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Westlake Legal Group > News Releases (Page 30)

Lights Slowly Come Back On in Manhattan After Major Power Failure

Westlake Legal Group 13power-hp-swap5-facebookJumbo-v2 Lights Slowly Come Back On in Manhattan After Major Power Failure Upper West Side (Manhattan, NY) Transit Systems Power Failures and Blackouts Consolidated Edison Inc

A power failure plunged a stretch of the West Side of Manhattan into darkness on Saturday night, trapping thousands of people in subways and elevators for a time, leaving drivers to fend for themselves at intersections with no traffic signals and eerily dimming the lights of a swath of Times Square.

Stores emptied out, and Broadway shows did not go on: Most theaters canceled their performances. In restaurants and bars, people drank by the light of their smartphones.

Con Edison said that the power failed at 6:47 p.m. and that 73,000 customers were in the dark for at least two hours, mainly on the West Side. The Fire Department said the failures stretched from 72nd Street to the West 40s, and from Fifth Avenue to the Hudson River.

Shortly after 10:30 p.m., Con Edison announced that six power networks had been knocked out, but that five had been restored.

One network between 32nd and 42nd Streets still remained out, the utility said, adding that it hoped power would be returned there relatively quickly.

Mayor Bill de Blasio, asked whether anything nefarious happened, said Con Edison believed that the blackout was caused by a mechanical issue. Mr. de Blasio was speaking from Iowa, where he was campaigning for president.

John McAvoy, Con Edison’s president, said at a news conference that the failures apparently stemmed from a problem at a substation, later identified as being on West 49th Street.

Mr. McAvoy said that the utility was investigating the cause, but that it did not appear to have originated from “excessive load,” often prompted by heavy use of air conditioning in the summer.

[Almost every Broadway show was canceled, but some casts serenaded patrons on the sidewalk.]

The blackout happened on the same date that a massive power failure in 1977 plunged the city into darkness. (Now as then, Times Square — usually blindingly bright with crowds strolling to theaters — was dark, and traffic signals were out.)

For several hours on Saturday night, the police asked drivers to avoid the area between West 42nd and 74th Streets, between Fifth and 12th Avenues.

At intersections, police officers and civilians worked together to direct traffic while fire trucks and ambulances screamed down side streets. Two young women posed for a selfie in the middle of 46th Street before an officer rushed over and chastised them, saying, “Ladies, this is not the time.”

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which runs the subways, said that “our entire system is affected” and that there was only limited service on the Nos. 1, 2 and 3 lines on the West Side; the Nos. 4, 5 and 6 lines on the East Side; and the No. 7 line between Manhattan and Queens.

Source: Con Edison

By The New York Times

The Fire Department said it had sent firefighters to a transformer blaze on West End Avenue in the West 60s, where Con Edison also has a facility. It did not say whether that fire was related to the power failure.

There was also “smoke in multiple buildings” on the West Side, the Fire Department said, and it was answering “numerous” reports of people stuck in elevators.

With signals not working, a group of men in shorts and T-shirts were directing traffic at the intersection of 10th Avenue and 47th Street. With no police officers in sight, one called out: “If you’re going to walk, walk now, people!”

Another yelled as pedestrians began to cross hesitantly: “Health and safety! Health and safety!”

Ellie Shanahan, 23, was on the A train between West 50th and 59th Streets when the train stopped unexpectedly. She waited with the other passengers for nearly 20 minutes before an M.T.A. worker announced that there was a power outage and that there would be no train service between West 59th and 163rd Streets.

Ms. Shanahan was on her way to visit her parents in Washington Heights. After evacuating the subway station, she said, she noticed police officers trying to monitor the frantic crowd at 50th Street.

She immediately got on a Citi Bike and rode it north to 125th Street.

“What was craziest to me was there was no traffic lights,” Ms. Shanahan said. “I was in shock, but people still seemed to know what to do. Everyone was being polite even though there were no lights to tell us when to go.”

As she biked north on Broadway, Ms. Shanahan noticed restaurants emptying out and long bus lines. She saw people evacuating a pitch-black movie theater on West 66th Street.

Most Broadway shows — including “Moulin Rouge,” “Hadestown,” “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” and “Aladdin” — canceled their performances.

On the sidewalks outside the theaters, the casts staged impromptu outdoor shows. Performers from “Waitress” and “Come From Away” sang versions of songs from their shows, and actors from “Hadestown” improvised a blackout-themed song of one of its songs.

Carnegie Hall announced it was canceling all performances Saturday night. At Lincoln Center, a performance from the Mark Morris Dance Group was canceled, but outside, the Midsummer Night Swing band kept going.

At the Jennifer Lopez birthday-themed extravaganza at Madison Square Garden, the outage occurred during the fourth song. The lights had been shining and the bass thumping and the opening notes of “Dinero,” Ms. Lopez’s hit Latin pop song, had sounded. A crew of dancers was onstage.

Suddenly, the lights went dark, and the speakers fell silent. The only sound was a live drum set, still playing as dancers continued their routine.

It became quickly apparent that this was not part of the act when Ms. Lopez appeared onstage to no fanfare. She made her way to a platform that extended to the middle of the floor. She appeared to be speaking, gesturing for fans to stay put. But with her microphone out, her message could not be heard.

After a while, a backup generator kicked in, and the lights came up.

Minutes later, a high-pitched siren wailed, and the audience was told to leave.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

WWE superstar Jeff Hardy arrested in South Carolina, charged with public intoxication

Wrestling superstar Jeff Hardy, half of the WWE’s “The Hardy Boyz” tag team, was arrested by Myrtle Beach, S.C., police on Saturday and charged with public intoxication, according to a report.

Myrtle Beach Online reported that police were called to the Ocean Enclave by Hilton Grand Vacations hotel for a report of an intoxicated man at approximately 11:15 a.m.

SOUTH CAROLINA DEPUTY SAVES CHOKING 12-DAY-OLD INFANT AFTER STOPPING SPEEDING VEHICLE

Hardy, 41, was arrested without incident and booked into the Myrtle Beach jail. If convicted of public intoxication, Hardy could face up to 30 days in jail and a $500 fine.

He was arrested in 2018 for a DUI charge and recently suffered a knee injury, according to a video posted in April on WWE.com.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Hardy was featured on the show Smackdown and is also a wrestler for IMPACT! where he goes by the name Brother Nero.

Click for more from the Myrtle Beach Sun News.

Westlake Legal Group Jeffrey-Hardy-mugshot WWE superstar Jeff Hardy arrested in South Carolina, charged with public intoxication Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/south-carolina fox-news/organization/wwe fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 33d55c1a-06f4-5c08-a902-949f47d1e2c4   Westlake Legal Group Jeffrey-Hardy-mugshot WWE superstar Jeff Hardy arrested in South Carolina, charged with public intoxication Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/south-carolina fox-news/organization/wwe fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 33d55c1a-06f4-5c08-a902-949f47d1e2c4

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘Devastated and heartbroken’: NYC power outage cancels Broadway shows, Jennifer Lopez concert

Westlake Legal Group Broadway1280 'Devastated and heartbroken': NYC power outage cancels Broadway shows, Jennifer Lopez concert Vandana Rambaran fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/person/jennifer-lopez fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/genres/pop fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 8b43b63e-4c46-5ec4-b27d-b8ca63c4289b

Broadway shows and a sold-out Jennifer Lopez concert at Madison Square Garden came to a halt Saturday night as a massive power outage left more than 61,000 Manhattan customers in the dark.

Between Midtown and the Upper West Side — including much of New York City’s bustling theatre district — dozens of shows and plays were forced to cancel and evacuate their buildings.

MANHATTAN TRANSFORMER FIRE KNOCKS OUT POWER TO THOUSANDS IN MIDTOWN, UPPER WEST SIDE

Fox News correspondent Bryan Llenas, who was celebrating his birthday by attending Lopez’s concert at Madison Square Garden, said “we were about three songs in, the party was just getting started and at about 9:25 the floodlights essentially came on, the power went out, and an announcement went out over the intercom, the speaker, saying that this was the building engineer and that as a precaution we need everybody to evacuate the building.”

The power outage caused the so-called “World’s Most Famous Arena” to be evacuated, with the estimated 19,000 audience members walking down service escalators to exit the building

Lopez, who was performing for the second night in New York as part of her “It’s My Party” tour tweeted: “Devastated and heartbroken that I can’t perform for all of you tonight. We will make this up to you. I promise! I love you!!”

Dozens of theatergoers lamented their show cancellations on social media.

The Saturday night showing of “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” was canceled at the midway point.

One Twitter user said, “They just canceled [the] second part of Harry Potter on Broadway due to power issues– tickets will be refunded….”

Others joked about the cancellation, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Electrical Grid.”

Another Twitter user complained that she “came all the way from Philadelphia” to see the comedian Dave Chappelle perform standup on Broadway “but thanks to the #blackout show was canceled.”

Performers of shows such as “Hadestown” and “Hamilton” took their shows outside and began performing in the streets of New York in an attempt to appease the disappointed masses.

But for one Broadway play, the show went on as the theater hosting the Tony-nominated show “Burn This,” continued despite the power outage.

Fox News foreign desk director Greg Headen was settling in for a movie at an AMC theater on the Upper West Side when the power went out and staff members called for everyone to evacuate.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“The movie hadn’t started yet. Everything went black. AC went off. Everything just shut down and complete pitch dark,” Headen said. “We were on the lower theatre which is actually underground and it was strange.”

Westlake Legal Group Broadway1280 'Devastated and heartbroken': NYC power outage cancels Broadway shows, Jennifer Lopez concert Vandana Rambaran fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/person/jennifer-lopez fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/genres/pop fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 8b43b63e-4c46-5ec4-b27d-b8ca63c4289b   Westlake Legal Group Broadway1280 'Devastated and heartbroken': NYC power outage cancels Broadway shows, Jennifer Lopez concert Vandana Rambaran fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/person/jennifer-lopez fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/genres/pop fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 8b43b63e-4c46-5ec4-b27d-b8ca63c4289b

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Alyssa Milano tweets images comparing Mike Pence to Holocaust architect Heinrich Himmler

Westlake Legal Group milanopence Alyssa Milano tweets images comparing Mike Pence to Holocaust architect Heinrich Himmler Sam Dorman fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/person/mike-pence fox-news/person/alyssa-milano fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 880ee22b-df0c-5f94-9ca9-8f13903c3c4a

Actress Alyssa Milano continued to attack the Trump administration Saturday when she suggested that Vice President Mike Pence’s Friday visit to a migrant detention center in Texas was similar to Nazi leader Heinrich Himmler visiting a Soviet POW camp.

Milano tweeted the side-by-side, black-and-white images showing a photo of Pence below a photo of Himmler, the main architect of the Holocaust.

Both photos showed the men standing behind gates separating them from detainees — migrants in Pence’s case and prisoners of war in Himmler’s.

PENCE SLAMS CNN FOR ‘DISHONEST’ COVERAGE OF DETENTION CENTER VISIT

Pence’s trip to the Texas border included a visit  Border Patrol station where hundreds of men were crowded in sweltering cages without cots. Milano’s tweet received mixed responses but many on the social media platform derided her comparison.

A chorus of Democratic lawmakers have claimed migrants are being detained under inhumane conditions. Pence and President Trump have heavily criticized media outlets and Democrats for the way they have viewed the issue.

DAN GAINOR: MEDIA DEMONIZE TRUMP ON IMMIGRATION, EMBRACE RAPINOE FOR KICKING HIM AROUND

“CNN is so dishonest. Today we took reporters to a detention facility on the border for families and children and all told us they were being treated well,” the vice president tweeted on Friday.

“The crisis at our southern border is not a ‘manufactured crisis,’ it is real and is overwhelming our system. To show this, we also visited an overcrowded facility for adult men, many of whom have been arrested multiple times. These men were in a temporary holding area because Democrats in Congress have refused to fund additional bed space.”

Last month, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y. claimed that the detention centers were “concentration camps on our southern border.” She later clarified that she didn’t think they were the same as “death camps” that Nazis oversaw during the Holocaust.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Her comments prompted the United States Holocaust Museum to reject similar comparisons.

“The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum unequivocally rejects efforts to create analogies between the Holocaust and other events, whether historical or contemporary,” a museum statement read. “That position has repeatedly and unambiguously been made clear in the Museum’s official statement on the matter – a statement that is reiterated and reaffirmed now.”

Fox News’ Joseph A. Wulfsohn and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group milanopence Alyssa Milano tweets images comparing Mike Pence to Holocaust architect Heinrich Himmler Sam Dorman fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/person/mike-pence fox-news/person/alyssa-milano fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 880ee22b-df0c-5f94-9ca9-8f13903c3c4a   Westlake Legal Group milanopence Alyssa Milano tweets images comparing Mike Pence to Holocaust architect Heinrich Himmler Sam Dorman fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/person/mike-pence fox-news/person/alyssa-milano fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 880ee22b-df0c-5f94-9ca9-8f13903c3c4a

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Power Failure Hits Manhattan’s West Side, Leaving 62,000 Customers in the Dark

Westlake Legal Group 13XP-POWER4-facebookJumbo-v2 Power Failure Hits Manhattan’s West Side, Leaving 62,000 Customers in the Dark Upper West Side (Manhattan, NY) Transit Systems Power Failures and Blackouts Consolidated Edison Inc

A power failure plunged a stretch of the West Side of Manhattan into darkness on Saturday night, trapping thousands of people in subways and elevators for a time, leaving drivers to fend for themselves at intersections with no traffic signals and eerily dimming the lights of a swath of Times Square.

Stores emptied out, and Broadway shows did not go on: Most theaters canceled their performances. In restaurants and bars, people drank by the light of their smartphones.

Mayor Bill de Blasio, asked whether anything nefarious happened, said Con Edison believed that the blackout was caused by a mechanical issue that could be resolved in a relatively short period of time.

Con Edison said that the power failed around 7 p.m. and that about 62,000 customers were in the dark, mainly on the West Side. The Fire Department said the failures stretched from 72nd Street to the West 40s, and from Fifth Avenue to the Hudson River.

Shortly after 10 p.m., Corey Johnson, the City Council speaker, announced that six power sections had been knocked out, and two had already been restored.

He said Con Edison had told him that the other four would be restored in the next two hours.

Con Edison then confirmed that. “We’re estimating most customers will be restored at midnight,” the utility said.

The blackout happened on the same date that a massive power failure in 1977 plunged the city into darkness. (Now as then, Times Square — usually blindingly bright with crowds strolling to theaters — was dark, and traffic signals were out.)

On Saturday night, the police asked drivers to avoid the area between West 42nd and 74th Streets, between Fifth and 12th Avenues.

At intersections, police officers and civilians worked together to direct traffic while fire trucks and ambulances screamed down side streets. Two young women posed for a selfie in the middle of 46th Street before an officer rushed over and chastised them, saying, “Ladies, this is not the time.”

A spokesman for Con Edison said the failures apparently stemmed from a problem at a substation on West 49th Street.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which runs the subways, said that “our entire system is affected” and that there was only limited service on the Nos. 1, 2 and 3 lines on the West Side; the Nos. 4, 5 and 6 lines on the East Side; and the No. 7 line between Manhattan and Queens.

The Fire Department said it had sent firefighters to a transformer blaze on West End Avenue in the West 60s, where Con Edison also has a facility. It did not say whether that fire was related to the power failure.

Source: Con Edison

By The New York Times

There was also “smoke in multiple buildings” on the West Side, the Fire Department said, and it was answering “numerous” reports of people stuck in elevators.

With signals not working, a group of men in shorts and T-shirts were directing traffic at the intersection of 10th Avenue and 47th Street. With no police officers in sight, one called out: “If you’re going to walk, walk now, people!”

Another yelled as pedestrians began to cross hesitantly: “Health and safety! Health and safety!”

Ellie Shanahan, 23, was on the A train between West 50th and 59th Streets when the train stopped unexpectedly. She waited with the other passengers for nearly 20 minutes before an M.T.A. worker announced that there was a power outage and that there would be no train service between West 59th and 163rd Streets.

Ms. Shanahan was on her way to visit her parents in Washington Heights. After evacuating the subway station, she said, she noticed police officers trying to monitor the frantic crowd at 50th Street.

She immediately got on a Citi Bike and rode it north to 125th Street.

“What was craziest to me was there was no traffic lights,” Ms. Shanahan said. “I was in shock, but people still seemed to know what to do. Everyone was being polite even though there were no lights to tell us when to go.”

As she biked north on Broadway, Ms. Shanahan noticed restaurants emptying out and long bus lines. She saw people evacuating a pitch-black movie theater on West 66th Street.

Most Broadway shows — including “Moulin Rouge,” “Hadestown,” “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” and “Aladdin” — canceled their performances.

On the sidewalks outside the theaters, the casts staged impromptu outdoor shows. Performers from “Waitress” and “Come From Away” sang versions of songs from their shows, and actors from “Hadestown” improvised a blackout-themed song of one of its songs.

Carnegie Hall announced it was canceling all performances Saturday night. At Lincoln Center, a performance from the Mark Morris Dance Group was canceled, but outside, the Midsummer Night Swing band kept going.

At the Jennifer Lopez birthday-themed extravaganza at Madison Square Garden, the outage occurred during the fourth song. The lights had been shining and the bass thumping and the opening notes of “Dinero,” Ms. Lopez’s hit Latin pop song, had sounded. A crew of dancers was onstage.

Suddenly, the lights went dark, and the speakers fell silent. The only sound was a live drum set, still playing as dancers continued their routine.

It became quickly apparent that this was not part of the act when Ms. Lopez appeared onstage to no fanfare. She made her way to a platform that extended to the middle of the floor. She appeared to be speaking, gesturing for fans to stay put. But with her microphone out, her message could not be heard.

After a while, a backup generator kicked in, and the lights came up.

Minutes later, a high-pitched siren wailed, and the audience was told to leave.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

5 things to know about the upcoming immigration raids in major U.S. cities

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 5 things to know about the upcoming immigration raids in major U.S. cities

After 9/11, the U.S. enforced stricter control on immigration. This enforcement led to the birth of Homeland Security and ICE, but what is ICE exactly? We explain. Just the FAQs, USA TODAY

TUCSON — A series of immigration raids is expected to begin as early as Sunday in several major American cities, according to President Donald Trump.

It’s part of the Trump administration’s crackdown on illegal immigration and the plans have sown fear in migrant communities around the United States.

The cities targeted are Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, Denver, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York and San Francisco. All of these cities were part of a one-year program that allowed the Department of Justice to fast-track the adjudication of cases through the normally sluggish immigration court system.

Trump initially claimed that “millions” of immigrants would be deported when he stunned immigration officials in mid-June by announcing the raids ahead of time, but Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials have said the raids would be smaller in scope.

In anticipation of the expected immigration raids, here are answers to five key questions about what to expect.

‘The crisis is real’: Mike Pence sees ‘tough stuff’ and ‘compassionate work’ at Texas border facilities

Who will be targeted?

The roundups are expected to target about 2,000 migrants, most of whom have been ordered deported, according to Claudia Valenzuela with the American Immigration Council, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit advocacy organization.

The primary focus is on individuals who have received standing deportation orders after they failed to show up to their court hearings. Immigration judges ordered that they be deported “in absentia.”

Valenzuela said a concern is that, in many instances, the families did not receive court notices, were summoned for non-existent dates, or simply didn’t know how to navigate the complex U.S. immigration system. 

Another big concern, she said, is the possibility of “collateral arrests.”

If immigration authorities come across “others in the vicinity that maybe aren’t the targets for arrest, maybe aren’t the subjects of an outstanding removal order, but ICE agents determine they are not here lawfully, that could result in those individuals being apprehended,” Valenzuela said.

Trump: Immigration raids begin Sunday, will target criminals ‘as much as we can’

What happens after they are detained?

After ICE officers detains someone, what happens next depends on whether the individual has a deportation order or not.

Ruben Reyes, a board member with the American Immigration Lawyers Association, said migrants who have final deportation orders have little recourse.

“They generally are picked up, they get taken to central processing, and then from central processing their ID is verified, their history is verified, their documents are obtained through the consulate so they can be repatriated,” he said. 

However, if someone doesn’t have a deportation order, the person is placed into deportation proceedings, Valenzuela said.

Such individuals could be held in immigration detention or released on bond while a judge determines if they should be deported. 

Can they be deported right away?

Deportations from the United States depend on the home countries of the migrants.

Under binational agreements, Reyes said, deportees from Mexico and Canada can be removed as quickly as the same day of their arrest. Mexican migrants are sent back to one of 11 repatriation points along the U.S.-Mexico border or flown to Mexico City. 

The process is different for countries that don’t share a border with the United States. 

The 2,000 targeted migrants likely come mostly from Central American countries, which makes it more challenging to deport them quickly, Valenzuela said. ICE has up to three months to deport someone; on average, it takes one to two months.

In these cases, it’s likely the U.S. government will try to move much more quickly, she added.

“I definitely think that the administration is aware that citizens of this country are outraged, that … the legal community is ready to step up and help these families,” Valenzuela said. “And one of their biggest tools is rapid deportation. I’m sure there have been discussions or plans to undertake these deportations as quickly as possible.”

What about the children?

In the past, immigration sweeps largely have focused on adult individuals or on businesses, but the raids expected to begin Sunday will include children who traveled with family members to the United States.  

“To proactively go to homes to arrest children, we’ve never seen it in this way,” Valenzuela said. “And as a policy and as an operation, we’ve never seen it.”

Reyes also expressed concern for mixed-status families and raised questions about what would happen to U.S.-born children if their parents are detained.

DREAMERS: Trump team unveils new immigration framework with path to citizenship

Based on what has happened in previous raids and sweeps, he encouraged families to plan so that their children and any property they own are protected.

“All of these are issues that I believe should be discussed in a very honest way so that we can avoid what I think are going to be a lot of these secondary consequences of these enforcement operations,” he said.

Is there any last-minute recourse for migrants?

Individuals with deportation orders don’t have a right to go before court, Valenzuela said.

Their only recourse is to reopen the deportation order, which means asking the court to step in and stop the deportation while the motion is pending. 

But under the way the system is currently set up, Valenzuela added, once there’s a deportation order, it’s difficult to get a court to hear the case.

“What ends up happening is if your deportation is not stopped, the courts don’t rule in time and … you can be deported before your motion is reopened and even decided,” Valenzuela said.

Reyes said that as the expected raids play out across the U.S., attorneys with the American Immigration Lawyers Association will be monitoring the situation and looking for any red flags in the process. 

“We’re going to be on the lookout for violations of due process,” he said. “Are they coming in and claiming that they have an order of arrest signed by a judge in their jurisdiction that will allow them to go in? Are they knocking down doors? Are they looking for collateral damage?”

While there may be little that can be done after a migrant with a deportation order is arrested, immigration advocates agree that consulting or retaining an attorney can make a big difference in the outcome of a case.

Reyes urged migrants to seek legal advice beforehand to understand where their immigration cases stand and if they are eligible for any other type of relief of visa. 

Have any news tips or story ideas about the U.S.-Mexico border? Reach the reporter at rafael.carranza@arizonarepublic.com, or follow him on Twitter at @RafaelCarranza.

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Tropical Storm Barry Rolls Into Louisiana, Drenches Gulf Coast

Westlake Legal Group 5d2a87da2600004f000445ba Tropical Storm Barry Rolls Into Louisiana, Drenches Gulf Coast

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Barry rolled into the Louisiana coast Saturday, flooding highways, forcing people to scramble to rooftops and dumping heavy rain that officials had feared could test the levees and pumps that were bolstered after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans in 2005.

After briefly becoming a Category 1 hurricane, the system weakened to a tropical storm as it made landfall near Intracoastal City, about 160 miles (257 kilometers) west of New Orleans, the National Hurricane Center said.

By early evening, New Orleans had been spared the worst effects, receiving only light showers and gusty winds. A National Weather Service forecaster said the city may escape with only 2 to 4 inches (5 to 10 centimeters) of rain. But officials warned that Barry could still cause disastrous flooding across a wide stretch of the Gulf Coast and drop up to 20 inches (50 centimeters) through Sunday across other parts of Louisiana.

“This is just the beginning,” Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said. “It’s going to be a long several days for our state.”

The Coast Guard rescued a dozen people from flooded areas of Terrebonne Parish, south of New Orleans, some of them from rooftops, a spokeswoman said. The people included a 77-year-old man who called for help because he had about 4 feet (1.2 meters) of water in his home.

None of the main levees on the Mississippi River failed or were breached, Edwards said. But a levee in Terrebonne Parish was overtopped by water, officials said. And video showed water getting over a second levee in Plaquemines Parish, where fingers of land extend deep into the Gulf of Mexico. Terrebonne Parish ordered a new evacuation affecting an estimated 400 people.

Nearly all businesses in Morgan City, about 85 miles (137 kilometers) west of New Orleans, were shuttered with the exception of Meche’s Donuts Shop. Owner Todd Hoffpauir did a brisk business despite the pounding winds and pulsating rain.

While making doughnuts, Hoffpauir said he heard an explosion and a ripping sound and later saw that the wind had peeled off layers of the roof at an adjacent apartment complex.

In some places, residents continued to build defenses against rising water. At the edge of the town of Jean Lafitte just outside New Orleans, volunteers helped several town employees sandbag a 600-foot stretch of the two-lane state highway. The street was already lined with one-ton sandbags, and 30-pound (14-kilogram) bags were being used to strengthen them.

“I’m here for my family, trying to save their stuff,” volunteer Vinnie Tortorich said. “My cousin’s house is already under.”

In Lafayette, Willie Allen and his 11-year-old grandson, Gavin Coleman, shoveled sand into 20 green bags, joining a group of more than 20 other people doing the same thing during a break in the rain. Wearing a mud-streaked T-shirt and shorts, Allen loaded the bags onto the back of his pickup.

“Everybody is preparing,” he said. “Our biggest concern is the flood.”

Many businesses were also shut down or closed early in Baton Rouge, and winds were strong enough to rock large pickup trucks. Whitecaps were visible on the Mississippi.

Oil and gas operators evacuated hundreds of platforms and rigs in the Gulf of Mexico. Nearly 70% of Gulf oil production and 56% of gas production were turned off Saturday, according to the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, which compiles the numbers from industry reports.

Barry developed from a disturbance in the Gulf that surprised New Orleans during the Wednesday morning rush with a sudden deluge that flooded streets, homes and businesses. For several days, officials braced for more flooding. But as sunset approached, the city saw only intermittent rain and wind, with occasional glimpses of sunshine.

Elsewhere, more than 120,000 customers in Louisiana and another nearly 6,000 customers in Mississippi and Alabama were without power Saturday, according to poweroutage.us.

During a storm update through Facebook Live, National Hurricane Center Director Ken Graham pointed to a computer screen showing a huge, swirling mess of airborne water. “That is just an amazing amount of moisture,” he said. “That is off the chart.”

Barry was moving so slowly that heavy rain was expected to continue all weekend.

Although the outlook for New Orleans had improved significantly, weather service forecaster Robert Ricks said it was too early to declare that the city was in the clear. The agency also reduced its rainfall estimates for Baton Rouge to between 6 and 10 inches (15 and 25 centimeters) through Sunday.

Forecasts showed the storm on a path toward Chicago that would swell the Mississippi River basin with water that must eventually flow south again.

For a few hours, the storm had maximum sustained winds of 75 mph (120 kph), just above the 74 mph (120 kph) threshold to be a hurricane. Barry was expected to continue weakening and become a tropical depression on Sunday.

Downpours also lashed coastal Alabama and Mississippi.

Governors declared emergencies in Louisiana and Mississippi, and authorities closed floodgates and raised water barriers around New Orleans. It was the first time since Katrina that all floodgates in the New Orleans area had been sealed.

Still, Edwards said he did not expect the Mississippi to spill over the levees despite water levels already running high from spring rains and melting snow upstream. The barriers range in height from about 20 to 25 feet (6 to 7.5 meters).

Authorities told at least 10,000 people in exposed, low-lying areas along the Gulf Coast to leave, but no evacuations were ordered in New Orleans, where officials urged residents to “shelter in place.”

Despite the apparent calm in her city, New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell cautioned that the storm continued to pose a threat.

“The slow pace pushed the timing of expected impacts further into today, tonight and Sunday,” Cantrell said. “This means that New Orleans residents are not out of the woods with this system.”

Associated Press writers Kevin McGill, Rebecca Santana and Sarah Blake Morgan in New Orleans; Jay Reeves in Baton Rouge; Juan Lozano in Lafayette; Rogelio Solis in Morgan City; Jeffrey Collins in Columbia, South Carolina; Russ Bynum in Savannah, Georgia; and Sudhin Thanawala and Lisa Adams in Atlanta contributed to this report.

For the latest on Tropical Storm Barry, visit https://apnews.com/Hurricanes

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Tropical Storm Barry Rolls Into Louisiana, Drenches Gulf Coast

Westlake Legal Group 5d2a87da2600004f000445ba Tropical Storm Barry Rolls Into Louisiana, Drenches Gulf Coast

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Barry rolled into the Louisiana coast Saturday, flooding highways, forcing people to scramble to rooftops and dumping heavy rain that officials had feared could test the levees and pumps that were bolstered after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans in 2005.

After briefly becoming a Category 1 hurricane, the system weakened to a tropical storm as it made landfall near Intracoastal City, about 160 miles (257 kilometers) west of New Orleans, the National Hurricane Center said.

By early evening, New Orleans had been spared the worst effects, receiving only light showers and gusty winds. A National Weather Service forecaster said the city may escape with only 2 to 4 inches (5 to 10 centimeters) of rain. But officials warned that Barry could still cause disastrous flooding across a wide stretch of the Gulf Coast and drop up to 20 inches (50 centimeters) through Sunday across other parts of Louisiana.

“This is just the beginning,” Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said. “It’s going to be a long several days for our state.”

The Coast Guard rescued a dozen people from flooded areas of Terrebonne Parish, south of New Orleans, some of them from rooftops, a spokeswoman said. The people included a 77-year-old man who called for help because he had about 4 feet (1.2 meters) of water in his home.

None of the main levees on the Mississippi River failed or were breached, Edwards said. But a levee in Terrebonne Parish was overtopped by water, officials said. And video showed water getting over a second levee in Plaquemines Parish, where fingers of land extend deep into the Gulf of Mexico. Terrebonne Parish ordered a new evacuation affecting an estimated 400 people.

Nearly all businesses in Morgan City, about 85 miles (137 kilometers) west of New Orleans, were shuttered with the exception of Meche’s Donuts Shop. Owner Todd Hoffpauir did a brisk business despite the pounding winds and pulsating rain.

While making doughnuts, Hoffpauir said he heard an explosion and a ripping sound and later saw that the wind had peeled off layers of the roof at an adjacent apartment complex.

In some places, residents continued to build defenses against rising water. At the edge of the town of Jean Lafitte just outside New Orleans, volunteers helped several town employees sandbag a 600-foot stretch of the two-lane state highway. The street was already lined with one-ton sandbags, and 30-pound (14-kilogram) bags were being used to strengthen them.

“I’m here for my family, trying to save their stuff,” volunteer Vinnie Tortorich said. “My cousin’s house is already under.”

In Lafayette, Willie Allen and his 11-year-old grandson, Gavin Coleman, shoveled sand into 20 green bags, joining a group of more than 20 other people doing the same thing during a break in the rain. Wearing a mud-streaked T-shirt and shorts, Allen loaded the bags onto the back of his pickup.

“Everybody is preparing,” he said. “Our biggest concern is the flood.”

Many businesses were also shut down or closed early in Baton Rouge, and winds were strong enough to rock large pickup trucks. Whitecaps were visible on the Mississippi.

Oil and gas operators evacuated hundreds of platforms and rigs in the Gulf of Mexico. Nearly 70% of Gulf oil production and 56% of gas production were turned off Saturday, according to the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, which compiles the numbers from industry reports.

Barry developed from a disturbance in the Gulf that surprised New Orleans during the Wednesday morning rush with a sudden deluge that flooded streets, homes and businesses. For several days, officials braced for more flooding. But as sunset approached, the city saw only intermittent rain and wind, with occasional glimpses of sunshine.

Elsewhere, more than 120,000 customers in Louisiana and another nearly 6,000 customers in Mississippi and Alabama were without power Saturday, according to poweroutage.us.

During a storm update through Facebook Live, National Hurricane Center Director Ken Graham pointed to a computer screen showing a huge, swirling mess of airborne water. “That is just an amazing amount of moisture,” he said. “That is off the chart.”

Barry was moving so slowly that heavy rain was expected to continue all weekend.

Although the outlook for New Orleans had improved significantly, weather service forecaster Robert Ricks said it was too early to declare that the city was in the clear. The agency also reduced its rainfall estimates for Baton Rouge to between 6 and 10 inches (15 and 25 centimeters) through Sunday.

Forecasts showed the storm on a path toward Chicago that would swell the Mississippi River basin with water that must eventually flow south again.

For a few hours, the storm had maximum sustained winds of 75 mph (120 kph), just above the 74 mph (120 kph) threshold to be a hurricane. Barry was expected to continue weakening and become a tropical depression on Sunday.

Downpours also lashed coastal Alabama and Mississippi.

Governors declared emergencies in Louisiana and Mississippi, and authorities closed floodgates and raised water barriers around New Orleans. It was the first time since Katrina that all floodgates in the New Orleans area had been sealed.

Still, Edwards said he did not expect the Mississippi to spill over the levees despite water levels already running high from spring rains and melting snow upstream. The barriers range in height from about 20 to 25 feet (6 to 7.5 meters).

Authorities told at least 10,000 people in exposed, low-lying areas along the Gulf Coast to leave, but no evacuations were ordered in New Orleans, where officials urged residents to “shelter in place.”

Despite the apparent calm in her city, New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell cautioned that the storm continued to pose a threat.

“The slow pace pushed the timing of expected impacts further into today, tonight and Sunday,” Cantrell said. “This means that New Orleans residents are not out of the woods with this system.”

Associated Press writers Kevin McGill, Rebecca Santana and Sarah Blake Morgan in New Orleans; Jay Reeves in Baton Rouge; Juan Lozano in Lafayette; Rogelio Solis in Morgan City; Jeffrey Collins in Columbia, South Carolina; Russ Bynum in Savannah, Georgia; and Sudhin Thanawala and Lisa Adams in Atlanta contributed to this report.

For the latest on Tropical Storm Barry, visit https://apnews.com/Hurricanes

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Tropical Storm Barry Rolls Into Louisiana, Spares New Orleans

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Weakened but still potent, Barry inundated the Gulf Coast but appeared unlikely to deluge New Orleans as it continued its slow advance, though it brought fresh fears of flash flooding to Mississippi’s capital city Sunday morning.

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards on Saturday night urged residents across south Louisiana to stay “vigilant,” warning that Barry could still cause disastrous flooding across a wide stretch of the Gulf Coast overnight.

“This storm still has a long way to go before it leaves this state,” Edwards said. “Don’t let your guard down.”

In Mississippi, up to 3 inches (7.6 centimeters) of rain had already fallen in the Jackson area before dawn Sunday — and more was on the way. That prompted the National Weather Service to issue a flash flood warning for the city and some of its suburbs.

New Orleans had been braced for heavy rains Saturday, but instead had intermittent bands of moderate showers and occasional sunshine.

Westlake Legal Group 5d2b1e1d2600004f00044609 Tropical Storm Barry Rolls Into Louisiana, Spares New Orleans

ASSOCIATED PRESS Martha Young, center, Patricia Plishka, left, and her husband Glen, right, battle the wind and rain from Hurricane Barry as it nears landfall Saturday, July 13, 2019, in New Orleans.

Though Barry will continue to dump rain throughout the weekend, forecasters downgraded rainfall estimates for the city through Sunday to between 2 to 4 inches (5 to 10 centimeters). Forecasters had earlier said New Orleans could get up to 20 inches (50 centimeters) of rain, raising concerns that water pumps strengthened after Hurricane Katrina would be overwhelmed.

National Weather Service forecaster Robert Ricks cautioned, however, that it was too early to say for certain that New Orleans was in the clear. “We’re about at the (halfway) mark of the marathon right now,” he said Saturday evening. Heavy rainfall from the storm would be concentrated overnight in a wide area centered around Lafayette, he said. The city is about 120 miles (193 kilometers) west of New Orleans. 

Late Saturday night, authorities were trying to rescue a family of five who was trapped by high water in the south Louisiana town of Franklin, according to KTBS-TV . The National Guard had to halt its initial rescue mission because waters were too high to safely reach the family’s home. Franklin is about 40 miles (64 kilometers) southeast of Lafayette.

In other parts of Louisiana on Saturday, Barry flooded highways, forced people to scramble to rooftops and dumped heavy rain, as it made landfall near Intracoastal City, about 160 miles (257 kilometers) west of New Orleans. Downpours also lashed coastal Alabama and Mississippi.

After briefly becoming a Category 1 hurricane, the system weakened to a tropical storm, the National Hurricane Center said. By early Sunday, its maximum sustained winds had fallen to 45 mph (72 kph), the National Hurricane Center said in its latest briefings.

<img class="image__src" src="https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/5d2b1ce13b00003700dac55a.jpeg?cache=iarjjcmzke&ops=scalefit_720_noupscale" alt="People wade through a flooded street after Hurricane Barry in Mandeville, Louisiana.“>

Reuters People wade through a flooded street after Hurricane Barry in Mandeville, Louisiana.

In Mandeville, a city on the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain across from New Orleans, storm surge and choppy waters sent waves pushing over the seawall and into nearby communities. Dozens of people waded through knee-high water to take a look at the pounding surf.

Roughly a block away, water was covering Lisa Keiffer’s front yard and the road in front of her house. It wasn’t in danger of going in the house, where Keiffer has lived for 22 years, but she was worried about her nearby business. She and her husband own The Candy Bank — a candy store a few blocks away in the lakefront community featuring homemade fudge, jars filled with gummy bears, chocolate-covered espresso beans and other candies.

Earlier Saturday the lake’s waters were lapping at the door, forcing her and her husband to scramble to raise everything off the floor.

“The problem with slow-moving storms or even tropical storms around this area is that it’s unpredictable,” she said. “It’s very stressful because you don’t know if you’re going to flood, so you go all through the trouble of picking things up, raising things, moving things, and then it looks like it’s not going to flood, and then 10 minutes later it looks like it’s going to flood.”

Westlake Legal Group 5d2b1de63b00003900dac55c Tropical Storm Barry Rolls Into Louisiana, Spares New Orleans

ASSOCIATED PRESS Barry Williams talks to a friend on his smartphone as he wades through storm surge from Lake Pontchartrain on Lakeshore Drive in Mandeville, La.

Elsewhere, Coast Guard helicopters rescued a dozen people and two pets from flooded areas of Terrebonne Parish, south of New Orleans, some of them from rooftops, a spokeswoman said. Those rescued included a 77-year-old man who called for help because he had about 4 feet (1.2 meters) of water in his home.

None of the main levees on the Mississippi River failed or were breached, and they were expected to hold up through the storm, Edwards said. But a levee in Terrebonne Parish was overtopped by water for part of the day, officials said. Video also showed water getting over a second levee in Plaquemines Parish, where fingers of land extend deep into the Gulf of Mexico. Terrebonne Parish ordered an evacuation affecting an estimated 400 people.

In some places, residents continued to build defenses against rising water. At the edge of the town of Jean Lafitte just outside New Orleans, volunteers helped several town employees sandbag a 600-foot (180-meter) stretch of the two-lane state highway.

“I’m here for my family, trying to save their stuff,” volunteer Vinnie Tortorich said. “My cousin’s house is already under.”

Many businesses were also shut down or closed early in Baton Rouge, and winds were strong enough to rock large pickup trucks. Ricks said forecasters also downgraded their rainfall estimates for Baton Rouge to between 6 and 10 inches (15 to 25 centimeters) through Sunday, with up to 15 inches (38 centimeters) in some spots.

Oil and gas operators evacuated hundreds of platforms and rigs in the Gulf of Mexico.

More than 140,000 customers in Louisiana and another more than 4,000 customers in Mississippi were without power early Sunday, according to poweroutage.us.

Barry was expected to continue weakening and become a tropical depression Sunday, moving over Arkansas on Sunday night and Monday. But forecasts showed the storm on a path toward Chicago that would swell the Mississippi River basin with water that must eventually flow south again.

In Alabama on Saturday, flooding closed some roads in low-lying areas of Mobile County in Alabama, and heavy rains contributed to accidents, said John Kilcullen, director of plans and operations for Mobile County Emergency Management Agency.

Authorities closed floodgates and raised water barriers around New Orleans. It was the first time since Katrina that all floodgates in the New Orleans area had been sealed.

Associated Press writers Kevin McGill, Rebecca Santana and Sarah Blake Morgan in New Orleans; Jay Reeves in Baton Rouge; Juan Lozano in Lafayette; Rogelio Solis in Morgan City; Jeffrey Collins in Columbia, South Carolina; Russ Bynum in Savannah, Georgia; and Sudhin Thanawala, Lisa Adams and Jeff Martin in Atlanta contributed to this report.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Power goes out in Manhattan, Midtown and Upper West Side

A widespread power outage Saturday evening left much of Manhattan, including the Upper West Side and Rockefeller Center, without electricity, authorities say.

The blackout was reportedly caused by a transformer fire, New York fire officials said.

Con Edison said on Twitter that they are working to restore power to roughly 42,000 people on the West Side of Manhattan impacted by the power outage. 

Earlier, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio told CNN this is a “limited power outage” and about 20,000 people are affected.

Several broadway shows have been cancelled for tonight, including “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” and “The Cher Show,” according to Broadway World.

Carnegie Hall was evacuated due to the loss of electricity.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority tweeted that there are “extensive delays on many subway lines.”

Subway riders told ABC7NY that the “trains just stopped” and while “some people felt like they were losing oxygen,” other people were “helping each other.”

Several subway stations are without power, the transit authority tweeted and were being bypassed by working trains.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority tweeted that there were outages at various underground stations.

Dozens of blocks south, on 14th Street in Greenwich Village, many people on the street Saturday night had no idea about the blackout. They were busy trying to snap photos of “Manhattanhenge,” one of the few nights when the setting sun perfectly aligns with the boroughs street grid.

A diner on Broadway at West 69th Street lost its lights, as did other surrounding businesses.

Ric Faud, an attorney, had just stepped off the elevator on the 44th floor of a Columbus Circle building when the building lost power. From up high, Faud said he can people trying to direct traffic and prevent accidents. 

Traffic in Midtown is slowed, Faud said, but not stopped.

This power outage comes 42 years to the day after The Great Blackout of 1977, which left most of New York City without electricity.

Contributing: Associated Press, Elinor Aspegren, Kevin McCoy

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