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Westlake Legal Group > News Media (Page 99)

XFL player quits league after learning how much he would be paid

A former college football and Alliance of American football defensive end who was planning on playing in the XFL when the league officially restarts in February has decided not to play after all.

The Los Angeles Wildcats selected Corey Vereen in the third-phase of the XFL’s draft last week. But representatives for the lineman said Thursday their client will not participate after learning that he will only be making a little more than $27,000 during the season.

XFL SALARIES REVEALED: LEAKED MEMO DETAILS PLAYER PAY FOR NEW LEAGUE

“The salary schedule did not come close to matching what was talked about rampantly throughout the XFL combine workouts and was discussed online by many different sources,” Logan Brown Sports said in a statement posted to Twitter. “The base salary is $27,040 with per-game active bonuses of $1,685 and weekly win bonuses of $2,222.”

Agents were told earlier this month that the average player salary would range around $55,000, including active bonuses and weekly win bonuses. The $27,040 salary is clearly a far cry from that number.

EX-SAINTS WIDE RECEIVER AT CENTER OF INFAMOUS BLOWN CALL JOINS XFL

It’s unclear whether other players like Vereen will be receiving the same amount of money. Vereen played college football for Tennessee and in the AAF with the Memphis Express before that spring league went belly up earlier this year.

Westlake Legal Group Memphis1 XFL player quits league after learning how much he would be paid Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/xfl fox news fnc/sports fnc bcd9e87f-78c9-5c58-9017-e2da210b06ef article

Corey Vereen #98 of the Memphis Express chases quarterback Luis Perez  #12 of the Birmingham Iron during the third quarter of their Alliance of American Football game at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium on March 24, 2019 in Memphis, Tennessee. The Memphis Express won 31-25 in overtime. (AAF/Getty)

Vereen was briefly on the New England Patriots in 2017 but never saw any game time.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

The XFL is set to kick off in February.

Westlake Legal Group Memphis XFL player quits league after learning how much he would be paid Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/xfl fox news fnc/sports fnc bcd9e87f-78c9-5c58-9017-e2da210b06ef article   Westlake Legal Group Memphis XFL player quits league after learning how much he would be paid Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/xfl fox news fnc/sports fnc bcd9e87f-78c9-5c58-9017-e2da210b06ef article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘SIM-Swap’ Scams Expose Risks Of Using Phones For Secondary I.D.

Westlake Legal Group att-text-message-20948c3a011a0d8d4f09c656798ca405efa69ccc-s1100-c15 'SIM-Swap' Scams Expose Risks Of Using Phones For Secondary I.D.

After regaining control of his number, Gregg Bennett says he received this automatic text message from the AT&T store in Boston that he believes was used by the SIM-swappers. Martin Kaste/Gregg Bennett hide caption

toggle caption

Martin Kaste/Gregg Bennett

Westlake Legal Group  'SIM-Swap' Scams Expose Risks Of Using Phones For Secondary I.D.

After regaining control of his number, Gregg Bennett says he received this automatic text message from the AT&T store in Boston that he believes was used by the SIM-swappers.

Martin Kaste/Gregg Bennett

Gregg Bennett is an entrepreneur in Bellevue, Wash., and he knows a bit about tech. So when his smart phone started acting funny one day last April, he got a bad feeling.

“I was having trouble getting into my email account. And all of a sudden my phone went dead,” he says. “I look at my phone and there’s no signal. And I go, ‘Oh no, something’s happened here.'”

It was a SIM-swap — a “social engineering” trick fraudsters use to take control of somebody else’s phone number. There are a couple of ways to do this. Sometimes they’ll fool the phone company into believing they’re the number’s rightful owner, who lost the phone and needs to transfer service to a new device. And sometimes it’s an inside job, with phone company staffers helping to make the switch, as alleged by federal prosecutors in a case this spring.

Once scammers control your number, they can get your text messages — including the verification codes many online services send when customers reset their passwords.

These are different from verification codes generated by two-factor apps or hardware keys, which are more secure because they don’t depend on a phone number. But companies often use the text-message version because it’s simple to use.

Bennett says the scammers used text-message verification codes to get into his email accounts, and from there it was open season.

“They got into my Amazon account, my Evernote account, my Starbucks account — they were kind of messing with me,” he says, with a rueful laugh.

The big prize was his Bitcoin account. It’s not clear exactly how they used his phone number to log in, but once they did, he says they stole 100 Bitcoin. At the time that was the equivalent of about half a million dollars, gone in minutes.

Westlake Legal Group view-two-53178a7c6b3942b1f8e7805599b7f7fa55631c41-s1100-c15 'SIM-Swap' Scams Expose Risks Of Using Phones For Secondary I.D.

Gregg Bennett, a businessman in Bellevue Wash. He says SIM-swappers took over his phone number in April, using it to get into his other online accounts and steal the equivalent of half a million dollars of Bitcoin. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

toggle caption

Martin Kaste/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  'SIM-Swap' Scams Expose Risks Of Using Phones For Secondary I.D.

Gregg Bennett, a businessman in Bellevue Wash. He says SIM-swappers took over his phone number in April, using it to get into his other online accounts and steal the equivalent of half a million dollars of Bitcoin.

Martin Kaste/NPR

And that’s what’s new here. SIM-swapping has been around for years, but there’s never been so much at stake.

“Phone numbers have suddenly become valuable,” says Allison Nixon, director of security research at Flashpoint, a company that tracks cyber crime. She says phone numbers have become an irresistible target for scammers because so many companies now use the numbers to help confirm customers’ identities.

“Financials, health care, social media, email — all of these different companies, by policy, require a phone number from you. And that’s what creates the vulnerability,” Nixon says.

Here’s what you can do to protect yourself from a SIM card swap attack:

  • Don’t reply to calls, emails, or text messages that request personal information. These could be phishing attempts by scammers looking to get personal information to access your cellular, bank, credit or other accounts. If you get a request for your account or personal information, contact the company using a phone number or website you know is real.
  • Limit the personal information you share online. If possible, avoid posting your full name, address, or phone number on public sites. An identity thief could find that information and use it to answer the security questions required to verify your identity and log in to your accounts.
  • Set up a PIN or password on your cellular account. This could help protect your account from unauthorized changes. Check your provider’s website for information on how to do this.
  • Consider using stronger authentication on accounts with sensitive personal or financial information. If you do use MFA, keep in mind that text message verification may not stop a SIM card swap. If you’re concerned about SIM card swapping, use an authentication app or a security key.

Source: The Federal Trade Commission

As scams go, SIM-swapping is labor-intensive. Thieves research their victims, looking for rich targets… such as the crypto-currency investor in California who says he lost $24 Million dollars to SIM-swappers last year. He’s now suing AT&T over the loss.

But Nixon says SIM-swapper are broadening their aim.

“Eventually you’re going to run out of rich people, right? And you’ve got to start targeting middle-class people, upper-middle class people,” Nixon says. “I know people that have been SIM-swapped that have no clear indication as to why, aside from the fact that they get paid and they have a retirement account.”

Experts have floated various ideas for improving security — for instance, carriers might require that any phone number transfers happen in person, at a store; carriers could also build a 24-hour waiting period into any number transfer.

Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Oregon, has been looking at what the phone companies could do. He won’t get into details about behind-the-scenes discussions, but he’s not optimistic.

“The industry is not exactly exerting itself in order to better protect consumers from these SIM-swap scams,” he says.

The wireless companies refer questions about SIM-swapping to their industry association, the CTIA — but the association wouldn’t do an interview with NPR. It pointed instead to a blog post with tips for avoiding sim-swaps.

Allison Nixon says phone companies have made progress in recent months, closing technical vulnerabilities that have been exploited by SIM-swappers. But she says the human element — gullible or corruptible staffers — remains a problem.

Still, she says she can understand why phone companies might be hesitant to erect higher security barriers for number-transfers.

“It would make the purchase process for the average legitimate customer a little more difficult, a little bit slower, and multiply that by however many millions of sales they make, it probably adds up to a decent amount of money,” she says.

Another solution might be to try to wean Americans from their reliance on phones numbers for authentication. Federal regulators have noted the vulnerabilities of text-message codes, compared to more secure methods such as two-factor authentication apps. But the wireless industry is pushing back. In a letter to the FTC in August, the industry defended text-message two-factor as, quote, “easily accessible and trusted.”

But they’re no longer trusted by Gregg Bennett.

“People who are using phones as their only source of two-factor identification are inviting identity theft,” Bennett warns.

He now uses authentication apps, such as Google Authenticator, or a hardware key. When companies force him to use text-message codes, he uses a second phone number, which he takes care not to share in places where scammers might find it.

He’s currently in arbitration with AT&T, which wouldn’t talk about his case to NPR. He says the company is stonewalling on details of how he got SIM-swapped, but he suspects he was victimized by somebody on the East Coast.

“When I finally recovered my phone,” he says, “I got a text message asking how my service was at the AT&T store in Boston.”

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos drops to world’s second richest person, Bill Gates reclaims spot

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos drops to world’s second richest person, Bill Gates reclaims spot

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos dropped along with his company’s stock price, losing his title as the richest person in the world to Microsoft’s Bill Gates, according to Forbes.

The e-commerce giant’s stock fell 7%, trading at $1,695 in Friday’s pre-market, after releasing its third-quarter earnings report Thursday, dragging Bezos’s net worth to $102.8 billion. With a net worth of $107 billion, Gates climbed back to the spot he lost in October 2017, Bloomberg says.

The Seattle-based company reported that it had increased in sales but made less profits than expected. The profit tumble is due to Amazon’s $800 million investment in same-day delivery, announced in April, Bezos said Thursday.

The Amazon CEO’s divorce from MacKenzie Bezos also has a lot do with the defeat. After splitting in January, she received a quarter of the couple’s Amazon’s holdings in July.

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Back in July, Gates dropped to No. 3 on the world’s richest list. A main reason for his downward shift: charitable donations. Gates, who in 2014 stepped down as Microsoft chairman but became a technology advisor for the tech giant, has given away the majority of his Microsoft stake over time.

Bernard Arnault, who owns Louis Vitton and Fendi, Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffet, and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg hold the third, fourth and fifth positions as the world’s richest, respectively, according to Bloomberg.

Amazon plunge: One-day shipping attracts more shoppers but puts a dent in profits

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2019/10/25/amazon-stock-drop-costs-ceo-jeff-bezos-spot-worlds-richest-person/2453507001/

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Trump Is Speaking at a Historically Black College. His Allies Will Outnumber Students.

Westlake Legal Group merlin_163194225_b67f47f6-4ace-4d46-98c4-219861f6ca1b-facebookJumbo Trump Is Speaking at a Historically Black College. His Allies Will Outnumber Students. Trump, Donald J Presidential Election of 2020 Historically Black Colleges and Universities criminal justice Benedict College

COLUMBIA, S.C. — President Trump and his allies have billed his speech at a historically black college here on Friday afternoon as a chance to step outside the friendly confines of his supporter base and pitch his administration’s actions on criminal justice reform and black employment directly to a black audience.

But in the invitation-only room of about 300 people, only about 10 students will be admitted from Benedict College, which is hosting the event, said Mayor Stephen K. Benjamin of Columbia. More than half of the seats were reserved for guests and allies of the administration, organizers said.

The ticket distribution was first reported by McClatchy DC.

Mr. Trump is scheduled to open a three-day event at the college, billed as the “Second Step Presidential Justice Forum.” Leading Democratic presidential candidates will attend the forum on Saturday and Sunday to pitch their criminal justice plans, including former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont.

Mr. Trump signed the bipartisan First Step Act in December, which has helped thousands of federal inmates secure early release under new sentencing guidelines and has been a key part of the White House’s pitch for black support. The Trump administration has hailed the act as one of its signature legislative accomplishments.

In the Democratic primary, black voters play a critical role in selecting the party’s nominee, and they are one of the party’s most surefire bases of support in the general election. But even the slightest downturn in black turnout can be fatal for a Democratic presidential candidate, and Mr. Trump and his allies have expressed some hope that they can peel off enough black voters — or keep them home altogether — to make an impact in battleground states in 2020.

In 2016, a decrease in black turnout in cities such as Milwaukee, Detroit and Philadelphia helped Mr. Trump win key swing states by razor-thin margins, propelling him to an Electoral College victory.

With that political backdrop in mind, overhauling the criminal justice system has, in recent years, been one of the rare areas of some bipartisan agreement in an increasingly polarized Congress, and that partial consensus has spilled into the presidential race. Democrats making the progressive argument for reform have cited the system’s disproportionate impact on black, Latino and Native American communities.

Conservatives, while avoiding portraying the system as inherently prejudiced, have often focused on the financial burden mass incarceration places on governments.

The Trump administration has sought to support historically black colleges and universities, increasing federal support by 14.3 percent. And Mr. Trump spoke to black educators last month at the National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week conference.

But Mr. Trump has also made attacks on lawmakers of color central to his re-election strategy. This summer, for example, he lashed out at Representative Elijah E. Cummings on Twitter, referring to Mr. Cummings’s majority-black district in Baltimore as a “disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess” where “no human being would want to live.”

Mr. Cummings, who died last week, on Thursday became the first African-American elected official to lie in state in the United States Capitol.

Leaders of historically black colleges and universities have long enjoyed close relationships with both Republican and Democratic presidential administrations, even as their institutions face increasingly dire financial straits. Born of a time of segregation when black Americans were forced to educate themselves, the schools have produced black leaders for more than a century, including politicians such as Senator Kamala Harris of California and Mr. Cummings, who both attended Howard University.

In 2017, when several presidents of black colleges met with Mr. Trump in the Oval Office, many faced backlash from their student bodies. At Howard, founded 150 years ago in Washington, campus buildings were tagged with graffiti that denounced the school’s president and said “Make Howard black again.”

Campus leaders defended themselves by pointing to their pocketbooks, and the need to secure federal funds to maintain viability.

“You need to get to the president to impact his budget if you hope to get your financial support from Congress,” said Johnny C. Taylor Jr., president and chief executive of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, which represents 47 black colleges and universities that receive public funding.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos drops to world’s second richest person, Bill Gates reclaims spot

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos drops to world’s second richest person, Bill Gates reclaims spot

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos dropped along with his company’s stock price, losing his title as the richest person in the world to Microsoft’s Bill Gates, according to Forbes.

The e-commerce giant’s stock fell 7%, trading at $1,695 in Friday’s pre-market, after releasing its third-quarter earnings report Thursday, dragging Bezos’s net worth to $102.8 billion. With a net worth of $107 billion, Gates climbed back to the spot he lost in October 2017, Bloomberg says.

The Seattle-based company reported that it had increased in sales but made less profits than expected. The profit tumble is due to Amazon’s $800 million investment in same-day delivery, announced in April, Bezos said Thursday.

The Amazon CEO’s divorce from MacKenzie Bezos also has a lot do with the defeat. After splitting in January, she received a quarter of the couple’s Amazon’s holdings in July.

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Back in July, Gates dropped to No. 3 on the world’s richest list. A main reason for his downward shift: charitable donations. Gates, who in 2014 stepped down as Microsoft chairman but became a technology advisor for the tech giant, has given away the majority of his Microsoft stake over time.

Bernard Arnault, who owns Louis Vitton and Fendi, Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffet, and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg hold the third, fourth and fifth positions as the world’s richest, respectively, according to Bloomberg.

Amazon plunge: One-day shipping attracts more shoppers but puts a dent in profits

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2019/10/25/amazon-stock-drop-costs-ceo-jeff-bezos-spot-worlds-richest-person/2453507001/

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Virginia couple adopts after viral pro-life post telling expectant mothers not to get abortion

A Virginia couple who went viral earlier this year with their pro-life plea to pregnant women has had their dreams answered.

Blake and Sarah Thomas, of Radford, posted a photo on Facebook about nine months ago pleading expectant mothers to not have an abortion.

“Please don’t abort. We will adopt your baby!” a sign in the photo said.

ARKANSAS COUPLE ADOPTS SEVEN SIBLINGS AT ONCE, GIVING THEM A ‘FOREVER FAMILY’

They had posted the image in response to the passing of a New York bill on the anniversary of Roe v. Wade that legalizes abortion up to birth in many cases.

“We believe as Christians that we are called to love and care for orphans,” Sarah Thomas told Fox News recently.

Soon after the post went viral, the Thomas’ agreed to adopt a child, but that fell through. To their surprise and joy, the mother decided to keep and parent the baby.

‘PERFECT LOVE’ LEADS NY WOMAN TO OPEN HER APARTMENT TO HOMELESS COUPLE

However, their wishes of taking a child in were answered, and they told Fox News they are in the process of adopting an 11-year-old boy from Bulgaria.

“We recently felt God burdening our hearts for older orphans, specifically boys who statistically are the least likely to be adopted,” Sarah Tomas said. “We’re so excited to meet him and we’re amazed by how God has already filled our hearts with love for this boy on the other side of the world that we’ve never met.”

This child won’t be the first entering their family through adoption.

“God has given us a heart for the fatherless and 3 years into our marriage we were convicted of our selfishness in waiting for children and obeyed God’s calling to become foster parents,” Sarah Thomas said.

TEXAS COUPLE: GOD ‘PURPOSEFULLY CONNECTED’ US TO KIDS FOUND CHAINED IN HORRIFIC ABUSE CASE

The Thomas family – who have a 1-year-old biological son – have also adopted Kayden, 3, through the foster care. They described him as a “blessing and such a joy.”

Westlake Legal Group ThomasFamily Virginia couple adopts after viral pro-life post telling expectant mothers not to get abortion fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/religion/christianity fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values/family fox-news/faith-values/faith fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/faith-values fnc cbac1711-a504-5d83-aa68-8847e0860446 Caleb Parke article

The Thomas family: Blake, 31, Sarah, 30, Kayden, 3, and Elliott, 1. (Stephanie Parker Photography)

The Virginia couple said dozens of mothers reach out to them, saying they decided to keep their babies after their post on Facebook was shared over 17,000 times.

ADOPTED PASTOR EMBRACES, FORGIVES BIOLOGICAL FATHER: ‘I PRAYED FOR THIS MOMENT’

“I’m Facebook friends with many of the mothers that contacted me back in January and my Facebook is covered with baby pictures right now which makes me so happy!” Sarah Thomas said, but she has received heartbreaking messages, too.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

One woman wrote to her: “I wish I had seen your post before I aborted. I would’ve given my daughter the life she deserved, away from her abusive father instead of deciding her fate.”

Westlake Legal Group ThomasFamily Virginia couple adopts after viral pro-life post telling expectant mothers not to get abortion fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/religion/christianity fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values/family fox-news/faith-values/faith fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/faith-values fnc cbac1711-a504-5d83-aa68-8847e0860446 Caleb Parke article   Westlake Legal Group ThomasFamily Virginia couple adopts after viral pro-life post telling expectant mothers not to get abortion fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/religion/christianity fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values/family fox-news/faith-values/faith fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/faith-values fnc cbac1711-a504-5d83-aa68-8847e0860446 Caleb Parke article

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Bernie Sanders Almost Won Iowa in 2016. He Knows He Can’t Slip Now.

MARSHALLTOWN, Iowa — On a trip to Iowa in June, Senator Bernie Sanders confided in aides about a central gamble of his second bid for the White House.

As nearly two dozen other presidential candidates and their supporters were heading to an Iowa Democratic Party dinner, the first major event of the 2020 election cycle, Mr. Sanders was on his way to march with striking fast-food workers. While such populist gestures have defined Mr. Sanders’s life in politics, he was taking a risk in favoring grass-roots organizing over the party politicking usually essential to winning the Iowa caucuses, as he acknowledged in a car ride to the protest.

“This is going to be hard,” he said, according to an aide who was present. “But,” he said, using a profanity for emphasis, “this is the only way we’re going to do it.”

Every top Democratic candidate has been making calculations to try to win Iowa’s first-in-the-nation caucus, and, lately, many have been staking their candidacies to a big result on Feb. 3. But Mr. Sanders stands out in several ways: He nearly won Iowa in 2016 against Hillary Clinton and, some allies say, he cannot afford to be anything less than a close runner-up again.

He is returning to the state this week after suffering a heart attack that stirred questions about his campaign’s viability. He has the most money in the race but also faces tough competition for liberal voters from a leading Iowa candidate, Senator Elizabeth Warren.

And, as his solidarity with the fast-food workers showed, he is trying to strengthen his base of voters by dedicating time and resources to wooing workers, young people, Latinos and others in Iowa, rather than focusing on winning over more party leaders. It is something of a shift from 2016, when Mr. Sanders and his allies were a greater presence at Democratic Party dinners and events to try to compete with Mrs. Clinton.

Increasingly, Mr. Sanders and his allies are making it clear that he is determined to win Iowa, even as he faces an uphill battle with about 100 days to go before the caucuses.

“I’m here this evening to ask for your help,” he said at a town hall-style event in Marshalltown on Thursday. “I don’t have to tell anybody in this room that Iowa plays a very disproportionately large role in the political process.”

Mr. Sanders continues to lag Ms. Warren and former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. in polls. As candidates like Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., nip at his heels, his campaign has zeroed in on Iowa, viewing it as critical to his chances of winning the Democratic nomination, according to several people familiar with his strategy. Some advisers say a strong showing in Iowa — especially if he finishes ahead of Ms. Warren — would be enough to catapult him through New Hampshire and into Nevada and Super Tuesday.

“Iowa has to be a top priority for the campaign — we need to do very well in the state,” said Representative Ro Khanna, one of Mr. Sanders’s national campaign co-chairs.

“I hope he can go there every week,” Mr. Khanna said. “He needs to be in Iowa as much as possible.”

Westlake Legal Group democratic-polls-promo-1560481207024-articleLarge-v10 Bernie Sanders Almost Won Iowa in 2016. He Knows He Can’t Slip Now. Warren, Elizabeth Sanders, Bernard Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Iowa

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To that end, his campaign has recently reallocated resources to the state, including spending $1.3 million to air its first television ad this month. It has built out its Iowa team, naming a key communications aide as its deputy state director. The campaign has also expanded its ground operation, with 13 field offices and more than 110 paid staffers.

Mr. Sanders returned Thursday for a two-day, five-event swing, and plans to be back next week to lead a “march to end corporate greed.” According to aides, his campaign is also discussing a trip to the state with Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who recently endorsed him.

Mr. Sanders, however, has competition: Nearly all of the top-tier candidates have also signaled that Iowa is a top priority.

Mr. Biden’s campaign has publicly sought to lower expectations but he has been to the state three times this month and is planning another four-day swing there next week. Ms. Warren, whose campaign was among the first to establish a presence in the state, has 19 field offices. Mr. Buttigieg recently completed an Iowa bus tour. Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota has made 21 trips to the state, including her own post-debate bus tour, and has visited 55 of the state’s 99 counties. Senator Kamala Harris vowed to visit the state every week in October.

The sudden flurry of attention represents a change from earlier this year, when White House hopefuls appeared to be embracing a more national campaign strategy that took them beyond Iowa and other early nominating states. The growth of social media, the changes to the electoral calendar and the increasing diversity of the Democratic electorate combined to make it seem like Iowa, a predominantly white state, might lose its sway in the primary process.

“Usually there’s a ramp-up period in past presidential cycles,” said Sean Bagniewski, the Democratic chair in Polk County, about the focus on Iowa. “This year, it was like a thunderclap.”

The stakes in Iowa for Mr. Sanders have personal and psychological dimensions. After his surprising performance in the caucuses in 2016, some aides said the state has taken on an almost mystical quality. A weak result could also indicate that he does not have the same influence with progressive voters as he used to.

Despite a series of disappointing polls in the state — a Suffolk University/USA Today poll released this week showed him in fourth place — allies are confident he is still in a position to do well.

Like it did in 2016, the Sanders campaign is betting on an extensive ground game that relies heavily on a vast network of volunteers that they hope will motivate other supporters to turn out on caucus night — including people who do not typically participate in the political process.

His aides believe that the technique, known as distributed organizing, will help motivate unlikely or first-time caucusgoers, especially those who were too young to participate in the last presidential caucuses; Latino voters, whose turnout rate in the caucuses is typically low; and working-class voters. The campaign sees high potential for victory particularly in and around college towns, like Ames and Iowa City, and in rural areas.

To solidify his base of support, he has spent hours rallying on college campuses in an effort to capture the support of young voters. He has courted labor support particularly in counties along the Mississippi River. And he has held multiple “Unidos con Bernie” events with Latino voters.

With $33.7 million cash on hand at the beginning of October, he will likely have plenty of money to spend in the state going forward on staffing and advertising. (On Friday, his campaign plans to go on air with an upbeat new television ad, about climate and green jobs in Iowa.)

Aides are sensitive to any comparison of the Sanders campaign of 2020 to the Sanders campaign of 2016: Unlike then, when voters only had to choose between him and Mrs. Clinton, they now have a wealth of options. To win in Iowa this cycle, he need only secure a larger percentage of the vote than his opponents.

But he has struggled to expand his support in the state, and there are some signs it may be diminishing: According to a poll last month from The Des Moines Register and CNN, only 25 percent of those who say they caucused for Mr. Sanders in 2016 said they would do so again, while 32 percent said they would support Ms. Warren and 12 percent said they would support Mr. Buttigieg.

In recent months, Mr. Sanders has begun holding smaller town hall-style events that give audience members the opportunity to share their own deeply personal stories. Advisers hope the events will inspire voters to work together to change what Mr. Sanders views as a broken system. (The campaign recently cut a television ad from one of these town halls in Iowa that featured a woman telling a horrific story about medical debt.)

Mr. Sanders is staking his success on supporters like Morgan Baethke, 58, of Indianola, Iowa, who was one of about 100 people who came to hear him speak in Marshalltown, the first stop on a two-day “end corporate greed” tour.

Mr. Baethke, who works in retail, said he tries to convince other voters to caucus for Mr. Sanders by knocking on doors and participating in parades and festivals.

But he also revealed a fundamental tension endemic to the Sanders campaign’s organizing strategy: He said that he prefers to speak to voters in a neighboring county rather than his own.

“I don’t feel comfortable in my home county looking at customers who I deal with during the day, going to their house in the evening, knocking on their door and saying, ‘Would you support Bernie Sanders?,’” he said.

Katie Glueck contributed reporting from Muscatine, Iowa, and Thomas Kaplan from Waterloo.

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New York Giants’ Golden Tate responds to Jalen Ramsey after Ramsey dumps Tate’s sister for Vegas dancer

New York Giants’ wide receiver Golden Tate had an ominous message for Los Angeles Rams’ cornerback Jalen Ramsey after he reportedly ended his long-term relationship with Tate’s sister so he could date a Vegas dancer.

The rumored controversy between the pros surfaced this week after Ramsey, 25, took to social media Wednesday to post a picture with new girlfriend, Monica Giavanna.

ODELL BECKHAM JR. CALLS $14G FINES FOR SHOWING TOO MUCH SKIN ‘RIDICULOUS’ 

“I think we need new shirts lol,” the caption read with the hashtag #WCW.

The picture was circulated on Twitter, prompting one person to tag Tate saying “If I was @ShowtimeTate I would have words with this young fella.”

A verified account belonging to Tate replied Thursday saying, “He know he gonna have to see me.”

Ramsey had been in a long-term relationship with Tate’s sister Breanna. The pair have two children together, and it was rumored that Ramsey ended things with Breanna prior to her giving birth to their second child in September.

A press release from the Jacksonville Jaguars, the team Ramsey played with before being picked up by the Rams last week, said he had left to be home with his family and it was unclear when he would return.

NFL COMMISSIONER ROGER GOODELL ON ANTONIO BROWN INVESTIGATION, RETURN TO FOOTBALL: I’LL ‘LET YOU KNOW’ 

“Months ago in the offseason, Jalen notified me that he was expecting the birth of his second child in late September,” head coach Doug Marrone said in a statement. “We spoke about this recently and again today after practice and decided that it was best for Jalen to fly to Nashville tonight after meetings to be with his family during the birth of their daughter. He will return to the team when he’s ready, and we will provide an update at that time.”

Westlake Legal Group jacksonville-jaguars-v-houston-texa-25c35e38c1419510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ New York Giants' Golden Tate responds to Jalen Ramsey after Ramsey dumps Tate’s sister for Vegas dancer Paulina Dedaj fox-news/sports/nfl/new-york-giants fox-news/sports/nfl/los-angeles-rams fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 26a06dfa-1d4e-50b7-a6f6-7f09f1a9e4a1

Jalen Ramsey #20 of the Jacksonville Jaguars plays to the crowd after he knocked the ball away from DeAndre Hopkins #10 of the Houston Texans at NRG Stadium on December 18, 2016 in Houston, Texas. (Photo by Bob Levey/Getty Images)

Tate briefly spoke to the New York Post on Thursday about his personal spat with Ramsey, saying he’s “not happy.”

“I’m not happy at all with the disrespect that he’s shown towards my sister and the things he’s done in the past, but I don’t really want to go too much into it,” he said.

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Ramsey appeared to fire back, posting a cryptic message on Twitter. “We live in a society where ignorant people feel they are owed an explanation of what goes on in our day-to-day lives.. And why we make the decisions we make.. We don’t have to answer to anyone but the man above!”

He added: “S**t is beyond overrated.”

Westlake Legal Group Jaleen-Ramsy-split New York Giants' Golden Tate responds to Jalen Ramsey after Ramsey dumps Tate’s sister for Vegas dancer Paulina Dedaj fox-news/sports/nfl/new-york-giants fox-news/sports/nfl/los-angeles-rams fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 26a06dfa-1d4e-50b7-a6f6-7f09f1a9e4a1   Westlake Legal Group Jaleen-Ramsy-split New York Giants' Golden Tate responds to Jalen Ramsey after Ramsey dumps Tate’s sister for Vegas dancer Paulina Dedaj fox-news/sports/nfl/new-york-giants fox-news/sports/nfl/los-angeles-rams fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 26a06dfa-1d4e-50b7-a6f6-7f09f1a9e4a1

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G.M. Workers Appear Set to Approve Contract and End Strike

Westlake Legal Group 25motors2-facebookJumbo-v4 G.M. Workers Appear Set to Approve Contract and End Strike Wages and Salaries United Automobile Workers Strikes Organized Labor Labor and Jobs General Motors Factories and Manufacturing Automobiles

The United Auto Workers union appears set to approve a new contract with General Motors and put an end to the strike that has idled tens of thousands of workers for almost six weeks.

Workers at several large G.M. plants have approved the tentative contract by considerable margins, raising expectations that it will be ratified when the final votes are tallied Friday afternoon.

“I think it’s a good contract,“ said Ashley Scales, a union member at G.M.’s truck plant in Flint, Mich. “There are people on all parts of the spectrum, for and against, but I think it will pass.”

If the contract is approved by a majority of the 49,000 union workers, G.M. could call skilled-trades workers, who maintain production machinery, back to work as soon as Saturday to begin preparing plants to resume operations, two people with knowledge of the company’s plans said.

In some locations, production could resume as soon as Monday, they said. Other factories that ran short of parts during the strike may take more time to restart, they said.

The contract gives the union a series of wage increases and a path for temporary workers to become permanent employees. Over four years, all full-time hourly workers will see their wages rise to the top level of $32 an hour, putting an end a two-tier wage system that has chafed workers. Each U.A.W. worker would also be paid a bonus of $11,000.

Health care terms are unchanged, with workers paying about 3 percent of the cost, well below the portion paid by G.M.’s salaried employees.

“It’s a rich contract for workers,” said Patrick Anderson, an economist based in East Lansing, Mich. “The health care coverage would be the envy of nearly every worker in America.”

At the same time, the agreement allows G.M. to close three idled factories permanently, including one in Lordstown, Ohio.

The closing of the Lordstown plant is one of the main sticking points for some workers voting against the contract. “We did everything that G.M. ever asked of us at times of concessions,” said Bill Goodchild, a member of Local 1112 in Lordstown. “We feel we deserve a product.”

But at the Detroit-Hamtramck factory, more than three-quarters of union members voted in favor. The plant was designated to close in January, but under the new contract, G.M. is supposed to invest $3 billion to upgrade and expand the factory.

If the agreement is ratified, the U.A.W. will restart negotiations with Ford Motor and Fiat Chrysler and seek to win similar terms from them.

Michelle Kaminski, a professor of labor relations at Michigan State University, said the strike and the terms the U.A.W. won were the latest sign of organized labor gaining strength.

“In the past couple of years, we’ve had quite a number of very successful teacher strikes around the country,” she said. The U.A.W. strike is a further example that “labor is still vibrant and when it fights, it wins,” she added.

At G.M.’s Flint plant, which employees about 4,800 hourly workers, members of U.A.W. Local 598 approved the contract, with 61 percent of the votes in favor and 39 percent against.

At Local 652, which represents about 1,400 workers at a sport-utility vehicle plant in Lansing, Mich., the contract was approved with a 75 percent majority.

Two plants have voted to oppose the contract, but by narrow margins. Workers in Spring Hill, Tenn., rejected the agreement by seven votes, while others in Bowling Green, Ky., voted it down by fewer than 100 votes.

Tallies are due today from three large truck plants, in Arlington, Texas; Wentzville, Mo.; and Fort Wayne, Ind. Each employs more than 4,000 U.A.W. workers, and approval in those locations would probably ensure ratification.

Workers at those locations have reasons to favor the contract. Those plants figure prominently in G.M.’s future plans. In the contract, G.M. agreed to invest $1.5 billion in the Wentzville factory. Earlier this year G.M. earmarked investments of $24 million at Fort Wayne and $20 million at Arlington.

Vote totals are also expected Friday from plants in Orion, Mich., and Fairfax, Kan.

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Watch Live: Elijah Cummings’s Funeral

BALTIMORE — Representative Elijah E. Cummings was firmly rooted in Baltimore, but for decades his voice extended far from his brick rowhouse on the city’s west side. On Friday, the legacy of his tireless advocacy brought powerful leaders from Washington and elsewhere to his city.

Mr. Cummings, a Democrat who rose in prominence in recent years for his unwavering pursuit of President Trump, died at 68 last week in the city he called home, the same one in which he was born and lived all his life.

Among the prominent cast of politicians, mentees and relatives expected to speak at his funeral on Friday morning were two former presidents, Barack Obama and Bill Clinton, as well as Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Hillary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren, the Massachusetts senator and presidential candidate.

Following a psalm read by Ms. Warren and a song from one of Mr. Cummings’s favorite singers, BeBe Winans, Ms. Clinton took the stage and thanked members of Mr. Cummings’s district “for sharing him with our country and the world.”

Ms. Clinton said Mr. Cummings never backed down in the face of abuses of power or from “those who put party ahead of country or partisanship above truth.”

“But he could find common ground with anyone willing to seek it with him,” she continued. “And he liked to remind all of us that you can’t get so caught up in who you are fighting that you forget what you are fighting for.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_163291821_362832b8-980f-411b-bbef-e4dbebb7bc1c-articleLarge Watch Live: Elijah Cummings’s Funeral Funerals and Memorials Cummings, Elijah E Baltimore (Md)

Hillary Clinton spoke during the funeral service for Representative Elijah Cummings at New Psalmist Baptist Church in Baltimore.Credit…Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Ms. Pelosi asked attendees how many had been mentored by Mr. Cummings, and at least a dozen raised their hands. She recalled that he had sought to mentor as many freshman representatives as he could after Democrats took control of the House in the 2018 election.

“By example, he gave people hope,” she said.

Ms. Pelosi had spoken at another funeral in Baltimore on Wednesday for her own brother, Thomas D’Alesandro III, a former mayor of the city.

Earlier in the morning, thousands of grieving Baltimoreans stood in looping lines as the sun rose outside of New Psalmist Baptist Church, which seats 4,000 people and filled up shortly before 10, with many still outside. It’s the same church where Mr. Cummings sat in the front row most Sundays even after he began using a walker and wheelchair.

Mr. Cummings’s body lay in an open coffin at the front of the church on Friday, his left hand resting on his right as mourners passed by and a choir sang gospel music. An usher stood nearby with a box of tissues in each hand.

Elonna Jones, 21, skipped her classes at the University of Maryland to attend with her mother, Waneta Ross, who nearly teared up as she contemplated Baltimore’s loss.

“He believed in the beauty of everything, especially our city,” Ms. Ross said. “It’s important we’re here to honor a civil rights activist who was still around in my generation.”

Ms. Jones, a volunteer coordinator for a City Council candidate, said Mr. Cummings had motivated her to pursue a role in improving her city.

“As a young, black woman in Baltimore who wants to be in politics, he inspired me,” she said.

Mourning residents stood in black coats, hats and heels and sang Mr. Cummings’s praises as the police corralled the extended lines of people who woke up early to pay their respects. Above all, attendees noted, he always looked out for his city.

“He never forgot who we were,” said Bernadette McDonald, who lives in West Baltimore. “He was a son of Baltimore and a man of the people.”

The big names on the service’s agenda, the television cameras lined up outside and the large crowd belied the way many attendees interacted with the devoted congressman, who lived in the heart of West Baltimore and would simply give a knowing nod to those who recognized him on the street. He carried himself like anyone else when running errands or taking a walk around the block.

“If you didn’t already know him, you wouldn’t know who he was,” Ms. McDonald said.

Mr. Cummings saw his profile rise in recent years as he consistently sparred with Mr. Trump, determinedly pursuing the president, his businesses and his associates as head of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform. Mr. Cummings became a leading figure in the impeachment inquiry and was said to still be joining strategy discussions with colleagues from his hospital bed.

Rhonda Martin, who works at a local high school, said Mr. Cummings had inspired the next generation of Baltimore’s leaders by speaking to students in schools around the city.

“He brought a message of hope and told students that he did it, and they can do it, too,” Ms. Martin said.

Mr. Cummings, whose parents were former sharecroppers in South Carolina, graduated from Howard University in Washington and earned a law degree at the University of Maryland. He was first elected to Congress in 1996 and never faced a serious challenge over 11 successful re-election campaigns.

On Thursday, Mr. Cummings’s body lay in state in the Capitol, the first black lawmaker to do so, and Republicans and Democrats praised his integrity and his commitment to his constituents.

Over more than two decades in Congress, Mr. Cummings championed working people, environmental reform and civil rights. He served for two years as the chair of the Congressional Black Caucus and frequently spoke of his neighborhood while pushing legislation to lower drug prices, promoting labor unions and seeking more funding for affordable housing.

Even in his war of words with the president, the battle made its way to Baltimore when, in July, Mr. Trump called Mr. Cummings’s district a “disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess” and appeared to make light of a break-in at Mr. Cummings’s home, during which the congressman scared an intruder away.

The president’s insults still anger Baltimore residents. “See? We’re not all trash and rats,” one congregant said as she sat down in the church on Friday.

Mr. Cummings responded to the president by saying it was his “moral duty” to fight for residents in his district. “Each morning, I wake up,” he wrote, “and I go and fight for my neighbors.”

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