web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Releases (Page 15)

Why Thousands Of Autoworkers Could End Up On Strike Soon

The United Auto Workers union is set to start bargaining new contracts covering 150,000 workers at Detroit’s Big Three on Monday in what could be the most contentious negotiations the auto industry has seen in years.

The union will be looking to make significant gains over the most recent four-year contracts with the companies, ratified in 2015. Automakers are looking to cut labor costs relative to foreign competitors building cars and trucks inside the U.S. with lower-earning workers. Industry-watchers believe the starkly different expectations create the possibility of a major strike. 

Westlake Legal Group 5d28fa9d240000ff3493562f Why Thousands Of Autoworkers Could End Up On Strike Soon

ASSOCIATED PRESS The United Auto Workers union is looking to make significant gains over the most recent four-year contracts with Detroit’s Big Three.

Several years of rising and near-record auto sales have made companies flush, but workers have not forgotten the sacrifices they made to stabilize the industry during the financial crisis, including by lowering the pay scale for new hires. Meanwhile, Ford, General Motors and Fiat Chrysler will point to a burgeoning sales slowdown and the need to invest in electric and automated vehicles as reasons they can’t afford higher costs.

Observers viewed GM’s decision late last year to idle several U.S. plants as a shot across the bow aimed at weakening the union’s position heading into talks.

“Right now we’re at or near the peak in auto sales, and forecasters are showing some softening. That could mean the profits for the next couple years won’t be what they were,” said Kristin Dziczek, who tracks labor and economics in the auto industry at the Center for Automotive Research.

At the same time, Dziczek said, “It’s a different environment after four years of pretty successful operations. Workers are going to want to see money in their paychecks.” 

It’s a different environment after four years of pretty successful operations. Workers are going to want to see money in their paychecks. Kristin Dziczek, Center for Automotive Research

Autoworkers’ contracts are determined through “pattern” bargaining: The union negotiates separately with each company, but the final agreements tend to include more or less the same wages and benefits. Each company will make its case for why its contract should be settled before the others so it can have the most influence and dictate the terms.

Just as the contracts often look similar, so do the main sticking points in negotiations. The UAW and all three automakers declined interviews for this story. But it’s clear both sides expect some of the biggest fights to revolve around the use of temporary workers inside the Big Three’s plants, as well as how long it takes newer employees to earn traditional wage rates.

The UAW’s contracts put caps on the number of temps the automakers can employ at a given time. The companies will probably want to expand their use in the name of “flexibility” ― i.e., filling vacancies or ramping up production on the cheap relative to permanent employees. The U.S. auto companies often point out the high share of temps at foreign competitors manufacturing in the U.S. South, such as Nissan, saying it puts them at a disadvantage.

In a statement to HuffPost on the negotiations, Ford said, “Our focus is reaching a fair agreement with the UAW that allows the company to be more competitive so we can continue to preserve and protect good-paying manufacturing jobs and maintain our track record of investing in our U.S. plants.” 

Both sides expect some of the biggest fights to revolve around the use of temporary workers inside the Big Three’s plants, as well as how long it takes newer employees to earn traditional wage rates.

But what’s flexible to the automakers is exploitative to the union. While the union contracts cover temp workers, those workers do not enjoy the same wages, benefits or job security as their full-time counterparts. Union members ― even those who have permanent positions ― would see it in their own interest to limit the companies’ use of temps.

Another likely point of contention is how long it takes workers with less tenure to start earning the top pay of $29 per hour. When the industry foundered amid the economic slowdown, the UAW agreed to a controversial two-tier system in which new employees would be on a lower pay scale than veterans. The union generally succeeded in eliminating that system in its 2015 contract. 

But members barely approved that deal, in part because of what the two-tier system was replaced with: an arrangement known as “in progression” in which it takes workers hired after 2007 eight years to reach the top pay scale. 

The UAW might make a push to tighten up or eliminate that timeline to more quickly rid plants of the remnants of the two-tier system. It’s also possible one or all of the automakers tries to lengthen the progression to keep pay for newer workers down.

Westlake Legal Group 5d28fad52600004f000444fa Why Thousands Of Autoworkers Could End Up On Strike Soon

ASSOCIATED PRESS A GM worker unloads parts from a stamping machine at the company’s Pontiac Metal Center in Michigan in 2015.

“It’s a very long bridge,” said Scott Houldieson, the vice president at UAW Local 551 and an electrician at Ford’s plant in Chicago. 

Houldieson noted that the eight-year progression does not include the time a worker might be employed as a temp, too. His local passed resolutions urging the union to go to bat for temporary workers in the contract talks.

Those issues don’t even touch upon health care, another likely point of contention. The automakers will almost certainly be looking to shift more of those costs onto employees through higher deductibles and other out-of-pocket costs. 

The UAW referred HuffPost to a March speech by the union’s president, Gary Jones, who took the helm last year. Jones announced that the union would be raising its strike pay ― the money workers receive from the union in the event of a work stoppage ― from $200 to $250 and eventually $275 per week. 

“The raise in strike pay is an important signal to all our members that the international executive board has their backs,” said Jones. “We are ready to put in the work and we are ready to make the plans. And we are ready to set the bar high.”

The automakers took it as a sign ― or as posturing ― that the union would be willing to call a strike if its demands aren’t met. The fund the UAW would tap into to weather a strike is deep, totaling more than $720 million as of 2018.

The negotiations start on Monday, with the union expected to take a series of strike votes sometime in August. The current contracts expire in September, though it’s possible new ones wouldn’t be ratified until November ― or later if workers end up going out on a prolonged strike.

“It’s going to be hard,” said Dziczek. “Nothing is done until everything is done.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Indianapolis mom, infant twins die in crash with semi-truck, driver arrested

The driver of a semi-truck involved in a crash that claimed the lives of a mother and her 18-month-old twins in Indianapolis was arrested on Sunday night and faces three preliminary counts of reckless homicide, a report said.

Bruce Pollard, 57, was arrested after investigators said they believe the truck’s speed could have been a factor, WISHTV.com reported. The report said that Pollard was driving the truck at around noon when he plowed into traffic that was stopped.

The mother and her twins were reportedly in the first car that was hit by the truck, the report said. It burst into flames, the report said. Several other cars were damaged. The mother and twins died at the scene.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The report said that seven adults were taken to nearby hospitals for treatment, two of whom were listed in critical condition.

Westlake Legal Group fiery-crash Indianapolis mom, infant twins die in crash with semi-truck, driver arrested fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/indiana fox news fnc/us fnc article 67835693-2168-50cf-8c72-bee138598d77   Westlake Legal Group fiery-crash Indianapolis mom, infant twins die in crash with semi-truck, driver arrested fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/indiana fox news fnc/us fnc article 67835693-2168-50cf-8c72-bee138598d77

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Geraldo Rivera Launches Tone-Deaf Defense Of ‘My Friend’ Trump After Racist Rant

Westlake Legal Group 5d2c0d622400009d179357d1 Geraldo Rivera Launches Tone-Deaf Defense Of ‘My Friend’ Trump After Racist Rant

Fox News personality Geraldo Rivera called out President Donald Trump on Sunday for taking the “low road” with his racist rant.

But he also described Trump as “my friend” and claimed that the president was “better than that”: 

Critics were quick to point out that Trump was not better than that, especially after he targeted progressive Democratic, telling them to “go back” to their own countries. He didn’t name names, but appeared to be referring to Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts and Ilhan Omar of Minnesota.

All are Americans, and all but one was born in the United States, but questioning the country of origin of his critics ― especially people of color ― has been a part of Trump’s playbook for years. He was, after all, a leader of the racist birther movement that questioned the birthplace of President Barack Obama

The president’s son, Donald Trump Jr., similarly shared ― then deleted ― a “birther” style attack on Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), a 2020 presidential candidate.

Given that history, Rivera’s critics were quick to point out that Trump’s problem wasn’t just racist “language”: 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Peter Navarro: President Trump continues to deliver on his promise to ‘Buy American, Hire American’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6059019718001_6059017036001-vs Peter Navarro: President Trump continues to deliver on his promise to 'Buy American, Hire American' Peter Navarro fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc fe444e9b-17f3-5541-bc76-5fb3da2cc410 article

Candidate Donald J. Trump promised his administration would follow two simple rules: “Buy American and Hire American.” Monday, during the third annual Made in America Showcase at the White House, President Trump will sign the latest in a series of executive orders keeping that promise.

The Buy American Act requires federal agencies to procure domestic iron, steel, and other materials and products for federal projects like airports, roads, and bridges. That’s good policy for at least three reasons.

Buy American federal procurement rules provide good manufacturing jobs at good wages, propelling more workers into middle-class prosperity.

TRUMP TELLS CONGRESS TO ‘IMMEDIATELY’ APPROVE MEXICO-CANADA TRADE DEAL, SAYS US MOVING PAST ‘STUPID YEARS’ OF TRADE POLICY

In addition, about 20 cents of every Buy American dollar tends to come back to the United States Treasury in the form of taxes paid by corporations and workers earning profits and wages on Buy American projects, and state and local governments benefitting from more sales tax revenues.

Perhaps most importantly, Buy American helps strengthen our manufacturing and defense industrial base in the interests of both economic and national security.

Just weeks after taking office, President Trump signed Executive Order 13788 — “Buy American I.”  This robust order immediately imposed greater oversight to stop unnecessary waivers to federal contractors. As a result, waivers dropped by 15 percent in just one year, and the proportion of federal government contract spending on foreign goods has hit a 10-year low.

Last January, President Trump signed “Buy American II” — Executive Order 13858. This order closes another costly loophole whereby, prior to this order, Buy American rules were often not applied to many forms of indirect federal government procurement that occurs through federal financial assistance to the states and other entities.

Going forward, under the rules of Buy American II, more than 30 federal agencies are now strongly encouraged to apply Buy American to loans, loan guarantees, cooperative agreements, insurance and interest subsidies, and other instruments.  When fully implemented, this order will potentially extend Buy American’s reach by tens of billions of dollars.

About 20 cents of every Buy American dollar tends to come back to the United States Treasury in the form of taxes paid by corporations and workers earning profits and wages on Buy American projects, and state and local governments benefitting from more sales tax revenues. 

Monday, the president is adding a third pillar to his Buy American platform by directing the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council to consider amending regulations that adopted the policies expressed in President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s Executive Order 10582.

In this landmark 1954 order, Eisenhower declared that a product is American-made if it is manufactured domestically and at least 50 percent of its value components by value are domestically sourced.

Two years later, Eisenhower authorized the greatest public works project in American history, the Interstate Highway System; and much of it would go on to be built with American materials because of his 1954 order.

With Monday’s signing of Buy American III, President Trump has moved towards increasing the Eisenhower domestic content threshold for American-made iron and steel from 50 percent to 95 percent.

He is also recommending raising the threshold for all other products from 50 percent to 55 percent, with consideration of eventually raising the threshold to 75 percent.

I have seen firsthand across this great nation how stronger Buy American rules, coupled with other Trump actions such as steel and aluminum tariffs, corporate tax cuts to stimulate investment, reduced regulatory burdens, and robust workforce development programs, are driving a revival in United States steel production and a renaissance in American manufacturing.

For example, I have stood on the Duluth Ore Dock watching tons of iron ore arrive by rail from Minnesota’s Mesabi iron range, toured the good ship Edgar G. Speer that would take that ore to steel mills in places such as Wisconsin and Indiana, and visited once idle mills now operating at full capacity.

I have also seen this beautiful American steel serve as the basic building block of combat vehicles made in Lima, Ohio and Oshkosh, Wisconsin and ships built in Marinette, Wisconsin.

When I visit these facilities, my first thought is always this: It is simply common sense to spend American taxpayer dollars on American materials and American labor.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

No one understands the power of Buy American, Hire American better than President Donald J. Trump.

So let us celebrate his latest Buy American action together – knowing full well that there will be more such actions to come for the men and women of America who work with their hands in the factories across this great nation – shining monuments of production that represent the engines of the American economy and the backbone of our defense industrial base.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6059019718001_6059017036001-vs Peter Navarro: President Trump continues to deliver on his promise to 'Buy American, Hire American' Peter Navarro fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc fe444e9b-17f3-5541-bc76-5fb3da2cc410 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6059019718001_6059017036001-vs Peter Navarro: President Trump continues to deliver on his promise to 'Buy American, Hire American' Peter Navarro fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc fe444e9b-17f3-5541-bc76-5fb3da2cc410 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Tells Congresswomen to ‘Go Back’ to the Countries They Came From

WASHINGTON — President Trump said on Sunday that a group of four minority congresswomen feuding with Speaker Nancy Pelosi should “go back” to the countries they came from rather than “loudly and viciously telling the people of the United States” how to run the government.

Wrapped inside that insult, which was widely established as a racist trope, was a factually inaccurate claim: Only one of the lawmakers was born outside the country.

Even though Mr. Trump has repeatedly refused to back down from stoking racial divisions, his willingness to deploy a lowest-rung slur — one commonly and crudely used to single out the perceived foreignness of nonwhite, non-Christian people — was largely regarded as beyond the pale.

“So interesting to see ‘Progressive’ Democrat Congresswomen, who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe, the worst, most corrupt and inept anywhere in the world,” Mr. Trump wrote on Twitter, “now loudly and viciously telling the people of the United States, the greatest and most powerful Nation on earth, how our government is to be run.”

Mr. Trump added: “Why don’t they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came. Then come back and show us how it is done.”

[In saying “go back,” President Trump fanned the flames of a racial fire, our correspondent says in an analysis.]

Delivered on the day he had promised widespread immigration raids, Mr. Trump’s comments signaled a new low in how far he will go to affect public discourse surrounding the issue. And if his string of tweets was meant to further widen Democratic divisions in an intraparty fight, the strategy appeared quickly to backfire: House Democrats, including Ms. Pelosi, rallied around the women, declaring in blunt terms that Mr. Trump’s words echoed other xenophobic comments he has made about nonwhite immigrants.

[When it comes to race, Mr. Trump plays with fire like no other president in a century.]

As the president’s remarks reverberated around Twitter, a chorus of Americans took to social media to say that they had heard some version of Mr. Trump’s words throughout their lives, beginning with childhood taunts on the playground. Senator Cory Booker, Democrat of New Jersey and a presidential candidate, joined scores of people who said it was jarring to hear the phrase from the president.

“We’ve heard this our whole lives,” Mr. Booker said. “Now we hear it from the Oval Office.”

We Want to Hear From You

Ms. Pelosi may have offered the bluntest take on Mr. Trump’s comments when she said his campaign slogan, “Make America Great Again,” “has always been about making America white again.”

Broadly, Mr. Trump’s attack on lawmakers appeared to be meant for members of the so-called squad, a group of liberal Democratic freshmen engaged in an existential and generational war of words with Ms. Pelosi: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Ayanna S. Pressley of Massachusetts.

But only one of the women, Ms. Omar, who is from Somalia, was born outside the United States. Ms. Ocasio-Cortez was born in the Bronx to parents of Puerto Rican descent. Ms. Pressley, who is black, was born in Cincinnati and raised in Chicago. And Ms. Tlaib was born in Detroit to Palestinian immigrants.

“These places need your help badly, you can’t leave fast enough,” Mr. Trump said. “I’m sure that Nancy Pelosi would be very happy to quickly work out free travel arrangements!”

Mr. Trump’s comments were a crude addition to his continued rhetoric that the United States is too full to take in people from other countries. “Sorry, can’t let them into our Country,” Mr. Trump also tweeted on Sunday, referring to the groups of men held in filthy conditions in detention centers at the border. He suggested that those groups were “loaded up with a big percentage of criminals.”

His tweets came on the same weekend that Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents began rounding up some 2,000 undocumented immigrants, many of whom had recently crossed the border in groups or families.

Mr. Trump’s attack on the congresswomen also followed days of Fox News coverage that centered on Ms. Omar. During her tenure in Congress, Ms. Omar has rattled fellow Democrats and provided ammunition to Republicans for her repeated criticisms of Israel, including a comment that pro-Israel activists were pushing “for allegiance to a foreign country.”

Prompted by an emergency border aid package that liberals felt did not place sufficient restrictions on the Trump administration, the back and forth between the freshmen women, Democratic moderates in the House and Ms. Pelosi has also been bruising.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 14dc-trump-hp-promo-articleLarge Trump Tells Congresswomen to ‘Go Back’ to the Countries They Came From United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J tlaib, rashida Pressley, Ayanna Pelosi, Nancy Omar, Ilhan Ocasio-Cortez, Alexandria

House Democrats rallied around Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, left, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, center, and Ayanna S. Pressley of Massachusetts.CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

The speaker spent much of the last week trying to return harmony to her restive caucus, and tensions were still raw heading into the weekend. When Ms. Ocasio-Cortez’s chief of staff, Saikat Chakrabarti, singled out Representative Sharice Davids, a moderate Democrat and Native American from Kansas, for voting in favor of the aid package, House Democrats used their official Twitter account to slap back. “Who is this guy and why is he explicitly singling out a Native American woman of color?” they wrote.

[Mr. Chakrabarti has become a symbol of Democratic division.]

On Sunday, Mr. Trump may have provided the impetus for a reconciliation — however brief — that Democratic leaders and rank-and-file House members quickly embraced.

Ms. Pelosi condemned Mr. Trump’s remarks as “xenophobic” in a pair of tweets of her own, turning them around to criticize Mr. Trump’s immigration policies and project Democratic unity. “Our diversity is our strength and our unity is our power,” she wrote of Democrats.

“Rather than attack Members of Congress, he should work with us for humane immigration policy that reflects American values,” she wrote in another tweet. “Stop the raids.”

A spokesman for Senator Mitch McConnell, the majority leader, declined to comment on Mr. Trump’s remarks. Representatives for Republican House leaders did not respond to emails seeking comment. The White House also did not respond to a request for comment. But Democrats began sharing their own stories, pointing out that Mr. Trump’s remarks did not reflect a country whose lawmakers — and citizens — are becoming increasingly more diverse.

Representative Joaquin Castro, Democrat of Texas and the chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, called Mr. Trump a “bigot.” Representative Justin Amash of Michigan, who left the Republican Party this month over differences with Mr. Trump and is the child of Syrian and Palestinian immigrants, declared the comments “racist and disgusting.”

All four lawmakers in “the squad” eventually weighed in and responded to the president. “You are stoking white nationalism,” Ms. Omar said, because “you are angry that people like us are serving in Congress and fighting against your hate-filled agenda.”

Ms. Pressley, sharing a screenshot of the president’s tweet, declared, “THIS is what racism looks like.” Ms. Tlaib said his comments “just make me work harder,” and that she is “fighting corruption in OUR country.” And Ms. Ocasio-Cortez sent out a series of tweets addressing the president directly. “Mr. President,” she said in one, “the country I ‘come from’ & the country we all swear to, is the United States.”

But by Sunday evening, Mr. Trump again criticized Democrats for defending members of the group. “If the Democrat Party wants to continue to condone such disgraceful behavior,” Mr. Trump said on Twitter, “then we look even more forward to seeing you at the ballot box in 2020!”

Ms. Omar and Ms. Tlaib are far from the only congressional lawmakers who immigrated to the United States or were born to immigrant parents. In the House, there are currently at least 52 voting members who are immigrants or children of immigrants and 16 in the Senate — most of them Democrats — according to a Pew Research Center analysis from this year. Aside from Ms. Omar, four other congresswomen were born outside the United States, but they have largely not involved themselves in entanglements with Ms. Pelosi.

Ms. Omar has been vocal about her life as a refugee who fled Somalia and eventually settled in America, only to be disappointed with the country she found. More than any of the others in her freshman group, Ms. Omar — one of the first two Muslim women in Congress along with Ms. Tlaib — has forcefully used her personal story to make the argument that loving America does not require an acceptance of its shortcomings.

“I grew up in an extremely unjust society, and the only thing that made my family excited about coming to the United States was that the United States was supposed to be the country that guaranteed justice to all,” Ms. Omar recently said. “So, I feel it necessary for me to speak about that promise that’s not kept.”

Comments like these have inflamed Fox News personalities like Tucker Carlson, who used his television program to lash out at Ms. Omar.

“Our country rescued Ilhan Omar,” Mr. Carlson said in a broadcast last week. “We didn’t do it to get rich; in fact, it cost us money. We did it because we are kind people. How did Omar respond to the remarkable gift we gave her? She scolded us, and called us names, she showered us with contempt.”

Mr. Trump has repeatedly said that he does not hold racist views, despite his public statements. After a 2017 white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., Mr. Trump was widely condemned for saying that people on “both sides” were to blame after one of the nationalists mowed down a group of protesters and killed a woman. And he was one of the most vocal proponents of the conspiracy theory that President Barack Obama was not born in the United States.

At other times, he has used vulgar language to describe immigrants and people of color. He has defended himself after calling people crossing into the country illegally “animals” — he said was referring only to MS-13 gang members. He has assailed players with the National Football League, many of whom are black, for taking a knee during the national anthem. And he has used a vulgar term to disparage immigrants from largely black nations.

But, to his critics, Mr. Trump’s comments on Sunday were a low point.

“It is sad to see the occupant of the Oval Office transition from empowering and encouraging racist taunts to actually using them himself,” said Nihad Awad, the national executive director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations. “If Trump shouted the same thing at a Muslim woman wearing hijab in a Walmart, he might be arrested.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Democrats Have The Religious Left. Can They Win The Religious Middle?

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-613689090_wide-f793694fd7703b4ad760ad27c9ef4406d30abdee-s1100-c15 Democrats Have The Religious Left. Can They Win The Religious Middle?

Democrats are hopeful they can mobilize a religious left to counter the religious right. But it’s unclear whether that outreach will resonate with voters who make up the religious middle. A-Digit/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

A-Digit/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Democrats Have The Religious Left. Can They Win The Religious Middle?

Democrats are hopeful they can mobilize a religious left to counter the religious right. But it’s unclear whether that outreach will resonate with voters who make up the religious middle.

A-Digit/Getty Images

Exit polls from the 2016 presidential election suggest that only one of six white evangelical voters supported Hillary Clinton. It was the worst such performance of any recent Democratic nominee.

“She never asked for their votes,” says Michael Wear, who directed religious outreach efforts for Barack Obama’s successful reelection campaign in 2012.

Democrats this year are making a more determined effort to reach voters whose political preferences are driven in part by their religious faith. Two presidential candidates — Sen. Cory Booker and Mayor Pete Buttigieg — are recruiting faith advisers to help in their campaigns, and the Democratic National Committee has hired a new “faith engagement” director, Rev. Derrick Harkins.

“We’re having these conversations in the summer of 2019 as opposed to the fall of 2020, because it helps faith leaders understand that we’re serious about this,” says Harkins, formerly senior pastor at the historically black Nineteenth Street Baptist Church in Washington, D.C. “We’re not scrambling at the last minute to try to cultivate relationships that will get us over the finish line.”

The new efforts have Democrats hopeful they can mobilize a religious left to counter the religious right, long a bedrock Republican constituency. Less clear is whether the outreach will resonate with those voters who make up the religious middle.

Among them is child advocate Kelly Rosati, a Colorado-based evangelical activist who promotes adoption, foster parenting, and orphan care. Rosati abandoned the Republican Party after concluding it was insufficiently compassionate, but neither does she identify as a Democrat, largely because of the party’s stance on abortion issues.

“I feel incredibly discouraged,” she says. “I am extremely disappointed at how far the Democratic candidates have come from ‘safe, legal, and rare’ and [their] position on government funding of abortion and late-term abortion. At the same time, I have the exact same feeling when I look at those in the Republican Party who seem to have a similar callousness as it relates to immigrant children or people without access to health care.”

Rosati is not alone. Among Christians, many Catholics and mainline Protestants see themselves as neither liberal nor conservative. Michael Wear, who identifies as an evangelical and works now as a political consultant, sees the religious middle as fertile ground for his fellow Democrats, if they approach it carefully.

“There are large numbers of faith voters who are looking for bolder approaches on voting rights, on immigration, on pro-family policies,” he says. “I do think there’s a cohort of swing voters who are religious who Democrats risk losing with their move to the left on abortion.”

One candidate moving hard in that direction is New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, who during a recent campaign stop in Iowa compared the restriction of abortion rights to racism. “I think there are some issues that have such moral clarity that we have as a society decided that the other side is not acceptable,” she said. “There is no moral equivalency when it comes to racism. And I do not believe there’s moral equivalency when it comes to changing laws that deny women’s reproductive freedom.”

Wear, who has not yet aligned with a Democratic candidate in this election cycle, was not impressed with Gillibrand’s comment.

“That’s a fast track to losing an election that should be almost unlosable,” he says. Wear advises Democratic candidates to follow the example of Barack Obama in their outreach to religious voters, a story he relates in his book Reclaiming Hope. He says such an effort can be successful even without abandoning core progressive principles.

“We met them where they were,” he says. “There were voters who knew that Barack Obama was pro-choice, who knew that he supported same-sex marriage, but thought that he was a good guy who wasn’t out to get them [and] that he understood the concerns that those who disagreed with him might have.”

Such an approach is endorsed as well by Sen. Chris Coons of Delaware, one of those in the Democratic Party who argues it should work harder to connect with faith voters.

“I don’t think the average voter looks at a score card of where a candidate stands on issue A and issue B and issue C as much as they listen and watch and say, ‘Do I like him? Do I believe her? Do I connect with them? Would they be a good leader? Would I feel safe with that person running our country?”

The answers to such questions come with the “gut feeling” a voter gets from a candidate, Coons says.

“To like someone, to engage with someone, and to ultimately support them and be comfortable with their leadership means knowing their heart,” Coons says, “which I think means knowing their faith.”

As a regular participant in Capitol Hill prayer breakfasts, Coons advises his Democrats to speak more openly about their own faith, an appeal he explained in a recent article in The Atlantic magazine.

To Coons’ surprise, the article was met with a decidedly mixed response.

“Some folks were quite offended by it,” he says. “[They] said politicians have no business talking about their faith at all, that this is dangerously against the separation of church and state.” Such feelings, he says, may explain why Democrats have been less comfortable than Republicans in talking about the values that led them into public service.

“As a result,” he says, “there is a misperception in middle America that the folks who are religious and elected are Republican, and the folks who are Democrats and elected are not [religious].”

At the Democratic National Committee, the work of changing that reputation now falls in part to Rev. Harkins, who served most recently as a senior vice president at Union Seminary in New York.

“Square One is making sure people know they are being heard and not being dismissed,” Harkins says. He will soon be meeting with faith leaders around the country from across the political spectrum to find out about their concerns and priorities.

“And then the responsibility falls on me and our work here, to act on those issues in the way that we can.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

This Day in History: July 15

On this day, July 15 …

1997: Fashion designer Gianni Versace, 50, is shot dead outside his Miami Beach home; suspected gunman Andrew Phillip Cunanan, 27, is found dead eight days later, from a suicide. (Investigators believe Cunanan killed four other people before Versace in a cross-country spree that began the previous March.)

Also on this day:

1799: French soldiers in Egypt discover the Rosetta Stone, which proves instrumental in deciphering ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs.

1910: The term “Alzheimer’s disease” is used to describe a progressive form of pre-senile dementia in the book “Clinical Psychiatry” by German psychiatrist Emil Kraepelin, who credited the work of his colleague, Alois (al-WAH’) Alzheimer, in identifying the condition.

1971: President Richard Nixon delivers a televised address in which he announces that he had accepted an invitation to visit the People’s Republic of China.

Westlake Legal Group 0c289f9f-HudsonDorisAIDS This Day in History: July 15 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc c2d6b06b-16f6-5339-95e9-aaa6ecbf14f6 article

FILE (AP Photo/Chris Hunter, File)

1985: A visibly gaunt Rock Hudson appears at a news conference with actress Doris Day (it would be later revealed Hudson was suffering from AIDS).

1996: MSNBC, a 24-hour all-news network, makes its debut on cable and the Internet.

Westlake Legal Group John-Walker-Lindh-Reuters This Day in History: July 15 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc c2d6b06b-16f6-5339-95e9-aaa6ecbf14f6 article

2002: John Walker Lindh, an American who’d fought alongside the Taliban in Afghanistan, pleads guilty in federal court in Alexandria, Virginia, to two felonies in a deal sparing him life in prison.

2008: In an All-Star game that begins at dusk and ends at 1:37 a.m. the next morning, the American League defeated the National League 4-3 in 15 innings at Yankee Stadium.

2010: After 85 days, BP stops the flow of oil from a blown-out well in the Gulf of Mexico using a 75-ton cap lowered onto the wellhead earlier in the week.

Westlake Legal Group VersaceAP This Day in History: July 15 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc c2d6b06b-16f6-5339-95e9-aaa6ecbf14f6 article   Westlake Legal Group VersaceAP This Day in History: July 15 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc c2d6b06b-16f6-5339-95e9-aaa6ecbf14f6 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

David Avella: Tom Steyer is Biden’s biggest threat

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6057347981001_6057347777001-vs David Avella: Tom Steyer is Biden’s biggest threat fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc e5cbaf93-1c9e-5a98-bec8-8b7561a1823b David Avella article

President Trump’s impeachment organizer Tom Steyer has joined the race to become the Democratic presidential nominee with a pledge to spend $100 million of his own billion-dollar fortune. While it will not put him any closer to defeating Donald Trump, it does likely close the door on former Vice President Joe Biden winning the nomination.

Steyer’s notoriety comes from donating the billions he has made investing in fossil fuels, private prisons and subprime lending companies into progressive activism for impeaching President Trump and reckless environmental policies.

TOM STEYER HITS BACK AT ‘INSIDER’ DEMOCRATIC RIVALS AFTER SANDERS, WARREN SWIPES

He will be pushing the same radical, job-killing climate change ideas that those defining the progressive agenda such as New York Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Senators Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren have been screaming for. The difference is Steyer’s pledge to spend $100 million means he will be a loud voice that voters will hear and see.

Steyer’s spending doesn’t guarantee voters will get behind his candidacy, but it does mean Biden will have to fend off attacks on his pragmatism or risk losing ground to Harris, Warren or Sanders.

He also ensures the eventual Democratic nominee will have to put economic socialism and environmental recklessness at the forefront of his or her message.

To date, Biden’s weakening support has been as much a matter of his own missteps as specific attacks by other candidates. His opponents have already increased attention to his record on race, his age, and not being connected to today’s Democratic Party – not to mention his propensity for being overly touchy.

Still, the negative quotient has been diffuse, making it hard to distinguish noise from actual sound. All that changes when Steyer puts his money on the table. The sheer amount he spends on a given message will force the discussion in that direction.

This will happen very quickly.  Steyer is already on television with advertising totaling $1.5 million in the first four contests — Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada. The impact of Steyer’s candidacy is one more nail in the coffin that will become the Biden for President campaign.

Also, while Biden is seemingly content to mechanically run his campaign as he has in his previous two bids for the presidency, Steyer will be relying on modern technology to get the job done. Two early states, Iowa and Nevada, are allowing votes to be cast for their caucuses using a mobile phone. It will hardly be a shocker when Steyer’s forces go to university campuses to engage and activate students on the spot to vote for their man.

These activists are determined to have their voices heard. And the Steyer candidacy will have the infrastructure to make it happen. The more progressive and single-issue environmental voters participate in early contests, the larger a turnout there will be for Steyer, Harris, Sanders and Warren.

The more Steyer talks about carbon-free sources of energy, the more Biden will be forced to admit to Pennsylvania coal miners that he is ready to sell them out.

The more ground Biden cedes to progressive, single-issue environmental causes, the harder it will be for him to, with any credibility, claim to be a champion for blue collar manufacturing workers.

Biden has now endorsed the Green New Deal but that does not mean he will receive a pass from the greener factions of the Democrat Party.

The self-funding Steyer also widens a vulnerability for Biden that is already being exploited by Warren – and that is his coziness with lobbyists and wealthy donors.

Just like Donald Trump in 2016, Steyer will be able to make the case that he doesn’t need special interest money because he is spending his own – and then point to Biden as part of the swamp.

The knock on Steyer is whether he’s the answer to the biggest question being asked by Democrats: “Who can beat President Trump?”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The GOP is ready to spend in the billions to win President Trump a second term.  Not even Steyer has the money it would need to overtake a well-funded incumbent party.

If Steyer actually comes through on his pledge to spend $100 million to push impeachment and progressive causes that Biden won’t support, then he is in the perfect position to spoil the race for Biden – and tip the race to Harris, Sanders or Warren.

Did someone say Steyer for Vice President?

CLICK HERE FOR MORE FROM DAVID AVELLA

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6057347981001_6057347777001-vs David Avella: Tom Steyer is Biden’s biggest threat fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc e5cbaf93-1c9e-5a98-bec8-8b7561a1823b David Avella article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6057347981001_6057347777001-vs David Avella: Tom Steyer is Biden’s biggest threat fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc e5cbaf93-1c9e-5a98-bec8-8b7561a1823b David Avella article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Today on Fox News, July 15, 2019

STAY TUNED

On Fox News: 

Fox & Friends, 6 a.m. ET: Guests include: U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.; U.S. Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo.; Scott Walker, former Wisconsin governor.

Fox News @ Night, 11 p.m. ET: Art Acevedo, chief of the Houston Police Department.

On Fox Business:

Mornings with Maria, 6 a.m, ET: Guests include: Ken Cuccinelli, acting director of Citizenship and Immigration Services.

Varney & Co., 9 a.m. ET: Larry Kudlow, director of the National Economic Council.

Lou Dobbs Tonight, 7 p.m. ET: Morgan Wright, cybersecurity expert.

On Fox News Radio:

The Fox News Rundown podcast:Should President Trump Be Troubled By Latest Polls?” – President Trump still lags behind Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, and Elizabeth Warren in head-to-head polls that were released over the weekend.  Brad Blakeman, former deputy assistant to President George W. Bush and Richard Fowler, Fox News contributor and senior fellow at New Leaders Council discuss where the 2020 candidates should be focusing their attention. Tuesday is the 20th anniversary of the death of John F Kennedy Jr.  Steve Gillon, his friend and a historian, joins the podcast to reflect on JFK Jr’s life and discuss his new book, “America’s Reluctant Prince: The Life of John F Kennedy Jr.” Plus, commentary by Judge Andrew Napolitano, Fox News senior judicial analyst.

Want the Fox News Rundown sent straight to your mobile device? Subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher.

The Brian Kilmeade Show, 9 a.m. ET: U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.; Michael Goodwin, New York Post columnist; Karl Rove, Fox News contributor and former White House deputy chief of staff under President George W. Bush; Bret Baier, anchor of “Special Report.”

Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News, July 15, 2019 fox-news/entertainment/media fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 23726622-ddbe-59dc-8817-d2074d09fd5c   Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News, July 15, 2019 fox-news/entertainment/media fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 23726622-ddbe-59dc-8817-d2074d09fd5c

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Amazon Prime Day Brings Sales, and Risks, for Retailers

Westlake Legal Group merlin_155850153_d3743ee7-d15e-4cc5-b714-1ed724c2afe9-facebookJumbo Amazon Prime Day Brings Sales, and Risks, for Retailers Shopping and Retail E-Commerce Amazon.com Inc

Amazon had already revolutionized the way people read books, watch TV and shop online. And now it has succeeded in transforming the retail calendar.

Monday is the start of Amazon’s annual Prime Day sale, when subscribers to the company’s Prime service get major discounts on everything from flat-screen TVs to Ben & Jerry’s ice cream. Now in its fifth year, the sale has grown so large that the term Amazon Prime Day no longer quite captures it. This year’s Prime sale stretches across two days, and Amazon is not the only company involved. A record 250 retailers are offering their own sales to compete with Prime Day.

Analysts call this confluence of summertime promotions “Black Friday in July.” In 2018, retailers in the United States recorded $447 billion in July sales, $4 billion more than their total that December.

But the emergence of a second major shopping season — four months before Thanksgiving — may come at a cost for the hundreds of retailers scrambling to keep up with Amazon.

“There are all these retailers that are jumping on the bandwagon,” said John Nash, the chief marketing and strategy officer at RedPoint Global, a data management firm that works with retail companies. “Retailers need to turn their marketing dollars into profitable revenue growth, and it is yet to be proven that these events are profitable.”

Mr. Nash said stores should focus on creating long-term relationships with customers, rather than chasing temporary sales spikes.

“If retailers continue to prioritize episodic events over ongoing customer engagements throughout the year,” he said, “consumers will be conditioned to buy this way — only when there is a major sale.”

One risk that retailers should consider as they plan mid-July sales is cannibalization, said Guy Yehiav, the chief executive of Profitect, an analytics provider for the retail industry. Shoppers who buy heavily discounted items in July may be less inclined to return to the same stores later in the summer.

“By offering steep discounts on products now, retailers remove the incentive for their customers to visit during the traditional back-to-school season, when they can offer the same items at a planned margin,” Mr. Yehiav said. “This costs retailers both margins and foot traffic.”

Still, despite that risk, a number of retail chains — including J. C. Penney and Staples — have put back-to-school items like backpacks and notebooks at the center of their July sales campaigns. Kristin McGrath, a shopping expert at BlackFriday.com, said those deals would not necessarily cut into future sales, since many shoppers remain interested in back-to-school products throughout August.

“The pessimistic look is that Prime Day is really hurting brick-and-mortar retail,” Ms. McGrath said. “But in a lot of ways, it’s really inspiring them to innovate.”

Amazon was not the first company to offer a major July sale. As early as 2012, Best Buy and Walmart used “Black Friday in July” to advertise summer deals. These days, however, hundreds of chains offer July deals, and most of the sales are the same week as Prime Day. Target’s sale covers the same two days, and Walmart has promised bargain prices from Sunday to Wednesday.

“While you will see some retailers offer deals right after Prime Day, for the most part they’ve really got to come in and ride the Prime Day wave,” Ms. McGrath said. “Because interest is going to drop when Prime Day ends.”

But while the growth of Prime Day illustrates Amazon’s power in the marketplace, the July sale season also offers retailers a chance to demonstrate what sets them apart from the e-commerce giant.

“They do have this physical footprint that they really should leverage,” Mr. Nash of RedPoint Global said. “They can meet with consumers in person, let them physically touch products. That’s an advantage.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com