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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 84)

Bolivia’s political crisis sparks dangerous clashes, 8 killed

Bolivia’s political crisis turned deadly again when security forces opened fire on supporters of Evo Morales. Officials said Saturday that at least eight people died and dozens were injured in an incident that threatens the interim government’s efforts to restore stability following the resignation of the former president in an election dispute.

Most of the dead and injured Friday in Sacaba, near the city of Cochabamba, had been shot, Guadalberto Lara, director of the town’s Mexico Hospital, told The Associated Press. He called it the worst violence he’s seen in his 30-year career.

The national Ombudsman’s Office said Sunday the death toll had risen to eight.

Angry demonstrators and relatives of the victims gathered at the site of the shootings, chanting: “Civil war, now!”

Morales, who was granted asylum in Mexico after his Nov. 10 resignation, said on Twitter that a “massacre” had occurred and he described the interim government led by Jeanine Áñez as a dictatorship.

“Now they are killing our brothers in Sacaba, Cochabamba,” he said in another tweet.

At least 13 other people had died during weeks of earlier protests against Morales before his departure, according to the Ombudsman’s Office. Several came in clashes between the president’s backers and those accusing him of fraudulently trying to win reelection.

The U.N. human rights chief, former Chilean President Michelle Bachelet issued a statement Saturday calling the deaths “an extremely dangerous development.”

“I am really concerned that the situation in Bolivia could spin out of control if the authorities do not handle it sensitively and in accordance with international norms,” she said in a statement.

“The country is split and people on both sides of the political divide are extremely angry. In a situation like this, repressive actions by the authorities will simply stoke that anger even further and are likely to jeopardize any possible avenue for dialogue,” she added.

BOLIVIA CHANGE OF POWER POLARIZES WESTERN HEMISPHERE ALONG ‘TIRED, IDEOLOGICAL LINES’

Protesters said police fired when demonstrators, including many coca leaf growers who backed Bolivia’s first indigenous president, tried to cross a military checkpoint. Emeterio Colque Sánchez, a 23-year-old university student, said he saw the dead bodies of several protesters and about two dozen people rushed to hospitals, many covered in blood.

Presidency Minister Jerjes Justiniano told reporters in La Paz that five people had been killed and an estimated 22 were injured.

He accused protesters of using “military weapons.”

Lara, the hospital director, said that 75 people were injured.

Westlake Legal Group Boliovia-Protests-AP-3 Bolivia's political crisis sparks dangerous clashes, 8 killed fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/united-nations/human-rights fox-news/world/united-nations/corruption fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime/homicide fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 1c89bb5b-1250-564d-9a34-e305d2b7095b

Supporter of former President Evo Morales protect themselves from tear gas launched by the police, in La Paz, Bolivia, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. Bolivia’s new interim president Jeanine Anez faces the challenge of stabilizing the nation and organizing national elections within three months at a time of political disputes that pushed Morales to fly off to self-exile in Mexico after 14 years in power. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Earlier in the day, Áñez said Morales would face possible legal charges for election fraud if he returns home from Mexico City.

Áñez also has said Morales would not be allowed to participate in new presidential elections, which are supposed to be held within three months.

The ousted leader, meanwhile, contended this week he is still president since the country’s legislature has not yet approved his resignation.

Morales stepped down following nationwide protests over suspected vote-rigging in an Oct. 20 election in which he claimed to have won a fourth term in office. An Organization of American States audit of the vote found widespread irregularities. Morales has denied there was fraud.

Westlake Legal Group Boliovia-Protests-AP-5 Bolivia's political crisis sparks dangerous clashes, 8 killed fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/united-nations/human-rights fox-news/world/united-nations/corruption fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime/homicide fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 1c89bb5b-1250-564d-9a34-e305d2b7095b

A backer of former President Evo Morales kneels in front of soldiers guarding a street in downtown La Paz, Bolivia, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. Bolivia’s new interim president Jeanine Anez faces the challenge of stabilizing the nation and organizing national elections within three months at a time of political disputes that pushed Morales to fly off to self-exile in Mexico after 14 years in power. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Families of the victims held a candlelight vigil late Friday in Sacaba. A tearful woman put her hand on a wooden casket surrounded by flowers and asked: “Is this what you call democracy? Killing us like nothing?” Another woman cried and prayed in Quechua over the coffin of Omar Calle, which was draped both in the Bolivian national flag and the multicolor “Wiphala” flag that represents indigenous peoples.

Bolivia’s Ombudsman’s Office called on the interim government to investigate if the security forces had acted within the constitution and international protocols on human rights.

“We express our alarm and concern over the result of an attempt to stop a demonstration by coca leaf growers from entering the city of Cochabamba,” it said, adding that it had counted 13 earlier deaths since the protests began.

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights condemned what it called “the disproportionate use of police and military force” in the clash.

Westlake Legal Group Boliovia-Protests-AP-2 Bolivia's political crisis sparks dangerous clashes, 8 killed fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/united-nations/human-rights fox-news/world/united-nations/corruption fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime/homicide fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 1c89bb5b-1250-564d-9a34-e305d2b7095b

Mourners gather around coffins of backers of former President Evo Morales killed during clashes with security forces in Sacaba, Bolivia, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. Bolivian security forces clashed with Morales’ backers leaving at least five people dead, dozens more injured and escalating the challenge to the country’s interim government to restore stability. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

“Firearms must be excluded from the operations used to control the social protests,” the commission said on Twitter with along with a video that showed the five people lying dead on a blanket on the floor. Soldiers and police in riot gear had been patrolling the area with armored vehicles in the previous days.

“We’re not going to let them make us flee, nor humiliate us. Let me say to Mrs. Añez that she must denounce this. If not the whole country is going to close in on her,” said Enrique Mamani, 21, a local resident. “They have carried out a state coup, paid off the military, paid off the police. There’s political persecution against our leaders.”

Backers of the interim government deny any coup, saying police and the military withdrew backing from Morales only to avoid shedding civilian blood during the massive protests against him.

BOLIVIA INTERIM PRESIDENT DECLARES ‘BIBLE HAS RETURNED TO THE PALACE’ AMID GROWING UNCERTAINTY

Supporters of Morales, who had been Bolivia’s president for almost 14 years and was the last survivor from the “pink tide” of South American leftist leaders, have been staging disruptive protests since his ouster, setting up blockades that forced closure of schools and caused shortages of gasoline in the capital.

“There’s no gas,” said Efraín Mendoza, a taxi driver from El Alto, who was forced to buy gasoline on the black market at twice the regular price.

“Products are scarce. There’s no meat, no chicken, people are making long lines. It’s all because of the blockades,” he said. “There’s division in Bolivia. It’s exasperating.”

Westlake Legal Group Boliovia-Protests-AP-4 Bolivia's political crisis sparks dangerous clashes, 8 killed fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/united-nations/human-rights fox-news/world/united-nations/corruption fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime/homicide fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 1c89bb5b-1250-564d-9a34-e305d2b7095b

A supporter of former President Evo Morales throws a stone to police, in La Paz, Bolivia, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. Bolivia’s new interim president Jeanine Anez faces the challenge of stabilizing the nation and organizing national elections within three months at a time of political disputes that pushed Morales to fly off to self-exile in Mexico after 14 years in power. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Áñez, who had been the highest-ranking opposition official in the Senate, proclaimed herself president when Morales resigned, saying every person in the line of succession ahead of her —all of them Morales backers — had resigned.

The Constitutional Court issued a statement backing her claim that she didn’t need to be confirmed by Congress, a body controlled by Morales’ Movement Toward Socialism party.

Much of the opposition to Morales sprang from his refusal to accept a referendum that would have forbidden him from seeking a new term.

Westlake Legal Group Boliovia-Protests-AP-6 Bolivia's political crisis sparks dangerous clashes, 8 killed fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/united-nations/human-rights fox-news/world/united-nations/corruption fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime/homicide fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 1c89bb5b-1250-564d-9a34-e305d2b7095b   Westlake Legal Group Boliovia-Protests-AP-6 Bolivia's political crisis sparks dangerous clashes, 8 killed fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/united-nations/human-rights fox-news/world/united-nations/corruption fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime/homicide fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 1c89bb5b-1250-564d-9a34-e305d2b7095b

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In Prime Time, Two Versions of Impeachment for a Divided Nation

Westlake Legal Group 16SPLITSCREEN-01-facebookJumbo In Prime Time, Two Versions of Impeachment for a Divided Nation Williams, Brian Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Television News and News Media MSNBC Maddow, Rachel Hannity, Sean Fox News Channel Carlson, Tucker Baier, Bret

For a glimpse at the country’s divided political reality, look no farther than a pair of television studios on opposite sides of the Avenue of the Americas in Midtown Manhattan.

From her set inside MSNBC headquarters, Rachel Maddow opened her prime-time coverage of the Trump impeachment hearings by calling the first day’s testimony “a double-barreled problem for the president — triple-barreled, maybe.” President Trump, she said, had been “caught doing something illegal” at the “direct expense of the country’s national interest.”

One block south, from a Fox News studio, Sean Hannity welcomed viewers by declaring “a great day for the United States, for the country, for the president — and a lousy day for the corrupt, do-nothing-for-three-years, radical, extreme, socialist Democrats and their top allies known as the media mob.”

These distinct visions — delivered simultaneously from skyscrapers roughly 1,000 feet apart — were beamed at the 9 p.m. hour into millions of American living rooms. It was a striking reflection of today’s choose-your-own-news media environment, and a far cry from the era when Americans experienced major events through the same television hearth.

Viewers are flocking to opinionated outlets with irreconcilable differences. Although every major TV station broadcast the hearings, Fox News and MSNBC were far and away the most popular networks for Americans to watch the opening round of public testimony this past week, outdrawing CNN and the “Big Three” networks of ABC, CBS and NBC, according to Nielsen.

On Wednesday, a pair of veteran foreign service officers testified that Mr. Trump had pressured the president of Ukraine to investigate his domestic political opponent, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. On Mr. Hannity’s show, the right-wing radio pundit Mark Levin compared the officers to “two homeless guys.” A guest on Tucker Carlson’s Fox News program said the men “looked like people who sat by themselves at recess.”

On MSNBC, the host Chris Hayes praised the officers, telling viewers they had revealed “brand-new evidence of the president’s plot to extort Ukraine.”

“Today, the American people got a fuller picture of the corrupt abuse of power by the president of the United States,” Mr. Hayes said, around the time that Mr. Carlson was telling his audience that the testimony was “pointless and tiresome.” Mr. Carlson added, “It made you realize that Democrats really have no master plan for impeachment.”

Television played a crucial role in framing impressions of the nation’s last two impeachment dramas. The Watergate hearings of 1973, now viewed with nostalgia as a moment when Americans could more or less agree on facts, were broadcast in sober tones on PBS. (ABC, CBS and NBC rotated coverage to avoid losing daytime ad revenue.)

Bill Clinton’s impeachment and Senate trial, which focused on a sensational sex scandal, came at a time of expansion for 24-hour cable news. The circus boosted ratings for then-fledgling Fox News and MSNBC and made celebrities of feisty partisan commentators, including future Trump-era figures like Kellyanne Conway and Laura Ingraham.

Now comes Mr. Trump’s impeachment, at a moment of profound fractionalization in the news business.

Many viewers have come to prefer partisan media venues, and the divide extends beyond cable. An entire news pipeline — from message threads on Reddit to chatter on Twitter and partisan Facebook groups — allows Americans to consume information that confirms their own biases and beliefs.

And tribal allegiances to news outlets mean that any hint of heresy can provoke an outcry. When NBCNews.com published an analysis arguing that Wednesday’s impeachment hearing lacked “pizazz,” many liberals seized on the phrase, objecting to the notion of assessing impeachment as entertainment. Even Stephen Colbert weighed in, mocking the article on his CBS late-night show.

A similar backlash occurred on Friday among conservatives, during the testimony of the former United States ambassador to Ukraine, Marie L. Yovanovitch.

When Mr. Trump tweeted an attack on the ambassador while she spoke to lawmakers, the Fox News anchor Bret Baier noted on-air that it might hurt the president’s case. Mr. Baier wrote on Twitter that the president’s message could be viewed as “witness tampering or intimidation — adding an article of impeachment real-time.”

Mr. Baier, the chief political anchor at Fox News, works in the network’s news division, not its partisan commentary ranks. But his remarks yielded a rash of frustration and disbelief among pro-Trump Fox viewers who took it as a kind of betrayal.

Daytime viewers of Fox News and MSNBC on Friday would have encountered some overlap in the channels’ commentary.

The MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace, who often criticizes Mr. Trump on her program, was a co-anchor of her channel’s coverage. On Fox News, viewers heard some tough words for Mr. Trump, too. Chris Wallace, the “Fox News Sunday” host, said, “If you are not moved by the testimony of Marie Yovanovitch today, you don’t have a pulse.” And Ken Starr, the independent counsel who investigated Bill Clinton and a frequent guest on Fox News, criticized Mr. Trump’s tweet as showing “extraordinarily poor judgment.”

By Friday prime-time, though, Fox News was back to ardently defending the president. Mr. Carlson opened his show with an onscreen graphic reading, “Media Fawns Over Yovanovitch’s ‘Poise, Charisma.’”

Historians and media scholars say the current moment is in some ways a throwback to an era long before the rise of mass media, when partisan newspapers were the way Americans received their news.

Coverage of the impeachment of Andrew Johnson, in 1868, was dominated by outlets with strident agendas; some papers were controlled outright by leaders of political parties.

“One of the things I find very amusing about the coverage today is when I hear about how divided the electorate is,” said Brenda Wineapple, a historian whose chronicle of the Johnson impeachment, “The Impeachers,” was published this spring. “It was equally divided, if not more so, in 1868.”

Ms. Wineapple said in an interview that contemporary coverage of Johnson was marked by character smears and misinformation intended to deceive the electorate. “All kinds of rumors and allegations that were largely unfounded,” she said. “There have been people staking out polarized sides for a very long time.”

In 1973, ABC said it received angry calls from viewers who opposed the network’s broadcast of the Watergate hearings. Among the objections: “You’re hurting our president,” “Watergate is being shoved down our throats” and “It’s Democratic propaganda.”

Jon Meacham, the journalist and historian who recently helped write a book on the history of impeachment, said that, in a way, history had come full circle.

“The Johnson impeachment unfolded in a Wild West of partisan media,” Mr. Meacham said in an interview. “Nixon unfolded in a consensus era,” when media outlets were broadly in step. “The reaction to that consensus on the right helped build the institutions and pipelines that were beginning to operate under Clinton and are now at full throttle under Trump.”

“Therefore, in a media sense, we’re all the way back to Johnson,” Mr. Meacham said. “You choose your reality by the paper to which you subscribe, or the channel which you watch.”

Michael M. Grynbaum is a correspondent covering the intersection of media and politics. @grynbaum

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AOC’s petition for Stephen Miller’s resignation now has over 20K signatures

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Bolivia’s political crisis sparks dangerous clashes, 8 killed

Bolivia’s political crisis turned deadly again when security forces opened fire on supporters of Evo Morales. Officials said Saturday that at least eight people died and dozens were injured in an incident that threatens the interim government’s efforts to restore stability following the resignation of the former president in an election dispute.

Most of the dead and injured Friday in Sacaba, near the city of Cochabamba, had been shot, Guadalberto Lara, director of the town’s Mexico Hospital, told The Associated Press. He called it the worst violence he’s seen in his 30-year career.

The national Ombudsman’s Office said Sunday the death toll had risen to eight.

Angry demonstrators and relatives of the victims gathered at the site of the shootings, chanting: “Civil war, now!”

Morales, who was granted asylum in Mexico after his Nov. 10 resignation, said on Twitter that a “massacre” had occurred and he described the interim government led by Jeanine Áñez as a dictatorship.

“Now they are killing our brothers in Sacaba, Cochabamba,” he said in another tweet.

At least 13 other people had died during weeks of earlier protests against Morales before his departure, according to the Ombudsman’s Office. Several came in clashes between the president’s backers and those accusing him of fraudulently trying to win reelection.

The U.N. human rights chief, former Chilean President Michelle Bachelet issued a statement Saturday calling the deaths “an extremely dangerous development.”

“I am really concerned that the situation in Bolivia could spin out of control if the authorities do not handle it sensitively and in accordance with international norms,” she said in a statement.

“The country is split and people on both sides of the political divide are extremely angry. In a situation like this, repressive actions by the authorities will simply stoke that anger even further and are likely to jeopardize any possible avenue for dialogue,” she added.

BOLIVIA CHANGE OF POWER POLARIZES WESTERN HEMISPHERE ALONG ‘TIRED, IDEOLOGICAL LINES’

Protesters said police fired when demonstrators, including many coca leaf growers who backed Bolivia’s first indigenous president, tried to cross a military checkpoint. Emeterio Colque Sánchez, a 23-year-old university student, said he saw the dead bodies of several protesters and about two dozen people rushed to hospitals, many covered in blood.

Presidency Minister Jerjes Justiniano told reporters in La Paz that five people had been killed and an estimated 22 were injured.

He accused protesters of using “military weapons.”

Lara, the hospital director, said that 75 people were injured.

Westlake Legal Group Boliovia-Protests-AP-3 Bolivia's political crisis sparks dangerous clashes, 8 killed fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/united-nations/human-rights fox-news/world/united-nations/corruption fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime/homicide fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 1c89bb5b-1250-564d-9a34-e305d2b7095b

Supporter of former President Evo Morales protect themselves from tear gas launched by the police, in La Paz, Bolivia, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. Bolivia’s new interim president Jeanine Anez faces the challenge of stabilizing the nation and organizing national elections within three months at a time of political disputes that pushed Morales to fly off to self-exile in Mexico after 14 years in power. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Earlier in the day, Áñez said Morales would face possible legal charges for election fraud if he returns home from Mexico City.

Áñez also has said Morales would not be allowed to participate in new presidential elections, which are supposed to be held within three months.

The ousted leader, meanwhile, contended this week he is still president since the country’s legislature has not yet approved his resignation.

Morales stepped down following nationwide protests over suspected vote-rigging in an Oct. 20 election in which he claimed to have won a fourth term in office. An Organization of American States audit of the vote found widespread irregularities. Morales has denied there was fraud.

Westlake Legal Group Boliovia-Protests-AP-5 Bolivia's political crisis sparks dangerous clashes, 8 killed fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/united-nations/human-rights fox-news/world/united-nations/corruption fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime/homicide fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 1c89bb5b-1250-564d-9a34-e305d2b7095b

A backer of former President Evo Morales kneels in front of soldiers guarding a street in downtown La Paz, Bolivia, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. Bolivia’s new interim president Jeanine Anez faces the challenge of stabilizing the nation and organizing national elections within three months at a time of political disputes that pushed Morales to fly off to self-exile in Mexico after 14 years in power. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Families of the victims held a candlelight vigil late Friday in Sacaba. A tearful woman put her hand on a wooden casket surrounded by flowers and asked: “Is this what you call democracy? Killing us like nothing?” Another woman cried and prayed in Quechua over the coffin of Omar Calle, which was draped both in the Bolivian national flag and the multicolor “Wiphala” flag that represents indigenous peoples.

Bolivia’s Ombudsman’s Office called on the interim government to investigate if the security forces had acted within the constitution and international protocols on human rights.

“We express our alarm and concern over the result of an attempt to stop a demonstration by coca leaf growers from entering the city of Cochabamba,” it said, adding that it had counted 13 earlier deaths since the protests began.

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights condemned what it called “the disproportionate use of police and military force” in the clash.

Westlake Legal Group Boliovia-Protests-AP-2 Bolivia's political crisis sparks dangerous clashes, 8 killed fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/united-nations/human-rights fox-news/world/united-nations/corruption fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime/homicide fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 1c89bb5b-1250-564d-9a34-e305d2b7095b

Mourners gather around coffins of backers of former President Evo Morales killed during clashes with security forces in Sacaba, Bolivia, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. Bolivian security forces clashed with Morales’ backers leaving at least five people dead, dozens more injured and escalating the challenge to the country’s interim government to restore stability. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

“Firearms must be excluded from the operations used to control the social protests,” the commission said on Twitter with along with a video that showed the five people lying dead on a blanket on the floor. Soldiers and police in riot gear had been patrolling the area with armored vehicles in the previous days.

“We’re not going to let them make us flee, nor humiliate us. Let me say to Mrs. Añez that she must denounce this. If not the whole country is going to close in on her,” said Enrique Mamani, 21, a local resident. “They have carried out a state coup, paid off the military, paid off the police. There’s political persecution against our leaders.”

Backers of the interim government deny any coup, saying police and the military withdrew backing from Morales only to avoid shedding civilian blood during the massive protests against him.

BOLIVIA INTERIM PRESIDENT DECLARES ‘BIBLE HAS RETURNED TO THE PALACE’ AMID GROWING UNCERTAINTY

Supporters of Morales, who had been Bolivia’s president for almost 14 years and was the last survivor from the “pink tide” of South American leftist leaders, have been staging disruptive protests since his ouster, setting up blockades that forced closure of schools and caused shortages of gasoline in the capital.

“There’s no gas,” said Efraín Mendoza, a taxi driver from El Alto, who was forced to buy gasoline on the black market at twice the regular price.

“Products are scarce. There’s no meat, no chicken, people are making long lines. It’s all because of the blockades,” he said. “There’s division in Bolivia. It’s exasperating.”

Westlake Legal Group Boliovia-Protests-AP-4 Bolivia's political crisis sparks dangerous clashes, 8 killed fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/united-nations/human-rights fox-news/world/united-nations/corruption fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime/homicide fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 1c89bb5b-1250-564d-9a34-e305d2b7095b

A supporter of former President Evo Morales throws a stone to police, in La Paz, Bolivia, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. Bolivia’s new interim president Jeanine Anez faces the challenge of stabilizing the nation and organizing national elections within three months at a time of political disputes that pushed Morales to fly off to self-exile in Mexico after 14 years in power. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Áñez, who had been the highest-ranking opposition official in the Senate, proclaimed herself president when Morales resigned, saying every person in the line of succession ahead of her —all of them Morales backers — had resigned.

The Constitutional Court issued a statement backing her claim that she didn’t need to be confirmed by Congress, a body controlled by Morales’ Movement Toward Socialism party.

Much of the opposition to Morales sprang from his refusal to accept a referendum that would have forbidden him from seeking a new term.

Westlake Legal Group Boliovia-Protests-AP-6 Bolivia's political crisis sparks dangerous clashes, 8 killed fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/united-nations/human-rights fox-news/world/united-nations/corruption fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime/homicide fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 1c89bb5b-1250-564d-9a34-e305d2b7095b   Westlake Legal Group Boliovia-Protests-AP-6 Bolivia's political crisis sparks dangerous clashes, 8 killed fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/united-nations/human-rights fox-news/world/united-nations/corruption fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime/homicide fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 1c89bb5b-1250-564d-9a34-e305d2b7095b

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Celine Dion weighs in on the ‘Titanic’ door debate

Celine Dion is the latest Hollywood star to weigh in on one of the biggest movie debates in cinematic history.

Could Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) have fit on the door with his love Rose (Kate Winslet) in “Titanic”?

The 51-year-old French Canadian singer, who sang the epic theme song for the movie — “My Heart Will Go On,” finally provided her opinion while appearing on the “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” Friday night.

BRAD PITT TEASES LEONARDO DICAPRIO ABOUT INFAMOUS ‘TITANIC’ DOOR SCENE

“Celine, I always try to ask you a good ‘Titanic’ question every time you’re here because I know you probably love those,” Fallon, 45, said. He then asked whether or not Jack could have survived the frozen Atlantic waters if “Rose just scooted over a little bit.”

“Don’t put me in trouble. What if they want to do a Titanic number two?” Dion joked.

“First of all, if you look closely [at] the picture, Rose is maybe dead or totally frozen, and she’s not quite all there, okay? Second of all, he doesn’t need an invitation. Come on, baby! Make himself comfortable. Jump in. You know?” Celine said.

“And then who did not think about this guy who is in the middle of the frozen ocean and that maybe all his body is so frozen that he didn’t have the strength to…”

TITANIC VICTIM’S LONG-LOST LETTER SURFACES, DESCRIBES NEAR MISS AS DOOMED SHIP SET OUT ON ITS MAIDEN VOYAGE

In 2016, Winslet argued that “I think he could have actually fit on that bit of door” during an appearance on “Jimmy Kimmel Live!

Westlake Legal Group titanic-20th-century-fox Celine Dion weighs in on the 'Titanic' door debate Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/celine-dion fox-news/entertainment/movies fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 0a19bb6d-95c1-5f03-bdf8-7907a6569cf1

Leonardo DiCaprio as Jack and Kate Winlset as Rose in ‘Titanic’ (20th Century Fox/Paramount/Kobal/REX/Shutterstock)

“Titanic” director James Cameron spoke with Vanity Fair in 2017 and said at the time, “The answer is very simple because it says on page 147 [of the script] that Jack dies. Very simple. Obviously, it was an artistic choice.

“The thing was just big enough to hold her, and not big enough to hold him…  I think it’s all kind of silly, really, that we’re having this discussion 20 years later.”

NEW TITANIC IMAGES SHOW THE WRECK’S ‘SHOCKING’ DETERIORATION

And most recently, DiCaprio in an interview with MTV News in July 2019 jokingly replied “no comment” when asked about the controversy.

“Titanic” was released in 1997 and is still one of the highest-grossing movies of all time.

Westlake Legal Group celine Celine Dion weighs in on the 'Titanic' door debate Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/celine-dion fox-news/entertainment/movies fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 0a19bb6d-95c1-5f03-bdf8-7907a6569cf1   Westlake Legal Group celine Celine Dion weighs in on the 'Titanic' door debate Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/celine-dion fox-news/entertainment/movies fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 0a19bb6d-95c1-5f03-bdf8-7907a6569cf1

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In Prime Time, Two Versions of Impeachment for a Divided Nation

Westlake Legal Group 16SPLITSCREEN-01-facebookJumbo In Prime Time, Two Versions of Impeachment for a Divided Nation Williams, Brian Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Television News and News Media MSNBC Maddow, Rachel Hannity, Sean Fox News Channel Carlson, Tucker Baier, Bret

For a glimpse at the country’s divided political reality, look no farther than a pair of television studios on opposite sides of the Avenue of the Americas in Midtown Manhattan.

From her set inside MSNBC headquarters, Rachel Maddow opened her prime-time coverage of the Trump impeachment hearings by calling the first day’s testimony “a double-barreled problem for the president — triple-barreled, maybe.” President Trump, she said, had been “caught doing something illegal” at the “direct expense of the country’s national interest.”

One block south, from a Fox News studio, Sean Hannity welcomed viewers by declaring “a great day for the United States, for the country, for the president — and a lousy day for the corrupt, do-nothing-for-three-years, radical, extreme, socialist Democrats and their top allies known as the media mob.”

These distinct visions — delivered simultaneously from skyscrapers roughly 1,000 feet apart — were beamed at the 9 p.m. hour into millions of American living rooms. It was a striking reflection of today’s choose-your-own-news media environment, and a far cry from the era when Americans experienced major events through the same television hearth.

Viewers are flocking to opinionated outlets with irreconcilable differences. Although every major TV station broadcast the hearings, Fox News and MSNBC were far and away the most popular networks for Americans to watch the opening round of public testimony this past week, outdrawing CNN and the “Big Three” networks of ABC, CBS and NBC, according to Nielsen.

On Wednesday, a pair of veteran foreign service officers testified that Mr. Trump had pressured the president of Ukraine to investigate his domestic political opponent, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. On Mr. Hannity’s show, the right-wing radio pundit Mark Levin compared the officers to “two homeless guys.” A guest on Tucker Carlson’s Fox News program said the men “looked like people who sat by themselves at recess.”

On MSNBC, the host Chris Hayes praised the officers, telling viewers they had revealed “brand-new evidence of the president’s plot to extort Ukraine.”

“Today, the American people got a fuller picture of the corrupt abuse of power by the president of the United States,” Mr. Hayes said, around the time that Mr. Carlson was telling his audience that the testimony was “pointless and tiresome.” Mr. Carlson added, “It made you realize that Democrats really have no master plan for impeachment.”

Television played a crucial role in framing impressions of the nation’s last two impeachment dramas. The Watergate hearings of 1973, now viewed with nostalgia as a moment when Americans could more or less agree on facts, were broadcast in sober tones on PBS. (ABC, CBS and NBC rotated coverage to avoid losing daytime ad revenue.)

Bill Clinton’s impeachment and Senate trial, which focused on a sensational sex scandal, came at a time of expansion for 24-hour cable news. The circus boosted ratings for then-fledgling Fox News and MSNBC and made celebrities of feisty partisan commentators, including future Trump-era figures like Kellyanne Conway and Laura Ingraham.

Now comes Mr. Trump’s impeachment, at a moment of profound fractionalization in the news business.

Many viewers have come to prefer partisan media venues, and the divide extends beyond cable. An entire news pipeline — from message threads on Reddit to chatter on Twitter and partisan Facebook groups — allows Americans to consume information that confirms their own biases and beliefs.

And tribal allegiances to news outlets mean that any hint of heresy can provoke an outcry. When NBCNews.com published an analysis arguing that Wednesday’s impeachment hearing lacked “pizazz,” many liberals seized on the phrase, objecting to the notion of assessing impeachment as entertainment. Even Stephen Colbert weighed in, mocking the article on his CBS late-night show.

A similar backlash occurred on Friday among conservatives, during the testimony of the former United States ambassador to Ukraine, Marie L. Yovanovitch.

When Mr. Trump tweeted an attack on the ambassador while she spoke to lawmakers, the Fox News anchor Bret Baier noted on-air that it might hurt the president’s case. Mr. Baier wrote on Twitter that the president’s message could be viewed as “witness tampering or intimidation — adding an article of impeachment real-time.”

Mr. Baier, the chief political anchor at Fox News, works in the network’s news division, not its partisan commentary ranks. But his remarks yielded a rash of frustration and disbelief among pro-Trump Fox viewers who took it as a kind of betrayal.

Daytime viewers of Fox News and MSNBC on Friday would have encountered some overlap in the channels’ commentary.

The MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace, who often criticizes Mr. Trump on her program, was a co-anchor of her channel’s coverage. On Fox News, viewers heard some tough words for Mr. Trump, too. Chris Wallace, the “Fox News Sunday” host, said, “If you are not moved by the testimony of Marie Yovanovitch today, you don’t have a pulse.” And Ken Starr, the independent counsel who investigated Bill Clinton and a frequent guest on Fox News, criticized Mr. Trump’s tweet as showing “extraordinarily poor judgment.”

By Friday prime-time, though, Fox News was back to ardently defending the president. Mr. Carlson opened his show with an onscreen graphic reading, “Media Fawns Over Yovanovitch’s ‘Poise, Charisma.’”

Historians and media scholars say the current moment is in some ways a throwback to an era long before the rise of mass media, when partisan newspapers were the way Americans received their news.

Coverage of the impeachment of Andrew Johnson, in 1868, was dominated by outlets with strident agendas; some papers were controlled outright by leaders of political parties.

“One of the things I find very amusing about the coverage today is when I hear about how divided the electorate is,” said Brenda Wineapple, a historian whose chronicle of the Johnson impeachment, “The Impeachers,” was published this spring. “It was equally divided, if not more so, in 1868.”

Ms. Wineapple said in an interview that contemporary coverage of Johnson was marked by character smears and misinformation intended to deceive the electorate. “All kinds of rumors and allegations that were largely unfounded,” she said. “There have been people staking out polarized sides for a very long time.”

In 1973, ABC said it received angry calls from viewers who opposed the network’s broadcast of the Watergate hearings. Among the objections: “You’re hurting our president,” “Watergate is being shoved down our throats” and “It’s Democratic propaganda.”

Jon Meacham, the journalist and historian who recently helped write a book on the history of impeachment, said that, in a way, history had come full circle.

“The Johnson impeachment unfolded in a Wild West of partisan media,” Mr. Meacham said in an interview. “Nixon unfolded in a consensus era,” when media outlets were broadly in step. “The reaction to that consensus on the right helped build the institutions and pipelines that were beginning to operate under Clinton and are now at full throttle under Trump.”

“Therefore, in a media sense, we’re all the way back to Johnson,” Mr. Meacham said. “You choose your reality by the paper to which you subscribe, or the channel which you watch.”

Michael M. Grynbaum is a correspondent covering the intersection of media and politics. @grynbaum

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LeBron James joins ‘long-time’ friend Tom Brady in playing until ‘we can’t walk no more’

Westlake Legal Group Brady-James-AP-Getty-2 LeBron James joins 'long-time' friend Tom Brady in playing until 'we can’t walk no more' Paulina Dedaj fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-lakers fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/person/tom-brady fox-news/person/lebron-james fox news fnc/sports fnc article 3c61e47c-eced-521d-8dc8-199f36ceb942

Two champs from two different sports with the same goal: “we’re going to play until we can’t walk no more.”

The Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James, 34, told ESPN’s Dave McMenamin Friday that he plans to play basketball as long as he physically can.

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“As long as I feel great, as long as I can still play at a high level and mentally I’m sharp and I’m there, I’m giving everything to the game,” he said before adding, “I have no idea.”

The three-time NBA champion said he plans to follow in the footsteps of New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady as far as playing beyond their respective league’s average player age.

“Me and Tom Brady are one and the same. We’re gonna play until we can’t walk no more,” he said.

Brady, 42, took to Twitter to add “I’m playing until I can’t dunk anymore,” to which James said: “Well I’m playing until I can’t throw TD passes anymore.”

Brady commented on the Twitter love, telling WEEI that he and James have been friends “for a long time.”

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“Yeah, I’ve always admired him. He’s a great athlete, player. I think he loves the sport, he loves basketball, he loves the competition. I feel the same way about football.”

Brady’s trainer commented earlier this week that the six-time Superbowl champion, who has previously vowed to play until 45, has recently said that he wants to go until “46 or 47.”

Westlake Legal Group Brady-James-AP-Getty-2 LeBron James joins 'long-time' friend Tom Brady in playing until 'we can’t walk no more' Paulina Dedaj fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-lakers fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/person/tom-brady fox-news/person/lebron-james fox news fnc/sports fnc article 3c61e47c-eced-521d-8dc8-199f36ceb942   Westlake Legal Group Brady-James-AP-Getty-2 LeBron James joins 'long-time' friend Tom Brady in playing until 'we can’t walk no more' Paulina Dedaj fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-lakers fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/person/tom-brady fox-news/person/lebron-james fox news fnc/sports fnc article 3c61e47c-eced-521d-8dc8-199f36ceb942

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Veteran with service dog denied entry to Pittsburgh restaurant

A combat veteran who suffers from PTSD said he was denied access to a Pittsburgh restaurant on Thursday because of his service dog.

Kris Jones accused the owner of The Huddle restaurant of stopping him; his Dutch Shepherd, Chopper; and a friend from entering the establishment.

“He’s very important to me. He’s definitely my lifeline,” Jones said about his furry companion, according to WTAE.

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Westlake Legal Group Service-Dog-iStock Veteran with service dog denied entry to Pittsburgh restaurant Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 6d2006e8-2354-53a7-80a6-f6d0658b2493

A combat veteran who suffers from PTSD said he was denied access to a Pittsburgh restaurant on Thursday because of his service dog. (Photo: iStock)

“He makes me feel safe. A lot of veterans, you don’t want to be alone, when you’re going into a public place or a restaurant, it can be pretty stressful.”

Jones enlisted in the Marines after the Sept. 11 attacks. He was injured during combat and later diagnosed with PTSD.

Chopper, he said, changed his life for the better.

STATUE OF SULLY, SERVICE DOG FOR LATE GEORGE H.W. BUSH, TO BE UNVEILED NEXT MONTH

Westlake Legal Group The-Huddle Veteran with service dog denied entry to Pittsburgh restaurant Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 6d2006e8-2354-53a7-80a6-f6d0658b2493

Kris Jones accused the owner of The Huddle restaurant of stopping him, his Dutch Shepherd, Chopper, and a friend from entering the establishment. (Photo: Google Maps)

Jones admitted Chopper wasn’t wearing his service dog vest but did have on his collar. However, he said was never given a chance to show documentation that Chopper was a service dog.

The owner of The Huddle, Pete Wagner, later said that he made a mistake.

Wagner said his business often accommodates service dogs, but he failed to realize Chopper was a service dog because the restaurant was crowded on the night Jones came in, due to a Steelers game.

Jones said he wants the incident to be a lesson to others about the reality for many veterans and people suffering from PTSD.

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“I want business owners, people, everywhere, children, everywhere to know that PTSD is a big thing,” he said.

“A lot of veterans come home and people can look OK and look fine, but you don’t know what’s going on on the inside.”

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Westlake Legal Group The-Huddle Veteran with service dog denied entry to Pittsburgh restaurant Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 6d2006e8-2354-53a7-80a6-f6d0658b2493   Westlake Legal Group The-Huddle Veteran with service dog denied entry to Pittsburgh restaurant Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 6d2006e8-2354-53a7-80a6-f6d0658b2493

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Fans accuse Janet Jackson of lip-syncing at concert, walk out in protest

Janet Jackson fans are not happy with the singer.

They accused the star of lip-syncing during her RNB performance Friday night in Brisbane, Australia, and some walked out in protest.

One fan told The Sunday Mail that the 53-year-old’s set was a “disaster.”

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“When Janet Jackson came on it was just a disaster,” one attendee said. “Her sound was just terrible. She would be singing and then all of a sudden just do random stuff.”

Jackson was also slammed after similar things happened during a performance in Perth on Nov. 8.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-662dcef5b59142b7814225e95d7fa280 Fans accuse Janet Jackson of lip-syncing at concert, walk out in protest Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/music fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 856677b7-d216-58fd-8ca4-e40947fdbfe2

Janet Jackson fans accused the singer of lip-synching at a concert in Australia.  (AP)

“It was the worst performance of the night and probably the worst I’ve seen,” a fan said to Daily Mail Australia.

“Once [Jackson] was on stage she started lip-syncing and it was so obvious she was dancing around trying to move the mic over her lips so we couldn’t see and she kept putting her hair over her face,” the ticketholder added.

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“Everyone started leaving and everyone was saying how disappointing it was. She was out of time for sure. We left when she tried to sing ‘Together Again.'”

A reviewer of the concert described Jackson as having low energy onstage in WA Today.

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There were “audio problems, with her lip-syncing painfully out of sync with the music and her performance lacking energy,” the critic wrote.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-662dcef5b59142b7814225e95d7fa280 Fans accuse Janet Jackson of lip-syncing at concert, walk out in protest Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/music fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 856677b7-d216-58fd-8ca4-e40947fdbfe2   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-662dcef5b59142b7814225e95d7fa280 Fans accuse Janet Jackson of lip-syncing at concert, walk out in protest Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/music fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 856677b7-d216-58fd-8ca4-e40947fdbfe2

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Frustrated baggage handler in Singapore jailed for swapping 286 luggage bag tags

A former baggage handler at the end of his rope in Singapore was sentenced to three weeks in jail on Monday for allegedly ruining the trips of hundreds of customers while costing two airlines thousands of dollars.

Tay Boon Keh, 66, was arrested for allegedly swapping the luggage tags of nearly 286 bags in Changi Airport, causing them to be sent to unintended destinations.

He admitted to changing the bag tags of unsuspecting passengers flying on Singapore Airlines and SilkAir between November 2016 and February 2017 — after feeling mistreated while working for Lian Cheng Contracting, a sub-contractor of Changi Airport Group, according to Channel News Asia.

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Westlake Legal Group Changi-Airport-2-Getty Frustrated baggage handler in Singapore jailed for swapping 286 luggage bag tags fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/travel fox news fnc/world fnc David Aaro article 1a091e40-b05d-5b37-b356-5105938d592e

A former baggage handler at the end of his rope was sentenced to three weeks in jail on Monday for allegedly ruining the trips of hundreds of customers at the airport, while costing two airlines thousands of dollars. (Photo by Serge Attal/The LIFE Images Collection via Getty Images/Getty Images)

Boon Keh was responsible for making sure luggage was properly aligned and placed on the X-ray machine during security screenings, but towards the end of September 2016, his machine broke down several times — forcing him to carry the bags to a working machine about six minutes away, the outlet reported.

He informed his supervisor that it was too difficult to carry the bags for that long of a distance, but no additional help was given to him, according to the prosecutors.

Feeling mistreated by management, he developed the scheme to inconvenience his employer with the goal of making sure they were aware of the lack of support given to him, according to CNA. A veteran of the airport, he even knew where the security cameras were set up, so he could get away with it.

Boon Keh was eventually apprehended after a representative at Changi Airport filed a police report, saying he had received emails about 20 passengers whose bags were rerouted to unforeseen destinations, the outlet reported.

CHINA’S LARGEST GARBAGE DUMP AT CAPACITY — 25 YEARS EARLY

Singapore Airlines and SilkAir also received an additional 266 complaints about bag tampering after the police report had been filed, according to CNA.

The airlines were forced to pay out nearly 221 impacted customers at the cost of roughly $42,000.

[Only because of] “the concerted effort of various police divisions that the accused was identified several days after the accused’s last swap”, Deputy Public Prosecutor Thiam Jia Min told the outlet. “A clear message has to be sent out to potential offenders that such acts have major consequences and that they should always resort to other more appropriate and legal channels to vent their frustrations.”

The defense told CNA that Boon Keh suffered from a major depressive disorder, which they said prevented him from having control over his actions.

However, District Judge Jasvender Kaur ruled that Boon Keh had a “significant amount of control over his actions.”

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“The offenses are not trivial,” she added. “The accused had come up with a plan to exact revenge on his employer for perceived unfair working conditions and abused his position 286 times over close to three-and-a-half months.”

Westlake Legal Group Changi-Airport-2-Getty Frustrated baggage handler in Singapore jailed for swapping 286 luggage bag tags fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/travel fox news fnc/world fnc David Aaro article 1a091e40-b05d-5b37-b356-5105938d592e   Westlake Legal Group Changi-Airport-2-Getty Frustrated baggage handler in Singapore jailed for swapping 286 luggage bag tags fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/travel fox news fnc/world fnc David Aaro article 1a091e40-b05d-5b37-b356-5105938d592e

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