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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 95)

Drexel University professor’s strip club purchases with research grant funds trigger theft arrest

A former Drexel University department chair is facing criminal charges after an audit found he spent $96,000 in research grant funds at strip clubs and sports bars.

Chikaodinaka Nwankpa, 57, the former head of Drexel’s Engineering Department, was arrested last week on two charges of theft.

“Mr. Nwankpa inappropriately and criminally diverted tens of thousands of dollars that were allocated for research purposes toward his own private enjoyment,” Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner said.

Westlake Legal Group Chikaodinaka-Nwankpa Drexel University professor's strip club purchases with research grant funds trigger theft arrest Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox news fnc/us fnc cfb7e853-eeb6-59cd-846e-1568b6aaabea article

Chikaodinaka Nwankpa, 57, was arrested last week. (Philadephia District Attorney’s Office)

DREXEL UNIVERSITY TO PAY NEARLY $200G AFTER PROFESSOR USED FEDERAL GRANT MONEY AT STRIP CLUBS, SPORTS BARS FOR 10 YEARS

Nwankpa was freed on bail after a court appearance, Fox 29 Philadelphia reported.

Krasner said Nwankpa tried to hide the strip-club visits by itemizing the charges as catering and food, ignoring the fact that most took place between midnight and 2 a.m.

2 MEN PLEAD GUILTY TO STEALING MILLIONS IN RARE BOOKS FROM PITTSBURGH LIBRARY

He said Nwankpa spent another $89,000 in research grant funds on iTunes, meals and other unauthorized purchases.

Drexel auditors said they found the improper $185,000 in improper charges took place from 2010 to 2017.

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The university last October reached a settlement with the federal government — the source of the research funds — that called for Drexel to reimburse the stolen money to the feds.

After the audit, Nwankpa resigned and repaid Drexel $53,000.

Westlake Legal Group Chikaodinaka-Nwankpa Drexel University professor's strip club purchases with research grant funds trigger theft arrest Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox news fnc/us fnc cfb7e853-eeb6-59cd-846e-1568b6aaabea article   Westlake Legal Group Chikaodinaka-Nwankpa Drexel University professor's strip club purchases with research grant funds trigger theft arrest Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox news fnc/us fnc cfb7e853-eeb6-59cd-846e-1568b6aaabea article

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Lew Olowski: Iran, not Trump, threatens US security – the president is handling the situation correctly

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124502541001_6124504178001-vs Lew Olowski: Iran, not Trump, threatens US security – the president is handling the situation correctly Lew Olowski fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 72936a8d-80e1-5e40-8c6c-395235261111

The enemy of your enemy is not necessarily your friend. Politicians forget this fact.

Right now, for example, politicians in Congress concentrate their time and attention upon articles of impeachment that call President Trump “a threat to national security.”

Meanwhile, Trump actively defends the United States against a real threat to national security: the Islamic Republic of Iran.

TRUMP FIRES BACK AFTER IRANIAN LEADER CONDEMNS HIM ON TWITTER: ‘MAKE IRAN GREAT AGAIN!’

Between Trump and Iran, the president’s opponents seem to think Trump is the worse enemy.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, for example, accuses Trump of “taking us pell-mell toward another war.”

More from Opinion

She joins other politicians who accuse Trump of “escalating” conflict with Iran. They fault Trump for two decisions, in particular: withdrawing the United States from the Iran nuclear deal in 2018; and killing Iran’s top general, Qassem Soleimani, in a targeted drone strike on Jan. 3, 2020.

These politicians are blaming the victim, and their accusations are false. In fact, Trump’s response to Iranian aggression has been necessary and proportional: not escalatory.

Recall that Iran has been waging war against the United States since 1979: long before Donald Trump won the presidency.

Almost immediately after the Islamic Republic was founded, it invaded the American embassy in Tehran and captured 98 hostages. Since then, Iran has routinely committed armed attacks against the United States and its allies. For example, Iran plotted to bomb a restaurant in Washington, D.C., in an attack that would have assassinated the Saudi ambassador and massacred 100–150 American civilians. Iran even helped Al Qaeda bomb the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, murdering hundreds of innocents.

Former South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg said Iran is likelier to build nuclear weapons because Trump “gutted” the Iranian nuclear deal. Yet the Iranian nuclear deal was gutless to begin with.

More recently, Iran killed about 600 American soldiers in Iraq, shot down U.S. aircraft, attacked commercial ships, bombed U.S. allies, besieged the U.S. embassy in Baghdad, and killed countless civilians worldwide.

Now imagine all this plus nuclear weapons.

Former South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg said Iran is likelier to build nuclear weapons because Trump “gutted” the Iranian nuclear deal. Yet the Iranian nuclear deal was gutless to begin with. It did not require Iran to abandon its decades-long terror campaign against the United States and its allies. Moreover, because the deal sunsets in 2025, it was designed to merely postpone Iran’s nuclear weaponry, not prevent it.

In other words, the deal let Iran keep its terror and have nukes, too. Trump rightly rejected it.

The goal of the nuclear deal was to charm Iran into thinking the commercial benefits of trade exceed the strategic benefits of a nuclear arsenal. So the deal paid Iran up to $150 billion — and lifted trade sanctions, allowing Iran to make even more money — in exchange for Iran’s promise to curb its nuclear development and submit to international inspections. But after the deal was signed, Iran broke the deal, anyway, violating rules governing nuclear centrifuges, international inspections, chemical production, and weapons technology.

To understand why Iran did that, follow the money.

First, by paying Iran and lifting pre-existing trade sanctions at the outset, the deal gave away Iran’s incentive to follow through on its promises: why buy the cow after you got the milk for free?

Second, by granting billions of dollars to Iran that were initially seized to enforce pre-existing nuclear sanctions — instead of making Iran forfeit this money — the deal gave Iran a get-out-of-sanctions-free card. This signaled to Iran and other nuclear proliferators — including Iran’s partner, North Korea — that illegally pursuing nuclear weapons is a win/break-even proposition instead of a risky business.

Third, because positive trade relations enrich everyone, Iran was confident that, once it violated the deal, other countries would be unlikely to punish it. Losing business hurts everyone, not just the bad guys in Tehran.

If withdrawing from the Iranian nuclear deal is an escalation that causes Iran to double-down on terrorism and nuclear armament, then there was never a deal to begin with: it was blackmail.

Similarly, the United States did not “escalate” by killing Soleimani in a targeted drone strike. Soleimani was a notorious enemy combatant. He led Iran’s war against the United States for many years. Killing him does not even match the scale of aggression he personally committed against the United States, let alone escalate Iran’s decades-long war.

Rather, the United States rightfully killed Soleimani as an act of responsive self-defense. With a single missile strike, Trump annihilated both Soleimani and Mahdi al-Muhandis, the leader of a paramilitary group that had just killed a U.S. citizen and attacked the U.S. embassy in Baghdad: two birds with one drone.

Killing individual enemy combatants — without collateral damage, remarkably — is not even an escalation against Iran’s most recent terrorism spree, let alone an escalation of its decades-long war against the United States.

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Trump is obligated to terminate these national security threats, not surrender to them. The United States is even entitled, as a matter of necessity and proportionality, to disable the Iranian government’s entire capacity to continue launching attacks: let alone to merely kill one Iranian general.

To be sure, Iran responded to this strike by launching missiles directly at Iraqi military bases containing some U.S. troops. Yet by exchanging direct attacks against each other, the United States and Iran are de-escalating the war between them.

First, Iran’s missile launch at Iraqi bases was less provocative than previous attacks because this time, at least, Iran inflicted no fatalities. But just a few weeks ago, Iran’s paramilitary forces fired missiles that killed an American citizen and wounded several others — causing Trump to respond in the first place.

Second, direct attacks imply a de-escalation because these are a concession from Iran’s preferred modus operandi in its war against the United States: committing armed attacks through paramilitary proxy forces.

Rogue governments like Iran command civilian militias and other paramilitary forces purposely to blur the line between combatants and non-combatants. This strategy endangers innocent civilians. That, of course, is the point: by blending into civilian populations, Iranian proxies use innocents as human shields. Because they are not wearing Iranian military uniforms or operating from Iranian-owned military bases, these forces can more easily conceal combatants, deter military responses for fear of collateral damage, and even hide the Iranian government’s own involvement.

This is the same strategy used by Al Qaeda, Islamic State, and Russia in its paramilitary operations against Ukraine and Estonia, a NATO ally.

Iranian terrorism’s longstanding paramilitary strategy undermines the most fundamental principles in the law of armed conflict. Military operations should temper the risk of harm to innocent civilians: not exploit such harm for tactical advantage.

Hopefully, the United States’ killing of Soleimani, and Iran’s missile response, represents a change in course for both countries.

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For Iran, its direct missile attack should initiate a move toward more lawful military operations: a de-escalation from the terrorist strategy Iran utilized under Soleimani’s leadership.

For the United States, killing Qassem Soleimani should signal the end of indifference to Iranian aggression and a renewed commitment toward defending the United States and its allies.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY LEW OLOWSKI

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124502541001_6124504178001-vs Lew Olowski: Iran, not Trump, threatens US security – the president is handling the situation correctly Lew Olowski fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 72936a8d-80e1-5e40-8c6c-395235261111   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124502541001_6124504178001-vs Lew Olowski: Iran, not Trump, threatens US security – the president is handling the situation correctly Lew Olowski fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 72936a8d-80e1-5e40-8c6c-395235261111

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Bill, Hillary Clinton reflect on their history, Lewinsky scandal in trailer for new documentary

Westlake Legal Group clintons-together-13e02ef6f1857510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ Bill, Hillary Clinton reflect on their history, Lewinsky scandal in trailer for new documentary Nate Day fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article a9ed761f-4acc-5298-8e85-8512a9356aa8

Former President Bill Clinton and his wife, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, are opening up for a new documentary series.

Set to premiere on Hulu on March 6, “Hillary” will recount the milestones of Hillary’s life and career, including her relationship with Bill.

In the trailer, Bill, 73, recounts meeting his future wife and seems to reference his affair with Monica Lewinsky, an incident that had him impeached by the House of Representatives for lying under oath.

GRAMMYS CEO PUT ON LEAVE AFTER SHOCKING MEMO SHE SENT TO HR

“It wasn’t like I thought, ‘How can I think about the most stupid thing I could possibly do and do it?'” Bill said in the clip.

“I didn’t want anything to do with him,” admitted Hillary, 72.

The former presidential candidate added: “Chelsea put herself between us and held both our hands,” as the trailer cut to a shot of Chelsea Clinton standing between her parents, holding their hands as they prepared to board Marine One.

The trailer also touches on Hillary’s work in feminism, including her famous “human rights are women’s rights and women’s rights are human rights” speech, as well as her email scandal and scrutiny she faced in the media.

MEGHAN MARKLE, PRINCE HARRY EXPECTED TO STILL RECEIVE FUNDS FROM PRINCE CHARLES: REPORT

The docuseries will also offer never-before-seen footage from Hillary’s historic 2016 presidential campaign as well as interviews with former staff, journalists, family and friends.

The trailer was shared at Friday’s Television Critics Association winter press tour, at which, Hillary said “nothing was off-limits” for the program.

“I was this lightning rod, and I was somebody who people were quick to judge, often having nothing to do with me, but due to times and attitudes about women,” said Hillary.

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“I sure hope [attitudes toward women change], because it’s really an unfair double standard disadvantage,” Hillary said. “I am certainly in the camp that believes the more women that get out there… the more we should realize women have the same right to have the full range of emotions… so we can begin to put that on a shelf and leave it there.”

Westlake Legal Group clintons-together-13e02ef6f1857510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ Bill, Hillary Clinton reflect on their history, Lewinsky scandal in trailer for new documentary Nate Day fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article a9ed761f-4acc-5298-8e85-8512a9356aa8   Westlake Legal Group clintons-together-13e02ef6f1857510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ Bill, Hillary Clinton reflect on their history, Lewinsky scandal in trailer for new documentary Nate Day fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article a9ed761f-4acc-5298-8e85-8512a9356aa8

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Member of Trump’s defense team Robert Ray on impeachment: Process has been ‘partisan and therefore illegitimate’

Westlake Legal Group robert-ray- Member of Trump’s defense team Robert Ray on impeachment: Process has been 'partisan and therefore illegitimate' Talia Kaplan fox-news/shows/sunday-morning-futures fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 8bf9451c-b4c5-5451-a995-6eda0772b84f

Former federal prosecutor Robert Ray, a member of President Trump’s impeachment legal defense team, spoke exclusively on Sunday with Fox Business anchor Maria Bartiromo on “Sunday Morning Futures,” calling the entire impeachment process “partisan and therefore illegitimate.”

Speaking with Bartiromo on Sunday, Ray shared what Trump’s principle defense could look like, saying he thinks it “is very simple.”

“This is an entirely partisan and therefore illegitimate effort by House Democrats to remove a president from office,” Ray told Bartiromo. “And the remedy for that is the United States Senate, as envisioned by the framers of the Constitution, in order to overturn the will of the electorate in the 2016 election, and particularly given the fact that we are now in the middle of a presidential campaign for 2020, ultimately that will can only be overturned with a bipartisan effort and overwhelming bipartisan support in the Senate with a two-thirds majority in order to remove a president, overturn the will of that electorate.”

KEN STARR, ALAN DERSHOWITZ JOIN TRUMP’S IMPEACHMENT DEFENSE TEAM

He added that he doesn’t expect any Republicans to vote for impeachment.

President Trump’s defense team also includes Ken Starr, the former independent counsel who led the Whitewater investigation into then-President Bill Clinton in the mid-1990s, attorney Alan Dershowitz, former Florida attorney general Pam Bondi and Jane Raskin, who was part of the president’s legal team during former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe. Both Starr and Dershowitz are former Fox News contributors.

The trial will kick off in earnest Tuesday when House impeachment managers will prosecute the case and Trump’s lawyers will offer a robust defense over a period of days.

PAM BONDI ON WHAT TO EXPECT FROM SENATE IMPEACHMENT TRIAL: WE’RE ‘ALL READY TO PUT THIS BEHIND US’

Ray, former Whitewater Independent Counsel, pointed out to Bartiromo that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was seen “essentially celebrating the notion that the stain of impeachment exists and exists forever.”

“The only rejoinder to that, and that’s the rejoinder that it is my job, together with the rest of the defense team, to place before the United States Senate for their consideration is the question about the rejoinder being that there will be acquittal forever as well. And that’s what we expect,” Ray said. “That’s the task ahead during the next several weeks.”

On Sunday, Ray also outlined what constitutes a “well-founded” article of impeachment, explaining why he believes the two at hand won’t fare well in the Senate.

“Well-founded articles of impeachment both allege that crimes were committed and that those are the type of crimes that constitute abuse of the public trust. Abuse of power alone, and history has shown this, similar to also obstruction of Congress, those types of articles of impeachment have been tried on for size before, but they have not fared well,” Ray said.

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“The core of the impeachment parameters allege that crimes have been committed, treason, bribery and things like that, in other words, high crimes and misdemeanors.”

Fox News’ Adam Shaw, John Roberts and Marisa Schulz contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group robert-ray- Member of Trump’s defense team Robert Ray on impeachment: Process has been 'partisan and therefore illegitimate' Talia Kaplan fox-news/shows/sunday-morning-futures fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 8bf9451c-b4c5-5451-a995-6eda0772b84f   Westlake Legal Group robert-ray- Member of Trump’s defense team Robert Ray on impeachment: Process has been 'partisan and therefore illegitimate' Talia Kaplan fox-news/shows/sunday-morning-futures fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 8bf9451c-b4c5-5451-a995-6eda0772b84f

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How U.S. Firms Helped Africa’s Richest Woman Exploit Her Country’s Wealth

Westlake Legal Group 19dossantos-02-facebookJumbo How U.S. Firms Helped Africa’s Richest Woman Exploit Her Country’s Wealth United States Tax Shelters Sonangol Group PricewaterhouseCoopers Poverty Politics and Government Oil (Petroleum) and Gasoline Money Laundering McKinsey&Co Malta Lourenco, Joao LISBON, Portugal Jewels and Jewelry International Consortium of Investigative Journalists High Net Worth Individuals Galp Energia embezzlement Dubai (United Arab Emirates) Dos Santos, Jose Eduardo dos Santos, Isabel Diamonds De Grisogono Corruption (Institutional) Consultants Angola Africa

LISBON — It was the party to be seen at during the Cannes Film Festival, where being seen was the whole point. A Swiss jewelry company had rented out the opulent Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc, drawing celebrities like Leonardo DiCaprio, Naomi Campbell and Antonio Banderas. The theme: “Love on the Rocks.”

Posing for photos at the May 2017 event was Isabel dos Santos, Africa’s richest woman and the daughter of José Eduardo dos Santos, then Angola’s president. Her husband controls the jeweler, De Grisogono, through a dizzying array of shell companies in Luxembourg, Malta and the Netherlands.

But the lavish party was possible only because of the Angolan government. The country is rich in oil and diamonds but hobbled by corruption, with grinding poverty, widespread illiteracy and a high infant mortality rate. A state agency had sunk more than $120 million into the jewelry company. Today, it faces a total loss.

Ms. dos Santos, estimated to be worth over $2 billion, claims she is a self-made woman who never benefited from state funds. But a different picture has emerged under media scrutiny in recent years: She took a cut of Angola’s wealth, often through decrees signed by her father. She acquired stakes in the country’s diamond exports, its dominant mobile phone company, two of its banks and its biggest cement maker, and partnered with the state oil giant to buy into Portugal’s largest petroleum company.

Now, a trove of more than 700,000 documents obtained by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, and shared with The New York Times, shows how a global network of consultants, lawyers, bankers and accountants helped her amass that fortune and park it abroad. Some of the world’s leading professional service firms — including the Boston Consulting Group, McKinsey & Company and PwC — facilitated her efforts to profit from her country’s wealth while lending their legitimacy.

The empire she and her husband built stretches from Hong Kong to the United States, comprising over 400 companies and subsidiaries. It encompasses properties around the world, including a $55 million mansion in Monte Carlo, a $35 million yacht and a luxury residence in Dubai on a seahorse-shaped artificial island.

Among the businesses was the Swiss jewelry company, which records and interviews reveal was led by a team recruited from Boston Consulting. They ran it into the ground. Under their watch, millions of dollars in Angolan state funds helped finance the annual parties on the French Riviera.

When Boston Consulting and McKinsey signed on to help restructure Sonangol, Angola’s state oil business, they agreed to be paid in an unusual way — not by the government but through a Maltese company Ms. dos Santos owned. Then her father put her in charge of Sonangol, and the government payments soared, routed through another offshore company, this one owned by a friend of hers.

PricewaterhouseCoopers, now called PwC, acted as her accountant, consultant and tax adviser, working with at least 20 companies controlled by her or her husband. Yet there were obvious red flags as Angolan state money went unaccounted for, according to money-laundering experts and forensic accountants who reviewed the newly obtained documents.

When the Western advisory firms came into Angola almost two decades ago, they were viewed by the global financial community as a force for good: bringing professionalism and higher standards to a former Portuguese colony ravaged by years of civil war. But ultimately they took the money and did what their clients asked, said Ricardo Soares de Oliveira, an international politics professor at Oxford who studies Angola.

“They are there as all-purpose providers of whatever these elites are trying to do,” he said. “They have no moral status — they are what you make of them.”

Now, more than two years after her father stepped down after 38 years as Angola’s strongman president, Ms. dos Santos is in trouble.

Last month, an Angolan court froze her assets in the country as part of a corruption investigation, along with her husband’s and those of a Portuguese business associate. The Angolan attorney general claimed the couple were responsible for more than $1 billion in lost state funds, with particular focus on De Grisogono and Sonangol.

Ms. dos Santos and her husband could face years in prison if convicted, according to the office of Angola’s president, João Lourenço. At the heart of the inquiry: $38 million in payments from Sonangol to a Dubai shell company hours after Angola’s new president announced her firing. Ms. dos Santos’s half brother is also facing corruption charges for helping to transfer $500 million from Angola’s sovereign wealth fund. The asset freeze came soon after I.C.I.J. reporting partners asked the government about transactions in the documents.

In an interview with the BBC, Ms. dos Santos, 46, denied any wrongdoing and called the inquiry a “political persecution.” “My companies are funded privately, we work with commercial banks, our holdings are private holdings,” she said.

Her husband, Sindika Dokolo, 47, suggested the new government was scapegoating them. “It does not attack the agents of public companies accused of embezzlement, just a family operating in the private sector,” he told Radio France Internationale, another I.C.I.J. partner.

Global banks including Citigroup and Deutsche Bank, bound by strict rules about politically connected clients, largely declined to work with the family in recent years, the documents show.

“These guys hear about Isabel and they run like the Devil from the cross,” Eduardo Sequeira, head of corporate finance for Fidequity, a Portuguese firm that manages many of Ms. dos Santos’s companies, wrote in a 2014 email after the Spanish bank Santander turned down work with her.

Consulting companies, far less regulated than banks, readily embraced her business. American advisory firms market their expertise in bringing best practices to clients around the world. But in their quest for fees, several have worked for authoritarian or corrupt regimes in places like China or Saudi Arabia. McKinsey’s business in South Africa was decimated by its partnership with a subcontractor tied to a political scandal that took down the country’s president.

The new leaks show the pattern repeating itself in Angola, where invoices point to tens of millions of dollars going to the firms. They agreed to be paid for Angolan government work by shell companies — tied to Ms. dos Santos and her associates — that were in offshore locations long used to avoid taxes, hide illicit wealth and launder money. The arrangement allowed her to keep a large portion of the state funds, the records show.

(The documents, called the Luanda Leaks after the Angolan capital, include emails, slide presentations, invoices and contracts. They came to the I.C.I.J. through the Platform to Protect Whistleblowers in Africa, a Paris-based advocacy and legal group.)

PwC, based in London, said it was investigating its dealings with Ms. dos Santos and would stop working with her family. Boston Consulting said it took steps, when hired, “to ensure compliance with established policies and avoid corruption and other risks.” McKinsey called the allegations against Ms. dos Santos “concerning,” and said it wasn’t doing any work now with her or her companies.

De Grisogono, an upstart Swiss jewelry company, was on life support. Its business had never fully recovered from the global financial crisis, and by 2012, it was deeply in debt.

Mr. Dokolo, Ms. dos Santos’s husband, seemed to offer a way out. He teamed up with Sodiam, the Angolan state diamond marketer, in a 50-50 venture set up in Malta that took over the jeweler. The state enterprise eventually pumped more than $120 million into the business, acquiring equity and buying off debt, the records indicate. Documents show that shortly after the acquisition, Mr. Dokolo put in $4 million, an amount he had gotten from a “success fee” — drawn from the Sodiam money and shunted through a shell company in the British Virgin Islands — for closing the deal.

Mr. Dokolo, through his law firm, said he had initially invested $115 million and “has subsequently invested significantly more into the business,” but that could not be verified in the documents.

Flush with Angolan government money, the Geneva jeweler hired the Boston Consulting Group, an American management company with offices in more than 50 countries.

In 2012, according to the documents, a Lisbon-based team at the firm took a central role in helping to run De Grisogono — “shadow management” as John Leitão, a Boston Consulting employee who would become the jeweler’s chief executive, said in a November interview in Lisbon.

The consulting firm, however, said its employees worked only on three specific projects, ending its involvement in early 2013.

By that year, the consultants had started leaving the firm to join the jeweler, eventually occupying the positions of chairman, chief financial officer and chief operating officer alongside Mr. Leitão.

He said in the interview that the consultants had inherited “a total mess.” But under his watch, the company, with boutiques in London, New York and Paris, went deeper into the red, despite an initial uptick in sales, documents show.

De Grisogono had a run of bad luck, including economic pressures affecting Russian oligarchs and Saudi sheikhs who had been big customers, Mr. Leitão said. Yet many rich patrons, including Ms. dos Santos and her husband, would take jewelry and wristwatches without paying for them up front, the documents show. Marketing expenses also shot up — 42 percent during Mr. Leitão’s first year to $1.7 million, with the increase going to the Cannes party, according to an internal presentation.

Mr. Dokolo was unapologetic about spending big on parties. “You tell me what major luxury brand spends less than this on promotion to become a global brand,” he told the French radio service. In an interview with BBC, Ms. dos Santos said she was not a stakeholder in De Grisogono, though several emails and documents call that into question, indicating she had an ownership interest in the Maltese companies controlling it.

The jeweler gave the couple an ability to better market Angolan diamonds. Mr. Dokolo already controlled the rights to more than 45 percent of the country’s diamond sales through a company that bought uncut gems, generating hundreds of millions of dollars in income, according to the Angolan president’s office.

Mr. Dokolo’s lawyers said he aimed to integrate the country’s diamond industry, “from mining to polishing to retail sales.”

The Angolan people did more than pay dearly for a European jewelry company. They paid with money borrowed at a 9 percent annual interest rate from Banco BIC, an Angolan lender where Ms. dos Santos owns a 42.5 percent stake. The government will have to repay some $225 million, according to the Angolan president’s office. The loans had been guaranteed by Ms. dos Santos’s father.

For all the money it put in, Sodiam never exercised any management control of the jeweler and never recouped any of its investment. Now, Sodiam officials want out, and the business is for sale.

“It is strange,” said Eugenio Bravo da Rosa, Sodiam’s new chairman, speaking of the man he replaced, who had signed off on the investment. “I can’t believe a person would start a business and let its partner run the business with total power to make all the decisions.”

In 2016, Sonangol, Angola’s state oil company, was in crisis after a drop in market prices. One former Boston Consulting employee described a company in an “absolutely chaotic” state. The Angolan president fired the company’s board and appointed his daughter, Ms. dos Santos, as chairwoman that June. Boston Consulting was helping Sonangol come up with a “road map” to restructure.

Ms. dos Santos had a history with the company. A decade earlier, she and her husband made millions partnering with Sonangol and a Portuguese businessman to invest in a Lisbon gas company, Galp Energia. Their stake came courtesy of the Angolan government — through an $84 million loan from Sonangol, documents show. Their share in Galp is now worth about $800 million.

The former Boston Consulting employee, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said that Ms. dos Santos — the president’s eldest child — was able to get things done that other executives could not because she wasn’t susceptible to pressure.

“We’re very committed to transparency,” Ms. dos Santos told Reuters at the time. “We’re very committed to improving our profits at Sonangol and to improving our organization.”

But transparency went only so far. More than half a year before she was named chairwoman, her father signed off on a decree drafted at the couple’s law firm, records show, that led to the awarding of $9.3 million to a Maltese company to oversee Sonangol’s restructuring. The business, Wise Intelligence Solutions, was owned by the couple and run by a close associate, Mário Leite da Silva, De Grisogono’s former chairman. Boston Consulting came on board, followed by McKinsey, with the Maltese firm acting as their manager.

Boston Consulting and other advisers billed for only about half of what Wise received from the Angolan treasury, receipts and invoices show, even though the Maltese company had only limited expertise of its own. Wise “does not have the human resources and specific know-how,” its Maltese accountant said in a March 2016 email. Ms. dos Santos disputed this, with her law firm saying Wise had “technical expertise.”

After she took charge of Sonangol, the payments to the offshore companies would surge even higher.

In May 2017, Wise was replaced as project manager by a company in Dubai owned by one of her friends. It issued a flurry of invoices later that year, some with the barest of details. One of them, simply marked “Expenses May-September 2017,” carried a charge of more than 470,000 euros (over $520,000). These invoices account for the $38 million Sonangol paid to the Dubai company in the hours after Ms. dos Santos was fired on Nov. 15, 2017.

The Sonangol account was with the Portuguese arm of Banco BIC, where she was the biggest shareholder. Shunned by global banks, the couple increasingly relied on the Angolan lender, which has a big office in Lisbon steps from her apartment. In 2015, Portuguese regulators said the bank had failed to monitor money flowing from Angola to European companies linked to her and her associates, concluding that the lender lacked internal controls.

“Paying huge and dubious consulting fees to anonymous companies in secrecy jurisdictions is a standard trick that should sound all alarm bells,” said Christoph Trautvetter, a forensic accountant based in Berlin who worked as an investigator for KPMG, a global business advisory firm.

Days before the invoices were issued, the Sonangol executive who would have approved them was fired, replaced by a relative of Ms. dos Santos, the documents show. The managing director of the Dubai company, Matter Business Solutions DMCC, was her frequent associate Mr. da Silva.

Months later, Carlos Saturnino, Ms. dos Santos’s successor as Sonangol’s head, publicly accused her of mismanagement, saying her tenure was marked by conflicts of interest, tax avoidance and excessive reliance on consultants. He also said she had approved $135 million in consulting fees, with most of that going to the Dubai shell company.

“We have there some situations of money laundering, some of them of doing business with herself,” Hélder Pitta Grós, Angola’s attorney general, said in an interview with I.C.I.J. partners.

Ms. dos Santos, speaking with the BBC, said the Dubai company supervised work for Sonangol by Boston Consulting, McKinsey, PwC and several other Western firms. When asked about the invoices, she said she was unfamiliar with them but insisted the expenses were legitimate, charged at “the standard rate” under a contract approved by Sonangol’s board.

“This work was extraordinarily important,” she added, saying that Sonangol cut its costs by 40 percent.

Her lawyers said the $38 million was “for services that had already been provided and delivered by consultants in accordance with the contract.”

By late 2017, Boston Consulting was winding down its work on the project, which ended that November. McKinsey and PwC declined to comment.

The consultants’ involvement with Ms. dos Santos extended far beyond the Swiss jeweler and Sonangol. McKinsey, for example, provided advice on a Portuguese engineering firm she had just acquired and the Angolan mobile phone company where she served as chairwoman, documents show.

Two of the “big four” accounting firms, PwC and KPMG, did consulting work for Urbinveste, another thinly staffed company she owned that acted as a public works contractor in Angola. It oversaw projects — such as road and port design and urban redevelopment — worth hundreds of millions of dollars, some set to be financed with loans from Chinese banks and built by Chinese state-owned companies. KPMG also audited at least two companies she owned in the country. The firm said that in Angola, it performs “additional due diligence procedures” for all the businesses it audits.

The other two major accounting firms, Deloitte and Ernst & Young, now known as EY, did work for companies tied to her as well.

Accounting firms in the European Union, where much of Ms. dos Santos’s business empire was located, are bound by the same rules banks are, requiring them to report suspicious activity. One firm in particular, PwC, had a broad view into the inner workings of Ms. dos Santos’s empire.

Ms. dos Santos had a long history with PwC. In the early 1990s, fresh out of King’s College London, she took a job with Coopers & Lybrand, soon to merge to become PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Her top money manager, Mr. da Silva, whose assets in Angola were frozen last month, was also a PwC alum. And when Ms. dos Santos took over Sonangol, she brought in a PwC partner, Sarju Raikundalia, as its finance head. The payments to Dubai in November 2017 happened on his watch before he, too, was fired. Neither of the businessmen responded to requests for comment.

PwC not only audited the books of her far-flung shell companies, but also provided her and Mr. Dokolo’s companies with tax advice and did consulting work for Sonangol.

Like Boston Consulting, PwC was paid by Wise Intelligence for its Angola work, and it audited the financial statements of the Maltese holding companies that controlled the Swiss jeweler.

In 2014, PwC accountants in Malta had a problem. As they prepared annual financial statements for Victoria Limited, one of the Maltese companies that controlled De Grisogono, they wrote in a draft that the ultimate owners were Mr. Dokolo and the Angolan government. But Antonio Rodrigues, an executive at Fidequity, objected — the couple had been facing increasing media scrutiny after a 2013 Forbes article examined the origins of their wealth. Such information, he wrote, should not “be mentioned.”

“Noted — we will discuss internally and revert,” a PwC accountant replied. The language was removed.

PwC accountants also noticed there was no paperwork to account for millions of dollars in loans being pumped into the Maltese holding companies and De Grisogono, according to emails.

Robert Mazur, who was an anti-money-laundering investigator for the United States Customs Service, reviewed the PwC financial statements at the I.C.I.J.’s request, along with email exchanges between the accountants and Ms. dos Santos’s money managers.

“The accountants and financial service providers involved in these transactions should have seriously considered filing a suspicious transaction report,” he said.

When presented with the I.C.I.J.’s findings, PwC said it would not comment on specific projects, citing client confidentiality, but said it was ending its work with Ms. dos Santos. “In response to the very serious and concerning allegations that have been raised,” the firm said, “we immediately initiated an investigation and are working to thoroughly evaluate the facts and conclude our inquiry.”

As for Ms. dos Santos’s assets, the bulk of her fortune is now outside Angola, much of it in tax and secrecy havens where it will be hard to pry loose.

Ana Gomes, a former European Parliament member, filed a complaint in November in Portugal alleging that Ms. dos Santos laundered money through Banco BIC. Ms. Gomes said that the network of professional service firms had enabled Ms. dos Santos to move her money out of Angola and into legitimate businesses in Europe and elsewhere.

“They are part of a system of finding the safest landing for all the assets that are siphoned off,” she said.

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Not a joke: Trump is looking into making bribery legal

Westlake Legal Group YAMV4zeuTCr33fC7Ai8wD6b5HKlxETAhOnMkE7Z0CqA Not a joke: Trump is looking into making bribery legal r/politics

Let’s not forget 5 right wing political activists on SCOTUS fucked up our campaign finance laws and Obama called this out years ago. There’s also former Justice Kennedy’s ties to Trump’s finances.

Kasie Hunt, who’s in the House chamber, reports that Justice Samuel Alito mouthed the words “not true” when President Barack Obama criticized the Supreme Court’s campaign finance decision.

“Last week, the Supreme Court reversed a century of law to open the floodgates for special interests — including foreign corporations — to spend without limit in our elections,” Obama said. “Well I don’t think American elections should be bankrolled by America’s most powerful interests, or worse, by foreign entities. They should be decided by the American people, and that’s why I’m urging Democrats and Republicans to pass a bill that helps to right this wrong.” (Via Politico, 2010)


But they (Justice Kennedy and Trump) had a connection, one Mr. Trump was quick to note in the moments after his first address to Congress in February 2017. As he made his way out of the chamber, Mr. Trump paused to chat with the justice.

“Say hello to your boy (Justin Kennedy),” Mr. Trump said. “Special guy.”

Mr. Trump was apparently referring to Justice Kennedy’s son, Justin. The younger Mr. Kennedy spent more than a decade at Deutsche Bank, eventually rising to become the bank’s global head of real estate capital markets, and he worked closely with Mr. Trump when he was a real estate developer, according to two people with knowledge of his role.

During Mr. Kennedy’s tenure, Deutsche Bank became Mr. Trump’s most important lender, dispensing well over $1 billion in loans to him for the renovation and construction of skyscrapers in New York and Chicago at a time other mainstream banks were wary of doing business with him because of his troubled business history. (Via NYT, 2018)


The Russian state bank VTB underwrote loans to Donald Trump via Deutsche Bank. Over the course of Trump’s relationship with DB, an inordinate amount of questionable, mismanaged & risky loans approved by Deutsche Bank to Trump required his Personal Guarantee which, over time, also lost its value.

Trump’s team at DB sought out creative ways to circumvent the varied protections DB’s compliance team institutionally implemented, & whether by happenstance or by design Trump’s loans became underwritten by Russia’s own VTB.

I informed the FBI of this in 2019. –Val Broeksmit


Former Deutsche Bank executive’s son (Val Broeksmit) secretly helped FBI’s investigation (Via The Hill, 2019)

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Jazz Saxophone Legend Jimmy Heath Has Died

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages_174532262-fdd314ec748d6e173c23e593d0ec8778981ad1c9-s1100-c15 Jazz Saxophone Legend Jimmy Heath Has Died

Saxophonist, composer and arranger Jimmy Heath. Lonnie Timmons III/Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  Jazz Saxophone Legend Jimmy Heath Has Died

Saxophonist, composer and arranger Jimmy Heath.

Lonnie Timmons III/Getty Images

Jimmy Heath, a prolific saxophonist, composer and bandleader who played alongside some of the biggest names of jazz, including Miles Davis and John Coltrane, has died.

Heath died Sunday morning in Loganville, Georgia of natural causes, his grandson told NPR. He was 93 years old. His family was at his side, including his wife of 60 years, Mona Heath, his children Mtume and Rozie, his grandchildren and great-grandchildren, and his brother, drummer Albert “Tootie” Heath.

In a career that spanned seven decades, Heath brought the bebop he loved to big bands — and into the 21st century.

Heath is best known as a saxophonist, but he wrote and arranged music throughout his life. In 2013, when he was 87 years old, he told NPR it was important to be a complete musician. “Not just to stand up and improvise,” he stressed. “You know, you got to compose. I want to be a person who can compose, and leave something here for posterity.”

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Heath left hundreds of compositions that were performed by his own bands, and others.

Phil Schaap is a curator of Jazz at Lincoln Center. He says that one of Jimmy Heath’s most important contributions was bringing the bebop revolution of the 1940s to succeeding generations.

“Moses is dead. The tablets are still here,” Schaap declares. “Well, Jimmy Heath read the commandments of jazz, and he got the tablets from the great prophets. And he used it his way to great benefit, and he even fed it back towards the prophets. You know, Miles Davis used his stuff. Charlie Parker used his stuff. And John Coltrane was nurtured by Jimmy Heath.”

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James Edward Heath was born October 25, 1926, in Philadelphia. His sister Elizabeth played piano; his older brother Percy played violin and bass; and his younger brother Tootie played the drums.

“My father played the clarinet,” recalled Jimmy Heath. “He was an auto mechanic for a living, but he played the clarinet on the weekends. He’d get it out of the pawn shop and play in a marching band in Philadelphia. But my mother sang in a church choir. But we were privy to have all these great recordings in our home at that time. We heard all the bands. The big bands were prominent at that time.”

Jimmy Heath developed a big sound on his saxophone. But he was a little man — 5’3″. For most of his life, his colleagues on the bandstand called him “Shorty” and “Little Bird” (a reference to saxophonist Charlie Parker, who was nicknamed “Bird”).

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“My father told me about that. He was a small guy,” Heath said. “He says, ‘Jimmy, you just got to work harder as a little person. Because the big guys get all of the girls, and all of the gigs. They get everything. But if you pursue your profession, and music, like I do, every day, just like before you came in here, I was practicing. And things like that, you can overcome these myths.'”

Jimmy Heath had to overcome more than myths. He beat a very real heroin habit, and went on to perform and record for more than half a century. He also taught for 20 years at Queens College in New York. Heath said the reason he was able to do all that was simple.

“I’m going to do this until I leave. This is all I love. It’s a matter of love. If you love what you do, and you can make a living at it, What’s better?”

And Jimmy Heath was one of the best.

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GOP Senator On Trump Soliciting Foreign Interference: Humans ‘Make Mistakes’

Westlake Legal Group 5e248b8c2200003e07473100 GOP Senator On Trump Soliciting Foreign Interference: Humans ‘Make Mistakes’

Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.) on Sunday shrugged off President Donald Trump’s requests for foreign countries to interfere in U.S. elections, stating that the president is “human” and makes mistakes from time to time.

ABC’s “This Week” host George Stephanopoulos asked Shelby, chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, a series of questions about the upcoming impeachment trial in the Senate.

“Do you think it was proper for the president to solicit foreign interference in our election?” Stephanopoulos asked Shelby, who claimed it’s “in dispute” whether Trump actually did so.

The House voted to impeach Trump over his efforts to get Ukraine to publicly commit to investigating former Vice President Joe Biden, a front-runner in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary, as well as over his decision to block witnesses from testifying during the chamber’s impeachment inquiry.

Stephanopoulos pointed out that Trump has publicly called on Ukraine and China to investigate Biden. Trump also urged Russia to hack Hillary Clinton’s emails when they were both candidates in the 2016 presidential election.

But Shelby said such statements were simply “political.”

“So it’s OK?” Stephanopoulos asked.

“I didn’t say it was OK,” Shelby responded. “But people make ’em ― people do things. Things happen.”

“Well, this is the president of the United States,” Stephanopoulos said.

Shelby noted that Trump is human. “He’s going to make mistakes of judgment and everything else,” he said. “They have historically ― both parties ― from the beginning of our republic.”

The senator added that he does not believe Trump’s actions rise “to the standard of an impeachable offense” but said he would wait to see what comes out of the Senate trial.

Federal Election Commission Chair Ellen Weintraub reminded Americans during the House impeachment inquiry that seeking foreign interference in a U.S. election is illegal.

“Let me make something 100% clear to the American public and anyone running for public office: It is illegal for any person to solicit, accept or receive anything of value from a foreign national in connection with a U.S. election,” Weintraub wrote in a statement in June that she shared again on Twitter in October.

“Electoral intervention from foreign governments has been considered unacceptable since the beginning of our nation,” her statement continued. “Anyone who solicits or accepts foreign assistance risks being on the wrong end of a federal investigation.”

The House impeachment managers delivered two articles of impeachment against Trump ― abuse of power and obstruction of Congress ― to the Senate last week. The president has denied any wrongdoing.

Opening arguments in the impeachment trial are expected to begin Tuesday.

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Tyreek Hill’s grandparents will be able to watch Chiefs play in AFC title game thanks to fan

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Tyreek-Hill Tyreek Hill's grandparents will be able to watch Chiefs play in AFC title game thanks to fan Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/kansas-city-chiefs fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/tyreek-hill fox news fnc/sports fnc f767427b-6679-50fa-abe3-37cd2ef0bf65 article

Sports have the ability to bring strangers closer together and the camaraderie among Kansas City Chiefs fans was on full display Friday.

Severe winter weather struck the Midwest in the days leading up to the AFC Championship game between the Chiefs and the Tennessee Titans and caused more than 100 flight cancellations out of St. Louis-Lambert International Airport on Friday night, according to FOX 2 St. Louis.

CHIEFS VS. TITANS: 5 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT THE AFC CHAMPIONSHIP GAME

The cancellations meant that Tyreek Hill’s grandparents couldn’t get across Missouri to see the wide receiver play in the conference championship. However, one fan came to the rescue.

Dave Fearn offered to drive Hill’s grandparents across the state in the icy weather. Fearn was heading that way to see the game as well.

Dakota Fearn, Dave’s son, told FOX 4 Kansas City that his father won the tickets to the game in a bet with his friends over the Chiefs-Houston Texans game just days prior.

CHIEFS’ TYRANN MATHIEU EXPLAINS WHAT IT’S LIKE TO TACKLE TITANS’ DERRICK HENRY

“Due to flight cancellations on the way to #KC for the #AFCChampionship, ended up meeting Tyreek Hill’s (@cheetah) grandparents in St. Louis. Worried they were gonna miss the flight and the game tomorrow, he drove them to KC,” Dakota Fearn tweeted Saturday.

Hill thanked Dave Fearn on Twitter for his generosity.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

The game isn’t expected to be affected by weather Sunday. But the temperature at Arrowhead Stadium isn’t expected to climb above 20 degrees.

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Tyreek-Hill Tyreek Hill's grandparents will be able to watch Chiefs play in AFC title game thanks to fan Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/kansas-city-chiefs fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/tyreek-hill fox news fnc/sports fnc f767427b-6679-50fa-abe3-37cd2ef0bf65 article   Westlake Legal Group NFL-Tyreek-Hill Tyreek Hill's grandparents will be able to watch Chiefs play in AFC title game thanks to fan Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/kansas-city-chiefs fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/tyreek-hill fox news fnc/sports fnc f767427b-6679-50fa-abe3-37cd2ef0bf65 article

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Larry Elder: Ilhan Omar and Steve King – parties have different ways of handling their flamethrowers

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120859713001_6120860592001-vs Larry Elder: Ilhan Omar and Steve King – parties have different ways of handling their flamethrowers Larry Elder fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Creators Syndicate article 6f5d3c48-5377-593d-abb9-35cb94dc076d

Eighty-six percent of Democrats consider President Trump “racist,” according to a July 2019 Quinnipiac poll. By contrast, 91 percent of Republicans do not consider him “racist.” Perhaps more disturbing, a November 2018 online Axios poll by SurveyMonkey found that a whopping 61 percent of Democrats believe Republicans are “racist/bigoted/sexist.” A comparatively small 31 percent of Republicans feel the same way about Democrats.

For a party that considers Republicans racist/bigoted/sexist, how do Democrats somehow, someway manage to tolerate, if not embrace, Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn.? For a congressional first-termer, her list of cringeworthy, insulting and anti-Semitic remarks is impressive.

Omar’s latest occurred shortly after Trump authorized the drone strike that killed the Iranian terrorist leader Qassem Soleimani. Flanked by other Democratic House members, Omar said she felt “ill” because “of everything that is taking place,” adding: “And I think every time I hear … of conversations around war, I find myself being stricken with PTSD. And I find peace knowing that I serve with great advocates for peace and people who have shown courage against war.”

IRAQI REFUGEE LAUNCHES GOP CHALLENGE TO ILHAN OMAR: ‘SHE NEEDS TO BE STOPPED’

Not a word of sympathy for the estimated 1,100 U.S. soldiers maimed or killed between 2005 and 2011 by explosively formed penetrators, the use of which Soleimani oversaw. In response to criticism over her “PTSD” comment, Omar, a Muslim refugee from Somalia, tweeted in response to Rep. Jim Banks, R-Ind., comments on her PTSD: “I survived war as a child and deal with post-traumatic stress disorder — much like many who have served or lived through war. It’s shameful that you as a member of Congress would erase the PTSD of survivors.”

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Omar, in 2012, before she became a member of Congress, tweeted: “Israel has hypnotized the world, may Allah awaken the people and help them see the evil doings of Israel.” After her election to Congress, she apologized: “I heard from Jewish orgs. that my use of the word ‘hypnotize’ and the ugly sentiment it holds was offensive. I spent … little energy (in) disavowing the anti-Semitic trope I unknowingly used, which is unfortunate and offensive.”

Then there were her accusations in February 2019 that supporters of Israel were deluded or bought off. It’s “all about the Benjamins baby,” she tweeted. At a town hall shortly after that comment, Omar said, “I want to talk about the political influence in this country that says it is OK for people to push for allegiance to a foreign country.” Rep. Nita Lowey, D-N.Y., tweeted, “I am saddened that Rep. Omar continues to mischaracterize support for Israel.” Omar did not back down, tweeting: “Our Democracy is built on debate, Congresswoman! I should not be expected to have allegiance/pledge support to a foreign country in order to serve my country in Congress or serve on committee. The people of the 5th elected me to serve their interests. I am sure we agree on that!”

Omar was dismissive of the seriousness of the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. At a March 2019 fundraiser for the Council on American-Islamic relations, she said: “Here’s the truth: For far too long we have lived with the discomfort of being a second-class citizen and, frankly, I’m tired of it, and every single Muslim in this country should be tired of it. CAIR was founded after 9/11 because they recognized that some people did something and that all of us were starting to lose access to our civil liberties.”

“Some people did something”?

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If Republicans have an equivalent to Omar, it is Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa. He, too, has compiled an impressive list of cringeworthy, bigoted comments. Last year, the pro-life congressman said: “What if we went back through all the family trees and just pulled those people out that were products of rape or incest? Would there be any population of the world left if we did that?” In 2016, he said: “They chose to have a Congressional Black Caucus. They chose to have an abortion. I would give you even money that a vast majority of mothers who say they can’t afford an abortion have an iPhone, which costs more.”

Then came King’s interview with The New York Times, in which he said, “White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive? Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of our history and our civilization?”

Within days of that comment, House Republicans introduced a resolution of disapproval condemning King by name, as well as his remarks. Every Republican voted for it, as did all but one Democrat. Republican House leadership then stripped King of all his committee assignments.

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By contrast, the Democrats, in response to Omar’s anti-Semitic comments, passed a watered-down resolution that condemned all types of bigotry, including anti-Semitism. But the resolution made no specific reference to Omar. And it appears that Democratic leadership did not even consider stripping her of committee assignments.

A tale of two flamethrowers. Now which party is “racist/bigoted/sexist”?

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY LARRY ELDER

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120859713001_6120860592001-vs Larry Elder: Ilhan Omar and Steve King – parties have different ways of handling their flamethrowers Larry Elder fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Creators Syndicate article 6f5d3c48-5377-593d-abb9-35cb94dc076d   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120859713001_6120860592001-vs Larry Elder: Ilhan Omar and Steve King – parties have different ways of handling their flamethrowers Larry Elder fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Creators Syndicate article 6f5d3c48-5377-593d-abb9-35cb94dc076d

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