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Westlake Legal Group > News Releases (Page 2)

Schumer, Pushing McConnell to Negotiate, Lays Out Plan for Impeachment Trial

WASHINGTON — As the House prepared to make President Trump only the third president in American history to be impeached, the Senate’s top Democrat on Sunday laid out a detailed proposal for a Senate trial “in which all of the facts can be considered fully and fairly” — including subpoenas for documents the White House has withheld and witnesses it has prevented from testifying.

Senator Chuck Schumer, the Democratic leader, presented the proposal in a letter to his Republican counterpart, Senator Mitch McConnell, in an opening move to force Republicans to negotiate over the shape and scope of the proceedings. Mr. McConnell’s statement last week that he was “taking my cues” from the White House infuriated Democrats, who accused him of abandoning his oath to render “impartial justice” in the trial.

In the letter, Mr. Schumer set the time frame for a trial that would begin on Jan. 7, and called for four top White House officials who have not previously testified — including Mick Mulvaney, Mr. Trump’s acting chief of staff, and John R. Bolton, the president’s former national security adviser — to appear as witnesses.

Mr. Schumer also called for the Senate to subpoena documents that could shed light on the events at the heart of the charges against Mr. Trump: his campaign to enlist Ukraine to investigate his political rivals. And he set forth a specific timetable for each side to present its case, modeled on the one used when President Bill Clinton was tried in 1999. Mr. Clinton’s trial lasted about five weeks.

“Senate Democrats believe strongly, and I trust Senate Republicans agree, that this trial must be one that is fair, that considers all of the relevant facts, and that exercises the Senate’s ‘sole power of impeachment’ under the Constitution with integrity and dignity,” Mr. Schumer wrote.

“The trial must be one that not only hears all of the evidence and adjudicates the case fairly; it must also pass the fairness test with the American people,” the letter went on. “That is the great challenge for the Senate in the coming weeks.”

Read Chuck Schumer’s Letter

The Senate’s top Democrat laid out his proposal for President Trump’s impeachment trial.

Westlake Legal Group thumbnail Schumer, Pushing McConnell to Negotiate, Lays Out Plan for Impeachment Trial United States Politics and Government Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Republican Party impeachment House of Representatives Democratic Party   3 pages, 0.29 MB

Mr. McConnell, of Kentucky, has voiced support for a short, dignified trial, even though Mr. Trump has privately pushed for a longer process that would allow him and his allies to mount an aggressive defense against what he has repeatedly called “a hoax” being perpetrated on the American people. Mr. McConnell met last week with Pat A. Cipollone, the White House counsel, to lay the groundwork for the proceedings, though no agreement has been reached.

There are effectively two paths Mr. McConnell can take in setting the parameters of the trial: He can strike an agreement with Mr. Schumer, or he can push through a resolution so long as he has the votes of 51 senators. But with just 53 Republicans in the Senate, Mr. McConnell has a narrow margin; he can only afford two defections.

Mr. McConnell has yet to reach out directly to Mr. Schumer. However, on Twitter over the weekend, Senator John Cornyn of Texas, who until this year was the Senate’s No. 2 Republican, said he was certain Mr. McConnell would work with the Democratic leader.

“Strictly procedural,” Mr. Cornyn wrote, in pushing back against the assertion that Mr. McConnell was letting Mr. Trump plan his own trial. “Customarily the parties try their own cases. Also I am sure Senator McConnell would listen to Senator Schumer’s ideas.”

In trying to force Mr. McConnell to the negotiating table, Mr. Schumer is betting that centrist and independent-minded Republicans like Senators Susan Collins of Maine, who is facing a tough race for re-election in 2020, and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska will not go along with a trial devised solely by Mr. McConnell and Mr. Trump.

The debate over the shape of the trial came as House Democrats barreled ahead with their plan to hold a vote to impeach the president on two charges: abuse of the powers of his office and obstruction of Congress. A vote is likely on Wednesday.

The vote will be a tough one for moderate House Democrats, especially the so-called front-liners in Trump-friendly districts who flipped Republican seats in 2018. One of those front-liners, Representative Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey, told aides over the weekend that he intends to become a Republican next week. Others were starting to announce their plans.

Representative Collin C. Peterson of Minnesota — who was the only Democrat, other than Mr. Van Drew, to vote against formalizing an impeachment inquiry — announced Saturday that he would most likely vote against impeachment. Representatives Jason Crow, Democrat of Colorado, and Antonio Delgado, Democrat of New York, said they would support impeachment.

At the same time, a group of more than two dozen freshman Democrats in the House is quietly lobbying for Representative Justin Amash of Michigan, an independent who left the Republican Party this year, to serve as one of the six or more impeachment managers to present the case against Mr. Trump during the Senate trial.

Mr. Amash has been an outspoken proponent of the president’s impeachment, and the freshman lawmakers believe his selection would be a sign of bipartisanship. The idea, which was first reported by The Washington Post, appeals to moderate Democrats from conservative-leaning districts where the president is popular who are wary of joining in a one-sided impeachment vote and looking for ways to show they pushed for a fair process.

“If he would be willing to do it, it would send all the right signals to have a principled constitutional conservative front and center in a process that is not supposed to be partisan,” said Representative Tom Malinowski, Democrat of New Jersey, who flipped a Republican seat and is facing a tough re-election race.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi will have the final say on who serves as managers, which are high-profile, coveted spots for Democratic lawmakers. A final decision is likely early this week, but Ms. Pelosi, who has kept tight control over the impeachment process so far, has given no indication that she would be willing to invite anyone but a loyalist to serve as the face of the House impeachment investigation.

A spokesman for Ms. Pelosi declined to comment about the possible selection of Mr. Amash as an impeachment manager. A person close to the impeachment inquiry said it would be highly unlikely that the speaker would risk appointing Mr. Amash when several of her own members are eager to be managers.

As party leaders looked ahead to a trial in the Senate, lawmakers of both parties took to the airwaves on Sunday.

Two Republican senators said they had already decided they would vote to acquit Mr. Trump. Senator Ted Cruz, Republican of Texas, predicted that the president would be cleared of the charges against him in the Senate, a view widely shared among members of both parties.

“I think this is the beginning of the end for this show trial that we’ve seen in the House,” Mr. Cruz said. “I think it’s going to come to the Senate. We’re going to have fair proceedings, and then it’s not going anywhere because the facts aren’t there.”

Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, said he hoped the Republican-led Senate would conduct a short impeachment trial that could be over quickly, without calling numerous witnesses on both sides.

“I think what’s best for the country is to get this thing over with,” Mr. Graham said on CBS’s “Face the Nation.” “I’m not trying to hide the fact that I have disdain for the accusations in the process.”

Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the Democratic chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, on Sunday condemned Mr. McConnell and others for seeking to conduct a trial without demanding testimony and documents that the White House refused to provide to House investigators.

“They don’t want the American people to see the facts,” Mr. Schiff said on “This Week.” “There’s more damning evidence to be had, and they don’t want the American people to see that, and I think that’s disgraceful.”

Senator Chris Coons, Democrat of Delaware, said that if the Senate proceeding was “dismissed on the first day, obviously that’s not a full and fair trial.” And he said he was worried about what the president would do if he was not removed from office.

“If the Senate Republican majority refuses to discipline him through impeachment, he will be unbounded,” Mr. Coons said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “And I’m gravely concerned about what else he might do between now and the 2020 election, when there are no restrictions on his behavior.”

Representative Jerrold Nadler of New York, the Democratic chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, which on Friday approved the articles of impeachment against Mr. Trump, said the president deserved to be impeached for pressuring Ukraine’s government to investigate his political rivals and obstructing Congress.

Mr. Nadler accused Mr. Trump of continuing to solicit foreign help in the 2020 elections and urged Republicans to join with Democrats in the House to impeach him during the vote expected on Wednesday, a prospect that appeared increasingly remote.

“This is a crime in progress against the Constitution and against the American democracy,” Mr. Nadler said on ABC’s “This Week.” “We cannot take the risk that the next election will be corrupted through foreign interference solicited by the president, which he is clearly trying to do. It goes to the heart of our democracy.”

Republicans defended Mr. Trump, insisting that after a nearly three-month investigation, Democrats had failed to prove that the president committed a crime. Representative Will Hurd, a Texas Republican who has criticized the president’s behavior in the Ukraine matter, nonetheless said he would vote against impeaching him.

“My fear is that you weaponize impeachment for political gains in the future,” Mr. Hurd said on CNN’s “State of the Union.” “For me, my standard for impeachment has always been a violation of the law.”

Nicholas Fandos and Chris Cameron contributed reporting.

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Body found inside portable toilet near Baltimore Ravens’ stadium, police say

A body turned up inside a port-a-potty outside the Baltimore Ravens‘ stadium on Sunday, police said.

Police were called to Lot G-3 outside M&T Bank Stadium at around 2 p.m. ET where they found the unidentified person inside the facility dead, the Baltimore Sun reported.

Police said crews took the body to the Office of the State Medical Examiner for an autopsy to determine the cause of death.

EX-NFL STAR VINCE YOUNG LOSES VALUABLE TROPHIES AFTER FAILING TO PAY FOR STORAGE SPACE: REPORT

It’s unclear how long the person was inside the port-a-potty.

The Ravens did not have a game scheduled Sunday. The team took on the New York Jets this past Thursday night at M&T Bank Stadium.

DALLAS COWBOYS’ DAK PRESCOTT AT CENTER OF UNUSUAL COIN-TOSS CONTROVERSY BEFORE GAME VS. LOS ANGELES RAMS

It was the second time this year that a person has died in a port-a-potty outside M&T Bank Stadium in the cold, the Sun reported.

Temperatures between Thursday night and Sunday afternoon ranged from 29 degrees to 51 degrees Fahrenheit.

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Baltimore won Thursday’s game against the Jets.

The team has one more regular-season home game this season. Baltimore takes on the Pittsburgh Steelers on Dec. 29.

Westlake Legal Group MT-Bank-Stadium-2 Body found inside portable toilet near Baltimore Ravens' stadium, police say Ryan Gaydos fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maryland fox-news/sports/nfl/baltimore-ravens fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 96aad02b-60b2-5bd4-b0f7-ef5eeeb8bf1e   Westlake Legal Group MT-Bank-Stadium-2 Body found inside portable toilet near Baltimore Ravens' stadium, police say Ryan Gaydos fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maryland fox-news/sports/nfl/baltimore-ravens fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 96aad02b-60b2-5bd4-b0f7-ef5eeeb8bf1e

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Gabrielle Union invites ‘American Gods’ star Orlando Jones to ‘chat’ after alleged firing

Westlake Legal Group Gabrielle-Union-Orlando-Jones Gabrielle Union invites 'American Gods' star Orlando Jones to 'chat' after alleged firing Nate Day fox-news/person/gabrielle-union fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 40f19f5f-afaa-5383-8878-0887c1f51d52

Gabrielle Union is looking to speak with actor Orlando Jones after he said he was fired from the show “American Gods,” which is produced by the same company behind “America’s Got Talent.”

On Saturday, Jones, 51, posted a video on Twitter, claiming he was fired because the show’s new writers felt his character send the “wrong message for black America.”

“American Gods” is based on a novel of the same name. Executives at the show’s production company, Fremantle, said in a statement to Deadline that Jones’ departure had nothing to do with race, but simply that his character was not featured in the show’s upcoming third season.

‘AMERICAN GODS’ STAR ORLANDO JONES CLAIMS HE WAS FIRED; PRODUCERS RESPOND

Jones again tweeted, this time, calling out several former cast members of “America’s Got Talent,” which Fremantle also has produced.

“Correction: I was fired Sept 10, 2019 like @itsgabrielleu @OfficialMelB @NickCannon @heidiklum all have said @FremantleUS is a nightmare,” Jones said in the tweet. “They treated you like a 2nd class citizen for doing your job too well. Stay tuned. More to come.”

JANE LYNCH WEIGHS IN ON GABRIELLE UNION’S ‘AGT’ EXIT: NBC NEEDS TO ‘GET THEIR ACT TOGETHER’

Among the celebrities tagged in the tweet was Union, whom “AGT” reportedly fired after complaints of a “toxic culture” on the show. She also reportedly was told that her rotating hairstyles were “too black” for the show’s audience.

Union, 47, responded on Twitter with: “Ohhhhhhhhhhh 👀🤔🤨 let’s chat my friend. #StrongerTogether.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Union recently held a “productive” discussion with NBC — the network airing “AGT” — and the show’s producers in regards to her exit, which has prompted an internal investigation.

Variety broke the news of Union’s departure from “AGT” alongside fellow judge Julianne Hough, and days later, Union’s husband Dwyane Wade alleged on Twitter that she was fired.

Westlake Legal Group Gabrielle-Union-Orlando-Jones Gabrielle Union invites 'American Gods' star Orlando Jones to 'chat' after alleged firing Nate Day fox-news/person/gabrielle-union fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 40f19f5f-afaa-5383-8878-0887c1f51d52   Westlake Legal Group Gabrielle-Union-Orlando-Jones Gabrielle Union invites 'American Gods' star Orlando Jones to 'chat' after alleged firing Nate Day fox-news/person/gabrielle-union fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 40f19f5f-afaa-5383-8878-0887c1f51d52

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Trump takes nasty dig at Pelosi in latest slam of House Dems

Westlake Legal Group AP19348741644935 Trump takes nasty dig at Pelosi in latest slam of House Dems fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc Bradford Betz article 785a2f3b-3882-50ca-b0dd-5f998a55f08f

President Trump on Sunday took a swipe at House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., over her response to a reporter who asked why bribery wasn’t included in the newly unveiled articles of impeachment, despite Democrats – including the speaker herself – having leveled those charges repeatedly against the president throughout impeachment proceedings.

“You yourself accused [Trump] of bribery,” the reporter asked.

“Why did you decide not to make bribery one of the articles of impeachment?”

Pelosi said the decision not to include bribery in the articles of impeachment against Trump came after “working together with our committee chairs, our attorneys and the rest.”

In a retweet of Pelosi’s response, Trump wrote that the House speaker’s teeth “were falling out of her mouth, and she didn’t have time to think!”

He then followed up the tweet by writing that “Congressional Do Nothing Democrats are being absolutely decimated in their districts on the subject of the Impeachment Hoax.”

“Crazy Nancy is finding defending Shifty Schiff harder than she thought!” he tweeted, in reference to House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., one of the most visible figures of the impeachment inquiry.

Pelosi did not immediately respond.

NADLER BRUSHES OFF VAN DREW’S PLANNED JUMP TO GOP, SAYS HE’S ‘REACTING’ TO POOR POLL NUMBERS

Democrats repeatedly have accused Trump of withholding military aid from Ukraine until it investigated former Vice President Joe Biden and his son. Trump and the White House have denied he did anything wrong.

After witness testimony last month, Pelosi lobbed the bribery accusation against Trump.

“Bribery—and that is in the Constitution and attached to impeachment proceedings,” Pelosi said. “The bribe is to grant or withhold military assistance in return for a public statement of a fake investigation into the election—that’s bribery.”

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When asked at the time whether bribery would be included as an article of impeachment, she replied: “We haven’t even made a decision to impeach. That’s what the inquiry is about.”

“I’m saying, [what] the president has admitted to as ‘perfect,’ is bribery,” Pelosi said.

Fox News’ Brooke Singman contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19348741644935 Trump takes nasty dig at Pelosi in latest slam of House Dems fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc Bradford Betz article 785a2f3b-3882-50ca-b0dd-5f998a55f08f   Westlake Legal Group AP19348741644935 Trump takes nasty dig at Pelosi in latest slam of House Dems fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc Bradford Betz article 785a2f3b-3882-50ca-b0dd-5f998a55f08f

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Trump Officials Praise Gains From China Deal, but They Come at a Cost

Westlake Legal Group 15dc-chinatrade1-facebookJumbo Trump Officials Praise Gains From China Deal, but They Come at a Cost United States Politics and Government United States International Relations United States Economy Trump, Donald J Lighthizer, Robert E International Trade and World Market Economic Conditions and Trends Customs (Tariff) China

WASHINGTON — Trump administration officials predicted big gains for the economy from a newly announced trade deal with China, but the economic losses sustained during a bruising 19-month trade war will not be easy to make up.

In a televised interview on Sunday, President Trump’s top trade negotiator praised the progress that the agreement between the world’s two biggest economies would make on issues like intellectual property, currency and financial services. He described the deal as “remarkable” and predicted that it would roughly double American exports to China by 2021.

Yet the negotiator, Robert Lighthizer, admitted that the limited agreement, which the administration says is just the first of several phases, was only a partial victory. He said it would leave many of the existing tariffs between the countries in place and other bigger changes to the Chinese economy undone.

“This is a first step in trying to integrate two very different systems, to the benefit of both of us,” Mr. Lighthizer, the United States trade representative, said in an interview on CBS’s “Face the Nation.” Anyone who thinks you would change China in one stroke of the pen “is foolish,” he said, adding: “The president is not foolish. He is very smart.”

Business groups have welcomed the first-phase trade pact as a sign of easing tensions in the trade war. On Sunday, Mr. Lighthizer predicted that Chinese purchases of American products would rise by more than $100 billion a year once the agreement, which is expected to be signed in January, goes into effect.

But the economic benefits of the pact appear to have come at significant costs — namely, the tariffs Mr. Trump imposed to force China to accept an agreement and the uncertainty that his unpredictable approach to trade has created. Those factors have added new costs for businesses, forced them to undertake expensive changes to their supply chains and caused them to put off investments and new hiring.

Once those costs are taken into account, trade experts said, the gains from the new agreement are less clear.

“It’s hard to see this China deal as the vindication of the president’s tactics,” said Edward Alden, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. “It’s a pretty small deal, coming at a pretty high cost.”

To persuade China to bend to American demands, Mr. Trump imposed more new tariffs than any other president in modern history. On Friday, Mr. Trump announced that he would not go forward with an additional tariff increase planned for Sunday and that he would lower the rate on some of the tariffs he had already placed on China.

But tariffs on more than $360 billion of Chinese goods — the bulk of products the country exports to the United States — will stay in place indefinitely.

The remaining tariffs cover a wide range of product categories in which American officials contend that the Chinese government has provided huge subsidies to businesses to become globally competitive. They also include many goods for which the Trump administration is leery of having the United States depend on China for national security or economic security reasons, such as nuclear reactor parts or certain widely used industrial pumps and motors.

In the interview on Sunday, Mr. Lighthizer described those tariffs as motivation for China to continue to negotiate with the United States. But many businesses continue to denounce them as a tax on doing business with the world’s second-largest economy.

Companies that import parts and finished products from China have already paid nearly $40 billion in additional taxes since Mr. Trump imposed his first tariffs, data from United States Customs and Border Protection shows. While Mr. Trump insists that China is paying those tariffs, most economic studies have found that the burden of the levies falls more heavily on American businesses and consumers than Chinese ones.

The deal will need to make up a lot of ground in the area of agriculture, as well.

Under pressure from the trade war, American farm exports to China have fallen sharply, as China has put tariffs on American products and Chinese state purchasers shifted to buying goods from Brazil, Argentina and other countries. American agricultural exports to China fell from $19.6 billion in 2017 to $9.2 billion in 2018, according to the United States Agriculture Department, and have remained depressed this year.

Mr. Trump and his advisers have predicted that the deal will result in China buying $40 billion to $50 billion of American farm products per year. But some analysts have questioned how realistic those estimates are, given that the highest level of farm products the United States has ever exported to China was $26 billion in 2012.

The uncertainty created by the trade war also appears to have taken a substantial toll on the American and global economy, particularly by suppressing business investment.

Mr. Trump and his advisers have pointed to record-low unemployment, a strong stock market and high consumer confidence as evidence that their trade war has little downside. But economists say American growth would be even stronger if not for the trade war.

Mark Zandi, the chief economist at Moody’s Analytics, estimated that the trade war lowered American gross domestic product by a third of a percentage point in the third quarter, when the American economy grew by 1.9 percent.

“The trade war has done significant damage to the economy,” Mr. Zandi said. “You can see the fingerprints of the trade war clearly in the manufacturing sector.”

The new tariffs that Mr. Trump decided not to move ahead with on Sunday would have fallen more heavily on American consumers by raising the price of apparel, smartphones and other finished goods. He also scaled back tariffs imposed in September on other consumer products.

But earlier tranches of tariffs, which fell more heavily on industrial components and machinery, will remain in effect. That could ironically penalize some companies for making goods in the United States, instead of China.

Robert J. Leo, a lawyer for the American Down and Feather Council, said that levies would remain in effect on down and feathers from China, but not on Chinese-made comforters and pillows.

“That means the Chinese manufacturers can manufacture their products and get them into the country without tariffs,” where American manufacturers that import the goods to make products in the United States will still be charged, Mr. Leo said.

Despite the barriers that remain, Mr. Lighthizer said in the interview that Friday was “probably the most momentous day in trade history ever,” because in addition to announcing the agreement with China, the administration submitted its revised United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement to Congress for a vote.

The two deals “have been hyped as short-term wins for the U.S. resulting from hard-nosed negotiations by the Trump administration,” said Eswar Prasad, a trade professor at Cornell University. “But the outcomes of these trade deals hardly compensate for the heightened uncertainty resulting from the trade tensions unleashed by the Trump administration on multiple fronts that has hurt business sentiment and contributed to falling investment.”

The North American deal has gained the support of congressional Democrats and appeared to be on track for passage in the House of Representatives as early as this week. But in recent days, Mexico has raised new concerns about the deal’s stronger labor provisions, throwing up a potential stumbling block to its passage.

Jesús Seade, Mexico’s chief negotiator for the pact, flew to Washington for meetings on Sunday after the United States said it would send as many as five labor attachés to Mexico to monitor labor conditions under the deal. Mexico has described the idea as a violation of its sovereignty.

For its part, the Chinese government appeared over the weekend to be keeping up its end of the deal struck on Friday, starting with the cancellation on Sunday of plans to impose further retaliatory tariffs against the United States.

China’s Finance Ministry announced that the country’s tariff commission had rescinded plans to impose tariffs of 5 percent or 10 percent on a range of American products, notably farm goods like sorghum and seed corn as well as flavored tea, electric clocks, magnifying glasses and navigational radars. China had previously said that it would put the tariffs in place if the United States proceeded with plans to impose further tariffs on Sunday.

The ministry said China would continue to collect 25 percent tariffs on a wide range of other American goods, in retaliation for the continued American imposition of 25 percent tariffs on $250 billion a year worth of Chinese goods.

Wang Yi, China’s foreign minister, praised the trade deal on Saturday, and that praise was widely echoed by state media.

Mr. Wang said the Phase 1 pact was based on principles of mutual respect between China and the United States — a crucial requirement and endorsement from Beijing’s perspective. He also said the understanding between the two countries was good news for their economies and for the global economy.

“It will help to shore up confidence” in the global economy, Mr. Wang said, according to state-run Chinese television.

Ana Swanson reported from Washington, and Keith Bradsher from Beijing. Chris Buckley contributed reporting from Beijing.

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Anna Karina, Acclaimed French New Wave Actress, Dies At 79

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-478439668_custom-437ed34997c7ef1d081cd198b48a0ba5fd8cce32-s1100-c15 Anna Karina, Acclaimed French New Wave Actress, Dies At 79

Anna Karina, the French New Wave actress who in the 1960s established herself as a fixture in films directed by Jean-Luc Godard, died on Saturday in Paris. She was 79. INA/INA via Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  Anna Karina, Acclaimed French New Wave Actress, Dies At 79

Anna Karina, the French New Wave actress who in the 1960s established herself as a fixture in films directed by Jean-Luc Godard, died on Saturday in Paris. She was 79.

INA/INA via Getty Images

Anna Karina, the French New Wave actress who in the 1960s established herself as a fixture in films directed by Jean-Luc Godard, died on Saturday in Paris. She was 79.

France’s culture minister confirmed the news, saying on Sunday that “her look was the look of New Wave. It will remain so forever.”

Danish-born Karina hitchhiked to Paris at the age of 17 following a short stint as a cabaret singer. Soon after, she met fashion designer Coco Chanel, who convinced her to change her name to Anna Karina from her birth name, Hanne Karin Bayer.

Best known for typifying 1960s cool with her on-screen mix of cunning and nonchalance, Karina’s roles helped popularize a type of visually gripping and technically precise filmmaking that still holds influence today.

When Godard was working on his debut feature film, Breathless, he noticed Karina in a Palmolive ad in which she was in a bathtub covered in soap suds.

Karina was an inexperienced actress at the time, but Godard was inspired by her and offered her a part in the film. She turned it down because the role required a nude scene.

As Karina told NPR in a 2001 interview, Godard did not forget about her. Three months later, the director rang her up and asked her to star in the film The Little Soldier.

“So I said, `Do I have to take my clothes off?’ He said, `No, no. You have to play the main part.’ So I said, `Well, you know, I’m not even 18. I could never do that.’ And he said, `Well, you don’t have to,'” she said. “‘You just have to do what I tell you to do.'”

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1174002667_custom-fdc244e37586cbbf577bd78ee4be994b833b81a8-s1100-c15 Anna Karina, Acclaimed French New Wave Actress, Dies At 79

Actress Anna Karina and director Jean-Luc Godard. RDB/ullstein bild via Getty Images/ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  Anna Karina, Acclaimed French New Wave Actress, Dies At 79

Actress Anna Karina and director Jean-Luc Godard.

RDB/ullstein bild via Getty Images/ullstein bild via Getty Images

The following year, Karina and Godard were married and the two formed both personal and artistic bonds, launching a period in Godard’s career that historians call the Karina years.

“He taught me so, so many things,” Karina told NPR. “It was like Pygmalion,” she said, referring to the play by George Bernard Shaw.

During that time, Godard directed films such as My Life to Live and Pierrot Le Fou, often casting Karina as a high-spirited and capricious thrill-seeker who seduced men and even killed some of them.

Although Godard and Karina become something of a celebrity couple in the art film world, the two divorced after just four years.

“He would say he was going out for cigarettes and then come back three weeks later,” she told the Guardian.

Yet the acclaim she attracted from her work across seven films with Godard led her to be cast by other prestigious directors, including Luchino Visconti, George Cukor and Jacques Rivette.

But it was her work with Godard that remained the most influential of her career. In her 2001 NPR interview, she said Godard’s working methods were just as distinctive as they were misunderstood. For instance, her roles were highly scripted, she said, not acts of improvisation, as Godard had done in other instances.

“He would not change one word. Never. Of course, if you had a good idea once in a while, he would use that. But if not, we’re not allowed to say a word for another,” Karina told NPR. “They’re so natural that people, most of the time, thought that you were just talking, you know, saying whatever we wanted to say, which is totally false.”

Karina went on to direct some of her own films, mostly recently the 2008 French-Canadian film Victoria. A lifelong singer, she also collaborated on music with Serge Gainsbourg and she wrote several books.

New Yorker film critic Richard Brody, who published a book on the work of Godard, said the Karina’s acting career, especially in the 1960s, left a substantial mark on French New Wave and more recent film-making alike.

“First, the films liberated the cinema from nostalgia for superseded aesthetics sustained by a hidebound industry,” Brody wrote in a 2016 appreciation in The New Yorker. “Then, decades later, they nourished a new wave of nostalgia for the very era of radical change that they’d helped to create.”

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Anna Karina, Acclaimed French New Wave Actress, Dies At 79

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-478439668_custom-437ed34997c7ef1d081cd198b48a0ba5fd8cce32-s1100-c15 Anna Karina, Acclaimed French New Wave Actress, Dies At 79

Anna Karina, the French New Wave actress who in the 1960s established herself as a fixture in films directed by Jean-Luc Godard, died on Saturday in Paris. She was 79. INA/INA via Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  Anna Karina, Acclaimed French New Wave Actress, Dies At 79

Anna Karina, the French New Wave actress who in the 1960s established herself as a fixture in films directed by Jean-Luc Godard, died on Saturday in Paris. She was 79.

INA/INA via Getty Images

Anna Karina, the French New Wave actress who in the 1960s established herself as a fixture in films directed by Jean-Luc Godard, died on Saturday in Paris. She was 79.

France’s culture minister confirmed the news, saying on Sunday that “her look was the look of New Wave. It will remain so forever.”

Danish-born Karina hitchhiked to Paris at the age of 17 following a short stint as a cabaret singer. Soon after, she met fashion designer Coco Chanel, who convinced her to change her name to Anna Karina from her birth name, Hanne Karin Bayer.

Best known for typifying 1960s cool with her on-screen mix of cunning and nonchalance, Karina’s roles help popularize a type of visually gripping and technically precise filmmaking that still holds influence today.

When Godard was working on his debut feature film, Breathless, he noticed Karina in a Palmolive ad in which she was in a bathtub covered in soap suds.

Karina was an inexperienced actress at the time, but Godard was inspired by her and offered her a part in the film. She turned it down because the role required a nude scene.

As Karina told NPR in a 2001 interview, Godard did not forget about her. Three months later, the director rang her up and asked her to star in the film The Little Soldier.

“So I said, `Do I have to take my clothes off?’ He said, `No, no. You have to play the main part.’ So I said, `Well, you know, I’m not even 18. I could never do that.’ And he said, `Well, you don’t have to,'” she said. “‘You just have to do what I tell you to do.'”

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1174002667_custom-fdc244e37586cbbf577bd78ee4be994b833b81a8-s1100-c15 Anna Karina, Acclaimed French New Wave Actress, Dies At 79

Actress Anna Karina and director Jean-Luc Godard. RDB/ullstein bild via Getty Images/ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  Anna Karina, Acclaimed French New Wave Actress, Dies At 79

Actress Anna Karina and director Jean-Luc Godard.

RDB/ullstein bild via Getty Images/ullstein bild via Getty Images

The following year, Karina and Godard were married and the two formed both personal and artistic bonds, launching a period in Godard’s career that historians call the Karina years.

“He taught me so, so many things,” Karina told NPR. “It was like Pygmalion,” she said, referring to the play by George Bernard Shaw.

During that time, Godard directed films such as My Life to Live and Pierrot Le Fou, often casting Karina as a high-spirited and capricious thrill-seeker who seduced men and even killed some of them.

Although Godard and Karina become something of a celebrity couple in the art film world, the two divorced after just four years.

“He would say he was going out for cigarettes and then come back three weeks later,” she told the Guardian.

Yet the acclaim she attracted from her work across seven films with Godard led her to be cast by other prestigious directors, including Luchino Visconti, George Cukor and Jacques Rivette.

But it was her work with Godard that remained the most influential of her career. In her 2001 NPR interview, she said Godard’s working methods were just as distinctive as they were misunderstood. For instance, her roles were highly scripted, she said, not acts of improvisation, as Godard had done in other instances.

“He would not change one word. Never. Of course, if you had a good idea once in a while, he would use that. But if not, we’re not allowed to say a word for another,” Karina told NPR. “They’re so natural that people, most of the time, thought that you were just talking, you know, saying whatever we wanted to say, which is totally false.”

Karina went on to direct some of her own films, mostly recently the 2008 French-Canadian film Victoria. A lifelong singer, she also collaborated on music with Serge Gainsbourg and she wrote several books.

New Yorker film critic Richard Brody, who published a book on the work of Godard, said the Karina’s acting career, especially in the 1960s, left a substantial mark on French New Wave and more recent film-making alike.

“First, the films liberated the cinema from nostalgia for superseded aesthetics sustained by a hidebound industry,” Brody wrote in a 2016 appreciation in The New Yorker. “Then, decades later, they nourished a new wave of nostalgia for the very era of radical change that they’d helped to create.”

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Bernie Sanders takes swings at batting practice, makes pitch for minor-league teams

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., took a swing at an issue close to home for the 2020 presidential hopeful Sunday, as he rallied against Major League Baseball’s plan to cut 42 minor-league teams across the country in the new year.

The MLB has been negotiating a new agreement with the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues, the governing body of the minors, that would primarily affect lower-level teams in short-season leagues, such as the Vermont Lake Monsters, the Single-A affiliate of the Oakland Athletics in Burlington, where Sanders previously served as mayor.

“It’s not just another business where you can pay people low wages and then shut down your enterprises in communities where this means so much to the kids and the families,” Sanders said at an event in Burlington, Iowa.

Sanders has been an outspoken opponent of the plan and met with Commissioner Rob Manfred earlier in December in an attempt to convince him to rescind the proposal.

SANDERS MEETS WITH MLB COMMISSIONER ROB MANFRED TO DISCUSS MINOR LEAGUE PLAN

Sanders followed up with a letter to Manfred on Saturday, arguing that baseball “has to be considered more than just the bottom line.”

Sanders railed against MLB Sunday, saying he was “outraged” by the plan and calling the organization “an institution owned mostly by billionaires.”

He continued, “There is a reason why baseball is considered the national pastime.”

The push to halt the cuts had the bipartisan support of more than 100 lawmakers in Congress.

“I am delighted that in Congress we actually have done something in a bipartisan way. Doesn’t happen very often nowadays. But, on this issue, you’ve got Democrats and you’ve got Republicans from all over this country saying to Major League Baseball, do not take away minor league baseball from 42 communities all over this country. Ain’t going to happen,” Sanders said, as he was joined by a group of representatives and players from three minor-league teams that could face potential cuts. “If it does happen, you’re going to have to deal with a number of us in Congress who will respond accordingly.”

The 78-year-old candidate, who recovered after a heart attack this past October, did some batting practice, even hitting a few balls lobbed at him by a member of his staff.

He shared stories of his childhood and love for baseball, and reminisced over his time as the “mayor of another Burlington called Burlington, Vermont,” where he helped clear the way for a Double-A team affiliated with the Cincinnati Reds squad, the Vermont Reds in the Eastern League.

“The ballplayers from the team made it into the majors. They ended up winning three Eastern League titles. What was most important to me as the mayor of the city at that time is seeing what Minor League Baseball did for our community. It was a beautiful, beautiful thing,” Sanders said.

Westlake Legal Group AP19349621281989 Bernie Sanders takes swings at batting practice, makes pitch for minor-league teams Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/vermont fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/sports/mlb fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/sports fnc article 0bd03256-ea0e-51ea-b4e8-86fc626e3b4a

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., hitting a baseball after a meeting with minor-league baseball players and officials Sunday in Burlington, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

MLB said in a statement that it “understands that we have an obligation to local communities to ensure that public money spent on minor league stadiums is done so prudently and for the benefit of all citizens,” but also added that the organization “must ensure that minor league players have safe playing facilities suitable for the development of professional baseball players, are not subjected to unreasonable travel demands, are provided with compensation and working conditions appropriate for elite athletes, and have a realistic opportunity of making it to the major leagues.”

The comments came after some minor-league players filed a federal class-action suit charging that many earned less than $7,500 per year, violating minimum-wage laws.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“Major League Baseball has gotta understand that baseball is more than just a bottom line for a group of billionaires. It is these communities where the kids come out, where young ballplayers,” Sanders said.

Fox News’ Andrew Craft in Burlington, Iowa, and The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group AP19349621281989 Bernie Sanders takes swings at batting practice, makes pitch for minor-league teams Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/vermont fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/sports/mlb fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/sports fnc article 0bd03256-ea0e-51ea-b4e8-86fc626e3b4a   Westlake Legal Group AP19349621281989 Bernie Sanders takes swings at batting practice, makes pitch for minor-league teams Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/vermont fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/sports/mlb fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/sports fnc article 0bd03256-ea0e-51ea-b4e8-86fc626e3b4a

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Ex-NFL star Vince Young loses valuable trophies after failing to pay for storage space: report

Westlake Legal Group Vince-Young Ex-NFL star Vince Young loses valuable trophies after failing to pay for storage space: report Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/tennessee-titans fox-news/sports/nfl/philadelphia-eagles fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/sports/ncaa/texas-longhorns fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox news fnc/sports fnc article 28d7c3ab-8ab2-54f9-895f-f842b6fa064b

Former NFL quarterback Vince Young reportedly lost several awards and trophies belonging to him because he didn’t pay his storage-unit bill in Houston.

The woman who won the memorabilia at an auction told TMZ Sports on Saturday she planned to sell the items.

ELI MANNING GETS STANDING OVATION FROM NEW YORK GIANTS FANS IN POTENTIAL FINAL HOME GAME AS STARTER

The unit contained several valuable possessions, including his Maxwell Award, his 2006 Rose Bowl MVP trophy and his Manning Award. The woman told the gossip site she claimed the items in November and listed only those three on eBay, asking for $50,000 each.

The other items in the unit included game-worn helmets throughout his career in college and the NFL, including the 2006 Rose Bowl.

BALTIMORE RAVENS’ MARCUS PETERS FINED MORE THAN $14G FOR BEER-CHUGGING CELEBRATION

The woman said she had not gotten in contact with Young and would be willing to resell the items to the ex-quarterback if he wanted them.

Young played college football at Texas and was on the winning side of one of the greatest college football games ever played when his Longhorns defeated USC for the national championship in 2006.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

The Tennessee Titans selected Young with the No. 3 pick of the 2006 draft. He spent five seasons with the Titans before moving onto the Philadelphia Eagles in 2011.

In 60 career games, he recorded 8,964 passing yards, 46 touchdown passes and 51 interceptions.

Westlake Legal Group Vince-Young Ex-NFL star Vince Young loses valuable trophies after failing to pay for storage space: report Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/tennessee-titans fox-news/sports/nfl/philadelphia-eagles fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/sports/ncaa/texas-longhorns fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox news fnc/sports fnc article 28d7c3ab-8ab2-54f9-895f-f842b6fa064b   Westlake Legal Group Vince-Young Ex-NFL star Vince Young loses valuable trophies after failing to pay for storage space: report Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/tennessee-titans fox-news/sports/nfl/philadelphia-eagles fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/sports/ncaa/texas-longhorns fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox news fnc/sports fnc article 28d7c3ab-8ab2-54f9-895f-f842b6fa064b

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Bernie Sanders takes swings at batting practice, makes pitch for minor-league teams

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., took a swing at an issue close to home for the 2020 presidential hopeful Sunday, as he rallied against Major League Baseball’s plan to cut 42 minor-league teams across the country in the new year.

The MLB has been negotiating a new agreement with the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues, the governing body of the minors, that would primarily affect lower-level teams in short-season leagues, such as the Vermont Lake Monsters, the Single-A affiliate of the Oakland Athletics in Burlington, where Sanders previously served as mayor.

“It’s not just another business where you can pay people low wages and then shut down your enterprises in communities where this means so much to the kids and the families,” Sanders said at an event in Burlington, Iowa.

Sanders has been an outspoken opponent of the plan and met with Commissioner Rob Manfred earlier in December in an attempt to convince him to rescind the proposal.

SANDERS MEETS WITH MLB COMMISSIONER ROB MANFRED TO DISCUSS MINOR LEAGUE PLAN

Sanders followed up with a letter to Manfred on Saturday, arguing that baseball “has to be considered more than just the bottom line.”

Sanders railed against MLB Sunday, saying he was “outraged” by the plan and calling the organization “an institution owned mostly by billionaires.”

He continued, “There is a reason why baseball is considered the national pastime.”

The push to halt the cuts had the bipartisan support of more than 100 lawmakers in Congress.

“I am delighted that in Congress we actually have done something in a bipartisan way. Doesn’t happen very often nowadays. But, on this issue, you’ve got Democrats and you’ve got Republicans from all over this country saying to Major League Baseball, do not take away minor league baseball from 42 communities all over this country. Ain’t going to happen,” Sanders said, as he was joined by a group of representatives and players from three minor-league teams that could face potential cuts. “If it does happen, you’re going to have to deal with a number of us in Congress who will respond accordingly.”

The 78-year-old candidate, who recovered after a heart attack this past October, did some batting practice, even hitting a few balls lobbed at him by a member of his staff.

He shared stories of his childhood and love for baseball, and reminisced over his time as the “mayor of another Burlington called Burlington, Vermont,” where he helped clear the way for a Double-A team affiliated with the Cincinnati Reds squad, the Vermont Reds in the Eastern League.

“The ballplayers from the team made it into the majors. They ended up winning three Eastern League titles. What was most important to me as the mayor of the city at that time is seeing what Minor League Baseball did for our community. It was a beautiful, beautiful thing,” Sanders said.

Westlake Legal Group AP19349621281989 Bernie Sanders takes swings at batting practice, makes pitch for minor-league teams Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/vermont fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/sports/mlb fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/sports fnc article 0bd03256-ea0e-51ea-b4e8-86fc626e3b4a

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., hitting a baseball after a meeting with minor-league baseball players and officials Sunday in Burlington, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

MLB said in a statement that it “understands that we have an obligation to local communities to ensure that public money spent on minor league stadiums is done so prudently and for the benefit of all citizens,” but also added that the organization “must ensure that minor league players have safe playing facilities suitable for the development of professional baseball players, are not subjected to unreasonable travel demands, are provided with compensation and working conditions appropriate for elite athletes, and have a realistic opportunity of making it to the major leagues.”

The comments came after some minor-league players filed a federal class-action suit charging that many earned less than $7,500 per year, violating minimum-wage laws.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“Major League Baseball has gotta understand that baseball is more than just a bottom line for a group of billionaires. It is these communities where the kids come out, where young ballplayers,” Sanders said.

Fox News’ Andrew Craft in Burlington, Iowa, and The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group AP19349621281989 Bernie Sanders takes swings at batting practice, makes pitch for minor-league teams Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/vermont fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/sports/mlb fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/sports fnc article 0bd03256-ea0e-51ea-b4e8-86fc626e3b4a   Westlake Legal Group AP19349621281989 Bernie Sanders takes swings at batting practice, makes pitch for minor-league teams Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/vermont fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/sports/mlb fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/sports fnc article 0bd03256-ea0e-51ea-b4e8-86fc626e3b4a

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