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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 97)

Sanders slams Trump pardons as part of ‘broken and racist criminal justice system’

Westlake Legal Group eUIGBFK-H08lBlzRQQE_j2lxr1HwJ6xdghiKsrvI3Gs Sanders slams Trump pardons as part of 'broken and racist criminal justice system' r/politics

It’s always been for the rich. I can’t begin to explain how many conversations I’ve had with so many people about racism, sexism, classism, capitalism, or socialism only to quiet them by explaining that the elite stand atop everyone else by design and on purpose because those in power feed on everyone.

If you’re not of the 1%, you’re part of the machine that feeds them. Against your will, choice, or power, your color, creed, location, orientation, identity, you are fodder for their cause. They are the elite. Everyone else is trash that they stand on to build society. We deserve better.

“Society” was not meant for US. We are what they stand on to do so.

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A Complete List of Trump’s Pardons and Commutations Today

Westlake Legal Group 00xp-pardon6-facebookJumbo A Complete List of Trump’s Pardons and Commutations Today United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Safavian, David H Prisons and Prisoners Paul Pogue Milken, Michael R Kerik, Bernard B Edward DeBartolo, Jr. David Safavian Blagojevich, Rod R Ariel Friedler Angela Stanton Amnesties, Commutations and Pardons

President Trump pardoned seven people on Tuesday, including the “junk bond king” Michael R. Milken and Bernard B. Kerik, a former New York City police commissioner. He also commuted the sentences of Rod R. Blagojevich, a former governor of Illinois, and three others.

The Constitution gives presidents what the Supreme Court has ruled is the unlimited authority to grant pardons, which excuse or forgive a federal crime. A commutation, by contrast, makes a punishment milder without wiping out the underlying conviction. Both are forms of presidential clemency.

Here are the 11 people who benefited from the executive grants of clemency that Mr. Trump signed.

COMMUTATION

Former Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich of Illinois was sentenced to 14 years in prison in 2011 for trying to sell or trade to the highest bidder the Senate seat that Barack Obama vacated after he was elected president. “He served eight years in jail, a long time,” President Trump said of Mr. Blagojevich, a Democrat, on Tuesday. “Seemed like a very nice person, don’t know him.”

Pardon

Edward DeBartolo Jr., a former owner of the San Francisco 49ers, pleaded guilty in 1998 to concealing an extortion attempt. He was prosecuted after agreeing to pay $400,000 to Edwin W. Edwards, a former governor of Louisiana, to secure a riverboat gambling license for his gambling consortium.

Although Mr. DeBartolo avoided prison time, he was fined $1 million and was suspended for a year by the N.F.L.

Pardon

Ariel Friedler, a technology entrepreneur, pleaded guilty in 2014 to conspiracy to access a protected computer without authorization and served two months in prison, according to a statement from the White House.

Mr. Friedler has since dedicated his time to promoting veterans issues and helping former prisoners re-enter society, the statement said.

COMMUTATION

Tynice Nichole Hall was sentenced in 2006 after she was convicted on various drug charges in Lubbock, Texas, according to the Justice Department. The evidence at trial showed that Ms. Hall’s residence was used as a stash house for drugs by her boyfriend, who was the main target of an investigation, according to court documents. The police found large quantities of crack and powder cocaine and loaded firearms in her apartment.

Ms. Hall has spent the last 14 years in prison, where she has participated in apprenticeships, completed coursework toward a college degree and taught educational programs to other inmates, the White House statement said.

Pardon

Ten years ago this month, Bernard B. Kerik, a former New York City police commissioner, was sentenced to four years in prison after pleading guilty to eight felony charges, including tax fraud and lying to White House officials. Mr. Kerik, who rose to national prominence and was a close ally of Rudolph W. Giuliani, took responsibility for his actions.

“Believe me when I say I have learned from this and I have become and will continue to become a better person,” he said in court in 2010. “I know I must be punished.” Since his conviction, Mr. Kerik has become a supporter of criminal justice and prison re-entry reform, according to a statement from the White House.

Pardon

Michael R. Milken was the billionaire “junk bond king” and a well-known financier on Wall Street in the 1980s. In 1990, he pleaded guilty to securities fraud and conspiracy charges, and months later was sentenced to 10 years in prison, though his sentence was later reduced to two years. He also agreed to pay $600 million in fines and penalties. Mr. Milken was also the inspiration for the Gordon Gekko character in the film “Wall Street.”

Since he was released from prison in 1993, Mr. Milken has striven to repair his reputation by creating a nonprofit think tank, the Milken Institute, devoted to initiatives “that advance prosperity.”

COMMUTATION

Crystal Munoz was found guilty in 2008 of conspiring to possess with intent to distribute marijuana, according to a petition filed by Texas A&M University’s Criminal Defense Clinic. Ms. Munoz was sentenced to nearly two decades in prison for drawing a map that her friends used in a large marijuana trafficking operation, according to Rolling Stone.

Over the past 12 years, Ms. Munoz has mentored people and volunteered with a hospice program while serving time in prison, according to the White House statement.

COMMUTATION

Judith Negron was sentenced to 35 years in prison in 2011 for her role in orchestrating a $205 million Medicare fraud scheme as the owner of a mental health care company in Miami. Ms. Negron has served eight years in prison, and her prison warden described her as a “model inmate,” according to the White House statement.

Pardon

In 2010, Paul Pogue, the founder and former chief executive of a large construction company in Texas, was sentenced to three years of probation and ordered to pay $723,0000 in fines and restitution for filing false income tax statements, according to the McKinney Courier Gazette.

The White House applauded his charitable work in a statement on Tuesday. “Despite his conviction, Mr. Pogue never stopped his charitable work,” the statement said.

Pardon

David Safavian, the top federal procurement official under President George W. Bush, was sentenced to a year in prison in 2009 for covering up his ties to the lobbyist Jack Abramoff. Mr. Safavian, a former chief of staff at the General Services Administration, was convicted of both obstruction of justice and making false statements.

“Having served time in prison and completed the process of rejoining society with a felony conviction, Mr. Safavian is uniquely positioned to identify problems with the criminal justice system and work to fix them,” the White House said in the statement.

Pardon

Angela Stanton, an author, television personality and motivational speaker, served six months of home confinement in 2007 for her role in a stolen vehicle ring. Her book “Lies of a Real Housewife: Tell the Truth and Shame the Devil” explores her difficult upbringing and her encounters with reality TV stars.

Recently she has begun giving interviews about her support of Mr. Trump. The White House credited her in a statement with working “tirelessly to improve re-entry outcomes for people returning to their communities upon release from prison.”

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Time magazine correspondent Charlotte Alter says Obama made voting ‘an act of love’

Westlake Legal Group Alter-Obama_Getty Time magazine correspondent Charlotte Alter says Obama made voting 'an act of love' Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/person/barack-obama fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 1a3807fc-b749-58cf-b0c0-fe4cd05d7890

Time magazine national correspondent Charlotte Alter told MSNBC on Tuesday that former President Barack Obama made voting an “act of love.”

When “MSNBC Live” anchor Katy Tur asked Alter why millennials didn’t vote in larger numbers, she answered: “One reason is that Barack Obama was such a transformative figure for people and he was, for many people our age, their first president that they really got behind.

HARVARD-EDUCATED TIME WRITER WHO CLAIMED SHE, AOC HAVE ‘NEVER EXPERIENCED AMERICAN PROSPERITY’ ROASTED

“And he made voting into an act of love,” Alter continued. “So I don’t think that millennials think of voting as their duty. They think of it as something that they only do for somebody that they really care about and really believe in — and that makes it really hard for somebody like a [former New York City Mayor] Michael Bloomberg or a [former Vice President] Joe Biden to attract millennial voters because they just don’t believe in them that much.”

Alter was appearing on the cable network to promote her new book, titled “The Ones We’ve Been Waiting For: How a New Generation of Leaders Will Transform America.”

More from Media

Last year, Alter — the daughter of former longtime Newsweek editor and New York Times best-selling author Jonathan Alter and former “The Colbert Report” executive producer Emily Lazar — was heavily criticized for tweeting a claim that the reason for the popularity of socialism among millennials is that they’ve “never experienced American prosperity.”

“AOC [Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.] and I were born the same year [1989],” Alter tweeted in March after her cover story on the freshman lawmaker was published in Time. “She was a Dunkaroos kid—I liked fruit roll-ups. People our age have never experienced American prosperity in our adult lives— which is why so many millennials are embracing Democratic socialism.”

CRITICS BLAST OBAMA CAMPAIGN FOR AD THAT LIKENS VOTING FOR BARACK OBAMA TO A YOUNG WOMAN LOSING HER VIRGINITY

Alter is far from the only media or Hollywood figure to rhapsodize about the 44th president. In 2012, Obama’s reelection campaign came under fire for an ad it released with actress Lena Dunham in which the “Girls” star suggested that voting for Obama was akin to losing one’s virginity.

“The first time shouldn’t be with just anybody. You want to do it with a great guy. Someone who really cares about and understands women,” she said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The ad, titled “Lena Dunham: Your First Time,” included Dunham suggesting that her vote made her into a woman.

“My first time voting was amazing. It was this line in the sand,” she said. “Before I was a girl, now I was a woman. I went to the polling station, I pulled back the curtain, I voted for Barack Obama.”

Westlake Legal Group Alter-Obama_Getty Time magazine correspondent Charlotte Alter says Obama made voting 'an act of love' Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/person/barack-obama fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 1a3807fc-b749-58cf-b0c0-fe4cd05d7890   Westlake Legal Group Alter-Obama_Getty Time magazine correspondent Charlotte Alter says Obama made voting 'an act of love' Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/person/barack-obama fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 1a3807fc-b749-58cf-b0c0-fe4cd05d7890

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Michael Bloomberg Surges in Polls and Qualifies for 2 Democratic Debates

WASHINGTON — Former Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg of New York has qualified for the next two Democratic debates, including one on Wednesday in Las Vegas. It will be his first appearance onstage alongside his presidential rivals.

A national poll from NPR, PBS NewsHour and Marist released on Tuesday showed Mr. Bloomberg with 19 percent support among Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents — his best result yet in a debate-qualifying poll, and good enough for second place behind Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who had 31 percent.

Later in the day, a national poll from NBC News and The Wall Street Journal showed Mr. Bloomberg at 14 percent: again behind Mr. Sanders (27 percent), and alongside former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. (15 percent) and Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts (14 percent).

Mr. Bloomberg will face off Wednesday night against Mr. Biden, Mr. Sanders, Ms. Warren, former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., and Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota.

The debate, which will air at 9 p.m. Eastern time, will be hosted by NBC News, MSNBC, Telemundo and The Nevada Independent.

Join us for live analysis on debate night. Subscribe to “On Politics,” and we’ll send you a link.

The polls showed a substantial surge for Mr. Bloomberg, who received only 4 percent support in the last NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll in December, and 9 percent in the last NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll in January.

Mr. Sanders’s support has also increased significantly since the last NPR/PBS/Marist poll, which showed him with 22 percent. His numbers did not change in the NBC/Wall Street Journal polls.

Mr. Biden came in third in the new NPR/PBS/Marist poll, with 15 percent, followed by Ms. Warren at 12 percent, Ms. Klobuchar at 9 percent and Mr. Buttigieg at 8 percent. The poll surveyed 527 Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents by phone Feb. 13-16 and had a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 5.4 percentage points.

The NBC/Wall Street Journal poll surveyed 426 Democrats from Feb. 14-17 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.75 percentage points.

The latest national polling average calculated by The New York Times, which was released late last week, put Mr. Bloomberg at 10 percent, behind Mr. Sanders, Mr. Biden and Ms. Warren.

Mr. Bloomberg formally entered the race in November, nearly a year after most of the other candidates. He failed to make the cut for the past several debates in part because he is not accepting outside contributions for his campaign. But new rules announced by the Democratic National Committee opened the door to his participation, as they enabled candidates to qualify for the Las Vegas debate, as well as the one that will take place on Feb. 25 in Charleston, S.C., without meeting a donor threshold.

He is certain to face onstage criticism Wednesday night from his rivals, especially Mr. Sanders and Ms. Warren, the two candidates who are not appearing at private fund-raisers and who have made targeting billionaires central to their campaigns.

Last week in Virginia, Ms. Warren told supporters that Mr. Bloomberg should not be the Democratic Party’s nominee because of his past remarks linking the end of redlining, a discriminatory housing practice, to the financial crisis.

Both Ms. Warren and Mr. Sanders previewed their arguments against Mr. Bloomberg in remarks on Tuesday.

“Anybody here with $60 billion, you can run for president, and you can buy the airwaves,” Mr. Sanders said in a speech in Reno, Nev. “That is called oligarchy, not democracy.”

Ms. Warren was more pointed. “It’s a shame Mike Bloomberg can buy his way into the debate,” she wrote on Twitter. “But at least now primary voters curious about how each candidate will take on Donald Trump can get a live demonstration of how we each take on an egomaniac billionaire.”

Mr. Bloomberg’s campaign manager, Kevin Sheekey, confirmed on Tuesday that Mr. Bloomberg would take part in the next debate.

“Mike is looking forward to joining the other Democratic candidates onstage and making the case for why he’s the best candidate to defeat Donald Trump and unite the country,” Mr. Sheekey said. “The opportunity to discuss his workable and achievable plans for the challenges facing this country is an important part of the campaign process.”

Westlake Legal Group bloomberg-promo-still-articleLarge Michael Bloomberg Surges in Polls and Qualifies for 2 Democratic Debates Presidential Election of 2020 Polls and Public Opinion democratic national committee Debates (Political) Bloomberg, Michael R

Bloomberg’s Billions: How the Candidate Built an Empire of Influence

The former mayor’s philanthropy has been a boon for progressive causes, earning support from Democrats nationwide even as parts of his record give them pause.

Also on Tuesday, Monmouth University released a poll of Virginia voters showing Mr. Bloomberg and Mr. Sanders tied at 22 percent each and leading the field. With 99 delegates at stake, Virginia is the fourth-largest prize on the Super Tuesday calendar, and Monmouth’s is the first poll to have been taken there since the summer. It is one of the first polls of any state in which Mr. Bloomberg has broken 20 percent. (The Virginia poll has no effect on qualifications for the next two debates.)

The other two candidates in the race, the billionaire Tom Steyer and Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii, appeared unlikely to receive the requisite 10 percent support in four national qualifying polls, or 12 percent in two polls taken in Nevada or South Carolina, before the qualification deadline for Wednesday’s debate.

They have another six days to qualify for next week’s debate. They can also qualify for that one by earning at least one delegate in Nevada.

Westlake Legal Group 20breakout-interruptions-PH-articleLarge-v21 Michael Bloomberg Surges in Polls and Qualifies for 2 Democratic Debates Presidential Election of 2020 Polls and Public Opinion democratic national committee Debates (Political) Bloomberg, Michael R

Who’s Qualified for the Next 2020 Democratic Debate?

Here’s a look at who’s made the cut for the next debate.

Candidates were able to qualify for the Nevada and South Carolina debates by winning at least one delegate in the Iowa or New Hampshire contests; that is the path Ms. Klobuchar and Mr. Buttigieg, who have not met either polling threshold, followed to get their invitations to the stage in Las Vegas.

Mr. Bloomberg has spent over $300 million on TV advertising nationwide — more than the rest of the field combined — and he has seen his standing steadily rise in national polling as voters have been saturated by his campaign commercials.

He decided to skip the first four nominating contests, held in states where campaigns traditionally spend a year organizing supporters, to focus instead on the delegate-rich primaries that take place beginning on Super Tuesday, March 3. His rivals, meanwhile, have been torn between attacking him and battling one another in the early-state contests.

Mr. Bloomberg, who has emerged in recent years as a leading financial benefactor for Democratic candidates and some liberal causes, such as gun control and environmental protection, entered politics as a Republican when he first ran for mayor in 2001. He endorsed President George W. Bush and spoke at the 2004 Republican National Convention.

He has backed other Republicans as well, including former Senator Scott Brown of Massachusetts, who was ousted by Ms. Warren in 2012, and Senator Patrick J. Toomey of Pennsylvania, a gun control ally, in 2016.

Reid J. Epstein reported from Washington, and Maggie Astor from New York. Rebecca R. Ruiz contributed reporting from Las Vegas, and Giovanni Russonello from Washington.

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Mike Bloomberg Referred To Transgender People As “It” And “Some Guy Wearing A Dress” As Recently As Last Year

Westlake Legal Group QS1Av84lfk9mxpY5NiwwVAXaLE6ijHJMbW8EK-E1p1M Mike Bloomberg Referred To Transgender People As “It” And “Some Guy Wearing A Dress” As Recently As Last Year r/politics

> Why have we stopped talking about warren in favor of Bloomberg?

Because her sun is setting whilst Bloomberg’s rises. Warren is essentially just Bernie-lite. Now that Bernie has emerged as the preeminent progressive (and clear frontrunner), her campaign is superfluous.

Bloomberg, on the other hand, has risen to 2nd place in recent polling. Biden’s future in the race grows shakier. In the event Biden fails to rack up some W’s in the near future, he may begin to hemorrhage support, and that support may go to Bloomberg. Bloomberg, like it or not, has a realistic path to the nomination. A brokered convention is not out of the question, and in that scenario, you can bet your ass the DNC prefers Bloomberg to Sanders.

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Mike Bloomberg Referred To Transgender People As “It” And “Some Guy Wearing A Dress” As Recently As Last Year

Westlake Legal Group QS1Av84lfk9mxpY5NiwwVAXaLE6ijHJMbW8EK-E1p1M Mike Bloomberg Referred To Transgender People As “It” And “Some Guy Wearing A Dress” As Recently As Last Year r/politics

> Why have we stopped talking about warren in favor of Bloomberg?

Because her sun is setting whilst Bloomberg’s rises. Warren is essentially just Bernie-lite. Now that Bernie has emerged as the preeminent progressive (and clear frontrunner), her campaign is superfluous.

Bloomberg, on the other hand, has risen to 2nd place in recent polling. Biden’s future in the race grows shakier. In the event Biden fails to rack up some W’s in the near future, he may begin to hemorrhage support, and that support may go to Bloomberg. Bloomberg, like it or not, has a realistic path to the nomination. A brokered convention is not out of the question, and in that scenario, you can bet your ass the DNC prefers Bloomberg to Sanders.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Ryan Newman: What to know about the NASCAR star

NASCAR driver Ryan Newman survived a horrific crash on the final lap of the Daytona 500 Monday night.

Newman’s car slammed into the wall at nearly 200 mph, flipped, got T-boned by another car, flipped several more times and skidded to a halt in flames.

Here is more about the 42-year-old driver and 2008 Daytona 500 champion.

DENNY HAMLIN WINS THIRD DAYTONA 500; RYAN NEWMAN HOSPITALIZED IN FIERY WRECK AT FINISH

SURVIVAL

Newman’s car continued to skid upside down along the speedway and crossed the finish line in flames as safety crews hurried to snuff out the fire and cut “Rocketman” loose. It took about eight minutes for workers to roll his car right-side up, and medical personnel used black screens to block spectator views as Newman was placed in a waiting ambulance and taken to Halifax Medical Center.

A sense of relief spread across Daytona International Speedway after the crash Monday night.

There has not been a fatality in NASCAR’s elite Cup Series since Dale Earnhardt died in a crash on the final lap of the 2001 Daytona 500.

Nineteen years later, it’s clear that Earnhardt’s death probably saved Newman’s life.

Westlake Legal Group Ryan-Newman-AP-2 Ryan Newman: What to know about the NASCAR star Frank Miles fox-news/auto/nascar fox-news/auto/attributes/racing fox news fnc/auto fnc b1fde474-9a74-5fca-afa7-2a9a24285634 article

Ryan Newman makes adjustments in his car during a NASCAR auto race practice at Daytona International Speedway, Saturday, Feb. 8, 2020, in Daytona Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

NASCAR spent the last two decades working to improve safety regulations by installing energy-absorbing walls around tracks, mandating the use of head-and-neck restraints attached to helmets and continuing to make improvements to the cars.

NASCAR has declined in popularity since the safety changes that followed Earnhardt’s death, almost falling back to its roots as a regional sport.

Newman’s crash surely will elicit calls for NASCAR to do even more.

CONTROVERSY

Newman, an Indiana native who graduated with an engineering degree from Purdue, has been a harsh critic of NASCAR’s struggles to keep cars on the racing surface, even getting fined for public comments the sanctioning body considered negative.

In 2010, he said fans shouldn’t even go to the track to see races at Talladega Superspeedway in Alabama.

Westlake Legal Group Ryan-Newman-AP-1 Ryan Newman: What to know about the NASCAR star Frank Miles fox-news/auto/nascar fox-news/auto/attributes/racing fox news fnc/auto fnc b1fde474-9a74-5fca-afa7-2a9a24285634 article

Ryan Newman climbs in his car during a NASCAR auto race practice at Daytona International Speedway, Saturday, Feb. 8, 2020, in Daytona Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

Newman had escaped several scary wrecks at Daytona and Talladega over the years. His car went airborne, flipped repeatedly and landed on its roof in the 2003 Daytona 500. He had a similar crash-landing at Talladega in 2009.

His latest one will go down in Daytona history along with Austin Dillon’s memorable crash into the catch fence on the final lap of the 2015 July race at Daytona. His car went airborne and tore down part of the fence and injured several fans. The car, with its engine already resting on another part of the track, ended up on its roof and then was smashed into by Brad Keselowski’s car. Dillon remarkably walked away unscathed.

FAMILY

The father of two daughters recently announced his separation from wife Krissie after 16 years of marriage.

“We will continue to jointly raise our girls, while remaining friends and continuing to work together supporting Rescue Ranch,” he wrote just four days before the fiery crash, mentioning his animal welfare work. “Thank you for the years of support and friendship. We ask that (our) daughters’ privacy be respected at this time.”

Right before the race Monday night, his estranged wife tweeted about the family affair: “I am,” she said about watching the race. “Would love to see my girls in [Victory Lane] but always praying for a safe race.”

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Ryan-Newman-AP-1 Ryan Newman: What to know about the NASCAR star Frank Miles fox-news/auto/nascar fox-news/auto/attributes/racing fox news fnc/auto fnc b1fde474-9a74-5fca-afa7-2a9a24285634 article   Westlake Legal Group Ryan-Newman-AP-1 Ryan Newman: What to know about the NASCAR star Frank Miles fox-news/auto/nascar fox-news/auto/attributes/racing fox news fnc/auto fnc b1fde474-9a74-5fca-afa7-2a9a24285634 article

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‘Hillary still ain’t in jail’: Alabama Senate GOP primary gets dirty as candidates fight over Sessions, Trump

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6101736026001_6101735680001-vs 'Hillary still ain't in jail': Alabama Senate GOP primary gets dirty as candidates fight over Sessions, Trump fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fox-news/politics/elections/state-and-local-primaries fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 6d08815c-f056-599f-9408-c215b98ff894

With the nation’s attention focused on the squabbles between the Democratic presidential primary contenders, a down-ballot Republican primary race for one of Alabama’s Senate seats is getting down and dirty itself.

The three top Republicans vying for a chance to take on incumbent Sen. Doug Jones, D-Ala. — former U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, former Auburn University football coach Tommy Tuberville, and Rep. Bradley Byrne – have each launched a series of nasty ads slamming one another and fighting for who is most aligned with President Trump.

The war of words kicked off last weekend when Byrne, who has represented the state’s 1st Congressional District since 2014, released an ad featuring actors playing Sessions and Tuberville interviewing for the Senate jobs while being criticized for their records.

“He let the president down and got fired,” one of the actors says of Sessions in the ad.

Another actor chimes in: “And Hillary still ain’t in jail.”

The Hillary line dredges up the “Lock Her Up” chant that was common at rallies during Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign when he ran against former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

The ad also slams Tuberville for past comments on immigration, claiming Tuberville wants “illegals here” and for taking a multimillion buyout to leave his head coaching spot at Auburn.

Both Sessions and Tuberville, however, quickly hit back at Byrne – and each other – with ads of their own.

SCANDAL-SCARRED ROY MOORE ANNOUNCES NEW SENATE BID, DESPITE GOP PROTESTS

Despite releasing a statement on Monday denouncing the negative attack ad by Byrne, Sessions’ campaign quickly released its own on the same day – touting his early endorsement of Trump in March 2016, while blasting Byrne saying Trump “was not fit” to be president in the aftermath of the now-infamous Access Hollywood tape where Trump used profane language and described how he groped women.

“Byrne stood with the liberals, said Trump ‘was not fit’ to be president and stabbed Trump in the back right before the election,” the ad says.

On Tuberville, Sessions’ add mocks the football coach as “a tourist in Alabama” and that he actually “lives, votes and pays taxes in Florida.” Tuberville admitted last year that he moved to Alabama in 2018 with an eye on entering politics.

Sessions is running for the same Senate seat he vacated in 2017 when he was nominated by Trump to be the attorney general. In a surprising turn after Sessions joined the administration, Jones defeated Roy Moore, the controversial former chief justice of the Supreme Court of Alabama, in a close race.

Tuberville’s ad hits Byrne for his “not fit” comments while accusing Sessions of “deserting” Trump and “sticking us with the Russian witch hunt.”

Then, in a non sequitur, the ad tacks in a different direction and attacks Utah Sen. Mitt Romney – the only Republican to vote to convict on an article of impeachment against Trump. While Romney has become a frequent target of derision for Trump and his allies, the Utah lawmaker has not weighed in on the Alabama race.

The ads come as the primary races enters its final weeks before the March 3 vote on Super Tuesday.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

A recent poll by Alabama Daily News found Sessions and Tuberville locked in a tight race, garnering 31 percent and 29 percent respectively, while Byrne pulls in 17 percent. Moore, who is also running for the nomination, got 5 percent.

According to Alabama law, if no candidate earns more than 50 percent of the vote in a primary election, the contest goes to a runoff between the candidates with the top two vote totals. This seems likely given the number of candidates in the race and the closeness of the polling numbers.

Whoever eventually wins the nomination, however, seems likely to defeat Jones in the general elections as polls indicate that Sessions, Tuberville and Byrne all hold sizeable leads over the senator in a potential match-up.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6101736026001_6101735680001-vs 'Hillary still ain't in jail': Alabama Senate GOP primary gets dirty as candidates fight over Sessions, Trump fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fox-news/politics/elections/state-and-local-primaries fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 6d08815c-f056-599f-9408-c215b98ff894   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6101736026001_6101735680001-vs 'Hillary still ain't in jail': Alabama Senate GOP primary gets dirty as candidates fight over Sessions, Trump fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fox-news/politics/elections/state-and-local-primaries fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 6d08815c-f056-599f-9408-c215b98ff894

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Woman vacuuming sidewalk goes viral — turns out there’s more to the story

Westlake Legal Group Vacuum-iStock Woman vacuuming sidewalk goes viral -- turns out there's more to the story Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/west/washington fox-news/entertainment/genres/viral fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc de119339-bd36-5650-a324-4e95bd3602fe article

A Washington state woman had the Internet scratching its head after a Facebook video showed her vacuuming her sidewalk.

The video, which was uploaded by Brandon Tatro last week, shows Yakima resident Cathy Rodriguez using a vacuum outside her home.

TIKTOK VIDEO SHOWS WOMAN SNATCHING ‘FREE’ FOOD FROM STRANGERS AT ALL

“Well we are in Yakima. We have seen it all,” Tatro says in the opening of the video as he records Rodriguez as he drives past. “Guess no one’s heard of a broom before.”

Facebook users couldn’t resist providing their commentary on what appeared to be a bizarre scenario.

“Her broom must be in the kitchen standing up by itself,” one person wrote, referring to the recent viral trend known as the “Broom Challenge.”

WAITER FALLS WHILE CARRYING FOUR MEALS, DOESN’T DROP A SINGLE PLATE

“She must go through a lot of vacuums!” another person joked.  “She’s a trend setter for sure!” one Facebook user commented.

More harsh comments, however, suggested that Rodriguez was on drugs.

As it turns out, there was far more to the lady and the vacuum story. Rodriguez revealed on Sunday that she was actually cleaning up glass after a drunk driver crashed into her van weeks prior.

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She simply didn’t want to risk someone getting hurt by stepping on any lingering glass on the sidewalk.

“I’m not a druggie and I’m not crazy, I was thinking of others,” Rodriguez told KIMA TV.

Her van was deemed a total loss, she said, which was her family’s only means of transportation. What’s worse, she said the driver didn’t have any insurance.

“He broke three of the glass windows in the back of my van and shattered it everywhere,” Rodriguez said.

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“I didn’t know what else to do, I was thinking about other people and the other animals and I didn’t want them to get hurt,” she added.

“Don’t judge from what you see, it’s not Yakima, crack or anything, people have situations that you don’t know about.”

Since Rodriguez shared her story with local news, many commenters took to the initial video to call out those who joked about it on Facebook.

“Shame on you, she is cleaning up broken glass. She doesn’t have much,” one person commented.

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“That’s what’s wrong with people they can’t wait to find something wrong. Instead of [seeing] something right. Let’s build each other up!”

Tatro, the original poster, also took to the comments section to address the online concerns.

“I apologize if anybody is offended by this. I’ve had multiple dm’s In defense of this ladies situation,” he wrote. “Don’t do drugs though. And use a Kirby to suck glass up not a Hoover!!”

Rodriguez and her family have since created a GoFundMe page to help raise money to fix the van, which was given to them by a neighbor. She said Tatro has since apologized to her and was the first person to donate.

Westlake Legal Group Vacuum-iStock Woman vacuuming sidewalk goes viral -- turns out there's more to the story Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/west/washington fox-news/entertainment/genres/viral fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc de119339-bd36-5650-a324-4e95bd3602fe article   Westlake Legal Group Vacuum-iStock Woman vacuuming sidewalk goes viral -- turns out there's more to the story Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/west/washington fox-news/entertainment/genres/viral fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc de119339-bd36-5650-a324-4e95bd3602fe article

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Michael Bloomberg Leans Left With Plan to Rein In Wall St.

Westlake Legal Group 18db-newsletter-bloomberg-copy-facebookJumbo-v2 Michael Bloomberg Leans Left With Plan to Rein In Wall St. Presidential Election of 2020 Federal National Mortgage Assn (Fannie Mae) Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp (Freddie Mac) Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Bloomberg, Michael R Banking and Financial Institutions

Michael R. Bloomberg on Tuesday offered his proposals for regulating Wall Street, where he made his billions, promising a return of Obama-era oversight if elected president and invoking the name of one of his rivals, Senator Elizabeth Warren, in an attempt to connect with the Democratic Party’s progressive wing.

As he proposed reversing some of President Trump’s deregulation of the finance industry, Mr. Bloomberg said he would rework the Volcker Rule, one of the most controversial regulations set up in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. In the past, he has criticized the way the rule put limitations on how banks can invest their money.

Mr. Bloomberg, who will join the Democratic primary debate stage for the first time on Wednesday, also said he would increase the capital requirements at large financial institutions to head off the need for another taxpayer bailout, phase in a 0.1 percent tax on transactions like stock sales and curb overdraft fees that hit the financially vulnerable.

Perhaps the most surprising proposal, given Mr. Bloomberg’s close personal ties to business titans, is a plan for the Justice Department to create a team to fight corporate crime by “encouraging prosecutors to pursue individuals, not only corporations, for infractions.”

“The financial system isn’t working the way it should for most Americans,” Mr. Bloomberg said in a statement. “The stock market is at an all-time high, but almost all of the gains are going to a small number of people.”

Some of the proposals offered by Mr. Bloomberg — a former Salomon Brothers trader whose estimated $63 billion fortune came from selling data to Wall Street — suggest how far to the left the moderate Democratic presidential hopefuls have felt they need to tack.

He shares his transaction tax proposal with three fellow candidates, Ms. Warren, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, an outspoken progressive from New York, last year co-sponsored a bill that called for such a tax.

By releasing a plan that contains provisions that Wall Street may balk at, Mr. Bloomberg is trying to confront one of his biggest liabilities as a candidate. In its polling and research, his campaign has found that Americans know little about him beyond two facts: He is a former mayor of New York and a billionaire.

Mr. Bloomberg and his strategists have used various tactics to stress the parts of his biography that help soften his image. His ads describe his middle-class upbringing in Boston and highlight his philanthropic giving, for instance.

He has also started talking more often about his plan to raise $5 trillion in new tax revenue from high earners and corporations. His message to voters as he campaigns across the country has been, in essence, that the government should raise taxes on people like him because they can afford it.

The surcharge on trading, meant to raise money for social programs like expanded health care coverage, has been roundly criticized by the sort of pro-business groups that Mr. Bloomberg had long been sympathetic to, like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

The group immediately criticized the proposal. A transaction tax “hits Main Street, not Wall Street,” said Tom Quaadman, a chamber executive. He added that it would “increase the cost of capital, decrease investment, harm businesses and hurt Americans who are saving and investing.”

Rachel Nagler, a Bloomberg campaign spokeswoman, argued that such a tax “is an effective and relatively painless way to raise more tax revenue from the wealthy,” citing its use in Britain and Hong Kong. A 2018 analysis by Congress’s Joint Committee on Taxation estimated that a tax similar to the one proposed by Mr. Bloomberg would raise $777 billion over 10 years.

Mr. Bloomberg’s plan embraces many of the regulatory changes made in the years after the financial crisis, even though he has often argued that rules aimed at reforming Wall Street are bad for the economy. In 2010, Mr. Bloomberg urged Democratic lawmakers not to get too tough on the finance industry, and he criticized the Volcker Rule, which is meant to reduce speculative trading by banks. He called the proposed restrictions “shortsighted,” with the potential to reduce middle-class jobs.

On Tuesday, Mr. Bloomberg said he would toughen the Volcker Rule — although his idea is more like a major rewrite. It would assume that banks were engaging in safe practices as long as they didn’t gain or lose too much on a deal. Rather than getting in traders’ heads about what constitutes a speculative trade, he proposes taxing big gains and losses, reasoning that volatile outcomes beyond a certain threshold must be the result of overly speculative activity.

Ms. Nagler rejected the notion that Mr. Bloomberg was flip-flopping.

“Context matters,” she said. When the Volcker Rule was introduced, Mr. Bloomberg “was skeptical of regulators’ ability to divine traders’ intent,” which was how the law required regulators to judge investments, she added. Mr. Bloomberg’s new plan would focus “on the outcome of speculative trading — big gains and losses — rather than on traders’ intent.”

Isaac Boltansky, director of policy research at Compass Point Research and Trading, said Mr. Bloomberg was engaging in “relatively tough talk” on banks and taking positions that were “more politically progressive than originally expected.”

“But we caution that talking about altering the Volcker Rule is exponentially simpler than actually revising the rule,” Mr. Boltansky wrote in a note to investors.

Mr. Bloomberg has faced escalating attacks by his fellow Democrats as he rises in the polls. His rivals, most notably Mr. Sanders, have made his wealth an issue by repeatedly accusing him of trying “to buy the election” with an advertising budget that is already approaching $500 million after less than three months.

Mr. Bloomberg’s immense wealth is a thorny matter in other ways: He owns a financial information and news behemoth that has said it will not do in-depth investigations of him or any other Democrats running for president. On Tuesday, Tim O’Brien, a senior adviser to the Bloomberg campaign, said Mr. Bloomberg would sell his company if he was elected — although he would not sell to a foreign buyer or private equity.

Although Mr. Bloomberg’s proposal frequently name-checked President Barack Obama, he also referred to Ms. Warren. He said he would strengthen the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and pointed out it was established under her leadership. Mr. Bloomberg said he would reverse some rule changes made by Mr. Trump and expand the agency’s power over auto lending and credit reporting.

Some of his proposals were thin on specifics. For example, the consumer bureau already oversees auto loans made by banks but not by car dealers — who aren’t specifically mentioned in Mr. Bloomberg’s plan. A person familiar with the proposal said that the proposal was indeed meant to include dealers and that they had been left out unintentionally.

“The devil is in the details,” said Dennis Kelleher, the president of the group Better Markets, which advocates rules that would rein in Wall Street and protect consumers.

But Mr. Kelleher said he believed Mr. Bloomberg was moving in the right direction on important issues. “He’s indicating that he disagrees with Trump’s deregulation, and he’s indicating that he’s going to be much tougher in a bunch of areas,” Mr. Kelleher said.

Opponents of regulation swiftly condemned Mr. Bloomberg’s proposals.

“His plan would slow down growth, innovation and entrepreneurship in the country,” said Veronique de Rugy, a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University.

In recent days, Mr. Bloomberg has been forced to defend his past comments on financial regulations. In 2011, for instance, he said: “It was not the banks that created the mortgage crisis. It was, plain and simple, Congress who forced everybody to go and give mortgages to people who were on the cusp.”

Mr. Bloomberg said he would bolster or restore elements of the 2010 Dodd-Frank law that were reversed or reduced under Mr. Trump. For example, he proposes making stress tests for banks more stringent and reinstating the requirement that banks produce annual “living wills,” which are complex documents that detail how they would unwind their operations in a bankruptcy.

Elsewhere in his plan, Mr. Bloomberg said he would merge Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, two government-owned housing giants. He would strengthen consumer protections that govern payday lending and financial advisers, and automatically enroll student-loan borrowers into income-based repayment plans with payments capped at 5 percent of disposable income.

Jeremy Peters contributed reporting.

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