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Westlake Legal Group > News Releases (Page 121)

Trump Calls Trudeau ‘Two-Faced’ After Video Shows Leaders Apparently Mocking Him

Westlake Legal Group ap_19338387394622-637efa5ac3fb3b64f2c1fe8a5345fb895c88d41f-s800-c15 Trump Calls Trudeau 'Two-Faced' After Video Shows Leaders Apparently Mocking Him

President Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrive Wednesday for a round table meeting for NATO leaders in Watford, England. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Evan Vucci/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Trump Calls Trudeau 'Two-Faced' After Video Shows Leaders Apparently Mocking Him

President Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrive Wednesday for a round table meeting for NATO leaders in Watford, England.

Evan Vucci/AP

Updated at 9:14 a.m. ET

President Trump has responded to a video that appeared to show Justin Trudeau and other world leaders mocking him, calling the Canadian prime minister “two-faced.”

Trump’s remarks follow the president’s meeting Tuesday with the Canadian leader in which the two men appeared to get along, though Trump needled Trudeau over Canada’s defense spending.

“Where are you at? What is your number?” Trump asked Trudeau during their meeting on the sidelines of the NATO summit outside London. Trudeau responded that Canada had, in fact, increased its spending on defense over the past few years. That did not appear to placate Trump who pressed on: “Where are you now in terms of your number?”

Canada, a NATO member, spends about 1.4% of its gross domestic product on defense. Trump, and indeed past U.S. presidents, have urged the alliance’s members to spend 2% or more on defense. At present, seven of NATO’s 29 members have reached that target. The U.S. is by far the largest contributor to the alliance, which was set up during the Cold War to protect Western Europe from Russian and Eastern bloc aggression.

Recent relations between Trump and Trudeau have been cordial, mostly because of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, the replacement for NAFTA championed by Trump. Still, they have a complicated history. Although Trudeau was one of the first world leaders to congratulate Trump on his election victory in 2016, the two men quickly found themselves on opposite sides of almost every major global issue: tariffs, climate change, and trade.

The tensions became apparent last year as Canada hosted the Group of Seven summit. After the meeting, Trudeau announced that Canada, whose economy is highly dependent on the U.S., would press ahead with retaliatory tariffs against the United States. In response, Trump, who had initially slapped tariffs on Canadian aluminum and steel, tweeted that Trudeau was “dishonest and weak” and “mild and meek.”

Trudeau, who leads the center-left Liberal Party in Canada, was recently endorsed in a tough reelection campaign by Trump’s predecessor, former Democratic President Barack Obama.

The release of the video late Tuesday is unlikely to help matters. Trudeau was captured on video talking to French President Emmanuel Macron, Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. They appeared to be discussing Trump though he is never mentioned by name. The leaders seem unaware they are being recorded.

“He was late because he takes a 40-minute press conference at the top,” Trudeau said in a video posted to Twitter by the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Trudeau is later heard saying: “You just watch his team’s jaws drop to the floor.”

Macron is also speaking in the video, but his words cannot be heard.

Trump’s meeting with Macron on the sidelines of the NATO summit was also testy. As the president left for the summit, his administration had proposed tariffs of up to 100 percent on French imports, including wine and cheese.

When asked about Trump’s comments on Wednesday, Trump responded: “Well, he’s two-faced,” but quickly added, “He’s a nice guy.”

“I find him to be a nice guy, but the truth is, I called him out on the fact that he’s not paying 2 percent, and I guess he’s not very happy about it,” he said. “I mean, you were there.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Who Is Michael J. Gerhardt? Professor Made Impeachment His Specialty

Westlake Legal Group merlin_157851348_c51b2986-83a7-40bb-871b-8be586e876c5-facebookJumbo Who Is Michael J. Gerhardt? Professor Made Impeachment His Specialty Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry impeachment Ethics and Official Misconduct Elections, House of Representatives

For the second time, Michael J. Gerhardt will appear before Congress as an expert on impeachment. In 1998, when President Bill Clinton was facing impeachment, he was the only expert on a panel of 19 witnesses summoned by both parties to offer insight into the process.

Thirty years ago, Mr. Gerhardt published his first law review article, titled “The Constitutional Limits on Impeachment and Its Alternatives.” Since then, Mr. Gerhardt, 63, an Alabama native who earned degrees from Yale University, the London School of Economics and the University of Chicago, has focused on constitutional conflicts between presidents and Congress. He has written six books on impeachment, constitutional authority and the separation of powers.

Mr. Gerhardt, now a law professor at the University of North Carolina, has written more than 100 law review articles and dozens of editorials on the subject, including for The New York Times. He also served as CNN’s expert on the impeachment process during the proceedings against Mr. Clinton, a role he is reprising this year.

As a recognized authority, Mr. Gerhardt has pushed back against the criticism unleashed by President Trump and his allies against the current impeachment inquiry, deeming it to be “fully legitimate.” In The Atlantic last month, he declared that “the nonsense that the president’s defenders have proliferated,” combined with the president’s “protestation that the Constitution allows him to do whatever he wants,” results in an executive branch that belies the vision established in the Constitution.

In an interview last week with Slate, he said Mr. Trump “has dismissed the rule of law as being relevant to his life.”

“Some of us who still take the Constitution rather seriously believe that those articles of impeachment that had been approved against Richard Nixon turn out to be relevant, as well, to the misconduct of President Trump,” he said.

Democrats invited Mr. Gerhardt, who also testified before the House Judiciary Committee this year as part of their hearings on the findings of the final report by the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III.

He served as deputy media director for former Vice President Al Gore’s first Senate campaign, and was involved in Mr. Clinton’s transition to the White House in the early 1990s. But he has said that Mr. Clinton “made his impeachment almost inevitable” in part because he “testified under oath in a way that was false.”

Mr. Gerhardt has been involved in confirmation proceedings for seven of the nine justices on the Supreme Court. For two of those nominations, he was special counsel to Senator Patrick J. Leahy, Democrat of Vermont, during his time as chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Kitty Bennett contributed research.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Discussion Thread: Day One of House Judiciary Impeachment Hearings – 12/04/2019 | Live 10am EST

This morning the House Judiciary Committee will hold their initial round of public hearings in preparation for possible Impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. Today’s hearing is titled ‘The Impeachment Inquiry into President Donald J. Trump: Constitutional Grounds for Presidential Impeachment’ and is intended to ‘explore the framework put in place to respond to serious allegations of impeachable misconduct like those against President Trump’

Chairman Jerry Nadler’s letter to President Trump inviting his participation in the hearing can be read here. The invitation was declined by the White House


Today’s hearing will call four Constitutional Scholars, as witnesses, to review and consider the House Intelligence Committee’s Report on Impeachment Inquiry and the constitutional grounds for impeachment.

Democrats call:

  • Noah Feldman, Felix Frankfurter Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

  • Pamela Karlan, Kenneth and Harle Montgomery Professor of Public Interest Law, Stanford Law Shool

  • Michael Gerhardt, Burton Craige Distinguished Professor of Jurisprudence, UNC School of Law

Republicans call:

  • Jonathan Turley, J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Professor of Public Interest Law, George Washington University Law

House Intelligence Committee Report on Impeachment Inquiry – Executive Summary

House Intelligence Committee Report on Impeachment Inquiry – Complete Report


The hearing is scheduled to begin at 10:00m EST. You can watch live online on CSPAN or PBS or House Judiciary. Many major networks will also air live coverage on TV or online.

You can also listen online via C-Span or download the C-Span Radio App


Today’s hearing is expected to follow the format for Impeachment Hearings as laid out in H.R. 660

  • Opening statements by Chairman Jerrold Nadler, Ranking Member Douglas Collins, along with 10 minute opening statements by each witness, followed by:

  • Two continuous 45 minutes sessions of questioning, largely led by staff counsel, followed by:

  • Committee Members each allowed 5 minutes of time for questions and statements, alternating from Dem to Rep, followed by:

  • Closing statements by Ranking Member Doug Collins and Chairman Jerry Nadler

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Calls Trudeau ‘Two-Faced’ After Video Shows Leaders Apparently Mocking Him

Westlake Legal Group ap_19338387394622-637efa5ac3fb3b64f2c1fe8a5345fb895c88d41f-s800-c15 Trump Calls Trudeau 'Two-Faced' After Video Shows Leaders Apparently Mocking Him

President Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrive Wednesday for a round table meeting for NATO leaders in Watford, England. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Evan Vucci/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Trump Calls Trudeau 'Two-Faced' After Video Shows Leaders Apparently Mocking Him

President Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrive Wednesday for a round table meeting for NATO leaders in Watford, England.

Evan Vucci/AP

Updated at 9:14 a.m. ET

President Trump has responded to a video that appeared to show Justin Trudeau and other world leaders mocking him, calling the Canadian prime minister “two-faced.”

Trump’s remarks follow the president’s meeting Tuesday with the Canadian leader in which the two men appeared to get along, though Trump needled Trudeau over Canada’s defense spending.

“Where are you at? What is your number?” Trump asked Trudeau during their meeting on the sidelines of the NATO summit outside London. Trudeau responded that Canada had, in fact, increased its spending on defense over the past few years. That did not appear to placate Trump who pressed on: “Where are you now in terms of your number?”

Canada, a NATO member, spends about 1.4% of its gross domestic product on defense. Trump, and indeed past U.S. presidents, have urged the alliance’s members to spend 2% or more on defense. At present, seven of NATO’s 29 members have reached that target. The U.S. is by far the largest contributor to the alliance, which was set up during the Cold War to protect Western Europe from Russian and Eastern bloc aggression.

Recent relations between Trump and Trudeau have been cordial, mostly because of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, the replacement for NAFTA championed by Trump. Still, they have a complicated history. Although Trudeau was one of the first world leaders to congratulate Trump on his election victory in 2016, the two men quickly found themselves on opposite sides of almost every major global issue: tariffs, climate change, and trade.

The tensions became apparent last year as Canada hosted the Group of Seven summit. After the meeting, Trudeau announced that Canada, whose economy is highly dependent on the U.S., would press ahead with retaliatory tariffs against the United States. In response, Trump, who had initially slapped tariffs on Canadian aluminum and steel, tweeted that Trudeau was “dishonest and weak” and “mild and meek.”

Trudeau, who leads the center-left Liberal Party in Canada, was recently endorsed in a tough reelection campaign by Trump’s predecessor, former Democratic President Barack Obama.

The release of the video late Tuesday is unlikely to help matters. Trudeau was captured on video talking to French President Emmanuel Macron, Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. They appeared to be discussing Trump though he is never mentioned by name. The leaders seem unaware they are being recorded.

“He was late because he takes a 40-minute press conference at the top,” Trudeau said in a video posted to Twitter by the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Trudeau is later heard saying: “You just watch his team’s jaws drop to the floor.”

Macron is also speaking in the video, but his words cannot be heard.

Trump’s meeting with Macron on the sidelines of the NATO summit was also testy. As the president left for the summit, his administration had proposed tariffs of up to 100 percent on French imports, including wine and cheese.

When asked about Trump’s comments on Wednesday, Trump responded: “Well, he’s two-faced,” but quickly added, “He’s a nice guy.”

“I find him to be a nice guy, but the truth is, I called him out on the fact that he’s not paying 2 percent, and I guess he’s not very happy about it,” he said. “I mean, you were there.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Who Is Noah Feldman? Scholar Specializes in Constitutional Law

Westlake Legal Group 04dc-feldman-facebookJumbo Who Is Noah Feldman? Scholar Specializes in Constitutional Law United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry impeachment House of Representatives Feldman, Noah Democratic Party Constitution (US)

Noah Feldman, a professor at Harvard Law School, is part of a vanishing breed, a public intellectual equally at ease with writing law review articles, books aimed at both popular and scholarly audiences and regular opinion columns, all leaning left but with a distinct contrarian streak.

In October, he declared that the country was in a constitutional crisis, caused by the events that followed the disclosure of a July 25 phone call between President Trump and President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine. When Mr. Trump told Congress that he would not participate in any of the House’s impeachment proceedings, it left the country with “situation where the Constitution does not provide a clear, definitive answer to a basic problem of governance,” Mr. Feldman wrote.

Mr. Feldman, 49, specializes in constitutional law and the relationship between law and religion and free speech. A graduate of Harvard and Yale Law School and a Rhodes Scholar, he clerked for Justice David H. Souter of the Supreme Court. Justice Souter was appointed by a Republican president, and was expected to serve as a conservative voice on the court, but he later regularly sided with the liberal wing.

With years of teaching constitutional law at some of the country’s most elite institutions, Mr. Feldman will bring a deep analysis of different aspects of the Constitution and a lot of historical context. A prolific writer, he has written eight books and been published broadly, including in The New York Times Magazine and Bloomberg News. And he has been outspoken about his views that the country is in a crisis without a simple solution to resolve it.

As one of the witnesses summoned by the Democrats, Mr. Feldman will most likely argue that there are constitutional grounds for impeaching Mr. Trump.

And he is not shy about what he thinks of Mr. Trump’s policies. For example, Mr. Feldman does not think Trump administration officials should have immunity from the impeachment proceedings; he does not think the president has the constitutional authority to engage in a this-for-that deal with a foreign country; and he thinks a special counsel should be appointed to investigate Attorney General William P. Barr and Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani.

Mr. Feldman, who was raised in an Orthodox Jewish community, served as a constitutional adviser to the American-led Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

ICE official blasts NY authorities for releasing twice-deported suspect facing manslaughter charge

Westlake Legal Group DECKER ICE official blasts NY authorities for releasing twice-deported suspect facing manslaughter charge Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/shows/fox-friends-first fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 1ff4cdae-b8d6-5a15-8fde-d5d441e06edd

A New York Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) official said Wednesday that sanctuary city policies make criminals feel more comfortable.

Appearing on “Fox & Friends First” with host Rob Schmitt, New York Field Office Director Thomas Decker said, “if you were a criminal coming to the United States illegally you would go to a sanctuary city.”

COLORADO ATTACK VICTIM BELIEVES ILLEGAL IMMIGRANT SUSPECT SHOULD HAVE BEEN DEPORTED, REPORT SAYS

Last week, ICE arrested 32-year-old illegal immigrant Feliciano Perez-Bautista in White Plains, New York. Perez-Bautista is a Mexican national who was arrested by the Yonkers Police Department in July after facing charges of manslaughter and gang assault. He had been previously deported twice –in May 2013 and September 2014. He is now in ICE custody, awaiting his third deportation.

According to the Epoch Times, ICE lodged multiple detainers with Yonkers and Westchester police departments, but the requests were disregarded and Perez-Bautista was released under the county’s Immigrant Protection Act. Federal authorities were reportedly not notified.

In a statement, Yonkers Police Department spokesman Dean Politopoulos said, “Perez-Bautista was in Yonkers Police custody from the time of his arrest on the 11th to the time of his arraignment on the 12th…Subsequent to his arraignment, the court and corrections has jurisdiction over his physical custody.”

Under federal law, ICE has the authority to lodge immigration detainers with law enforcement partners who have custody of individuals arrested on criminal charges and who ICE has probable cause to believe are removable aliens. The detainer asks other law enforcement to notify the agency in advance of release and to maintain custody of the individual for a brief period of time prior to their release into ICE custody.

Decker explained that Westchester County administration and politicians passed the Immigrant Protection Act a more than a year ago, which “basically put a stop to releasing an honoring detainers.”

The measure prevents the county from using any of its resources to assist in federal investigations based on race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, ethnicity, or national origin.

Decker told Schmitt that county law enforcement is using the law to ignore ICE’s detainer requests “by saying they can’t meet it because of a judicial warrant.”

“Which judicial judges can’t issue because it’s a civil violation,” he added.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“What happens is that you have individual subjects — who’ve been arrested by the police and they should be removed from the country — be released back into the community,” said Decker. “So, what that tells other immigrants or citizens of the community is that all of a sudden, if you go and be a witness — you know, if you’re a victim — going to the police that person’s going to be released right back into the community.”

According to the New York Daily News, from July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019 the NYPD has accepted none of the 2,916 detainer requests submitted by ICE. Decker noted that was about 56 people released per week, which is 183 percent higher than just two years before.

Westlake Legal Group DECKER ICE official blasts NY authorities for releasing twice-deported suspect facing manslaughter charge Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/shows/fox-friends-first fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 1ff4cdae-b8d6-5a15-8fde-d5d441e06edd   Westlake Legal Group DECKER ICE official blasts NY authorities for releasing twice-deported suspect facing manslaughter charge Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/shows/fox-friends-first fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 1ff4cdae-b8d6-5a15-8fde-d5d441e06edd

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Who Is Noah Feldman? Scholar Specializes in Constitutional Law

Westlake Legal Group 04dc-feldman-facebookJumbo Who Is Noah Feldman? Scholar Specializes in Constitutional Law United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry impeachment House of Representatives Feldman, Noah Democratic Party Constitution (US)

Noah Feldman, a professor at Harvard Law School, is part of a vanishing breed, a public intellectual equally at ease with writing law review articles, books aimed at both popular and scholarly audiences and regular opinion columns, all leaning left but with a distinct contrarian streak.

In October, he declared that the country was in a constitutional crisis, caused by the events that followed the disclosure of a July 25 phone call between President Trump and President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine. When Mr. Trump told Congress that he would not participate in any of the House’s impeachment proceedings, it left the country with “situation where the Constitution does not provide a clear, definitive answer to a basic problem of governance,” Mr. Feldman wrote.

Mr. Feldman, 49, specializes in constitutional law and the relationship between law and religion and free speech. A graduate of Harvard and Yale Law School and a Rhodes Scholar, he clerked for Justice David H. Souter of the Supreme Court. Justice Souter was appointed by a Republican president, and was expected to serve as a conservative voice on the court, but he later regularly sided with the liberal wing.

With years of teaching constitutional law at some of the country’s most elite institutions, Mr. Feldman will bring a deep analysis of different aspects of the Constitution and a lot of historical context. A prolific writer, he has written eight books and been published broadly, including in The New York Times Magazine and Bloomberg News. And he has been outspoken about his views that the country is in a crisis without a simple solution to resolve it.

As one of the witnesses summoned by the Democrats, Mr. Feldman will most likely argue that there are constitutional grounds for impeaching Mr. Trump.

And he is not shy about what he thinks of Mr. Trump’s policies. For example, Mr. Feldman does not think Trump administration officials should have immunity from the impeachment proceedings; he does not think the president has the constitutional authority to engage in a this-for-that deal with a foreign country; and he thinks a special counsel should be appointed to investigate Attorney General William P. Barr and Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani.

Mr. Feldman, who was raised in an Orthodox Jewish community, served as a constitutional adviser to the American-led Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Calls Trudeau ‘Two-Faced’ After Video Shows Leaders Apparently Mocking Him

Westlake Legal Group ap_19338387394622-637efa5ac3fb3b64f2c1fe8a5345fb895c88d41f-s800-c15 Trump Calls Trudeau 'Two-Faced' After Video Shows Leaders Apparently Mocking Him

President Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrive Wednesday for a round table meeting for NATO leaders in Watford, England. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Evan Vucci/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Trump Calls Trudeau 'Two-Faced' After Video Shows Leaders Apparently Mocking Him

President Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrive Wednesday for a round table meeting for NATO leaders in Watford, England.

Evan Vucci/AP

Updated at 9:14 a.m. ET

President Trump has responded to a video that appeared to show Justin Trudeau and other world leaders mocking him, calling the Canadian prime minister “two-faced.”

Trump’s remarks follow the president’s meeting Tuesday with the Canadian leader in which the two men appeared to get along, though Trump needled Trudeau over Canada’s defense spending.

“Where are you at? What is your number?” Trump asked Trudeau during their meeting on the sidelines of the NATO summit outside London. Trudeau responded that Canada had, in fact, increased its spending on defense over the past few years. That did not appear to placate Trump who pressed on: “Where are you now in terms of your number?”

Canada, a NATO member, spends about 1.4% of its gross domestic product on defense. Trump, and indeed past U.S. presidents, have urged the alliance’s members to spend 2% or more on defense. At present, seven of NATO’s 29 members have reached that target. The U.S. is by far the largest contributor to the alliance, which was set up during the Cold War to protect Western Europe from Russian and Eastern bloc aggression.

Recent relations between Trump and Trudeau have been cordial, mostly because of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, the replacement for NAFTA championed by Trump. Still, they have a complicated history. Although Trudeau was one of the first world leaders to congratulate Trump on his election victory in 2016, the two men quickly found themselves on opposite sides of almost every major global issue: tariffs, climate change, and trade.

The tensions became apparent last year as Canada hosted the Group of Seven summit. After the meeting, Trudeau announced that Canada, whose economy is highly dependent on the U.S., would press ahead with retaliatory tariffs against the United States. In response, Trump, who had initially slapped tariffs on Canadian aluminum and steel, tweeted that Trudeau was “dishonest and weak” and “mild and meek.”

Trudeau, who leads the center-left Liberal Party in Canada, was recently endorsed in a tough reelection campaign by Trump’s predecessor, former Democratic President Barack Obama.

The release of the video late Tuesday is unlikely to help matters. Trudeau was captured on video talking to French President Emmanuel Macron, Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. They appeared to be discussing Trump though he is never mentioned by name. The leaders seem unaware they are being recorded.

“He was late because he takes a 40-minute press conference at the top,” Trudeau said in a video posted to Twitter by the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Trudeau is later heard saying: “You just watch his team’s jaws drop to the floor.”

Macron is also speaking in the video, but his words cannot be heard.

Trump’s meeting with Macron on the sidelines of the NATO summit was also testy. As the president left for the summit, his administration had proposed tariffs of up to 100 percent on French imports, including wine and cheese.

When asked about Trump’s comments on Wednesday, Trump responded: “Well, he’s two-faced,” but quickly added, “He’s a nice guy.”

“I find him to be a nice guy, but the truth is, I called him out on the fact that he’s not paying 2 percent, and I guess he’s not very happy about it,” he said. “I mean, you were there.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Calls Trudeau ‘Two-Faced’ After NATO Leaders Caught On Video

Westlake Legal Group ap_19338387394622-637efa5ac3fb3b64f2c1fe8a5345fb895c88d41f-s800-c15 Trump Calls Trudeau 'Two-Faced' After NATO Leaders Caught On Video

President Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrive Wednesday for a round table meeting for NATO leaders in Watford, England. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Evan Vucci/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Trump Calls Trudeau 'Two-Faced' After NATO Leaders Caught On Video

President Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrive Wednesday for a round table meeting for NATO leaders in Watford, England.

Evan Vucci/AP

Updated at 9:14 a.m. ET

President Trump has responded to a video that appeared to show Justin Trudeau and other world leaders mocking him, calling the Canadian prime minister “two-faced.”

Trump’s remarks follow the president’s meeting Tuesday with the Canadian leader in which the two men appeared to get along, though Trump needled Trudeau over Canada’s defense spending.

“Where are you at? What is your number?” Trump asked Trudeau during their meeting on the sidelines of the NATO summit outside London. Trudeau responded that Canada had, in fact, increased its spending on defense over the past few years. That did not appear to placate Trump who pressed on: “Where are you now in terms of your number?”

Canada, a NATO member, spends about 1.4% of its gross domestic product on defense. Trump, and indeed past U.S. presidents, have urged the alliance’s members to spend 2% or more on defense. At present, seven of NATO’s 29 members have reached that target. The U.S. is by far the largest contributor to the alliance, which was set up during the Cold War to protect Western Europe from Russian and Eastern bloc aggression.

Recent relations between Trump and Trudeau have been cordial, mostly because of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, the replacement for NAFTA championed by Trump. Still, they have a complicated history. Although Trudeau was one of the first world leaders to congratulate Trump on his election victory in 2016, the two men quickly found themselves on opposite sides of almost every major global issue: tariffs, climate change, and trade.

The tensions became apparent last year as Canada hosted the Group of Seven summit. After the meeting, Trudeau announced that Canada, whose economy is highly dependent on the U.S., would press ahead with retaliatory tariffs against the United States. In response, Trump, who had initially slapped tariffs on Canadian aluminum and steel, tweeted that Trudeau was “dishonest and weak” and “mild and meek.”

Trudeau, who leads the center-left Liberal Party in Canada, was recently endorsed in a tough reelection campaign by Trump’s predecessor, former Democratic President Barack Obama.

The release of the video late Tuesday is unlikely to help matters. Trudeau was captured on video talking to French President Emmanuel Macron, Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. They appeared to be discussing Trump though he is never mentioned by name. The leaders seem unaware they are being recorded.

“He was late because he takes a 40-minute press conference at the top,” Trudeau said in a video posted to Twitter by the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Trudeau is later heard saying: “You just watch his team’s jaws drop to the floor.”

Macron is also speaking in the video, but his words cannot be heard.

Trump’s meeting with Macron on the sidelines of the NATO summit was also testy. As the president left for the summit, his administration had proposed tariffs of up to 100 percent on French imports, including wine and cheese.

When asked about Trump’s comments on Wednesday, Trump responded: “Well, he’s two-faced,” but quickly added, “He’s a nice guy.”

“I find him to be a nice guy, but the truth is, I called him out on the fact that he’s not paying 2 percent, and I guess he’s not very happy about it,” he said. “I mean, you were there.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Media woes, a scandal and more

Westlake Legal Group 09e6925a-ae2f-4f7f-9d4d-e1705928d25b-AP_APTOPIX_Britain_Royals Media woes, a scandal and more

It’s fair to say there’s never been a year in the last seven decades when nothing much happened of note in the British royal family, the world’s most famous, most storied royals in the history of modern monarchies. Queen Elizabeth II’s many descendants just can’t help but make news.

This year, 2019, was no different, with highs and lows in the fortunes of the Windsors occupying the news feeds of fans around the globe. 

Perhaps the most surprising royal story of the year was the saga of the Sussexes: How did a royal marriage that started out on a super high in 2018 come to tears in 2019?

A year nearly to the day after Prince Harry married the former Meghan Markle –outspoken, biracial, American-born, divorced, a former actress – in a blaze of royal splendor and joy, she gave birth to Archie, the first baby of part African descent in the family.  

How is the royal family adjusting to Meghan? How is she adjusting to them? As we learned this year, it’s complicated.

Here, in chronological order, are the top royal stories of 2019:        

Westlake Legal Group  Media woes, a scandal and more

Jan. 17: Prince Philip’s royal car wreck

Prince Philip, the queen’s retired husband, was driving alone onto a highway near the royal Sandringham estate in Norfolk when he collided with another car in a violent wreck. He said he couldn’t see because the sun was in his eyes.

The then-97-year-old Duke of Edinburgh escaped injury although his Land Rover was totaled. A passenger in the other car was treated for a broken wrist, and a 9-month-old baby in the car was uninjured.

Aside from relief that he was pulled unscathed from such a mangled vehicle, there was widespread shock that the nonagenarian was still driving himself – and sometimes without security.

But maybe it shouldn’t have been a surprise: Since his youth, Philip, now 98, collected race cars and loved to drive them – very fast, according to the often alarmed queen. A man who prizes his few opportunities for independence from royal restraints, he would not be happy giving up his car keys.

Nevertheless, Philip voluntarily surrendered his driving license a few weeks after the wreck. 

Westlake Legal Group  Media woes, a scandal and more

April 23: Prince Louis of Cambridge turns 1 

The baby of the Cambridge family, Prince Louis, turned 1 on April 23. He is just as cute as big brother Prince George, 6, and sister Princess Charlotte, 4.

He also seems to be a very happy baby judging from the few photos we’ve seen. A recent favorite: Louis, toddling down a garden path at the Chelsea Flower Show, dressed in red-striped short pants, blue sweater, blue socks and blue leather baby shoes, and carrying a big stick.

His parents, Prince William and Duchess Kate of Cambridge, released three new pictures for his birthday, as has been their custom, and all show him with huge smiles.

Maybe it’s because it’s his amateur photographer mum is behind the camera. 

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May 6: Royal baby Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor is born

Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan of Sussex’s much anticipated royal baby was born amidst confusion and mystery: The privacy-seeking couple did not release his place of birth or the circumstances, and palace plans to inform the media of timing went awry.

Later, we learned he was born at 5:26 a.m. local time in an American-owned London hospital to which she was rushed from Windsor in the middle of the night.

Hours after the birth, Harry went before cameras at the Windsor Castle stables to declare his over-the-moon joy at being a dad. Two days later, the trio appeared together at the castle to announce his nontraditional name (no title but with his great-grandfather’s surname added to Windsor). 

They also released a picture on their @SussexRoyal Instagram page with the queen, Prince Philip and Meghan’s mom, Doria Ragland, looking delighted with the baby.  

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June 3: The Trump State Visit to Britain

President Donald Trump got his heart’s desire – a three-day “State Visit” featuring most of the royal bells and whistles and hosted by Queen Elizabeth II. He and first lady Melania Trump (plus a clutch of other Trumps) arrived at Buckingham Palace on June 3 to be treated to the kind of royal pomp-and-ceremony the British are so good at staging.

They met top royals like Prince William and Duchess Kate of Cambridge and Prince Harry (but not Harry’s American wife, new mom Meghan, or the queen’s husband, Prince Philip).

There was a lavish white-tie state banquet at the palace and a reciprocal dinner for the royals at the U.S. Ambassador’s residence. The Trumps visited Westminster Abbey, took tea with Charles and his wife, Duchess Camilla, at Clarence House, met with Britain’s political leaders and took part in ceremonies commemorating the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings.

Except for social media sneering at his “ill-fitting” white-tie ensemble, there were no major protocol faux pas. 

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July-November: The woes of Prince Andrew, Duke of York

The queen’s beloved second son’s friendship with American financier and convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein embarrassed the royal family and damaged Andrew’s reputation starting in 2011.

In 2015, one of Epstein’s self-described “teen sex slaves,” Virginia Roberts Giuffre, alleged in court documents that she was forced by Epstein to sexually service Andrew and others among his powerful friends, allegations Andrew and the palace emphatically denied.

It all came rushing back into headlines in July when Epstein was arrested and charged with new sex crimes, and pictures of Andrew with Epstein and with Giuffre surfaced again on social media. In August, Epstein was found dead in his cell in federal custody.

With federal authorities promising to pursue Epstein’s associates and Giuffre continuing to publicly denounce Andrew, saying he should “go to jail,” Andrew decided to sit for a BBC interview, hoping to contain the damage to his image and that of the royal family.

The sit-down was poorly received, and on Nov. 20, four days after the BBC interview aired, he announced his withdrawal from royal duties and the end of his royal patronages and charity work “for the foreseeable future.”

August-November: The media troubles of Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan 

The tabloid backlash against Harry and Meghan began building earlier in the year: She was said to be too bossy, too American, too mean to sister-in-law Kate with whom she was said to be “feuding.” Then the story shifted: The “feud” was actually between Harry and brother Will.

After the birth of Archie the carping grew louder: In August, Harry and Meghan were branded “eco-hypocrites” for using private jets for getaways while lecturing about climate change. Their friends, including celebrities such as Elton John, rushed to defend them; tabloid columnists rushed to mock them. 

Then, in October, at the end of their 10-day tour of southern Africa, the couple announced they were suing three tabloids for copyright infringement, invasion of privacy and phone hacking.

Their declaration of war on the tabloids, relatively rare for royals, stunned the media and distracted from the overall success of the tour, during which Archie adorably made his public debut.

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After their return, interviews they did with ITV aired in a documentary film in which they lamented their “struggle” living with “relentless” and “malicious” media scrutiny, some of which they believe are anti-American and verging on racist.

Meghan appeared to be holding back tears as she talked about the effect of the pressure on her mental and physical health as a new mother. “Not many people have asked if I’m OK, but it’s a very real thing to be going through behind the scenes,” she said.

On Nov. 13, the couple announced they would spend Christmas with her mother, Doria Ragland, and not at Sandringham for the traditional royal family holiday. Their plans are part of their desire to take a six-week family-time break from royal duties, possibly spending at least part of it in the U.S.

The news was greeted with incredulity by many tabloid columnists – a “snub” to the queen, they brayed – even though the palace insisted the queen approved of their Christmas plans. Besides, Will and Kate spent at least two Christmas holidays with Kate’s family away from Sandringham in the early years of their marriage. 

So if Harry and Meghan just want to get away from all the negativity during the holidays, who can blame them?

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