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Westlake Legal Group > News Releases (Page 25)

‘Bombshell’ Raises a Question: What’s Megyn Kelly Up to Anyway?

Westlake Legal Group 12KELLY-01-facebookJumbo ‘Bombshell’ Raises a Question: What’s Megyn Kelly Up to Anyway? Television Roach, Jay Presidential Election of 2020 News and News Media National Broadcasting Co Megyn Kelly Today (TV Program) Kelly, Megyn Fox News Channel Carlson, Tucker Bombshell (Movie) Ailes, Roger E

Megyn Kelly last appeared on NBC more than a year ago, trying to contain an uproar over on-air remarks about blackface that ultimately brought her tenure at the network to an abrupt, unhappy end.

In a few weeks’ time, she will make a return — of sorts.

On Jan. 5, NBC will broadcast the 2020 Golden Globes, where Charlize Theron will walk the red carpet as a leading nominee for her portrayal of Ms. Kelly in the movie “Bombshell,” a dramatized account of the Fox News chairman Roger Ailes’s downfall that puts Ms. Kelly center stage.

Viewers will be treated to clips of Ms. Theron’s uncanny rendition of Ms. Kelly — the actress captures, with startling precision, the vocal tics and lawyerly cadences of the former Fox News anchor — in a performance that generated awards buzz even before the film opened on Friday in New York and Los Angeles. (Its wide release begins Dec. 20.)

But so far, Ms. Kelly has shown little interest in weighing in on her big-screen doppelgänger.

She did not participate in the making of the film — which was directed by Jay Roach from a script by Charles Randolph — and she and Ms. Theron have never spoken. Ms. Kelly attended a screening of “Bombshell” in New York last month, according to two people familiar with the event, but she has made no public remarks about it. Contacted for this article, Ms. Kelly declined to comment.

Her quietude may be strategic. Behind the scenes, Ms. Kelly is pondering a route back into the national media, according to several people who requested anonymity in describing private conversations with the anchor.

In recent weeks, Ms. Kelly has begun to re-emerge. After months of communicating primarily via Twitter, she appeared on Tucker Carlson’s prime-time show in October — to the chagrin of many of Mr. Carlson’s Fox News colleagues — and has posted two self-produced interviews to her Instagram account, including one with the House minority leader, Representative Kevin McCarthy.

Still, these appearances are a far cry from Ms. Kelly’s previous perch as a daily presence in American living rooms, first in prime-time on Fox News and then, less successfully, in the 9 a.m. hour of NBC’s “Today” show. On Fox News, she regularly drew 2 to 3 million viewers a night; her Instagram videos have received a fraction of that.

Ms. Kelly’s portrayal in “Bombshell” may return the anchor to public consciousness, and the depiction is, on balance, a positive one. Ms. Theron’s Kelly is a tack-sharp anchor who presses Donald J. Trump on his sexism during a major debate, puts up with verbal abuse from right-wing trolls (and newsroom colleagues), and ultimately comes forward about being harassed by Mr. Ailes, a testimonial that seals the once-invincible TV king’s fate.

But like the real-life Ms. Kelly, the movie version has already proven divisive.

In The New York Times, Manohla Dargis described the onscreen Ms. Kelly as “a warrior” who “could lead an army or maybe a rebellion, if she chose,” even as the character hesitates between principle and ambition. (The film also dings Ms. Kelly for lobbing softball questions at Mr. Trump in a 2016 prime-time interview.) But Ms. Dargis, as well as critics at BuzzFeed News and The Guardian, also faulted the filmmakers for downplaying Ms. Kelly’s role in Mr. Ailes’s success; after all, she was a willing star on his network for years.

Her rocky tenure at NBC — where she clashed with colleagues and drew low ratings — have dimmed the likelihood of a return to broadcast television. Instead, Ms. Kelly has discussed potential jobs in the digital news space, including conversations with podcast production companies, according to the people familiar with her thinking.

Ms. Kelly, the people said, believes she can find a niche as an equal-opportunity skeptic amid a divided news media. She has told friends that she did not feel comfortable at her previous employers. “I felt like the Rachel Maddow of Fox News and the Sean Hannity of NBC,” she has said.

Ms. Kelly is not currently restricted from working for another outlet, and she is still collecting the remainder of her roughly $30 million exit agreement with NBC, according to two people familiar with the terms of her deal. Other people who have spoken with her say they do not expect an imminent career announcement.

“She will be an asset to any television (or other) network who is seeking an exceptional journalist who has a gift of finding the right angle to a story or interview,” said Eric Bolling, a former Fox News personality who now hosts a national affairs show for Sinclair Broadcast Group.

Any attempt to revive her fortunes, however, will face resistance.

It was nearly three years ago that Ms. Kelly made her splashy, $69 million deal with NBC that gave her a Sunday night newsmagazine show as well as a daytime slot, making her one of the richest personalities in television news. The move went sideways in a hurry.

An early broadcast of “Sunday Night With Megyn Kelly” sparked criticism after she interviewed the Infowars leader Alex Jones, and the show failed to find an audience. The sunny environment of morning television proved an odd fit for Ms. Kelly’s prosecutorial persona; the anchor initially delivered poor ratings and caused a stir after she offended a guest, Jane Fonda, by asking about her plastic surgery; she later assailed Ms. Fonda on-air as “Hanoi Jane.”

Since “Megyn Kelly Today” was canceled in October 2018, viewership for the hour has gone up 9 percent, according to Nielsen, a noticeable uptick at a time when ratings across the board have gone down.

All the while, Ms. Kelly was attacked from the left for her comments over the years at Fox News, most prominently a segment where she insisted that Santa Claus was white. (The Santa uproar is mentioned several times in “Bombshell.”) Last fall, she stunned co-workers by musing on-air that it was once appropriate for white people to dress up in blackface for Halloween. Days later, her show was canceled.

Ms. Kelly believed that NBC executives used the blackface uproar as a pretext to fire her because they were uncomfortable with her reporting on the network’s own harassment scandal, involving the “Today” host Matt Lauer, who had been fired after allegations of sexual misconduct in November 2017. On Twitter, she continues to suggest a double standard: last week, she posted a video from an early 2000s episode of Comedy Central’s “The Man Show” in which Jimmy Kimmel, now the host of ABC’s late night program, wore blackface to portray the basketball player Karl Malone.

“America’s late night darling Jimmy Kimmel? Who every Hollywood star cozies up to?” Ms. Kelly tweeted. “The very same stars who then lecture the rest of us on woke culture? Whatever could he have done??”

Her attack on Mr. Kimmel is typical of the online persona Ms. Kelly has cultivated over the past year. In between updates on her family life in Manhattan and a newly adopted dog, Ms. Kelly has aimed spiky commentary at the mainstream media, including former NBC colleagues like Seth Meyers and the “Today” host Craig Melvin.

On Mr. Carlson’s show in October, Ms. Kelly faulted NBC for failing to commission an independent investigation of its newsroom culture. Her appearance was a hit: more than 4 million people tuned in, higher than Mr. Carlson’s average audience and making it the most-watched program in all of cable that night.

Her efforts since have not had the same reach. Ms. Kelly joined Instagram last month to promote an interview she secured with a young TV producer involved in a dust-up at ABC News over the network’s decision, several years ago, not to air an investigative report about Jeffrey Epstein. The interview has been viewed about 272,000 times on YouTube.

On Mr. Carlson’s show, Ms. Kelly said that she was relishing spending time with her young children. But her comments suggested that “Bombshell,” and Ms. Theron’s portrayal of her, may not be the final word.

“I’ll get back on that horse soon, because this has been fun,” Ms. Kelly told Mr. Carlson, smiling. “I’ll probably get back out there.”

Nicole Sperling contributed reporting from Los Angeles.

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Senator McConnell Must Recuse – The Senator Has Already Violated His Oath as a Juror

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FCC Approves Plan For 3-Digit Suicide Prevention Number Similar To 911

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-892267984_wide-9d6fa0959f2c0312e9525a389c4d55c3534e87a8-s1100-c15 FCC Approves Plan For 3-Digit Suicide Prevention Number Similar To 911

The Federal Communications Commission announced Thursday that it was putting forward a proposal to designate 988 as a “suicide prevention and mental health crisis hotline.” Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  FCC Approves Plan For 3-Digit Suicide Prevention Number Similar To 911

The Federal Communications Commission announced Thursday that it was putting forward a proposal to designate 988 as a “suicide prevention and mental health crisis hotline.”

Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

It’s a lesson you learn as early as grade school: If you find yourself injured, threatened or otherwise in harm’s way, just break out your phone and dial a simple, three-digit number: 911. After more than five decades, the 911 emergency call system has become so memorable and ubiquitously known, it even has its own network TV adaptation.

But what if the danger is rooted less in the physical, and more in one’s mental health?

On Thursday the Federal Communications Commission unanimously voted to proceed with a proposal to set up a new hotline similar to 911 — only, instead of dialing the police, the number would connect callers to experts in suicide prevention and mental health. The proposed number, 988, would link callers to an already existing network of crisis centers around the country set up by the Department of Health and Human Services.

That network, comprised of 163 such call centers around the country, is already accessible at 1-800-273-TALK or online right here. But the simplified alternative laid out Thursday would, in the words of an FCC report published in August, “make it easier for Americans in crisis to access potentially life-saving resources.”

“Overall, the record supports the use of a dedicated 3-digit dialing code as a way to increase the effectiveness of suicide prevention efforts, ease access to crisis services, and reduce the stigma surrounding suicide and mental health conditions,” the federal agency explained in the study, prepared in collaboration with HHS’ Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, or SAMHSA.

Congress requested the report as part of the National Suicide Hotline Improvement Act, passed and signed into law last year in a rare display of bipartisan agreement.

Thursday’s FCC vote does not mean you can dial 988 today and be connected with the suicide prevention hotline. The move simply represents a major step forward in the process, opening a period of public comment on the proposal before the commission reaches the stage of finalizing the rules.

The notice proposes an 18-month time frame for making the number a reality.

“Our hearts go out to those who are struggling,” FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said in a recorded statement released Thursday, “and we hope to move as quickly as we can in order to help them get the help they need and deserve.”

Pai pointed to some alarming statistics, noting that the U.S. recently has seen its highest rates of suicide since World War II. To wit:

  • “More than 47,000 Americans died by suicide and more than 1.4 million adults attempted suicide” in 2017, according to SAMHSA.
  • In a span of less than two decades, 1999 to 2017, the age-adjusted suicide rate rose about 33%, according to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention earlier this year.
  • At-risk populations such as veterans, LGBTQ youth and American Indians have been shown to be particularly vulnerable.
  • Suicide is the second leading cause of death among young people aged 10 to 24, who saw a stark 56% rise in suicide rates from 2007 to 2017.
  • Overall, suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S.

The FCC says that last year alone, counselors at the 163 crisis centers around the country answered more than 2.2 million calls and more than 100,000 online chats. SAMHSA says its research shows that “callers were significantly more likely to feel less depressed, less suicidal, less overwhelmed, and more hopeful” by the end of their calls with counselors.

Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., on Thursday applauded the commission’s vote as a “historic action” toward boosting access to these kinds of services.

He and a bipartisan group of his colleagues introduced a bill in the Senate in October that would pursue the same aim of setting up 988 as a suicide prevention hotline. The National Suicide Hotline Designation Act would also allow states to collect fees to support the plan’s implementation.

On Wednesday it received the approval of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, which sent it along to the wider chamber for further consideration.

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House poised for final impeachment vote

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6115610396001_6115620134001-vs House poised for final impeachment vote fox-news/columns/fox-news-halftime-report fox news fnc/politics fnc dc56e003-2f34-5bbd-a8f6-0d2ff4e0a857 Chris Stirewalt article

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On the roster: House poised for final impeachment vote – Warren, Buttigieg feud could help Biden in Iowa – Might Trump duck 2020 debates? – Labour isn’t working: Boris romps, Corbyn quits – A lesson for all

HOUSE POISED FOR FINAL IMPEACHMENT VOTE 
Fox News: “The House Judiciary Committee on Friday voted to adopt two articles of impeachment against President Trump – capping a contentious three-day session that Republicans panned as a ‘kangaroo court’ and teeing up a historic floor vote right before the holiday break. The committee adopted both articles, alleging abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, on a party-line vote of 23-17. A final roll call in the full House is expected next week, which could trigger a Senate trial in the new year just as presidential primaries are set to get underway. ‘Today is a solemn and sad day,’ Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., told reporters after the vote. ‘For the third time in a little over a century and a half, the House Judiciary Committee has voted articles of impeachment against the president…’ … After the vote, the White House released a scathing statement, dismissing the inquiry as a ‘charade.’ ‘This desperate charade of an impeachment inquiry in the House Judiciary Committee has reached its shameful end,’ White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham said.”

Who will be Pelosi’s prosecutors? – WaPo: “With Democrats confident of having a majority to impeach Trump next week, a new parlor game has broken almost into the open. It’s the next step in the process in which [Speaker NancyPelosi has unilateral power to appoint members to serve as impeachment managers in the Senate, presenting their case in what would be only the third impeachment trial of a president. Many Democrats would like the opportunity to fulfill such a rare, historic role, but they know Pelosi has declared this period ‘somber’ and ‘prayerful,’ cautioning that it would be a task undertaken with ‘humility.’ In other words, showboats need not apply to be an impeachment manager. If the speaker sees a Democrat openly campaigning for the appointment, trying to boost his or her profile, she will almost certainly knock that candidate off the list. And, for a leader who has commanded enormous clout within her caucus of late, Pelosi receives utter deference from people who might get the nod.”

Trump says impeachment is good for him politically – WaPo: “Trump told reporters that Democrats are ‘trivializing impeachment’ after the House Judiciary Committee voted along party lines Friday morning for two articles of impeachment against him. ‘It’s a very sad thing for our country, but it seems to be very good for me politically,’ Trump said as reporters looked on during an Oval Office visit by Paraguayan President Mario Abdo Benítez. ‘The people are absolutely disgusted. Nobody’s ever seen anything like this.’ … Asked if he would prefer a long or short trial in the Senate, Trump said, ‘I’ll do whatever I want. Look, there is — we did nothing wrong. So I’ll do long or short.’”

THE RULEBOOK: NOT ROCKET SCIENCE
“Experience has instructed us that no skill in the science of government has yet been able to discriminate and define, with sufficient certainty, its three great provinces the legislative, executive, and judiciary; or even the privileges and powers of the different legislative branches.” – James MadisonFederalist No. 37

TIME OUT: UGHHHHHHH
NatGeo: “Picture yourself at a crowded airport departure gate. Your flight is 20 minutes late, although the illuminated sign still says On Time. … We know an annoyance when we experience it. But from a scientific perspective, just what makes something annoying? Are some things universally annoying, while others are specific to an individual? And does research offer any advice for preventing life’s annoyances from making our heads explode? The answers to those questions are: We don’t know, we don’t know, and no. Annoyance may well be the most widely experienced and least studied of all human emotions. On what [does journalist Joe Palca] base that assertion? About a decade ago, fellow journalist Flora Lichtman and [Palca] made that claim in a book called Annoying: The Science of What Bugs Us—and in the intervening years, no one has challenged [them]. After [they] noted the lack of studies on this topic, did scholars step up to the plate? … Nothing.”

Flag on the play? – Email us at HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM with your tips, comments or questions.

SCOREBOARD
DEMOCRATIC 2020 POWER RANKING
Biden: 27.6 points (↑ 1.6 points from last wk.)
Warren: 18.4 points (↓ 1 point from last wk.)
Sanders: 18.2 points (↑ 1 point from last wk.)
Buttigieg: 8.6 points (↓ 1.6 points from last wk.)
[Averages include: Quinnipiac University, Monmouth University, CNN, NBC News/WSJ and ABC News/WaPo.]

TRUMP JOB PERFORMANCE 
Average approval: 43 percent
Average disapproval: 52.4 percent
Net Score: -9.4 percent
Change from one week ago: ↑ 0.4 points 
[Average includes: Monmouth University: 44% approve – 49% disapprove; Quinnipiac University: 41% approve – 55% disapprove; CNN: 43% approve – 53% disapprove; NPR/PBS/Marist: 44% approve – 51% disapprove; Gallup: 43% approve – 54% disapprove.]

WANT MORE HALFTIME REPORT? 
You can join Chris and Brianna every day on Fox Nation. Go behind-the-scenes of your favorite political note as they go through the must-read headlines of the day right from their office – with plenty of personality. Click here to sign up and watch!

WARREN, BUTTIGIEG FEUD COULD HELP BIDEN IN IOWA
Politico: “As Elizabeth Warren and Pete Buttigieg do battle ahead of the Iowa caucus, Joe Biden’s campaign is relishing the show. It’s a familiar scenario to longtime Iowa watchers: two leading rivals going at it, creating an opening for a come-from-behind win in Iowa by the establishment candidate. In 2004, the last time Democrats sought to unseat a Republican incumbent, a nasty feud between Howard Dean and Dick Gephardt allowed John Kerry to surge to a surprise win in the state. Now, Joe Biden hopes to repeat the feat, having just won the endorsement of his former Senate colleague, who joined him on the trail in Iowa last week. … So far, Warren and Buttigieg have been tamer in their attacks than Gephardt and Dean were in 2004, when they blasted each other repeatedly by name and in TV ads, Elmendorf said. The post-Christmas ad blitz expected from the Warren and Buttigieg campaigns will show whether that holds.”

Bloomy building out staff quickly – Politico: “Mike Bloomberg is making up for lost time — just two weeks after his late entry into the Democratic presidential primary, the former New York City mayor has hired more than 300 people so far to work on his campaign. The self-funded multi-billionaire recently tapped nearly 100 staffers to fan out across 15 states as he pursues his unorthodox strategy of skipping the four early voting states and zeroing in on Super Tuesday on March 3. His headquarters on Manhattan’s tony Upper East Side employs more than 200 people, including familiar faces from his days in City Hall. Former deputy mayors Kevin Sheekey and Patti Harris are his campaign manager and chair, respectively. … Team Bloomberg is also picking off the carcasses of fallen Democratic candidates as he bulks up his team.”

Castro, Delaney don’t file for Virginia’s Democratic primary – Richmond Times-Dispatch: “All but two candidates in the crowded Democratic field for president filed petition signatures and other paperwork in an effort to appear on Virginia’s primary ballot on March 3. Julian Castro, the former mayor of San Antonio and Obama administration housing secretary, and former U.S. Rep. John Delaney of Maryland did not file by the deadline of 5 p.m. Thursday. Candidates are required to submit at least 5,000 signatures from eligible voters, including 200 or more from each of Virginia’s 11 congressional districts.”

Close race in Wisconsin – Marquette University: “Among those who say they will vote in the Democratic presidential primary in April, Joe Biden receives the most support. Biden is the first choice of 23 percent, followed by Bernie Sanders at 19 percent, Elizabeth Warren at 16 percent and Pete Buttigieg at 15 percent. Cory Booker is the first choice of 4 percent. Recently announced candidate Michael Bloomberg has the support of 3 percent, as does Andrew Yang and Amy Klobuchar. … Two-thirds of Democratic primary voters, 65 percent, say they might change their minds about their primary choice, while 34 percent say their mind is made up.”

MIGHT TRUMP DUCK 2020 DEBATES?
NYT: “President Trump is discussing with his advisers the possibility of sitting out the general election debates in 2020 because of his misgivings about the commission that oversees them, according to two people familiar with the discussions. Mr. Trump has told advisers that he does not trust the Commission on Presidential Debates, the nonprofit entity that sponsors the debates, the two people said. Less of a concern for Mr. Trump than who will emerge as the Democratic nominee is which media personality will be chosen as the debate moderator, according to people in contact with him. At a state-of-the-race campaign briefing in Arlington, Va., the president’s advisers declined to comment on what their plan was for the debates. One senior adviser to the president seemed to wince at the question, and said it was not something advisers were prepared to discuss until next year.”

Former GOP speakers team up for statehouse fight – WSJ: “Former House speakers Paul RyanJohn Boehner and Newt Gingrich plan a fundraising campaign to defend Republican-controlled legislatures in Texas, Pennsylvania and a handful of other states from an onslaught of Democratic money and attention. Control over the congressional redistricting process is at stake in 2020: The Republican State Leadership Committee cites estimates that as few as 42 state legislative races could determine as much as a 136-seat swing in the House over the next decade, based on how those legislatures draw new maps.”

Twitter to restore election labels for candidates – AP: “Twitter is bringing back special labels to help users identify accounts and tweets from U.S. political candidates. The company, which first used such labels for the midterm elections last year, said it is trying to provide users with original sources of information and prevent spoofed and fake accounts from fooling voters. Many political candidates already have blue check marks to indicate that Twitter has confirmed that they are who they say they are. The election labels go further and provide details such as what office a person is running for and where. They will also carry a small ballot box icon. The labels will appear on candidates’ accounts and tweets, even if they are retweeted by someone else. Twitter hopes its efforts will help people know when candidates are behind the words attributed to them.”

LABOUR ISN’T WORKING: BORIS ROMPS, CORBYN QUITS
Fox News: “U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson vowed on Friday morning to ‘get Brexit done’ by Jan. 31, 2020 with ‘no ifs, no buts, no maybes,’ following his Conservative Party’s landslide victory in the country’s general election. A sudden burst in London-listed companies brought European markets to record peaks early Friday, Reuters reported, as investors celebrated the probable end of more than three-and-a-half years of political turmoil in Britain once the United Kingdom settles on a deal to leave the European Union. ‘This election means that getting Brexit done is now the irrefutable, irresistible unarguable decision of the British people.’ … Johnson also promised that his Conservative Party’s top priority is to massively increase investments in the National Health Service and ‘make this country the cleanest, greenest on Earth with our far-reaching environmental program.’ … The prime minister is scheduled to meet with Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace, where she will formally ask him to form a new government in her name.”

PLAY-BY-PLAY
Pergram: Congress rings in holidays with one of its most stressful Decembers ever – Fox News

Report: U.S. and China reach phase one trade deal – Fox Business

Congress reaches deal for $1.3 trillion in spending, likely averting shutdown threat – WaPo

Senate Confirms Stephen Hahn as new F.D.A. boss – NYT

Lawyer John Sullivan confirmed as next U.S. ambassador to Russia – Reuters

AUDIBLE: ADCOCK, INDEED
“A chicken can kill a chicken and eat a chicken. They’re starting to henpeck each other. We’re eating our own.” – Chris Adcock, chairwoman of the Page County Democratic Party in Iowa, discussing the Democratic presidential candidates with the WaPo.

ANY GIVEN SUNDAY
This weekend Mr. Sunday will sit down with former FBI Director James Comey, White House Special Adviser Pam Bondi and Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif. Plus, be sure to tune in as Chris shares the latest Fox News national polls on impeachment and the 2020 election. Watch “Fox News Sunday with Chris Wallace.” Check local listings for broadcast times in your area.

#mediabuzz – Host Howard Kurtz has the latest take on the week’s media coverage. Watch #mediabuzz Sundays at 11 a.m. ET. 

FROM THE BLEACHERS
“I happen to live in an early primary state, and of course we have been inundated with Tom 2020 and Mike 2020 commercials ad nauseam, the hilarity of these two in rolled up sleeves and dungarees pretending to be just like the common working man, nearly leaves me in convulsions. If you can reach them by wire or wireless, please ask them to stop. Not wishing my remaining days away the February primary simply can’t get here soon enough!” – James W. Herzog, Spartanburg, S.C.

[Ed. note: You had me at “dungarees” Mr. Herzog. Would that I could spare you. But at least the weather is good in Spartanburg this time of year!]

“I’m a lifelong conservative and know when someone has a bias. I’ve watched you on Fox and have read your articles on Fox News Halftime Report. I know I’m biased and watch Fox News because I like the thinking of the Fox News pundits but if I want your subliminal anti Conservative messages I’ll watch the mainstream media. I must be a glutton for punishment reading your daily article. I’m sorry but you are biased against Mr. Trump.” – Dick Alexander, Pickerington, Ohio

[Ed. note: Oh now, Mr. Alexander! Subliminal anti-conservative messages! It can’t be all that bad. Maybe you like the jokes or reader letters. Or maybe you agree with me on the best kind of hot dogs. Whatever it is, I’m glad you’re here and I do truly hope we’re helping you see the world of politics and government in a broader, more interesting way. And for the record, I don’t stand with any politician or party and I most assuredly don’t care how you vote.]

“This is a bit off topic (politics yesterday, today and forever), but probably has a more profound impact on one of the institutions that unite us, namely baseball. The word is out that the powers that be wish to eliminate 42 minor league teams, where players develop the skills needed to compete in the majors, as an economy measure. Bernie Sanders, among others, is talking about a review of baseball’s antitrust exemption if they follow through with the idea. Perhaps you could give us the history of what that exemption covers, why baseball has it, and a discussion of the issues involved.” – Bruce Moyer, Southgate, Mich.

[Ed. note: When it comes to Major League Baseball, I am positively antediluvian in my attitudes. For example, the American League’s 1973 decision to excuse pitchers from having to bat and allowing teams to plump their run counts with the services of semi-mobile sluggers laboring under the absurdly legalistic name “designated hitter” remains one of the greatest indignities inflicted on the American pastime. But when it comes to the minors, I take a more capacious view. The plan, as I understand it, is for M.L.B. to spin off those 42 teams from the lower-level minors but maintain its relationship with the remaining 118 teams. I’m sure that’s a bitter pill for fans of junior circuit teams like the single-A West Virginia Power. Nobody likes to lose status. I do wonder, though, if anyone has ever attended a Power game because of the team’s affiliation with the Seattle Mariners. Folks love minor leaguers games for the cheap entertainment, hot dogs, cold brews and laid-back atmosphere. The quality of the baseball or the connection to the pros at those games already so far removed from “the show” seems almost immaterial. But that’s not your question. Major League Baseball’s anti-trust exemption is one of the great inside jokes of all time. Since 1922, U.S. courts have held that baseball is not subject to federal rules against monopolies because – get this – baseball is not “a subject of commerce.” Oliver Wendell Holmes, the progressive darling who wrote the opinion, was big on courts bowing to popular sentiment. And in 1922, baseball was without question America’s game. The NFL was just in its third season and football was mostly still something for college boys. American sports were dominated by baseball and boxing. Babe Ruth and Jack Dempsey were kings among men. And baseball needed the exemption to continue its efforts to modernize. The game was rebounding from the 1919 Black Sox scandal and looking to impose new controls. In no other business could you have the kinds of collusion required of the competitors in baseball. The owners of today’s 30 M.L.B. teams are proprietors of individual businesses, but they get together to fix prices, rig rules, share revenues, etc. If the owners of America’s petroleum companies did the same thing, Justice Department lawyers would be rappelling through Exxon’s windows. As the decades rolled by, justices continued to work around Holmes’ lulu — at one point telling Congress in a decision that if baseball was abusing its exempt status, it should pass a law, not them. It has passed exactly one in 98 years, and it only codified the league policy on free agency. Sanders no doubt would like to save his hometown Vermont Lake Monsters’ affiliation with the Oakland A’s, but I tend to doubt that this will be the moment that the federal government tries to ruin baseball. The owners do a good enough job of that on their own!]

Share your color commentary: Email us at HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM and please make sure to include your name and hometown.

A LESSON FOR ALL
Fox News: “She went from ‘sandwich artist’ to con artist. Police in New Mexico arrested a Subway restaurant employee in Las Cruces after she staged a robbery in her own shop, allegedly because ‘she wanted to teach one of the employees a lesson.’ Lorena Ariana Marin, the Subway employee, and her alleged accomplice, Angelo Rey Espinosa, orchestrated the fake robbery on Monday, bursting into the store with masks over their faces. Marin, 22, then hopped over the counter and began ‘verbally and physically’ threatening the two on-duty employees while Espinosa, 19, stood by. … Marin and Espinoza soon herded the two employees toward the back of the store, at which point one of the employees ‘bolted’ out of the eatery and made it to her car. … Police caught up with Marin and Espinoza ‘within minutes’ of the crime after a citizen reported seeing a suspicious vehicle parked nearby.”

AND NOW, A WORD FROM CHARLES…
“I suspect history will similarly see [George W.] Bush as the man who, by trial and error but also with prescience and principle, established the structures that will take us through another long twilight struggle, and enable us to prevail.” – Charles Krauthammer (1950-2018) writing in the National Review on April 26, 2013.

Chris Stirewalt is the politics editor for Fox News. Brianna McClelland contributed to this report. Want FOX News Halftime Report in your inbox every day? Sign up here.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6115610396001_6115620134001-vs House poised for final impeachment vote fox-news/columns/fox-news-halftime-report fox news fnc/politics fnc dc56e003-2f34-5bbd-a8f6-0d2ff4e0a857 Chris Stirewalt article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6115610396001_6115620134001-vs House poised for final impeachment vote fox-news/columns/fox-news-halftime-report fox news fnc/politics fnc dc56e003-2f34-5bbd-a8f6-0d2ff4e0a857 Chris Stirewalt article

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Trump slams Pelosi, says Dems using impeachment for ‘political gain’ after Judiciary vote

Westlake Legal Group Donald-Trump-12-12 Trump slams Pelosi, says Dems using impeachment for ‘political gain’ after Judiciary vote Marisa Schultz fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 2d2d1f74-e1b7-556b-8d05-586659eacbba

President Trump called Speaker Nancy Pelosi a “liar” and accused Democrats of trivializing an impeachment process that should only be used “in an emergency,” in his first comments after House Democrats advanced articles of impeachment against him.

“It’s a scam. It’s something that shouldn’t be allowed,” Trump said in the Oval Office Friday. “And it’s a very bad thing for our country and you’re trivializing impeachment. And I tell you what, someday there will be a Democrat president, and there will be a Republican House.”

“And I suspect they’re going to remember it,” he said. “Because [that’s what happens] when you use impeachment for absolutely nothing other than to try and get political gain.”

JUDICIARY COMMITTEE APPROVES ARTICLES OF IMPEACHMENT AGAINST TRUMP, AS GOP SLAMS ‘KANGAROO COURT’

Trump insisted he did nothing wrong and blamed the impeachment “hoax” on Democrats looking for any reason to try to oust him from office.

He pointed to Pelosi’s recent interview at Politico’s Women Rule Summit, where she pushed back on criticism that the impeachment process was moving too quickly.

“It’s been going on for 22 months. Two and a half years, actually,” Pelosi said.

Republicans have pounced on those comments as evidence Pelosi and House leadership have been plotting impeachment since Trump was elected and were just waiting for another controversy to pounce.

“It showed she’s a liar,” Trump said of the comments, saying Pelosi got “duped.”

“It’s a very sad thing for our country but it seems to be very good for me politically … The polls have gone through the roof for Trump.”

He continued: “The impeachment is a hoax. It’s a sham. It started a long time ago — probably before I came down the escalator with the future first lady.”

UNDER-SIEGE DEMS IN TRUMP DISTRICTS KEEP IMPEACHMENT DECISION CLOSE TO THE VEST

Trump’s comments come shortly after the House Judiciary Committee approved two articles of impeachment against him for abuse of power and obstructing Congress in a party-line vote. The full House will vote as early as Wednesday on whether to impeach the president.

Democrats allege that Trump violated his oath of office by pressuring the president of Ukraine to interfere in the 2020 election when he requested investigations into his political rival Joe Biden and son, Hunter. Trump asked Ukraine’s Volodymyr Zelensky for the investigations in a phone call on July 25 – as the White House put a hold on nearly $400 million in aid.

Trump insists the call was “perfect” and House Republicans have slammed Democrats for trying to overturn the results of the 2016 election for conduct that doesn’t warrant impeachment.

The House Rules Committee will meet on Tuesday to set up the terms of the impeachment floor debate likely for the following day. Pelosi needs 216 votes — assuming all members are present and voting — to impeach Trump. That would set up a trial in the Senate, where Trump is expected to be acquitted.

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Long before the Ukraine controversy came to light, Pelosi said she wasn’t in favor of impeaching Trump because it would be too rancorous for the country.

“Impeachment is so divisive to the country that unless there’s something so compelling and overwhelming and bipartisan, I don’t think we should go down that path, because it divides the country,” Pelosi told The Washington Post Magazine in March. “And he’s just not worth it.”

But those remarks were in reference to allegations Trump colluded with Russia in the 2016 presidential race. Pelosi got on board with impeachment on the narrower issue of Ukraine.

Trump made his impeachment remarks during an Oval Office meeting with Paraguay President Mario Abdo Benítez, just as he was finishing up a trade deal with China.

“It’s been a wild week,” Trump said.

Westlake Legal Group Donald-Trump-12-12 Trump slams Pelosi, says Dems using impeachment for ‘political gain’ after Judiciary vote Marisa Schultz fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 2d2d1f74-e1b7-556b-8d05-586659eacbba   Westlake Legal Group Donald-Trump-12-12 Trump slams Pelosi, says Dems using impeachment for ‘political gain’ after Judiciary vote Marisa Schultz fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 2d2d1f74-e1b7-556b-8d05-586659eacbba

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Video shows Maryland kidnapping suspect crashing into bowling alley

Westlake Legal Group Kidnapping- Video shows Maryland kidnapping suspect crashing into bowling alley Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maryland fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 6edb9176-23b0-5441-a8e0-bb7aa465884b

Maryland deputies were searching for a kidnapping suspect caught on surveillance video crashing into a bowling alley in a stolen vehicle.

The suspect kidnapped a woman on Wednesday night, after she surprised him as he was burglarizing her home in Waldorf, the Charles County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release.

He ordered her into her car and then drove her around to various ATM machines, where he forced her to withdraw money.

NORTH CAROLINA WOMAN USED KIDNAPPING STORY TO STEAL TRUCK, POLICE SAY AFTER 26-MILE PURSUIT

He then left her on the side of the road in another town and fled, the news release said.

“Shortly after, the suspect backed the victim’s car into the front doors of the Waldorf AMF bowling alley on Acton Lane,” the deputies said. “He got out of the car, walked toward the ATM inside the business but left after realizing the ATM was not operable. He left in the victim’s car and has not been located.”

Cops found the woman after responding to a report of a woman walking in the roadway at 3:37 a.m. Thursday, according to the news release.

They were also looking for her black Toyota Camry with Maryland plates.

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A reward of $1,000 is being offered for information leading to an arrest, the news release said.

Westlake Legal Group Kidnapping- Video shows Maryland kidnapping suspect crashing into bowling alley Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maryland fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 6edb9176-23b0-5441-a8e0-bb7aa465884b   Westlake Legal Group Kidnapping- Video shows Maryland kidnapping suspect crashing into bowling alley Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maryland fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 6edb9176-23b0-5441-a8e0-bb7aa465884b

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FCC Approves Plan For 3-Digit Suicide Prevention Number Like 911

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-892267984_wide-92ed356c597aa7f3e416cf4682d3a751231fb659-s1100-c15 FCC Approves Plan For 3-Digit Suicide Prevention Number Like 911

The Federal Communications Commission’s hearing room in Washington, D.C., seen in late 2017. The commission announced Thursday that it was putting forward a proposal to designate 988 as a “suicide prevention and mental health crisis hotline.” Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  FCC Approves Plan For 3-Digit Suicide Prevention Number Like 911

The Federal Communications Commission’s hearing room in Washington, D.C., seen in late 2017. The commission announced Thursday that it was putting forward a proposal to designate 988 as a “suicide prevention and mental health crisis hotline.”

Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

It’s a lesson you learn as early as grade school: If you find yourself injured, threatened or otherwise in harm’s way, just break out your phone and dial one simple, three-digit number: 911. After more than five decades, the 911 emergency call system has become so memorable and ubiquitously known, it even has its own network TV adaptation.

But what if the danger is rooted less in the physical, and more in one’s mental health?

On Thursday the Federal Communications Commission unanimously voted to proceed with a proposal to set up a new hotline similar to 911 — only, instead of dialing the police, the number would connect callers to suicide prevention and mental health experts. The proposed number, 988, would link callers to an already-existing network of crisis centers across the country set up by the Department of Health and Human Services.

That network, composed of 163 such call centers across the country, is already accessible at 1-800-273-TALK or online right here. But the simplified alternative laid out Thursday would, in the words of an FCC report published in August, “make it easier for Americans in crisis to access potentially life-saving resources.”

“Overall, the record supports the use of a dedicated 3-digit dialing code as a way to increase the effectiveness of suicide prevention efforts, ease access to crisis services, and reduce the stigma surrounding suicide and mental health conditions,” the federal agency explained in the study, prepared in collaboration with HHS’ Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, or SAMHSA.

Congress requested the report as part of the National Suicide Hotline Improvement Act, passed and signed into law last year in a rare display of bipartisan agreement.

Now, Thursday’s FCC vote does not mean you can dial 988 today and be connected with the suicide prevention hotline. The move simply represents a major step forward in the process, opening a period of public comment on the proposal before the commission reaches the stage of finalizing the rules.

The notice proposes an 18-month timeframe for making the number a reality.

“Our hearts go out to those who are struggling,” FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said in a recorded statement released Thursday, “and we hope to move as quickly as we can in order to help them get the help they need and deserve.”

Pai pointed to some alarming statistics, noting that the U.S. recently has seen its highest rates of suicide since World War II. To wit:

  • “More than 47,000 Americans died by suicide and more than 1.4 million adults attempted suicide” in 2017 alone, according to SAMHSA.
  • In a span of less than two decades, 1999 to 2017, the age-adjusted suicide rate rose about 33%, according to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention earlier this year.
  • At-risk populations such as veterans, LGBTQ youth and American Indians have been shown to be particularly vulnerable.
  • Suicide is the second leading cause of death among young people age 10 to 24, who saw a stark 56% rise in suicide rates from 2007 to 2017.
  • Overall, suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S.

The FCC says that last year alone, counselors at the 163 crisis centers around the country answered more than 2.2 million calls and more than 100,000 online chats. SAMHSA says its research shows that “callers were significantly more likely to feel less depressed, less suicidal, less overwhelmed, and more hopeful” by the end of their calls with counselors.

Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., on Thursday applauded the commission’s vote as a “historic action” toward boosting access to these kinds of services.

He and a bipartisan group of his colleagues introduced a bill in the Senate in October that would pursue the same aim of setting up 988 as a suicide prevention hotline. The National Suicide Hotline Designation Act would also allow states to collect fees to support the plan’s implementation.

On Wednesday it received the approval of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, which sent it along to the wider chamber for further consideration.

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Meghan McCain on Boris Johnson’s win: Brexit was a ‘tea leaf’ to read before Trump beat Clinton

Westlake Legal Group boris-johnson-meghan-mccain-AP-ABC Meghan McCain on Boris Johnson's win: Brexit was a 'tea leaf' to read before Trump beat Clinton Sam Dorman fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/europe/brexit fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/meghan-mccain fox-news/entertainment/the-view fox news fnc/media fnc article 33a29c2c-5c3c-5948-af85-4e5aec188ade

“The View” co-host Meghan McCain suggested that Thursday’s outcome in the United Kingdom could serve as an indicator of how President Trump will perform in the 2020 presidential election.

“I actually thought that Brexit was a warning shot and a tea leaf that you could read leading up to President Trump,” she said on Friday’s show.

She added that Labour Party candidate Jeremy Corbyn’s defeat showed that Brits completely rejected his brand of socialism.

“And now you see a complete and total rejection of — there’s no politician in this country you can compare to Corbyn but he is like Bernie Sanders on acid plus anti-Semitism included in it — and the British public completely and utterly rejected it,” she added.

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UK ELECTION: JOHNSON’S CONSERVATIVES PICK UP MASSIVE MAJORITY, WREAK HAVOC IN LABOUR HEARTLANDS

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party was swept back into government after an historic election night that saw opposition Labour Party strongholds across the country swing dramatically to the Tories. This makes Britain’s departure from the European Union a near-certainty, and brings back a promise of a new trade deal from President Trump.

As the results came in, Johnson declared that his party had been given “a powerful new mandate.” In the morning, he promised to secure Brexit and the rest of his agenda — from the health service to the economy to immigration.

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Co-host Sunny Hostin suggested that Johnson was like Trump in that they both embraced some form of “white nationalism.”

“Donald Trump really is talking about America first. He’s much more of a white nationalist, in my opinion. He’s — everything is about being at home. That’s really what I think Boris Johnson is about also. Brexit is about … everything is about England,” she said.

Fox News’ Adam Shaw contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group boris-johnson-meghan-mccain-AP-ABC Meghan McCain on Boris Johnson's win: Brexit was a 'tea leaf' to read before Trump beat Clinton Sam Dorman fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/europe/brexit fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/meghan-mccain fox-news/entertainment/the-view fox news fnc/media fnc article 33a29c2c-5c3c-5948-af85-4e5aec188ade   Westlake Legal Group boris-johnson-meghan-mccain-AP-ABC Meghan McCain on Boris Johnson's win: Brexit was a 'tea leaf' to read before Trump beat Clinton Sam Dorman fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/europe/brexit fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/meghan-mccain fox-news/entertainment/the-view fox news fnc/media fnc article 33a29c2c-5c3c-5948-af85-4e5aec188ade

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Democratic Front-Runners May Skip Presidential Debate Over Labor Dispute

Westlake Legal Group 5df3d57e250000ec0098e158 Democratic Front-Runners May Skip Presidential Debate Over Labor Dispute

A labor dispute is threatening to disrupt next week’s presidential debate at Loyola Marymount University in California.

Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) have said they will not attend if it is not resolved in time. 

LMU has a contract with Sodexho for its food service operations. Unite Here Local 11 represents 150 cooks, dishwashers, cashiers and servers employed by Sodexo who prepare and serve meals for students and university employees.

Susan Minato, co-president of Unite Here Local 11, said the union has been in negotiations with the company over a contract for the past month ― but it all broke down on Friday. 

“Honestly, the proposals are relatively modest ― living wage, improvements on health care,” she said. “So we did not anticipate that there would be majority difficulty over it. But we were wrong. They abruptly canceled negotiations. I believe they were for today. And so that put us in the position of really declaring that this is a true fight now.”

Neither Sodexho nor LMU responded to a request for comment. 

The union will be picketing the debate next Thursday until the dispute is resolved. Minato said the goal is a settlement; the union does not want to see the debate canceled. 

“We would hope that the candidates would honor that picket line,” she said. 

Warren and Sanders tweeted Friday that they would stand with the union and respect the picket line, as did businessman Andrew Yang

The Democratic National Committee moved the December debate to LMU because there was also a union dispute at the original venue, the University of California, Los Angeles.

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

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Joy Behar acknowledges Hunter Biden benefited from ‘nepotism’: ‘Call it what it is’

Westlake Legal Group Hunter-Biden-Joy-Behar-Getty-ABC Joy Behar acknowledges Hunter Biden benefited from 'nepotism': 'Call it what it is' Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/joy-behar fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/entertainment/the-view fox news fnc/media fnc article 005b175c-284c-5ae9-95c4-c5aef03b1096

“The View” co-host Joy Behar criticized Republican attacks on Hunter Biden but acknowledged on Friday that the former vice president’s son benefited from nepotism.

“The Burisma thing is nepotism,” Behar said, referring to the Ukrainian firm where the younger Biden worked. “And let’s just call it what it is. It’s just nepotism.”

The co-hosts were discussing how, during an impeachment hearing, Republicans focused on Hunter Biden and Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., even referenced his drug use. According to co-host Meghan McCain, that was inappropriate, but it was fair game to talk about his Burisma connections.

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Behar added, however, that President Trump’s White House was also guilty of nepotism.

“It’s all over the White House,” she said.

TENSIONS FLARE AS GOP REP. GAETZ BRINGS HUNTER BIDEN’S DRUG PAST INTO IMPEACHMENT DEBATE

Co-host Sunny Hostin added: “The one thing that no one’s talking about is the fact that Ivanka Trump — after taking a role in the White House — got all of these Chinese patents for things that she had been begging to get before she got into the White House.”

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Behar also argued that former Vice President Joe Biden should start playing the “aggrieved father card.”

“I think he needs to go out there and really shame them … he has lost two children — Joe Biden has. He has one son left and these shameless people are attacking his son, the one boy that he loves still, that he has to go home to at night,” she said.

Westlake Legal Group Hunter-Biden-Joy-Behar-Getty-ABC Joy Behar acknowledges Hunter Biden benefited from 'nepotism': 'Call it what it is' Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/joy-behar fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/entertainment/the-view fox news fnc/media fnc article 005b175c-284c-5ae9-95c4-c5aef03b1096   Westlake Legal Group Hunter-Biden-Joy-Behar-Getty-ABC Joy Behar acknowledges Hunter Biden benefited from 'nepotism': 'Call it what it is' Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/joy-behar fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/entertainment/the-view fox news fnc/media fnc article 005b175c-284c-5ae9-95c4-c5aef03b1096

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