcing the court to disclose all opinions within six months of issuance.

SAPRA also creates public reporting requirements about the extent to which intelligence agencies illegally used FISA to surveil Americans or target activity protected under the First Amendment.

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My fellow cosponsors and I can only hope that as the evidence has piled on that more of our colleagues will support our bipartisan legislation. With the March 15 deadline approaching, we are in a unique position to correct this prior constitutional malpractice and systemic abuse.

For too long, Congress has allowed an overzealous intelligence community to operate with limited oversight in the name of national security. America can (and must) sustain the world’s preeminent intelligence capabilities without infringing on the rights of American citizens. SAPRA will help bring this era of congressional negligence to an end and usher in a newfound appreciation for the power and purpose of those oft-forgotten Third and Fourth Amendments.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM REP. WARREN DAVIDSON

Westlake Legal Group Congress-sunrise-pic Rep. Warren Davidson: Our Founding Fathers would let bulk surveillance expire Warren Davidson fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/privacy fox-news/us/constitution fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc b2110506-055f-51e8-bbfd-b95fcb33bbe7 article   Westlake Legal Group Congress-sunrise-pic Rep. Warren Davidson: Our Founding Fathers would let bulk surveillance expire Warren Davidson fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/privacy fox-news/us/constitution fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc b2110506-055f-51e8-bbfd-b95fcb33bbe7 article

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What happens to your social media accounts when you die?

None of us are getting out of this alive. With the advent of consumer tech and the internet, you can now make your wishes known in a myriad of ways. For starters, if you’re wondering where’s the best place to make sure your loved ones follow your will directives and have access to your passwords, you can do this online.

Specialty sites can store all your important documents from wills, trusts and passwords to your funeral preferences. While most sites are subscription-based, there is a free option that is HIPPA-compliant with secured bank-level encryption. Tap or click here for pay and free sites to help you organize your end-of-life planning.

Speaking of death, virtual reality recently let a grief-stricken mother talk and play with her deceased daughter in a park they used to go to together. The story is fascinating on so many levels that you have to see. Tap or click here for the heartbreaking story and videos that will show you what happened.

You can control what happens to your social media accounts when the inevitable happens. Here’s how to do it.

Facebook’s Legacy feature

Before you dive in, do a solid check of your Facebook privacy settings. Tap or click here my list of privacy essentials for any Facebook account.

On Facebook, you can designate a legacy contact to manage your account after you’re gone. They can do things like writing a pinned post for your profile as a farewell message or letting your friends know the details of a memorial service.

Your designated person can also respond to friend requests, update your profile and cover photos, decide who can see your feed and who can post tributes, among other things.

There are limits to protect your privacy. He or she won’t be able to read your messages, log into your account or delete friends.

Here’s how to set up your Legacy Contact:

  • Go to your general account Settings and choose Memorialization Settings.
  • Click Edit and you can choose a legacy contact.
  • Use the “Choose a friend” box to add your legacy contact.

That person will receive an email explaining how the process works. Just be sure you give your chosen friend or family member a heads up first and make sure they’re willing to handle the responsibility.

Once you have your legacy contact set, look through the Memorialization Settings. On this page, you can decide whether your legacy contact can download a copy of what you’ve shared on your feed, including posts, photos, videos, and profile information.

TECH ADVICE YOU CAN TRUST: Get breaking tech news as it happens with free email alerts from my desk to your inbox. Tap or click here to sign up.

Once a year, you will receive a reminder about your legacy contact. If you’re certain your person won’t change, or that you’ll remember to change them if need be, you can click “stop annual reminders” in the Annual Reminder section.

If you’d rather have your account deleted after you pass away, go to the Memorialization Settings page and scroll down. Right above the Close button, there is an option you can click that says, “Request that your account be deleted after you pass away.”

You’ll still need to enlist the help of a trusted loved one. After he or she lets Facebook know you’ve died, your account will be completely deleted.

SPEED UP YOUR SMARTPHONE: If your phone is sluggish, apps are closing and your memory is full, a cleaner app could be the answer. There are tons of shady downloads out there, though. Tap or click for 5 apps you can trust.

What about Instagram?

Instagram, owned by Facebook, has similar features and procedures when it comes to memorializing accounts. Like Facebook, your family can request the deletion of your account or have it memorialized.

Instagram doesn’t allow you to choose a legacy contact. You’ll have to leave detailed instructions to your loved ones to have your account deleted or memorialized.

To do so, he or she needs to submit proof of your passing and proof of authority under local law that the person who is attempting to delete your account is a lawful representative of you or your estate.

If you need to delete an Instagram account for someone who is deceased, tap or click here to fill out the report. If you choose to memorialize an account, it can’t be changed or altered in any way. This includes any previous likes, followers, tags, posts and comments.

Twitter is a bit more limited

Twitter recently announced it would be deleting inactive accounts. However, the backlash was so great, the company was forced to redact their statement and find a happy medium for its users. Tap or click here for the full backstory.

In the end, Twitter decided not to delete inactive accounts until there’s an appropriate method of memorializing those belonging to people who have died.

Twitter has not yet created memorialized or legacy accounts, but they will remove a deceased user’s account if requested by a verified immediate family member who can provide the appropriate details. Tap or click here to learn more about Twitter’s deletion policies.

BONUS TIP FOR EXTRA KNOW-HOW: PC vs. Mac: 10 of the biggest differences explained

Mac versus Windows: The debate that’s raged since the 1980s. Whole commercial campaigns were put together around this very concept, claiming one was better than the other.

But what are the true, bias-free differences between Mac computers and Windows ones? What sets each one apart? Let’s start with their price tags.

Tap or click here to see Apple and Microsoft battle it out.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch the Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

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China Targets 3 Wall Street Journal Reporters as Media Relations Sour

Westlake Legal Group 19china-wsj-1-facebookJumbo China Targets 3 Wall Street Journal Reporters as Media Relations Sour Xi Jinping Wall Street Journal Politics and Government Newspapers DOW JONES&CO China

HONG KONG — China on Wednesday said it would revoke the press credentials of three Wall Street Journal reporters working in mainland China, in a significant escalation of Beijing’s pressure on the foreign news media.

At a daily news briefing on Wednesday, a spokesman for China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs said the credentials would be revoked in retaliation for a headline for an essay that ran in The Journal’s editorial pages earlier this month. The Chinese authorities had objected to its headline, which read, “China Is the Real Sick Man of Asia.”

Chinese officials have “demanded that The Wall Street Journal recognize the seriousness of the error, openly and formally apologize, and investigate and punish those responsible, while retaining the need to take further measures against the newspaper,” Geng Shuang, the ministry spokesman, said in a transcript provided by the Chinese government.

“The Chinese people do not welcome media that publish racist statements and smear China with malicious attacks,” he added.

The Journal identified the reporters as Josh Chin, its deputy bureau chief in Beijing and an American national; Chao Deng, an American; and Philip Wen, an Australian national.

A spokesman for Dow Jones & Company, publisher of The Journal, did not have an immediate comment.

Like other media organizations, including The New York Times, The Journal runs its news and editorial departments as separate operations, meaning none of the newspaper’s reporters in China would have been involved in writing the essay’s headline.

The move comes just months after Chinese officials effectively expelled another Journal reporter, Chun Han Wong, from mainland China. Officials did not provide a reason, but the expulsion came after he co-wrote an article about a cousin of China’s top leader, Xi Jinping.

It also comes less than one day after American officials in Washington said they would treat five government-controlled Chinese news organizations — Xinhua, CGTN, China Radio, China Daily and People’s Daily — as foreign government functionaries, subject to similar rules as diplomats stationed in the United States.

The opinion piece with the “Sick Man” headline was written by Walter Russell Mead, a professor at Bard College. It criticized China’s initial response to the coronavirus outbreak as well as the state of the country’s financial markets.

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Who is Judge Amy Berman Jackson?

Former Trump adviser Roger Stone is expected to be sentenced Thursday by U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson, who has been involved in several high-profile cases since being appointed to the federal bench in 2011 by former President Barack Obama.

In recent years the 65-year-old Baltimore native and Harvard Law School graduate has presided over cases involving Stone, former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort and former Democratic U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. — as well as one involving Hillary Clinton‘s Benghazi-related emails.

Jackson said Tuesday during a pre-sentence hearing that she will move ahead with the sentencing of Stone this week — rejecting requests by the defense to delay or request a new trial.

JUDGE TO MOVE FORWARD WITH ROGER STONE SENTENCING AMID CONTROVERSY

She has been described by some as tough, fair and always prepared.

Here are more details about cases over which Judge Jackson has presided.

Roger Stone case

Jackson is presiding over the Roger Stone case, in which a jury found him guilty on all seven counts of obstruction, witness tampering and making false statements to Congress in connection with former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation.

Stone was charged with providing false statements to the House Intelligence Committee about communication involving WikiLeaks, obstructing a congressional investigation of Russian interference during the 2016 U.S. presidential election and witness tampering.

During the trial, Jackson barred Stone from speaking publically about the ongoing prosecution after a picture of her appeared on his Instagram with what appeared to be crosshairs on the background.

Stone blamed the decision — which he reviewed — on an unnamed volunteer and apologized, to which Jackson replied last February, “I have serious doubts about whether you learned anything at all.”

Westlake Legal Group e8a31da9-AP20042622394199 Who is Judge Amy Berman Jackson? fox-news/us fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/judiciary fox-news/person/roger-stone fox-news/person/barack-obama fox news fnc/politics fnc David Aaro article 3ad3698c-d1a3-5af7-8125-591d1510c144

​​​​​​​Roger Stone, a longtime Republican provocateur and former confidant of President Donald Trump, waits in line at the federal court in Washington, Nov. 12, 2019. (Associated Press)

“From this moment on, the defendant may not speak publicly about this case — period,” Jackson said. “No statements about the case on TV, radio, print reporters, or [the] internet. No posts on social media. [You] may not comment on the case through surrogates. You may send out emails about donating to the Roger Stone defense fund.”

“This is not baseball. There will be no third chance. If you cannot abide by this, I will be forced to change your surroundings so you have no temptations,” she added.

“This is not baseball. There will be no third chance. If you cannot abide by this, I will be forced to change your surroundings so you have no temptations.”

— Judge Jackson to Roger Stone

Ahead of Thursday’s scheduled hearing, Jackson was attacked by President Trump in a Feb 11 tweet. He also criticized prosecutors’ recommendation that Stone should face seven to nine years in prison.

“Is this the Judge that put Paul Manafort in SOLITARY CONFINEMENT, something that not even mobster Al Capone had to endure? How did she treat Crooked Hillary Clinton? Just asking!” Trump wrote.

After his tweets, the Justice Department announced in a surprising decision it was revising the federal sentencing guidelines of term length. Several prosecutors quit and Trump was accused of interfering in the process, which he denied.

Fox News contributor Andrew McCarthy said Jackson can impose whatever sentence she feels is appropriate, regardless of how Trump or Attorney General Bill Barr feel about the case. But McCarthy wrote recently that “the Stone prosecution is more politics than law enforcement. It was the Mueller probe’s last gasp at pretending there might be something to the Russia-collusion narrative.”

Paul Manafort case

Jackson sentenced former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort to nearly seven years in prison last March in connection with his guilty plea related to foreign lobbying and witness tampering. She ordered a term of 73 months to be added to a 47-month sentence given earlier on bank and tax fraud charges in a separate case by Virginia Judge T.S. Ellis.

In December, Manafort’s state mortgage fraud charges were dismissed citing double jeopardy laws.

“This defendant is not public enemy number one, but he is not a victim either,” Jackson said last March during Manafort’s sentencing and prior to his charges being dismissed. “The question of whether there was any collusion with Russia … was not presented in this case, period, therefore it was not resolved by this case.”

In 2018, Manafort agreed to cooperate with prosecutors, pleading guilty to two felony conspiracy charges in relation to his lobbying work with Ukraine.

Last February, Jackson ruled Manafort intentionally breached his guilty plea agreement by lying to investigators on Mueller’s team.

PAUL MANAFORT’S STATE FRAUD CHARGES DISMISSED, NEW YORKK JUDGE CITES DOUBLE JEOPARDY

“The Office of Special Counsel (OSC) made its determination that the defendant made false statements and thereby breached the plea agreement in good faith,” Jackson wrote. “Therefore, the Office of Special Counsel is no longer bound by its obligations under the plea agreement, including its promise to support a reduction of the offense level in the calculation of the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines for acceptance of responsibility.”

Westlake Legal Group manafort-state-case1 Who is Judge Amy Berman Jackson? fox-news/us fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/judiciary fox-news/person/roger-stone fox-news/person/barack-obama fox news fnc/politics fnc David Aaro article 3ad3698c-d1a3-5af7-8125-591d1510c144

​​​​​​​Paul Manafort arrives in court in New York, June 27, 2019 after a judge threw out his New York mortgage fraud case on double jeopardy grounds. (Associated Press)

Jackson grilled Mueller’s team during the probe on whether Manafort lied to investigators before her eventual ruling.

“So, I’m trying to figure out what the importance is of his ongoing work for a potential candidate in the Ukraine at that time is, and the importance of any lies about that, or lies about Konstantin Kilimnik’s [who has ties to Russian intelligence] knowledge about that,” Jackson said.

She appreciated Manafort’s attendance in court last February after denying his attempt to skip the hearing due to what he described were health reasons.

“I believe it was very helpful, very useful and very important for you to have been here, Mr. Manafort,” Jackson said. “I know that we’ve had hearings where counsel sought to minimize the burden on you and not have you be here, but this is about you, it’s not about them. And I think it’s very important that they have you available to ask questions to.”

Jesse Jackson Jr. case

The judge sentenced former Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. to 2-1/2 years in prison back in 2013 after he was convicted of spending $750,000 in campaign funds on personal items — such as a gold watch, cigars and mounted elk heads.

Jessie Jackson Jr. is the son of civil rights leader the Rev. Jesse Jackson.

Westlake Legal Group jackson_court_022013 Who is Judge Amy Berman Jackson? fox-news/us fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/judiciary fox-news/person/roger-stone fox-news/person/barack-obama fox news fnc/politics fnc David Aaro article 3ad3698c-d1a3-5af7-8125-591d1510c144

Former U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., arrives at the E. Barrett Prettyman Federal Courthouse in Washington, Feb. 20, 2013. (Associated Press)

During the case, she said that if she had given him no prison time it would have suggested there was one system for the well-connected and one for everyone else.

FORMER REP. JESSE JACKSON JR. SENTENCED TO 30 MONTHS IN PRISON

“I cannot do it. I will not do it,” she said, adding that as a public official, Jackson Jr. was expected to “live up to a higher standard of ethics and integrity.”

Clinton Benghazi email case

Jackson tossed out a wrongful-death lawsuit against Hillary Clinton in 2017 by the parents of two Americans who were among those killed in a terror attack against a diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya. The lawsuit alleged that Clinton’s use of the private email server caused their deaths.

WHAT HAPPENED DURING AND AFTER THE BENGHAZI ATTACK IN 2012

The ruling was based on the Westfall Act, which gives federal employees immunity from tort claims arising out of acts made during the course of their official duties.

“Her actions – communicating with other State Department personnel and advisers about the official business of the department – fall squarely within the scope of her duty to run the Department and conduct the foreign affairs of the nation as Secretary of State,” Jackson wrote.

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Jackson ruled the parents didn’t sufficiency challenge that Clinton wasn’t acting in her official capacity when she used the email server.

“The untimely death of plaintiffs’ sons is tragic, and the Court does not mean to minimize the unspeakable loss that plaintiffs have suffered in any way,” Jackson wrote in a 29-page opinion.

Fox News’ Brooke Singman, Gregg Re and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Bloomberg, coming out of his cocoon, must show he can take debate flak

Westlake Legal Group image Bloomberg, coming out of his cocoon, must show he can take debate flak Howard Kurtz fox-news/politics fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc article 6e07a885-1478-5788-b92c-ae218e119868

Mike Bloomberg has had the luxury, available only to billionaires, of creating his own campaign universe—floating above the fray, mostly avoiding journalists, carpet-bombing the airwaves with ads.

Well, that ends tonight, at least briefly. On a stage in Las Vegas, the Wizard of Oz will have to come out from behind the curtain and engage with the mere mortals slogging it out for the nomination.

And Bloomberg will have to confront the criticism of his record that the press has unearthed in what might be called vetting on steroids, packing loads of negative info and self-inflicted wounds in the space of 10 days.

BLOOMBERG PLAYS DEFENSE AS THE MEDIA TRUMPET OPPO RESEARCH

That became official yesterday when Bloomberg surged into second place, at 19 percent, in a poll for NPR and the PBS “NewsHour.” Bernie Sanders led the pack at 31 percent, with Joe Biden (15), Elizabeth Warren (12), Amy Klobuchar (9) and Pete Buttigieg (8) in the second tier. With Nevada and South Carolina approaching, this shows that Klobuchar and Buttigieg have not been able to convert their Iowa and New Hampshire showings into a competitive position in larger and more diverse states.

Although Bloomberg is a national figure by virtue of running New York City for a dozen years, the MSNBC debate amounts to a reintroduction for many millions of Americans. And for all the apparent effectiveness of the “Mike Will Get It Done” ads, the truth is that Mike isn’t a great orator or stellar debater.

But Bloomberg doesn’t have to be Lincoln or Douglas, he just has to survive with a minimum of cuts and bruises. Aides say he has been practicing in mock debates but that his rivals have honed their skills during the past eight faceoffs.

The 78-year-old candidate has been positioning himself as the only adult in the room who can beat Trump, but in his years of sparring with reporters he has also turned testy over questions he doesn’t like.

The world will see how thick his skin is. But obviously many Democrats have been willing to overlook what they see as Bloomberg’s flaws—he is after all a onetime Wall Street trader first elected as a Republican—in the belief that he’s their best shot at ousting Trump.

Sanders, who has been pounding Bloomberg, and the others will have no shortage of material. Every day, it seems, another video surfaces of Bloomberg saying things that are politically incorrect or downright offensive. First there was him saying young blacks should be thrown up against a wall as a way of getting guns off the streets, and blaming the 2008 financial collapse on the end of redlining by banks. Now there’s tape of Bloomberg saying it doesn’t take much in the way of smarts to be a farmer or operate machinery.

SUBSCRIBE TO HOWIE’S MEDIA BUZZMETER PODCAST, A RIFF OF THE DAY’S HOTTEST STORIES

The twin blows of the Washington Post detailing his past sexist and profane remarks to women and the New York Times saying he uses his charitable giving to buy political support would wound any candidate. But Bloomberg, of course, is not just any candidate, and his record-shattering spending has been a surprisingly strong political shield.

Everything had to go break right for Bloomberg’s skip-the-early-states strategy to work (and I’m among those who were skeptical). Joe Biden had to get clobbered and Bernie Sanders had to keep rising, setting off a panic among the Dems for a moderate liberal who could defeat the president.

When you’re back in the pack, the press scrutiny is lighter. Klobuchar couldn’t name the president of Mexico at a recent Latino forum, and there are reports she then left early, but it barely caused a blip. Bloomberg doesn’t get a pass on stop-and-frisk or any of his other policies that are less palatable to liberals and minorities than gun control and climate change.

But while we’re hearing plenty (especially from Bernie) about a rich guy trying to buy the election, it takes more than money. Otherwise Tom Steyer would have the nomination locked up, and Jeb Bush would have won last time. Bloomberg’s ad barrage, backed by hundreds of millions of dollars, resonate because he has a solid record as mayor of the nation’s largest city. Even Donald Trump has praised him in the past, before trying to transform him into a height-challenged wannabe.

It’s healthy for the process that Bloomberg will now have to deal with challenges from moderators and political rivals. How he fares could well determine his chances on Super Tuesday and beyond.

Westlake Legal Group image Bloomberg, coming out of his cocoon, must show he can take debate flak Howard Kurtz fox-news/politics fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc article 6e07a885-1478-5788-b92c-ae218e119868   Westlake Legal Group image Bloomberg, coming out of his cocoon, must show he can take debate flak Howard Kurtz fox-news/politics fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc article 6e07a885-1478-5788-b92c-ae218e119868

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