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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 90)

Deutsche Bank Does Not Have Trump’s Tax Returns, Court Says

Westlake Legal Group 10deutsche1-facebookJumbo Deutsche Bank Does Not Have Trump’s Tax Returns, Court Says United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump Tax Returns Deutsche Bank AG

If investigators are going to get their hands on President Trump’s tax returns, they will have to find them somewhere other than Deutsche Bank.

The German bank — which for nearly two decades was the only mainstream financial institution consistently willing to lend money to Mr. Trump — has told a federal appeals court that it does not have the president’s personal tax returns, the court said on Thursday.

Democratic-controlled congressional committees issued subpoenas to Deutsche Bank this year for financial records related to the president, his companies and his family. Mr. Trump sued the bank, which became his main lender after a string of bankruptcies cost other banks hundreds of millions of dollars, to block it from complying.

That litigation is working its way through the federal courts. Last month, The New York Times and other media outlets asked the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in New York to unseal a letter from Deutsche Bank that identified two members of the Trump family whose tax returns the bank possesses.

On Thursday, the court rejected the request. Part of the reason, it said, was that Deutsche Bank had informed the court that “the only tax returns it has for individuals and entities named in the subpoenas are not those of the president.”

Current and former bank officials previously told The Times that Deutsche Bank had portions of Mr. Trump’s personal and corporate tax returns. The bank collected at least some of those tax records in 2011, when Deutsche Bank’s private-banking arm — which caters to the ultra-wealthy — took on Mr. Trump as a client. The returns and other financial documents were reviewed by a number of bank executives, according to the current and former officials.

Deutsche Bank relied on the information provided in the tax returns and other financial documents to approve a series of loans to Mr. Trump in early 2012 in connection with his Doral golf resort in Florida and his Chicago skyscraper.

Over the ensuing years, Deutsche Bank’s private-banking arm continued lending to Mr. Trump, including $170 million in 2014 to convert the Old Post Office building, a few blocks from the White House, into a hotel. By the time Mr. Trump was sworn in as president, he owed the bank more than $300 million, making it his largest creditor.

It is unclear when Deutsche Bank stopped retaining Mr. Trump’s tax returns. A former senior bank executive, who said he had seen the returns, said the normal practice was for Deutsche Bank to keep such materials on file.

Troy Gravitt, a Deutsche Bank spokesman, said the bank was “committed to cooperating with authorized investigations.”

Breaking with decades of presidential precedent, Mr. Trump has refused to publicly disclose his federal tax returns, and Democrats are keen to obtain the documents, believing they are crucial to unlocking his closely guarded financial secrets. Mr. Trump is fighting those efforts.

Mr. Trump’s lawyers sued Deutsche Bank and another lender, Capital One, to block them from complying with subpoenas that were issued in April by the House Intelligence and Financial Services Committees.

The Financial Services Committee has said it wants to know whether Mr. Trump helped Russians and other foreign real estate buyers launder money through his properties, and the Intelligence Committee is trying to determine whether Mr. Trump’s financial dealings made him subject to foreign influence. Mr. Trump’s lawyers have argued the subpoenas have no legitimate legislative purpose.

During one hearing, judges from the appeals court asked the banks’ lawyers whether they had copies of Mr. Trump’s returns, and requested a written answer. Deutsche Bank released a partly redacted letter saying it did have at least draft versions of some returns covered by the subpoenas, prompting the news media requests for the information to be unsealed.

Investigators seeking Mr. Trump’s tax returns have other avenues to pursue.

Another congressional committee and the Manhattan district attorney have subpoenaed Mr. Trump’s accounting firm, Mazars USA, for his tax returns. Mr. Trump has sued to block those subpoenas as well; on Monday, a federal judge sided with the Manhattan district attorney’s office, but Mr. Trump’s lawyers quickly appealed.

The House Ways and Means Committee asked the I.R.S. this year to hand over six years of Mr. Trump’s returns. The Treasury Department has refused that request.

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Power restored to some, but 2 million Californians still in the dark – and rolling blackouts could expand.

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Power restored to some, but 2 million Californians still in the dark – and rolling blackouts could expand.

California’s largest utility says as many as two million people will remain without power at least through Thursday as a precaution against wildfires. The outage affects mostly Northern California and parts of the San Francisco Bay Area. (Oct 9) AP, AP

REDDING, California – The state’s largest power company turned the lights back on for more than 100,000 homes and businesses Thursday as improving weather conditions eased the wildfire risk in some areas.

Power remained out for more than 600,000 customers of Pacific Gas & Electric – about 2 million residents – as high winds and hot, dry conditions conspired to raise fire concerns through much of Northern California. Southern California Edison said it “de-energized” 4,700 customers in Los Angeles and three other counties.

PG&E warned that many homes and businesses might not get power back for several days. And power may be cut to more customers if weather forecasts and fickle Santa Ana winds start to shift.

Wind gusts reached as high as 70 mph in some areas overnight, and gusty winds could last into Friday in some areas, the National Weather Service warned.

The blackouts began early Wednesday in more than 500,000 homes. Almost 250,000 homes were added later in the day and into Thursday, utility officials said.

For many, losing electricity is more than just an inconvenience. In Anderson, Lisa Round started her car before going to bed so she could power her sleep apnea mask through the night. Without it, there’s a chance she could stop breathing, she said.

“I ran my car so that I wouldn’t die in my sleep,” she said.

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At Regency Place Senior Apartments, residents – some of whom are more than 100 years old – were told to ask their oxygen providers for extra supplies. Other residents have a variety of special needs, according to community manager Janet Applegarth-Yarbrough.

“I check on them several times a day because you just never know,” she said.

The three utilities regulated by the California Public Utilities Commission have had more than 4 million customer hours of preemptive outages since the end of 2017.

“We faced a choice between hardship or safety, and we chose safety,” said Michael Lewis, a utility vice president. “We deeply apologize for the inconvenience and the hardship, but we stand by the decision because the safety of our customers and communities must come first.”

Gov. Gavin Newsom said his office was working with communities to ease the burden of the outages, known as Public Safety Power Shutoffs. He defended their use, saying keeping people safe must be the priority.

“The frustration that Californians feel as they deal with the impacts of these power outages is warranted,” he said. “The purpose of utilities across our state conducting PSPS is to protect communities against the real threat of wildfires due to existing weather conditions.”

Thousands of kids were locked out of darkened schools. The University of California-Berkeley canceled classes for its 42,000 students for a second day because power was out on campus. UC-Santa Cruz also was shut down Thursday.

The rolling blackouts could expand. A third phase is being considered for portions of Kern County, home to Bakersfield. The improving weather conditions meant that about 4,000 customers would be involved, down from an estimate of 43,000 earlier in the week, the company said.

Millions of Californians were on edge as utility companies weigh the risks of active transmission lines sparking a wildfire vs. the burden that shutting down those lines places on customers.

PG&E is particularly sensitive to wildfire issues. The utility declared bankruptcy this year after being held liable for tens of billions in damages resulting from many of the dozens of deadly wildfires that flared in recent years because of downed power lines or other utility equipment.

Outages: Here’s what you need to know

‘PG&E clearly hasn’t made its system safe: California lawmakers slam utility

Southern California was not exempt. Southern California Edison  considered plans to cut power to 180,000 homes and businesses, including almost 50,000 in Los Angeles County. San Diego Gas and Electric notified 30,000 customers that outages could be coming.

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Difficulties obtaining the latest information on outages added to concerns. Thousands of residents clicked links to utility company websites only to find them inaccessible. Pacific Gas & Electric alleviated some of its website overload by setting up an alternative page where people could find out their status.

Websites flared up to the south, where Southern California Edison considered plans to cut power to 18 communities.

“We’re aware of intermittent issues,” Southern California Edison said in a note on its website. “If you experience an issue, please try again later. We’re working to resolve the issue as soon as possible and apologize for any inconvenience.

Late Wednesday, Cal Fire expanded its red flag warning toward the state’s Central Valley, a 450-mile-long stretch of the state’s interior.

“There is a #RedFlagWarning that has expanded towards the central valley and is issued for most of Northern CA and the southernmost portion of CA from today until late Thursday evening, and even into Friday for some areas, due to strong winds/low humidity,” Cal Fire tweeted. 

Bacon reported from McLean, Virginia. Contributing: Cheri Carlson, Ventura County Star

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/10/10/california-power-outage-power-restored-some-still-in-dark/3927858002/

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How Long the PG&E Outage Will Last, and Other Questions Answered

Westlake Legal Group 10utility1-facebookJumbo How Long the PG&E Outage Will Last, and Other Questions Answered Wildfires Power Failures and Blackouts Pacific Gas and Electric Co Electric Light and Power California Public Utilities Commission California

Pacific Gas & Electric’s unusual decision to cut power to hundreds of thousands of customers in Northern California to reduce the risk of wildfires has angered many residents and lawmakers. Many of them have questioned whether the company made the right call.

About 600,000 Northern California customers, including some in the San Francisco Bay Area, were without power Thursday morning. Gov. Gavin Newsom said on Wednesday that the company’s decision was “appropriate under the circumstances.” But he also criticized the company for not investing enough in safety and infrastructure upgrades.

The utility has been found responsible for about two dozen wildfires and filed for bankruptcy protection in January. PG&E has said it could face up to $30 billion in liabilities for fires started by its equipment in recent years.

Separately, Southern California Edison, the state’s second-largest investor-owned utility after PG&E, said on Thursday that it had cut power to almost 13,000 customers and that the shut-off could ultimately affect almost 174,000 customers in nine counties, including Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino.

PG&E has said it acted after its meteorologists noticed a threat of strong winds in up to 34 California counties. The National Weather Service also issued a fire weather watch for those areas.

The utility resorts to blackouts when certain conditions are met. Sustained winds have to reach at least 25 miles per hour with gusts of at least 45 m.p.h. Vegetation in and around its power lines has to be dry and the humidity low. And the Weather Service has to issue a “red flag” warning about the risks of wildfires.

Strong winds and dry conditions have been implicated in several major California wildfires started by utility equipment. PG&E has said that one of its transmission lines probably started the state’s largest wildfire, known as the Camp Fire, which killed more than 80 people and destroyed the town of Paradise in November 2018.

PG&E has said that weather forecasts were the most important consideration it used to decide which areas would lose power. But the company has also shut off power in some areas that might not experience adverse weather. That is because the power lines serving those areas are connected to lines and other equipment in places with strong winds and dry conditions.

Critics of PG&E, including some state lawmakers, have said that the company may have blacked out more customers than necessary to reduce the risk of wildfires. State Senator Jerry Hill, a Democrat from the Bay Area, sent a letter venting his frustration to the California Public Utilities Commission, which will review PG&E’s actions.

“Today marks an unprecedented turn in the history of electricity service in California,” Mr. Hill wrote. He said that safety shut-offs “must be a surgical, last resort measure.”

Not directly. The power shut-offs are part of PG&E’s wildfire safety program, which the utility developed in response to state rules put in place after the devastating 2017 wildfires in the Napa and Sonoma wine country.

Lawmakers required the state’s utilities to submit plans to help prevent wildfires. PG&E proposed several measures, including shutting off power when wildfire risk was elevated. Another utility, San Diego Gas & Electric, has used this approach for years.

The safety measures were intended to prevent wildfires and to keep the utilities from financial ruin by limiting their liability for the damage caused by their equipment. In its bankruptcy case, PG&E has been seeking to resolve wildfire damage claims from thousands of homeowners, insurance companies and others.

PG&E’s internal models and forecasts from the National Weather Service indicate that the extreme weather conditions could last through Friday. PG&E said it had restored service to about 126,000 customers. But 600,000 were still without power Thursday morning, and thousands more could still lose electricity.

Before restoring power, PG&E will have to inspect its equipment for damage and make any needed repairs. That process cannot begin until the severe weather has passed, the company said.

PG&E uses 43 helicopters for aerial inspections, along with workers on foot. In some instances, the utility sends drones to help inspect the 24,782 miles of distribution lines and 2,443 miles of transmission lines.

PG&E may be able to restore power to some areas quickly, while other places could be without electricity for days.

Without a battery attached, a home’s rooftop solar system usually does not work when the electric grid blacks out, according to Sunrun, the nation’s largest residential solar company.

Here’s why: Rooftop systems from companies like Sunrun, Tesla and Vivint generally do not provide power directly to homes. The electricity generated from the panels goes to the electric grid, controlled by the power companies and grid managers, and the customer is credited. Because the electricity flows to the closest destination that needs it, it may travel back down to the home that generated it or to a neighboring property. Otherwise, the power flows wherever the next closest demand is, just as water follows the path of least resistance.

This setup is in part a safety measure to ensure that electricity workers aren’t harmed by home solar systems tied to the grid as they work to restore power.

But lithium-ion battery systems like Tesla’s Powerwall or Sunrun’s Brightbox, which charge during the day, can keep homes powered for short outages, depending on the unit’s size. Increasingly, companies marketing solar panels also sell batteries to keep homes powered during grid outages. Lithium-ion battery technology, recognized with a Nobel Prize this week, is seen as a key to reshaping the electricity grid and home energy.

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Lindsey Graham dishes on Trump in hoax calls with Russians

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Giuliani associates arrested while trying to board international flight with one-way tickets, prosecutors say

Westlake Legal Group Parnas-Fruman Giuliani associates arrested while trying to board international flight with one-way tickets, prosecutors say

Two associates of Rudy Giuliani made their initial appearance before a federal judge on Thursday, less than 24 hours after they were arrested on campaign finance violations while trying to board an international flight with one-way tickets at Dulles International Airport outside of Washington D.C.

Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman appeared in federal court in Alexandria, Va. to face a four-count indictment alleging that they, along with two other co-defendants, conspired to violate a ban on foreign donations and contributions in connection with federal and state elections.

The two men remained mostly silent during their appearance before U.S. Magistrate Judge Michael Nachmanoff. They did not enter a plea, but both are expected back in court tomorrow for a detention hearing.

GIULIANI ON TRUMP IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY: SALEM WITCH TRIALS ‘FAIRER THAN THIS’

“Protecting the integrity of our elections and protecting our elections from unlawful foreign influence are core functions of our campaign finance laws,” Manhattan U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman said at a press conference on Thursday. Parnas and Fruman are being charged in New York’s Southern District.

Berman added: “As this office has made clear, we will not hesitate to investigate or prosecute those who engage in criminal conduct that draws into question the integrity of our political process. And I want to add that this investigation is continuing.”

Parnas, 47, and Fruman, 53, created Global Energy Producers (GEP), and allegedly funneled money through the company. This included contributions of $325,000 and $15,000 to committees in May 2018, “to obtain access to exclusive political events and gain influence with politicians,” the indictment says. They allegedly incorporated GEP around the time the contributions were made.

According to Federal Election Commission (FEC) records, GEP contributed $325,000 in May 2018 to pro-Trump super PAC America First Action. In a statement, a spokesperson for America First Action noted that a complaint was filed with the FEC in July 2018 over this contribution, as well as separate litigation in Florida. The statement said that the money was placed “in a segregated bank account,” was not used, and “will remain in this segregated account until these matters are resolved.”

Both men are accused of making false statements related to the nature of GEP and the contribution in response to the FEC complaint.

BIDEN CAMPAIGN SLAMS NY TIMES FOR RUNNING ‘CLINTON CASH’ AUTHOR’S OP-ED ON EX-VP’s UKRAINE TIES

Additionally, contributions from Fruman were allegedly made in Parnas’ name to get around federal contribution limits, and several contributions were made under the name “Igor Furman” instead of “Fruman,” allegedly “to conceal the source of the funds and to evade federal reporting requirements.”

The indictment also claims that Parnas and Fruman “committed to raise $20,000 or more for a then-sitting U.S. Congressman” whom they had met at a political event. The congressman wasn’t identified by name in court papers, but the donations to “Congressman 1” in the indictment match campaign finance reports for former Rep. Pete Sessions, a Texas Republican who lost his re-election bid in November 2018.

At approximately the same time that they made that commitment, Parnas and the Congressman discussed the Congressman’s assistance in securing the removal of the then-U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine, and this was done “at least in part, at the request of one or more Ukrainian government officials,” the indictment alleges.

The indictment also lays out allegations of a separate “foreign national donor scheme” involving the two men and two other defendants, American David Correia, and Ukrainian national Andrey Kukushkin. The foursome allegedly engaged in a conspiracy to make political contributions funded by an unnamed Russian national to obtain influence with political candidates regarding policies to benefit a recreational marijuana business venture, and to help obtain retail marijuana licenses.

House Democrats on Thursday subpoenaed Parnas and Fruman as part of the impeachment inquiry into Trump. The subpoenas are for documents that the men have so far failed to provide to Congress.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Parnas and Fruman were involved in Giuliani’s efforts to urge Ukrainian officials to investigate Trump’s political rival Joe Biden and his family. That effort was also discussed by Trump in a July call with Ukraine’s president and is at the heart of the impeachment probe.

Giuliani told Fox News that he represents Parnas and Fruman on a separate matter and called the timing of their arrest and indictment “suspect.” He added that he “will reveal relevant facts very very shortly.”

Giuliani, an attorney for President Trump, said he finds it “extremely suspicious” that the arrest was made in connection with an FEC matter that has yet to be resolved, and which Giuliani said is a civil matter. He acknowledged, however, that both men “logistically helped” in his collection of evidence against Hunter Biden, and that they helped connect him with Viktor Shokin and Yuriy Lutsenko former Prosecutors General of Ukraine.

Fox News’ Ronn Blitzer, Jake Gibson and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Parnas-Fruman Giuliani associates arrested while trying to board international flight with one-way tickets, prosecutors say   Westlake Legal Group Parnas-Fruman Giuliani associates arrested while trying to board international flight with one-way tickets, prosecutors say

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Giuliani associates arrested while trying to board international flight with one-way tickets, prosecutors say

Westlake Legal Group Parnas-Fruman Giuliani associates arrested while trying to board international flight with one-way tickets, prosecutors say fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc b9d07cd5-85d9-5176-850f-94a548354999 article Andrew O'Reilly

Two associates of Rudy Giuliani made their initial appearance before a federal judge on Thursday, less than 24 hours after they were arrested on campaign finance violations while trying to board an international flight with one-way tickets at Dulles International Airport outside of Washington D.C.

Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman appeared in federal court in Alexandria, Va. to face a four-count indictment alleging that they, along with two other co-defendants, conspired to violate a ban on foreign donations and contributions in connection with federal and state elections.

The two men remained mostly silent during their appearance before U.S. Magistrate Judge Michael Nachmanoff. They did not enter a plea, but both are expected back in court tomorrow for a detention hearing.

GIULIANI ON TRUMP IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY: SALEM WITCH TRIALS ‘FAIRER THAN THIS’

“Protecting the integrity of our elections and protecting our elections from unlawful foreign influence are core functions of our campaign finance laws,” Manhattan U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman said at a press conference on Thursday. Parnas and Fruman are being charged in New York’s Southern District.

Berman added: “As this office has made clear, we will not hesitate to investigate or prosecute those who engage in criminal conduct that draws into question the integrity of our political process. And I want to add that this investigation is continuing.”

Parnas, 47, and Fruman, 53, created Global Energy Producers (GEP), and allegedly funneled money through the company. This included contributions of $325,000 and $15,000 to committees in May 2018, “to obtain access to exclusive political events and gain influence with politicians,” the indictment says. They allegedly incorporated GEP around the time the contributions were made.

According to Federal Election Commission (FEC) records, GEP contributed $325,000 in May 2018 to pro-Trump super PAC America First Action. In a statement, a spokesperson for America First Action noted that a complaint was filed with the FEC in July 2018 over this contribution, as well as separate litigation in Florida. The statement said that the money was placed “in a segregated bank account,” was not used, and “will remain in this segregated account until these matters are resolved.”

Both men are accused of making false statements related to the nature of GEP and the contribution in response to the FEC complaint.

BIDEN CAMPAIGN SLAMS NY TIMES FOR RUNNING ‘CLINTON CASH’ AUTHOR’S OP-ED ON EX-VP’s UKRAINE TIES

Additionally, contributions from Fruman were allegedly made in Parnas’ name to get around federal contribution limits, and several contributions were made under the name “Igor Furman” instead of “Fruman,” allegedly “to conceal the source of the funds and to evade federal reporting requirements.”

The indictment also claims that Parnas and Fruman “committed to raise $20,000 or more for a then-sitting U.S. Congressman” whom they had met at a political event. The congressman wasn’t identified by name in court papers, but the donations to “Congressman 1” in the indictment match campaign finance reports for former Rep. Pete Sessions, a Texas Republican who lost his re-election bid in November 2018.

At approximately the same time that they made that commitment, Parnas and the Congressman discussed the Congressman’s assistance in securing the removal of the then-U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine, and this was done “at least in part, at the request of one or more Ukrainian government officials,” the indictment alleges.

The indictment also lays out allegations of a separate “foreign national donor scheme” involving the two men and two other defendants, American David Correia, and Ukrainian national Andrey Kukushkin. The foursome allegedly engaged in a conspiracy to make political contributions funded by an unnamed Russian national to obtain influence with political candidates regarding policies to benefit a recreational marijuana business venture, and to help obtain retail marijuana licenses.

House Democrats on Thursday subpoenaed Parnas and Fruman as part of the impeachment inquiry into Trump. The subpoenas are for documents that the men have so far failed to provide to Congress.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Parnas and Fruman were involved in Giuliani’s efforts to urge Ukrainian officials to investigate Trump’s political rival Joe Biden and his family. That effort was also discussed by Trump in a July call with Ukraine’s president and is at the heart of the impeachment probe.

Giuliani told Fox News that he represents Parnas and Fruman on a separate matter and called the timing of their arrest and indictment “suspect.” He added that he “will reveal relevant facts very very shortly.”

Giuliani, an attorney for President Trump, said he finds it “extremely suspicious” that the arrest was made in connection with an FEC matter that has yet to be resolved, and which Giuliani said is a civil matter. He acknowledged, however, that both men “logistically helped” in his collection of evidence against Hunter Biden, and that they helped connect him with Viktor Shokin and Yuriy Lutsenko former Prosecutors General of Ukraine.

Fox News’ Ronn Blitzer, Jake Gibson and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Parnas-Fruman Giuliani associates arrested while trying to board international flight with one-way tickets, prosecutors say fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc b9d07cd5-85d9-5176-850f-94a548354999 article Andrew O'Reilly   Westlake Legal Group Parnas-Fruman Giuliani associates arrested while trying to board international flight with one-way tickets, prosecutors say fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc b9d07cd5-85d9-5176-850f-94a548354999 article Andrew O'Reilly

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Ex-NFL star Kellen Winslow II faces reckonings and retrial on rape charges

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Ex-NFL star Kellen Winslow II faces reckonings and retrial on rape charges

VISTA, Calif. — In the four months since a jury convicted him of raping a homeless woman, former NFL star Kellen Winslow II has faced several personal reckonings inside and outside his jailhouse here in north San Diego County.

►His wife of 13 years sold their home in nearby Encinitas Aug. 6 for $2.9 million.

►Then she filed for divorce Aug. 30, leaving her with custody of their 8-year-old son and 6-year-old daughter.

►And now he’s getting ready for a retrial on other rape charges that could force him to spend the rest of his life behind bars.

But he’s still defiant about his innocence and is still trying to regain his freedom after a jury convicted him of three of 12 charges in June.

“The convictions must be reversed,” one of Winslow’s new defense attorneys wrote to the court on Sept. 25.

His attorneys are asking the court to erase those findings of guilt, arguing Winslow should get a whole new trial on all charges because he was denied due process in the first trial.

That request is a longshot for Winslow, 36, who has been incarcerated here since March after once living the high life with $40 million in career earnings as an NFL tight end. Even if that request is denied as expected, he still will head to a retrial Oct. 24 on eight of the charges that hung the jury in his first trial.

MORE WINSLOW: How Kellen Winslow II went from NFL star to accused serial rapist

A new jury will be seated for that proceeding, where he again will face charges of raping a hitchhiker, sodomizing a homeless woman, raping an unconscious woman in 2003 and abusing a 77-year-old woman at a local gym in February.

In many ways, it’ll be a remake of the first trial, where Winslow’s father, a Pro Football Hall of Famer, was among those who showed up every day and heard a brutal display of graphic evidence against his namesake son.

The retrial will include much of the same evidence as in the first trial, but this time the prosecution will try to get the new jury to deliver unanimous verdicts on the remaining eight charges, which is required for conviction under California law. In the first trial, the jury deadlocked by a 10-2 margin in favor of Winslow’s guilt on four of the eight counts, by a 7-5 margin on three others and 8-4 on one.

And that doesn’t bode well for Winslow in a retrial. Additional convictions could put him behind bars for life.

“As every defense attorney across the nation knows, a retrial usually does not end up in the defense’s favor,” said M. Dod Ghassemkhani, a San Diego criminal defense attorney who is not involved in the Winslow case. “The reason is the (prosecutor) always learns from the mistakes they made in the first trial as to why it hung on certain counts.”

The same jury in June convicted Winslow of three crimes: forcible rape of a homeless woman, misdemeanor indecent exposure with another woman, plus misdemeanor lewd conduct with the woman at the gym in February, all ages 58 or older. He hasn’t yet been sentenced for those convictions but faces nine years in prison for them – which his attorneys will attempt to have overturned before the start of the retrial.

They argue that the first trial unfairly included all five alleged victims – three who alleged rape, one who alleged misdemeanor indecent exposure and one who alleged misdemeanor lewd conduct. His attorneys say that the misdemeanor cases should not have been joined with the rape cases, but because they were, they were unfairly used to influence his rape conviction at the first trial after San Diego County prosecutor Dan Owens painted Winslow as a sexual deviant.

“Had the jurors not been inundated with claims that defendant was ‘wired’ to be a ‘pervert’ or ‘deviant,’ it is probable that jurors (at least one) would not have voted to convict,” Winslow’s attorney Patrick Morgan Ford wrote the court Sept. 25.

Winslow’s attorneys made a similar request before the first trial, asking for separate trials instead one trial with five alleged victims. That request was denied by Superior Court Judge Blaine K. Bowman, who also will hear this request to reverse the convictions shortly before the retrial Oct. 24.

Ghassemkhani told USA TODAY Sports that the request to reverse the convictions has “no chance” because Bowman isn’t going to overrule his previous decision.

Owens, who prosecuted the first trial, argued that Judge Bowman properly allowed the jury to consider the misdemeanor indecent exposure case as evidence of Winslow’s propensity to commit other sexual offenses. In that misdemeanor case, the jury in June convicted him of pulling his pants down and exposing himself to a woman who lived down the street from the Winslow home that was sold in August.

“The People in this case vigorously but appropriately argued the evidence showed (Winslow) to be a sexual predator who continuously engaged in both violent and impulsive sexual offenses, and the elements of each individual offense were supported by the evidence,” Owens wrote the court in response to Winslow’s motion for a new trial.

In his first trial, Winslow’s attorneys tried to raise reasonable doubt with the jury about his guilt by stressing inconsistencies in witness testimony and the lack of physical evidence in each case. Winslow’s attorney, Brian Watkins, also said in his opening statement at the first trial that Winslow cheated on his wife “numerous times” and had consensual sex with the hitchhiker but didn’t rape her or others.

Winslow married his wife Janelle in June 2006, but the couple separated Dec. 20, after most of the allegations came out, according to court documents. She cited irreconcilable differences with him in her divorce petition.

Since his conviction in June, Winslow also his shuffled his defense team. Watkins is no longer on the case because of a scheduling conflict. Attorney Marc Carlos will continue to represent Winslow at the retrial, along with a new attorney, Gretchen von Helms.

Carlos and Owens didn’t immediately return messages seeking comment.

Follow reporter Schrotenboer @Schrotenboer. E-mail: bschrotenb@usatoday.com

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House Impeachment Investigators Subpoena Giuliani Associates Under Indictment

Westlake Legal Group 10dc-impeach-facebookJumbo House Impeachment Investigators Subpoena Giuliani Associates Under Indictment United States Politics and Government Ukraine Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Parnas, Lev impeachment House Committee on Intelligence Giuliani, Rudolph W Fruman, Igor Federal Bureau of Investigation

WASHINGTON — House investigators issued subpoenas on Thursday to compel two associates of Rudolph W. Giuliani to sit for depositions in the impeachment inquiry, just hours after the men were indicted on campaign finance charges that touched on their work in Ukraine.

Three chairmen leading the investigation of President Trump’s efforts to pressure Ukraine to investigate his political rivals wrote that the associates, Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman, were required to appear for a deposition next Wednesday and hand over records related to their work with Mr. Giuliani, Mr. Trump’s private lawyer.

Mr. Giuliani was at the center of Mr. Trump’s attempts to persuade the Ukrainian government to open corruption investigations into former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and his son, and other Democrats, efforts that are now the subject of a rapidly expanding impeachment inquiry.

The House investigation has touched off a constitutional clash, as the White House has signaled that it will stonewall all requests for witnesses and documents. The latest subpoenas emerged as criticism of the president’s actions in the Ukraine matter continued to grow. Asked whether it was proper for the president to solicit foreign interference in the political process, H.R. McMaster, Mr. Trump’s former national security adviser, responded, “Of course it is not appropriate.”

Speaking at an event in Washington on Thursday, Mr. McMaster said it was up to Congress “to make a judgment as to whether or not that happened.”

It was unclear how the indictment unsealed on Thursday morning would influence the impeachment inquiry. Mr. Parnas had been scheduled to appear for a deposition on Capitol Hill on Thursday and Mr. Fruman on Friday. But even before their arrests, their lawyer, John M. Dowd, had indicated that they would not comply voluntarily.

The subpoena issued by the House Intelligence Committee makes no mention of the federal indictment. The F.B.I. arrested the two men as they were about to board an international flight late Wednesday, and on Thursday federal prosecutors charged them with funneling foreign money to government officials and campaigns in an effort to influence American policy, including toward Ukraine.

In a letter to Mr. Dowd, the three House chairmen wrote that as private citizens, Mr. Parnas and Mr. Fruman were “required by law to comply with the enclosed subpoenas.” It was signed by Representative Adam B. Schiff, the chairman of the Intelligence Committee; Representative Elijah E. Cummings, the chairman of the Oversight and Reform Committee; and Representative Eliot L. Engel, the chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee.

“They may not evade requests from Congress for documents and information necessary to conduct our inquiry,” the chairmen wrote. “They are not exempted from this requirement merely because they happen to work with Mr. Giuliani, and they may not defy congressional subpoenas merely because President Trump has chosen the path of denial, defiance and obstruction.”

The indictments could complicate congressional attempts to get them to testify, raising such issues as whether lawmakers will grant immunity to them that would bar the use of their testimony as criminal evidence.

Also, an assertion of Fifth Amendment rights against self-incrimination is a lawful basis to avoid answering questions despite a subpoena.

The New York Times reported in May that the two men helped connect Mr. Giuliani to Ukrainian prosecutors who provided him information related to the investigations he wanted into Mr. Biden and his son Hunter, as well as a debunked conspiracy about Ukrainian meddling to aid Democrats in the 2016 election.

The federal indictment in Manhattan made no mention of Mr. Giuliani, but stated that the men worked with one or more Ukrainian government official to try to secure the removal of Marie L. Yovanovitch as the United States’ ambassador to the country.

Mr. Giuliani was seeking Ms. Yovanovitch’s removal, as well, and ultimately the White House called her back to Washington early, having deemed her insufficiently loyal to the president.

House investigators are scheduled to hear from Ms. Yovanovitch on Friday in a private deposition, but as of midday Thursday, it remained unclear if the State Department would try to block her testimony. Democrats were prepared to issue a subpoena to increase pressure if needed.

The indictment may also significantly complicate Mr. Giuliani’s ability to serve as a face of the president’s defense. Senate Republicans allied with the president have said they might host a public hearing with Mr. Giuliani in an effort to showcase his accusations against the Bidens and undercut the House’s impeachment narrative. Now they may simply decide he is too toxic to expose to public questioning.

Charlie Savage and Peter Baker contributed reporting.

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Providing health insurance to illegal immigrants could cost up to $23 billion a year, study finds

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6053435434001_6053435666001-vs Providing health insurance to illegal immigrants could cost up to $23 billion a year, study finds fox-news/us/immigration fox news fnc/politics fnc article Adam Shaw 9b2f979d-83ed-5de8-ab34-984c1949c5fd

In the span of just a few months, the idea of providing health care to illegal immigrants has morphed from a fringe, left-wing fancy to a plank of many 2020 Democrats’ presidential campaigns — but it’s a proposal that one study predicts would cost American taxpayers tens of billions of dollars a year.

A standout moment of the June 27 Democratic primary debate was that of all the candidates on the stage raising their hands, signifying support for government health care plans including “undocumented” immigrants.

ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS SHOULD GET HEALTH CARE, SAY DEMS IN NIGHT 2 DEBATE

Republicans and the White House have seized on that moment, with President Trump declaring it “the end of the race.”

But with the campaign definitely not over, and a number of frontrunners now backing the policy, more attention is turning to how much it could cost to give millions of illegal immigrants health insurance. On Thursday, the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS), a policy group that advocates for lower levels of immigration overall, published a study finding that the cost could be up to $23 billion a year.

While candidates have not necessarily gone into detail about their plans, CIS cites an Atlantic survey that found that Sens. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Kamala Harris, D-Calif., and Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.; and former Housing Secretary Julian Castro would all provide “full benefits” to those in the country illegally.

The CIS study estimated that 4.9 million illegal immigrants have incomes below 400 percent of the poverty line and also do not have insurance — meaning they have incomes low enough to receive coverage via either Medicaid or the Affordable Care Act — also known to many, particularly critics, as ObamaCare.

The study estimates that if all income-eligible, uninsured illegal immigrants received subsidies under the ACA, then the cost to insure would be $22.6 billion, but with “likely enrollment” of 46 percent, the total cost would be perhaps $10.4 billion a year. It predicts that the average cost of a subsidized premium would be $4,637.

If a mixed approach of ACA subsidies and Medicaid enrollment were used, the cost would dip to $19.6 billion with 100 percent enrollment, and $10.7 billion assuming “likely enrollment.”

These numbers could change significantly if a more overarching health care overhaul is passed by a future Democratic White House and Congress.

“Numbers aside, the fact that presidential candidates are advocating spending billions of dollars on people who are in the country illegally is significant in its own right,” the report concludes. “It suggests that allowing in large numbers of less-educated workers will inevitably generate significant political pressure to provide them access to social programs.”

Extending health care to illegal immigrants could, however, be only one part of the cost to taxpayers of more generous social policies being pushed by Democrats.

AOC PUSHES NATIONAL RENT CONTROL, WELFARE FOR ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS IN LATEST MASSIVE PROPOSAL

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-Calif., who was an early champion of left-favored policies now finding their way into 2020 Democratic platforms, recently introduced a new package of policies known as the “Just Society.”

Among those bills is “The Embrace Act,” which would allow illegal immigrants to claim the same welfare benefits as U.S. citizens and those in the country legally.

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“Notwithstanding any other provision of law … an individual who is an alien (without regard to the immigration status of that alien) may not be denied any federal public benefit solely on the basis of the individual’s immigration status,” the bill reads.

The bill defines a federal public benefit as: “any grant, contract, loan, professional license or commercial license provided by an agency of the United States or by appropriated funds of the United States; and … any retirement, welfare, health, disability, public or assisted housing, post-secondary education, food assistance, unemployment benefit,or any other similar benefit for which payments or assistance are provided to an individual, household, or family eligibility unit by an agency of the United States or by appropriated funds of the United States.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6053435434001_6053435666001-vs Providing health insurance to illegal immigrants could cost up to $23 billion a year, study finds fox-news/us/immigration fox news fnc/politics fnc article Adam Shaw 9b2f979d-83ed-5de8-ab34-984c1949c5fd   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6053435434001_6053435666001-vs Providing health insurance to illegal immigrants could cost up to $23 billion a year, study finds fox-news/us/immigration fox news fnc/politics fnc article Adam Shaw 9b2f979d-83ed-5de8-ab34-984c1949c5fd

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Florida man disguised as woman robs bank, steals patrol car, police allege

A man in Florida accused of robbing a bank while disguised as a woman has been arrested after he allegedly stole a police cruiser and led deputies on a two-county chase, investigators said.

Gumersindo Reyes Jr., 51, was wearing a gold dress and a red wig when he entered a Chase Bank in Casselberry, northeast of Orlando, and passed a note to the teller demanding money, Police Chief Larry Krantz told reporters. He allegedly left carrying an undisclosed amount of cash in his backpack.

Reyes drew the attention of a passing Seminole County deputy who saw the suspect ditch his disguise behind a bush, Fox 35 Orlando reported.

TEXAS POLICE CHASE, CAPTURE MAN ACCUSED OF RAPING WOMAN, STUFFING HER IN TRUNK, BODYCAM VIDEO SHOWS

The deputy got out of his patrol car and confronted Reyes, who police said was displaying “bizarre” behavior.

Westlake Legal Group Gumersindo-Reyes-Jr-inset Florida man disguised as woman robs bank, steals patrol car, police allege Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 55f5c876-15e5-56e6-8d68-ec16499fd95a

Reyes was wearing a woman’s gold dress and a red wig when he entered a Chase Bank, police said. (Casselberry Police Department)

After failing to subdue Reyes with a stun gun, the deputy chased him into an apartment complex across the street from the bank, WFTV reported. The deputy reached for his firearm to order Reyes to the ground but Reyes also tried to grab the weapon, setting off a struggle.

Reyes then dashed out of the complex and stole the deputy’s patrol vehicle, police said.

DELAWARE MAN CHOKES WALMART CASHIER IN FLORIDA, ATTEMPTS TO HEAD-BUTT OFFICERS, POLICE SAY

“There’s nothing that drives me crazier than to see a ‘bad guy,’ or know that a ‘bad guy’ got behind the wheel of one of our patrol vehicles, even for just one moment,” Seminole County Sheriff Dennis Lemma said. “I’m OK that he was in the car, but he was sitting in the wrong seat.”

Reyes led deputies on a wild chase through Seminole and Orange counties before crashing the vehicle into another car in Maitland where they finally arrested him, police said.

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He faced numerous charges including battery on an officer, resisting an officer with violence and robbery with a firearm, according to police records.

Reyes had a criminal history of attempted murder and robbery in Puerto Rico, officials told WFTV.

Westlake Legal Group Gumersindo-Reyes-Jr-inset Florida man disguised as woman robs bank, steals patrol car, police allege Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 55f5c876-15e5-56e6-8d68-ec16499fd95a   Westlake Legal Group Gumersindo-Reyes-Jr-inset Florida man disguised as woman robs bank, steals patrol car, police allege Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 55f5c876-15e5-56e6-8d68-ec16499fd95a

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